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Progression Of Diabetes Complications

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FULL VERSION: https://goo.gl/APNPrA?21971

Role Of Adiponectin In Development And Progression Of Diabetic Complications

Role of Adiponectin in Development and Progression of Diabetic Complications Title: Role of Adiponectin in Development and Progression of Diabetic Complications Authors: Soher A. Mohammed Ismail, Ahmed Osman, Mustafa Abd El-Aziz M, Shaimaa Mohammed kamel, Iman A. Fahmy, Mohamed El Hefni, Safyea Mohamed Hussien This study aimed to elucidate the role of adiponectin in evolution of microvascular complication of type 2 diabetes mellitus, in particular retinopathy and nephropathy. In addition, we attempted to find a correlation between the serum levels of adiponectin and different parameters such as duration of diabetes, age, sex, glycemic state, insulin resistance, lipid profile and albumin-creatinine ratio in type 2 diabetic patients with retinopathy and nephropathy in order to understand more about these risk factors . This study involved sixty diabetic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus with or without micro vascular complications involving either retinal or renal vasculatures or both. These patients were recruited from the outpatient clinic (A written consent was obtained from each case included in the study according to the Ethical Committee Approval of the Research Institute Continue reading >>

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  1. antiquedave

    The progression of type 2 diabetes means your pancreas will produce less insulin as t

    The progression of type 2 diabetes means your pancreas will produce less insulin as time goes on. Nothing more, nothing less.
    This is a comment from another post that interested me and I'd like to know how others define the progression of Diabetes.
    I know I'm a newbie but in everything I've read in the past 3 months I've come away with the conclusion that in spite of your best efforts there are aspects of the disease that will progress. You can slow it down but you can't stop it entirely.
    That each of us is different as to what we can tolerate for food, how we benefit from exercize, how our meds impact our D and which systems in our bodies will be impacted more severely from our D.
    If it is simply that our pancreas produces less insulin as time goes on where does Insulin resistance fit into that theory?

  2. Jimmy Cowboy

    Hi Dave, I'm pretty new to this also, having been just diagnosed in March, 2009. My A1c was then 8.91, last week it's down to 5.7. Almost strictly through diet change.
    What has prompted my diet change is that I've read that if you can maintain near non-diabetic BG and A1c readings, you can significantly slow down, or ever stop the progression.
    I might also add, that I've read that even in a non-diabetic person, the pancreas starts to be less effective as you age. Same with all our other organs.
    Both of us being about the same age, mid-50s throws another angle into this equation. That being, how many of the complications that manifest due to poorly managed diabetes won't also manifest just do to aging. Almost all the diabetes complications are also age related complications.
    My Dad was also T2, starting about our age now, mid-50s. And he lived to be 82. He had some of symptoms of diabetes. High blood pressure, poor circulation etc. But still functioned rather well for another 30 years. Did the complications of diabetes get him? Or old age?
    If we live long enough, we'll die of something.
    I'm betting on the theory that by diet changes, life style changes, we can dramatically arrest the progress of diabetes to maybe even the point where it won't be an issue. Sure it will still be there, but if we treat it with the proper respect and stick to our diets and exercise, yes, we can slow the advancement, or even stop it.
    Or maybe it's wishful thinking, but I'm willing to give it my best shot!!

  3. Shanghaied Guy

    Originally Posted by antiquedave
    The progression of type 2 diabetes means your pancreas will produce less insulin as time goes on. Nothing more, nothing less.
    This is a comment from another post that interested me and I'd like to know how others define the progression of Diabetes.
    If it is simply that our pancreas produces less insulin as time goes on where does Insulin resistance fit into that theory? Dave,
    There is much that we do not know.
    We know that deteriation of pancreatic function progresses in most T2's over time, but we do not know exactly why this happens. The popular theory was that your beta cells in the pancreas are "exhausted" from producing so much insulin in the in insulin resistant T2 body, but science suggests it is much more complicated than this.
    There is a school of thought which is well reflected in the Blood Sugar 101 website that believes that strictly controlling your BGs may halt the progression or at least slow it down. I am one of the people who believe that strictly controlling BGs will help and hope that it will halt the progression of my BG. After 13 years, my BGs are better than ever and I do not require exogenous insulin. There's hope.
    There are other people less optimistic than me. Some people here in DD Land report that after a period of very good control they suffered a sudden deterioration of pancreatic function. The person who you quote had such an experience. Differences in experience suggest there is a strong genetic component. My father had the D for over 40 years and his pancreatic function did not further detiorate, but he is now dying of heart disease, the number one complication from T2.
    My advice is do everything you can to control your BGs. It will reduce your chances of diabetic progression and diabetic complications. If you have a family history of heart disease, I would advise you to also read about preventing coronary artery disease.
    Be well.

  4. -> Continue reading
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Having diabetes and taking diabetes medications increases the risk of dementia the more medication, the higher the risk. Interventions including dietary change, exercise, cognitive training programs, and proactive healthcare are highly effective for preventing dementia in high-risk people. Give us a call at 614-841-7700

Severity Of Diabetes Complications Linked To Dementia

Severity of Diabetes Complications Linked to Dementia The risk of developing dementia correlates with the severity of diabetes complications such as neuropathy, according to a 12-year Taiwanese study. The research represents the first nationwide effort to look at the progression and severity of diabetes and risk for dementia and was published online July 9 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. "[In our study], the risk of dementia was increased from diabetes onset and was associated with diabetic complication severity and progression," commented first author Wei-Che Chiu, MD, PhD, of the department of psychiatry, Cathay General Hospital and the School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, in Taipei, Taiwan. "Progression of diabetic severity in the early years of [type 2] diabetes could predict the risk of dementia," he added. Past studies have shown a consistent link between diabetes and an increased risk for dementia, with some suggesting that diabetes increases the risk for dementia up to threefold, according to background information in the article. Moreover, diabetic complications and poor glucose control have been linked to mild cognitive impairment, which Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. antiquedave

    The progression of type 2 diabetes means your pancreas will produce less insulin as t

    The progression of type 2 diabetes means your pancreas will produce less insulin as time goes on. Nothing more, nothing less.
    This is a comment from another post that interested me and I'd like to know how others define the progression of Diabetes.
    I know I'm a newbie but in everything I've read in the past 3 months I've come away with the conclusion that in spite of your best efforts there are aspects of the disease that will progress. You can slow it down but you can't stop it entirely.
    That each of us is different as to what we can tolerate for food, how we benefit from exercize, how our meds impact our D and which systems in our bodies will be impacted more severely from our D.
    If it is simply that our pancreas produces less insulin as time goes on where does Insulin resistance fit into that theory?

  2. Jimmy Cowboy

    Hi Dave, I'm pretty new to this also, having been just diagnosed in March, 2009. My A1c was then 8.91, last week it's down to 5.7. Almost strictly through diet change.
    What has prompted my diet change is that I've read that if you can maintain near non-diabetic BG and A1c readings, you can significantly slow down, or ever stop the progression.
    I might also add, that I've read that even in a non-diabetic person, the pancreas starts to be less effective as you age. Same with all our other organs.
    Both of us being about the same age, mid-50s throws another angle into this equation. That being, how many of the complications that manifest due to poorly managed diabetes won't also manifest just do to aging. Almost all the diabetes complications are also age related complications.
    My Dad was also T2, starting about our age now, mid-50s. And he lived to be 82. He had some of symptoms of diabetes. High blood pressure, poor circulation etc. But still functioned rather well for another 30 years. Did the complications of diabetes get him? Or old age?
    If we live long enough, we'll die of something.
    I'm betting on the theory that by diet changes, life style changes, we can dramatically arrest the progress of diabetes to maybe even the point where it won't be an issue. Sure it will still be there, but if we treat it with the proper respect and stick to our diets and exercise, yes, we can slow the advancement, or even stop it.
    Or maybe it's wishful thinking, but I'm willing to give it my best shot!!

  3. Shanghaied Guy

    Originally Posted by antiquedave
    The progression of type 2 diabetes means your pancreas will produce less insulin as time goes on. Nothing more, nothing less.
    This is a comment from another post that interested me and I'd like to know how others define the progression of Diabetes.
    If it is simply that our pancreas produces less insulin as time goes on where does Insulin resistance fit into that theory? Dave,
    There is much that we do not know.
    We know that deteriation of pancreatic function progresses in most T2's over time, but we do not know exactly why this happens. The popular theory was that your beta cells in the pancreas are "exhausted" from producing so much insulin in the in insulin resistant T2 body, but science suggests it is much more complicated than this.
    There is a school of thought which is well reflected in the Blood Sugar 101 website that believes that strictly controlling your BGs may halt the progression or at least slow it down. I am one of the people who believe that strictly controlling BGs will help and hope that it will halt the progression of my BG. After 13 years, my BGs are better than ever and I do not require exogenous insulin. There's hope.
    There are other people less optimistic than me. Some people here in DD Land report that after a period of very good control they suffered a sudden deterioration of pancreatic function. The person who you quote had such an experience. Differences in experience suggest there is a strong genetic component. My father had the D for over 40 years and his pancreatic function did not further detiorate, but he is now dying of heart disease, the number one complication from T2.
    My advice is do everything you can to control your BGs. It will reduce your chances of diabetic progression and diabetic complications. If you have a family history of heart disease, I would advise you to also read about preventing coronary artery disease.
    Be well.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
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Vascular Complication Of Diabetes

Joseph I. Wolfsdorf, Katharine C. Garvey, in Endocrinology: Adult and Pediatric (Seventh Edition) , 2016 The vascular complications of diabetes are classified as either microvascular (retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy) or macrovascular, which includes coronary artery, peripheral, and cerebral vascular disease. The microvascular complications can develop within 5 years of the onset of T1D, but infrequently develop before the onset of puberty. Clinically significant macrovascular complications are virtually never seen until adulthood. Intensive glycemic control decreases the risk of microvascular disease, retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy, and macrovascular disease.89 In addition to hyperglycemia, several other modifiable risk factors contribute to and influence the risk of vascular complications. Use of tobacco considerably increases the risk of onset and progression of nephropathy and macrovascular disease.90 Hypertension, likewise, is associated with increased risk and rate of progression of retinopathy, nephropathy, and macrovascular disease. Dyslipidemia contributes to the risk of macrovascular disease, nephropathy, and retinopathy. A family history of hypertension Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. antiquedave

    The progression of type 2 diabetes means your pancreas will produce less insulin as t

    The progression of type 2 diabetes means your pancreas will produce less insulin as time goes on. Nothing more, nothing less.
    This is a comment from another post that interested me and I'd like to know how others define the progression of Diabetes.
    I know I'm a newbie but in everything I've read in the past 3 months I've come away with the conclusion that in spite of your best efforts there are aspects of the disease that will progress. You can slow it down but you can't stop it entirely.
    That each of us is different as to what we can tolerate for food, how we benefit from exercize, how our meds impact our D and which systems in our bodies will be impacted more severely from our D.
    If it is simply that our pancreas produces less insulin as time goes on where does Insulin resistance fit into that theory?

  2. Jimmy Cowboy

    Hi Dave, I'm pretty new to this also, having been just diagnosed in March, 2009. My A1c was then 8.91, last week it's down to 5.7. Almost strictly through diet change.
    What has prompted my diet change is that I've read that if you can maintain near non-diabetic BG and A1c readings, you can significantly slow down, or ever stop the progression.
    I might also add, that I've read that even in a non-diabetic person, the pancreas starts to be less effective as you age. Same with all our other organs.
    Both of us being about the same age, mid-50s throws another angle into this equation. That being, how many of the complications that manifest due to poorly managed diabetes won't also manifest just do to aging. Almost all the diabetes complications are also age related complications.
    My Dad was also T2, starting about our age now, mid-50s. And he lived to be 82. He had some of symptoms of diabetes. High blood pressure, poor circulation etc. But still functioned rather well for another 30 years. Did the complications of diabetes get him? Or old age?
    If we live long enough, we'll die of something.
    I'm betting on the theory that by diet changes, life style changes, we can dramatically arrest the progress of diabetes to maybe even the point where it won't be an issue. Sure it will still be there, but if we treat it with the proper respect and stick to our diets and exercise, yes, we can slow the advancement, or even stop it.
    Or maybe it's wishful thinking, but I'm willing to give it my best shot!!

  3. Shanghaied Guy

    Originally Posted by antiquedave
    The progression of type 2 diabetes means your pancreas will produce less insulin as time goes on. Nothing more, nothing less.
    This is a comment from another post that interested me and I'd like to know how others define the progression of Diabetes.
    If it is simply that our pancreas produces less insulin as time goes on where does Insulin resistance fit into that theory? Dave,
    There is much that we do not know.
    We know that deteriation of pancreatic function progresses in most T2's over time, but we do not know exactly why this happens. The popular theory was that your beta cells in the pancreas are "exhausted" from producing so much insulin in the in insulin resistant T2 body, but science suggests it is much more complicated than this.
    There is a school of thought which is well reflected in the Blood Sugar 101 website that believes that strictly controlling your BGs may halt the progression or at least slow it down. I am one of the people who believe that strictly controlling BGs will help and hope that it will halt the progression of my BG. After 13 years, my BGs are better than ever and I do not require exogenous insulin. There's hope.
    There are other people less optimistic than me. Some people here in DD Land report that after a period of very good control they suffered a sudden deterioration of pancreatic function. The person who you quote had such an experience. Differences in experience suggest there is a strong genetic component. My father had the D for over 40 years and his pancreatic function did not further detiorate, but he is now dying of heart disease, the number one complication from T2.
    My advice is do everything you can to control your BGs. It will reduce your chances of diabetic progression and diabetic complications. If you have a family history of heart disease, I would advise you to also read about preventing coronary artery disease.
    Be well.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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