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Proper Storage Of Glucose Test Strips And How Does Improper Storage Affect The Results

The Impact Of Human Error On Meter Accuracy

The Impact Of Human Error On Meter Accuracy

Many individuals with type 2 diabetes monitor their day-to-day diabetes control with the help of a blood glucose meter. Blood glucose monitoring is typically recommended for those who have insulin treated diabetes. However, blood glucose monitoring may also be recommended for those managing their diabetes with oral medications and/or lifestyle changes (i.e. diet and exercise). As stated by the American Association of Diabetes Educators, “Self- monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) provides feedback on the effectiveness of the treatment plan…”1 A diabetes educator can play an important role in helping with meter selection as well as teaching proper blood glucose monitoring technique. According to a recent article from the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, “Inappropriate handing of SMBG (i.e. human error) has been identified as the most common factor affecting BG (blood glucose) results; more than 90% of overall inaccuracies result from incorrect use of BG meters.”2 Over-the-counter blood glucose meters are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and are required to meet strict accuracy criteria. The most recent accuracy standards (as of 2013) are as follows: “95% of all measured blood glucose meter values must be within 15% of the true value (a lab measurement) 99% of meter values must be within 20% of the true value.”3 However, there is a greater risk of both improper storage and handling of blood glucose meters and test strips when used for personal use in comparison to use in a professional setting thus potentially having a negative impact on the above stated accuracy standards. Human error responsible for inaccurate blood glucose results The following is a list of “Human Errors” that can result in inaccurate blood glucose results: Continue reading >>

Glucose Monitor Test Strips

Glucose Monitor Test Strips

When I was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, I was offered a coupon for a glucose monitor. Having no idea what I was getting into, I got the monitor, brought it home, and started using it. The very first problem I came up against was that the monitor came with ten free strips, which did not last long. The cost for the strips when I bought them at the pharmacy was another shock. There are many things I wish I had known then, so I am sharing these tips I’ve learned over years of dealing with test strips in the hope that you will avoid my mistakes. First, check the cost You may already know this, but there is never any need to buy a glucose monitor. The major monitor makers will be happy to send you one free. But which one do you want? After you have done a little research and decided on the monitor you would like to use, the next step should be to find out how much those test strips cost. Every monitor style uses a different kind of test strip, so you must buy the ones specifically made for the monitor you picked. If you check the prices online on a site like Amazon, you can easily compare your monitor’s test strips with others on the market. There is sometimes a surprising price difference. Another tip: It will be easier on your pocketbook if the monitor you chose is popular. You will find the test strips everywhere with no trouble, often at lower cost because they are widely available. Second, read the expiration date on every batch of test strips Your test strips have a limited shelf life. It may be a year or more, but if you have several vials or boxes, make sure you use the oldest ones first so they do not expire. Whether you get yours at the pharmacy or buy them online, always make sure the expiration date is a long way off. Mine usually are good for a year. If th Continue reading >>

Take Care Of Your Test Strips For Accurate Results

Take Care Of Your Test Strips For Accurate Results

Test strips are one of the most important supplies in your medicine cabinet. Regular testing can help you keep track of your blood sugar levels, and that allows you to make lifestyle and medication adjustments accordingly. Proper handling and storage of test strips can help ensure an accurate result every time. Six tips for handling test strips When it's time to take a blood sugar reading, handle test strips properly for an accurate result. Here are six things to keep in mind when dealing with your test strips. Wash your hands. Wash and dry your hands thoroughly before you open the test strip vial. Check the expiration date. Make sure the vial is not past its expiration date, and that the strips are clean and dry. Check the test strip code. If your strips must be coded, make sure the code on the meter matches the code on the vial. Handle carefully. Shake a test strip out into your hand. Try not to touch the end of the strip. Protect test strips from air. Immediately close the vial to protect the integrity of the remaining strips. Make sure you have the proper amount of blood for a good reading. You only get one shot at this per strip, so make sure you have ample blood before applying the drop. Also, be sure to apply the blood correctly. Some test strips wick the blood drop at the side of the strip, while others do so at the very end of the strip. Test strips that are sold in wheels or drums don't have to be handled individually. This can be an advantage for those with arthritis or other conditions that might affect dexterity. Follow the instructions very carefully to ensure that you have inserted the drum or wheel properly. How to properly store test strips Your test strips should remain in the vial or wrapping until you are ready to use one of them. Test strips are pac Continue reading >>

Nova Statstrip Glucose Meter Training For Glucometer Operators

Nova Statstrip Glucose Meter Training For Glucometer Operators

A Self-Study Packet for The Johns Hopkins Hospital Point-of-Care Testing Program ©copyright 2015 Johns Hopkins Hospital All rights reserved Overview and Objectives This module provides an introduction to the JHH policy for performing bedside blood glucose monitoring. At the conclusion of the module the learner will be able to: State training and maintenance of competency requirements with point of care testing ( POCT ) for blood glucose Define indications for blood glucose monitoring Identify how to perform a blood glucose test using the Nova StatStrip Glucose meter State procedure for obtaining capillary, venous, neonatal, and arterial blood specimen for glucose POCT Identify limitations of POCT Define operator responsibilities with POCT Training and Competency Only those operators who have completed training and have demonstrated competency may perform POCT blood glucose testing. The Training program will consist of: Attending a defined in-service session on the glucose meter. Passing a written examination Demonstrating competence through the proper performance and interpretation of quality control. Maintaining competency: Annual online education Perform 2 levels of QC once a year Reasons for Point of Care Blood Glucose Monitoring On-going management of blood glucose in patients with diabetes Rapid detection of extreme blood glucose concentrations in patients who: are in a coma have symptoms that suggest hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia Monitoring of patients: who have diabetes who are receiving Parenteral Hyperalimentation who are receiving medications which affect blood glucose concentration after liver or pancreas operative procedures with post-op or post procedure elevations in glucose secondary to stress with infection undergoing renal dialysis hyperglycemia  P Continue reading >>

Getting Accurate Blood Glucose Test Results

Getting Accurate Blood Glucose Test Results

For the most part, blood glucose meters—devices that measure and display blood glucose levels—are simple to use and provide readings you can trust. But they aren't perfect and inaccurate readings are possible. Extremely high or low readings that are made in error can have serious consquences. Inaccurate readings happen for a variety of reasons, including human error. But the error can usually be corrected without much effort. Here are some common mistakes users make along with tips to help you improve the reliability of your device and your test results. But first, it's important to note that if you get a reading that seems way off—especially one that doesn't match your symptoms—always perform a re-test. When re-testing, take your time to ensure you are using the strips and the device correctly and repeat the procedure. If you get a similar reading again, call your healthcare professional or the phone number on the back of the meter as malfunctions can occur and product recalls happen periodically. The following factors can impact meter accuracy.If you find you are contributing unintentionally to the problem, take the necessary steps to get the right results: Be sure your meter and hands are clean. It seems like a no-brainer, but a dirty meter can alter your reading. Clean your meter regularly, and before you do a reading, wipe off any noticeable blood, dirt, or grease. It's also vital to perform your test on a clean fingertip. Wash your hands with soap and warm water before extracting a blood sample. Be aware of test strip issues. Make sure your test strips are compatible with your meter. Saving money by purchasing less expensive strips that are not designed to work with your meter is a bad idea. Be sure the strip is inserted correctly into the meter. Test stri Continue reading >>

Address Correspondence To:

Address Correspondence To:

Christina Schmid, PhD,1 Cornelia Haug, MD,1 Lutz Heinemann, PhD,2 and Guido Freckmann, MD1 Institut für Diabetes-Technologie Forschungs- und Entwicklungsgesellschaft mbH an der Universität UlmGermany E-mail: [email protected] For self-monitoring of blood glucose by people with diabetes, the reliability of the measured blood glucose values is a prerequisite in order to ensure correct therapeutic decisions. Requirements for system accuracy are defined by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) in the standard EN ISO 15197:2003. However, even a system with high analytical quality is not a guarantee for accurate and reliable measurement results. Under routine life conditions, blood glucose measurement results are affected by several factors. First, the act of performing measurements as well as the handling of the system may entail numerous possible error sources, such as traces of glucose-containing products on the fingertips, the use of deteriorated test strips, or the incorrect storage of test strips. Second, ambient and sampling conditions such as high altitude, partial pressure of oxygen, ambient temperature, and the use of alternate test sites can have an influence on measurement results. Therefore, the user-friendliness of a system and the quality of the manufacturer's labeling to reduce the risk of handling errors are also important aspects in ensuring reliable and accurate measurement results. In addition, the analytical performance of systems should be less prone to user errors and ambient conditions. Finally, people with diabetes must be aware of the information and instructions in the manufacturer's labeling and must be able to measure and interpret blood glucose results correctly. Continue reading >>

My New Meter Gives Me A Different Result Than My Old Meter For The Same Test. Does That Mean My Meter Isn't Accurate?

My New Meter Gives Me A Different Result Than My Old Meter For The Same Test. Does That Mean My Meter Isn't Accurate?

My new meter gives me a different result than my old meter for the same test. Does that mean my meter isn't accurate? No. What you are most likely noticing is the different way meters represent results. There are meters that give "plasma" results and meters that give "whole blood" results. You may notice this difference because you have purchased a new meter and are comparing it with your old one, or are comparing it with a lab test results you've received from your doctor. Many people expect that all blood glucose meters will give the exact same result, and expect that it will be the same as their lab test result. After all, they're measuring the same thing-the amount of glucose in your blood, but meters and lab equipment measure different parts of the blood and therefore give seemingly different results. Other causes: 1. Humidity or heat may have damaged the test strips. 2. Expired or defective test strips. 3. Insufficient amount and improper placement of blood on the test strips. 4. The reading displayed on the meter is not within the normal range numbers printed on the strip vial label. 5. The meter may have been dropped, or its electrical components may be worn out. 6. Meters and laboratory equipment may be calibrated or set to measure blood glucose in different ways and will give different results. 7. User error: Test strips may have been exposed to air longer than a few minutes. Solutions: 1. Perform a quality control test to make sure your monitor is accurate and reliable. 2. Follow set-up procedures by a health care professional; obtain professional training and guidance for the use of your particular meter. 3. You can test your glucose level while your health care provider watches your technique to make sure you are using the meter correctly. 4. Use test strip Continue reading >>

Va National Center For Patient Safety

Va National Center For Patient Safety

Hazard Summary for Blood Glucose Meters (BGMs) a.k.a. Glucometers This Hazard Summary addresses portable Blood Glucose Monitors (BGMs) that are used by diabetic patients to self-monitor glucose levels. This Hazard Summary is a supplement; it DOES NOT replace latest revisions of existing guidelines and directives for proper handling, storage and operation of BGMs, their accessories and/or test strips. This Hazard Summary references the “systems approach” to delineate vulnerabilities in a system, where the patient is identified as part of the system. Portable Blood Glucose Monitors (BGMs), also known as Glucometers, are portable, battery operated medical devices that measure the blood glucose concentration from a small drop of capillary blood (from finger sticks or alternate sites) using methodologies such as: reflectance photometry, absorbance photometry, or electrochemistry.1 Benefits: Some of the benefits of this device are convenience and safety to the patient on many levels: Since patients can check and monitor their own blood glucose levels at their leisure, they do not have to travel to a healthcare facility to have their venous and/or arterial blood drawn. Therapy/treatment can be rendered quickly at their homes. Since the blood sample these portable devices require is smaller than that needed for automated laboratory/chemistry analyzers, BGMs can reduce patient blood loss due to laboratory testing. Cost is greatly reduced for the care and treatment of diabetic patients for all parties involved: the patient, the healthcare facility, insurance providers and the physician. Hazards: Recent FDA and manufacturers’ notifications and recalls of these devices have proven that there are associated vulnerabilities in the use of glucometers. Feature Vulnerability Porta Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Test Strips

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Test Strips

Update: A lot of our readers ask us where can they find the best deals for test strips. We personally recommend Amazon. You can check the list of selections they offer by clicking here. Blood glucose test strips play a crucial role in helping you to monitor your daily blood glucose level and giving your doctor the data to adjust your medication to control your diabetes symptoms. Without the help from these little disposable strips, life with diabetes can become even more chaotic than ever. But what exactly are these thin little plastic slip and why are they so expensive? Are there any alternative method I can use? Where can I get the best deal on these test strips? This article will answer many of your questions and concerns regarding these blood glucose test strips: Table of Contents History on Glucose Test Strips How Does the Test Strips Work Why Are the Strips So Expensive? And Why the Price Discrepancy? Why Must Diabetic Patients Use Glucometer and Test Strip? How Often Should You Administer A Blood Glucose Test? How to Find Out if Your Glucose Monitor is Accurate? How Accurate Are the Test Strips? How to Find Out if Your Glucose Monitor is Accurate? What is a Urine Glucose Test? Can’t I Use This Procedure Instead? Expiration of Test Strips Medicare Plan B Coverage for Glucose Test Strips Where to Get the Best Deal on Test Strips? Ways to Save of Test Strips How to Avoid Counterfeit Blood Glucose Test Strips Can You Reuse Test Strips? Can You Make Your Own Test Strip? 4 Most Affordable Meters How to Pick the Right Glucometer? How to Dispose Used Test Strips, Lancets, and Needles? What to Do with All These Test Strip Containers? Selling Your Glucose Test Strips A Good Idea? Odd Way to Earn Some Money Back Questions? History on Glucose Test Strips The first glucomet Continue reading >>

Effect Of Adverse Storage Conditions On Performance Of Glucometer Test Strips.

Effect Of Adverse Storage Conditions On Performance Of Glucometer Test Strips.

Abstract OBJECTIVE: A study was conducted to assess the impact of adverse storage environments, i.e., not manufacturer recommended, on the performance of reagent test strips used with a point of care testing (POCT) glucometer to measure whole blood glucose levels. DESIGN/SETTING: Glucose reagent test strips were placed in open, i.e., uncapped, and closed, i.e., capped vials. These vials were those used by the manufacturer to package and store the reagent test strips. One of each type of vial was placed in the manufacturer-recommended storage environment at room temperature and the adverse environments (incubator, direct light to mimic sunlight exposure, humidity, and refrigerated). The Accu-Chek Easy glucometer and reagent test strips as well as Accu-Chek Easy high and low glucose control solutions, manufactured by Roche, were used for this study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: On day-3, day-7, and then once every 7 days, one strip from each vial in each environment was tested with the same glucometer using both a high and a low glucose control. The strip was considered failed for a type of vial and storage environment when either control was out of the reference range on a regular testing day and still out of range when tested the subsequent day. Testing continued up to 50 days. RESULTS: For the tested environments it was found that, overall, test strip stability lasted longer for closed vials than open vials. For open vials in adverse storage conditions, the refrigerator environment offered the longest stability at 35 to 50 days and direct light and humidity offered the shortest periods of stability at 3 to 14 days. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study support the manufacturer's recommendations to store POCT glucose test strips in their original vial, capped, and at room te Continue reading >>

Storing Your Glucose Test Strips Correctly

Storing Your Glucose Test Strips Correctly

Storing glucose test strips incorrectly, especially in high humidity, can lead to falsely high readings. Congratulations on your decision to manage your diabetes using a home glucose monitoring system. The success of glucose monitoring at home depends on accurate readings. Though you may face several issues when checking your glucose levels at home, inaccurate glucose readings are often resulted from test strip errors. If you use test strips to monitor your glucose levels at home you must ensure you close the vial immediately after using them especially in in a humid environment. Failure to do so can potentially expose the test strips to humidity. Exposure to humidity can often result in erroneous glucose test results. How to Properly Store Test Strips? To ensure proper storage of your glucose test strips follow these 4 steps: Store the test strips in their original vial Close the vial tightly after taking out the test strips Write the discard date on the vial. Discard date is 9 months after you first open the vial. Check the expiration date on the vial before using test strips Test strips contain electrical terminals that can quantify the amount of Gluconic acid present in the blood sample. The current amount of glucose produced depends on the level of Gluconic acid. The intensity of the current is then measured by the blood glucose monitor and a numbered reading is generated. Therefore it’s crucial to tightly close the vial immediately after use. Leaving test strips in an open vial or in an unoriginal vial could expose the test strips to an environment that could change the chemical properties of test strips. Such an exposure can result in false glucose readings. Always read the safety instruction provided in the test strip box. Keep your strips in their original vi Continue reading >>

Read Instructions Before Use.

Read Instructions Before Use.

SID E OK-P 10-62-2965-0103 V1-FAB11 OKP010001 Before You Begin PLEASE READ THIS BEFORE USING. The following basic safety precautions should always be taken. 1. Close supervision is necessary when the device is used by, on, or near children, handicapped persons or invalids. 2. Use the device only for the intended use described in this manual. 3. Do not use test strips and control solutions which are not supplied by the manufacturer. 4. Do not use the device if it is not working properly, or if it has suffered any damage. 5. Before using any product to test your blood glucose, read all instructions thoroughly and practice the test. Do all quality control checks as directed and consult with a diabetes healthcare professional. KEEP THIS USER GUIDE WITH YOU. Intended Use The system is intended for use outside the body (in vitro diagnostic use only). It should be used only for self-testing blood glucose (blood sugar) and only with fresh capillary whole blood samples. The system is intended for use in the home and in clinical settings. The system should not be used for the diagnosis of diabetes or for the testing of newborns. Principle of Measurement Blood glucose is measured by an electrical current that is produced when a blood samples mixes with the reagent (special chemicals) of the test strip. The electrical Getting To Know Your System The OKmeter Cameo Blood Glucose Monitoring System. The OKmeter Cameo system uses the latest technology to provide you with easy and comfortable testing. The system requires only a 0.7 μL of blood sample to complete the testing in only 6 seconds. Important : Use only OKmeter Cameo test strips and control solutions with your OKmeter Cameo meter. Use other test strips and control solutions with this meter can produce inaccurate results. cur Continue reading >>

Diabetes Test Strips

Diabetes Test Strips

Tweet Blood glucose test strips (diabetes test strips) are a key component of blood glucose testing. These small disposable strips of plastic may look insignificant but they provide a very important role in helping people with diabetes to monitor and control their diabetes. In the vast majority of cases, each meter will take one type of test strip only. There are some blood glucose meters however that take blood ketone strips as well, to test for ketone levels. How do diabetes test strips work? When blood is placed onto the test strip, it reacts with a chemical called glucose oxidase producing gluconic acid from the glucose in the blood. At the other end of the test strip, the meter transfers a current to the test strip. The test strip has electric terminals which allow the meter to measure the current between the terminals. The current between the terminals changes depending on the level of gluconic acid that has been produced. The blood glucose meter then uses an algorithm to work out the blood glucose level based upon the difference in current. Some blood glucose test strips allow the reapplication of more blood to the same test strip if needed during the test. The amount of blood required by a test strip can vary between manufacturers. Generally, between 0.5 μl to 1 μl of blood is required. Some test strips, not so commonly used these days, do not require a meter. When blood is placed on the active part of the strip and then wiped off after a specified number of seconds, the reagent will change colour and the result can be obtained by matching the colour of against a colour chart on the side of the pot. It is less accurate than using a blood glucose meter but the test strips can often be cheaper. Where can I get test strips? Within the UK, blood glucose test strip Continue reading >>

Diabetes Educator Guide To Blood Glucose Meter Selection And Monitoring For Accuracy And Safety

Diabetes Educator Guide To Blood Glucose Meter Selection And Monitoring For Accuracy And Safety

The diabetes educator can play an important role in assisting patients with choosing the best blood glucose meter (BGM) to fit their needs and optimize accuracy and safety. There is a wide variety of BGMs on the market and patients are often at the mercy of their prescriber and insurance company when making a choice. In addition to teaching the patient appropriate techniques that will improve accuracy regardless of BGM, diabetes educators should address barriers (physical abilities, mental status, insurance coverage, etc.) to help patients choose a BGM with features that best support individual needs. With the typical life of a meter being 3 to 5 years, the diabetes educator’s role is critical in helping the patient select a BGM that has features that will enhance his/her care. Meter Selection To make sure the device is matched to patient need, consider if the following features may be helpful: • High contrast display that assist with visual impairments/low vision • Talking meter for visual impairments • Test strip and meter size and shape for individuals with dexterity impairments • Lancet function and needle removal for issues with manual dexterity • Alternate site monitoring possibilities • Portability of meter for monitoring multiple times a day • Affordability and access (insurance coverage/copays) • Ability to assist with insulin dosage calculations (bolus calculator) • Uploading capabilities • Interaction with a smart phone app Note: Diabetes Forecast magazine provides an annual review of current meters that can be helpful in guiding decision-making regarding meter selection. Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) provides feedback on the effectiveness of the treatment plan, assists with the eval Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Monitors: What Factors Affect Accuracy?

Blood Glucose Monitors: What Factors Affect Accuracy?

Sometimes my blood glucose monitor seems to give incorrect readings. What can I do to make sure the measurement is accurate? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. When used correctly, blood glucose monitors — small devices that measure and display your blood sugar level — are usually accurate. But occasionally they may be incorrect. Consider these factors that affect meter accuracy and the steps to resolve or prevent the problem: Factors that affect accuracy Solutions Test strip problems Throw out damaged or outdated test strips. Store strips in their sealed container; keep them away from heat, moisture and humidity. Be sure the strips are meant for your specific glucose meter. Extreme temperatures Keep your glucose meter and test strips at room temperature. Alcohol, dirt or other substances on your skin Wash and dry your hands and the testing site thoroughly before pricking your skin. Improper coding Some meters must be coded to each container of test strips. Be sure the code number in the device matches the code number on the test strip container. Monitor problems Fully insert the test strip into the monitor. Replace the monitor batteries as needed. Not enough blood applied to the test strip Touch a generous drop of blood to the test strip. Don't add more blood to the test strip after the first drop is applied. Testing site location If you're using a site other than your fingertip and you think the reading is wrong, test again using blood from a fingertip. Blood samples from alternate sites aren't as accurate as fingertip samples when your blood sugar level is rising or falling quickly. The amount of red blood cells in your blood If you are dehydrated or your red blood cell count is low (anemia), your test results may be less accurate. Blood glucose monitor quality Continue reading >>

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