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Progression Of Diabetes Complications

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Dr. Pugh discusses how to avoid complications from diabetes in this House Calls TV video segment.

Avoiding Complications Of Diabetes

It can take work to get your diabetes under control, but the results are worth it. If you don't make the effort to get a handle on it, you could set yourself up for a host of complications. Diabetes can take a toll on nearly every organ in your body, including the: Heart and blood vessels Eyes Kidneys Nerves Gastrointestinal tract Gums and teeth Heart and Blood Vessels Heart disease and blood vessel disease are common problems for many people who don’t have their diabetes under control. You're at least twice as likely to have heart problems and strokes as people who don’t have the condition. Blood vessel damage or nerve damage may also cause foot problems that, in rare cases, can lead to amputations. People with diabetes are ten times likelier to have their toes and feet removed than those without the disease. Symptoms: You might not notice warning signs until you have a heart attack or stroke. Problems with large blood vessels in your legs can cause leg cramps, changes in skin color, and less sensation. The good news: Many studies show that controlling your diabetes can help you avoid these problems, or stop them from getting worse if you have them. Diabetes is the leading cau Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. antiquedave

    The progression of type 2 diabetes means your pancreas will produce less insulin as t

    The progression of type 2 diabetes means your pancreas will produce less insulin as time goes on. Nothing more, nothing less.
    This is a comment from another post that interested me and I'd like to know how others define the progression of Diabetes.
    I know I'm a newbie but in everything I've read in the past 3 months I've come away with the conclusion that in spite of your best efforts there are aspects of the disease that will progress. You can slow it down but you can't stop it entirely.
    That each of us is different as to what we can tolerate for food, how we benefit from exercize, how our meds impact our D and which systems in our bodies will be impacted more severely from our D.
    If it is simply that our pancreas produces less insulin as time goes on where does Insulin resistance fit into that theory?

  2. Jimmy Cowboy

    Hi Dave, I'm pretty new to this also, having been just diagnosed in March, 2009. My A1c was then 8.91, last week it's down to 5.7. Almost strictly through diet change.
    What has prompted my diet change is that I've read that if you can maintain near non-diabetic BG and A1c readings, you can significantly slow down, or ever stop the progression.
    I might also add, that I've read that even in a non-diabetic person, the pancreas starts to be less effective as you age. Same with all our other organs.
    Both of us being about the same age, mid-50s throws another angle into this equation. That being, how many of the complications that manifest due to poorly managed diabetes won't also manifest just do to aging. Almost all the diabetes complications are also age related complications.
    My Dad was also T2, starting about our age now, mid-50s. And he lived to be 82. He had some of symptoms of diabetes. High blood pressure, poor circulation etc. But still functioned rather well for another 30 years. Did the complications of diabetes get him? Or old age?
    If we live long enough, we'll die of something.
    I'm betting on the theory that by diet changes, life style changes, we can dramatically arrest the progress of diabetes to maybe even the point where it won't be an issue. Sure it will still be there, but if we treat it with the proper respect and stick to our diets and exercise, yes, we can slow the advancement, or even stop it.
    Or maybe it's wishful thinking, but I'm willing to give it my best shot!!

  3. Shanghaied Guy

    Originally Posted by antiquedave
    The progression of type 2 diabetes means your pancreas will produce less insulin as time goes on. Nothing more, nothing less.
    This is a comment from another post that interested me and I'd like to know how others define the progression of Diabetes.
    If it is simply that our pancreas produces less insulin as time goes on where does Insulin resistance fit into that theory? Dave,
    There is much that we do not know.
    We know that deteriation of pancreatic function progresses in most T2's over time, but we do not know exactly why this happens. The popular theory was that your beta cells in the pancreas are "exhausted" from producing so much insulin in the in insulin resistant T2 body, but science suggests it is much more complicated than this.
    There is a school of thought which is well reflected in the Blood Sugar 101 website that believes that strictly controlling your BGs may halt the progression or at least slow it down. I am one of the people who believe that strictly controlling BGs will help and hope that it will halt the progression of my BG. After 13 years, my BGs are better than ever and I do not require exogenous insulin. There's hope.
    There are other people less optimistic than me. Some people here in DD Land report that after a period of very good control they suffered a sudden deterioration of pancreatic function. The person who you quote had such an experience. Differences in experience suggest there is a strong genetic component. My father had the D for over 40 years and his pancreatic function did not further detiorate, but he is now dying of heart disease, the number one complication from T2.
    My advice is do everything you can to control your BGs. It will reduce your chances of diabetic progression and diabetic complications. If you have a family history of heart disease, I would advise you to also read about preventing coronary artery disease.
    Be well.

  4. -> Continue reading
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Having diabetes and taking diabetes medications increases the risk of dementia the more medication, the higher the risk. Interventions including dietary change, exercise, cognitive training programs, and proactive healthcare are highly effective for preventing dementia in high-risk people. Give us a call at 614-841-7700

Severity Of Diabetes Complications Linked To Dementia

Severity of Diabetes Complications Linked to Dementia The risk of developing dementia correlates with the severity of diabetes complications such as neuropathy, according to a 12-year Taiwanese study. The research represents the first nationwide effort to look at the progression and severity of diabetes and risk for dementia and was published online July 9 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. "[In our study], the risk of dementia was increased from diabetes onset and was associated with diabetic complication severity and progression," commented first author Wei-Che Chiu, MD, PhD, of the department of psychiatry, Cathay General Hospital and the School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, in Taipei, Taiwan. "Progression of diabetic severity in the early years of [type 2] diabetes could predict the risk of dementia," he added. Past studies have shown a consistent link between diabetes and an increased risk for dementia, with some suggesting that diabetes increases the risk for dementia up to threefold, according to background information in the article. Moreover, diabetic complications and poor glucose control have been linked to mild cognitive impairment, which Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. antiquedave

    The progression of type 2 diabetes means your pancreas will produce less insulin as t

    The progression of type 2 diabetes means your pancreas will produce less insulin as time goes on. Nothing more, nothing less.
    This is a comment from another post that interested me and I'd like to know how others define the progression of Diabetes.
    I know I'm a newbie but in everything I've read in the past 3 months I've come away with the conclusion that in spite of your best efforts there are aspects of the disease that will progress. You can slow it down but you can't stop it entirely.
    That each of us is different as to what we can tolerate for food, how we benefit from exercize, how our meds impact our D and which systems in our bodies will be impacted more severely from our D.
    If it is simply that our pancreas produces less insulin as time goes on where does Insulin resistance fit into that theory?

  2. Jimmy Cowboy

    Hi Dave, I'm pretty new to this also, having been just diagnosed in March, 2009. My A1c was then 8.91, last week it's down to 5.7. Almost strictly through diet change.
    What has prompted my diet change is that I've read that if you can maintain near non-diabetic BG and A1c readings, you can significantly slow down, or ever stop the progression.
    I might also add, that I've read that even in a non-diabetic person, the pancreas starts to be less effective as you age. Same with all our other organs.
    Both of us being about the same age, mid-50s throws another angle into this equation. That being, how many of the complications that manifest due to poorly managed diabetes won't also manifest just do to aging. Almost all the diabetes complications are also age related complications.
    My Dad was also T2, starting about our age now, mid-50s. And he lived to be 82. He had some of symptoms of diabetes. High blood pressure, poor circulation etc. But still functioned rather well for another 30 years. Did the complications of diabetes get him? Or old age?
    If we live long enough, we'll die of something.
    I'm betting on the theory that by diet changes, life style changes, we can dramatically arrest the progress of diabetes to maybe even the point where it won't be an issue. Sure it will still be there, but if we treat it with the proper respect and stick to our diets and exercise, yes, we can slow the advancement, or even stop it.
    Or maybe it's wishful thinking, but I'm willing to give it my best shot!!

  3. Shanghaied Guy

    Originally Posted by antiquedave
    The progression of type 2 diabetes means your pancreas will produce less insulin as time goes on. Nothing more, nothing less.
    This is a comment from another post that interested me and I'd like to know how others define the progression of Diabetes.
    If it is simply that our pancreas produces less insulin as time goes on where does Insulin resistance fit into that theory? Dave,
    There is much that we do not know.
    We know that deteriation of pancreatic function progresses in most T2's over time, but we do not know exactly why this happens. The popular theory was that your beta cells in the pancreas are "exhausted" from producing so much insulin in the in insulin resistant T2 body, but science suggests it is much more complicated than this.
    There is a school of thought which is well reflected in the Blood Sugar 101 website that believes that strictly controlling your BGs may halt the progression or at least slow it down. I am one of the people who believe that strictly controlling BGs will help and hope that it will halt the progression of my BG. After 13 years, my BGs are better than ever and I do not require exogenous insulin. There's hope.
    There are other people less optimistic than me. Some people here in DD Land report that after a period of very good control they suffered a sudden deterioration of pancreatic function. The person who you quote had such an experience. Differences in experience suggest there is a strong genetic component. My father had the D for over 40 years and his pancreatic function did not further detiorate, but he is now dying of heart disease, the number one complication from T2.
    My advice is do everything you can to control your BGs. It will reduce your chances of diabetic progression and diabetic complications. If you have a family history of heart disease, I would advise you to also read about preventing coronary artery disease.
    Be well.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
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http://ehow2.co/diabetes-treatment - Visit the link and discover more about symptoms and treatment of diabetes type 1 in men and women. Diabetes Type 1 - Diabetes Type 1 Life Expectancy - Type 1 Diabetes - Living With Diabetes Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition, which means your immune system attacks healthy body tissue by mistake. In this case, it attacks the cells in your pancreas. Your damaged pancreas is then unable to produce insulin, so that glucose cannot be moved out of your bloodstream and into your cells. Complications of Diabetes Type 1 Diabetes is the most common cause of vision loss and blindness in people of working age. Everyone with diabetes aged 12 or over should be invited to have their eyes screened once a year for diabetic retinopathy. Diabetes is the reason for many cases of kidney failure and lower limb amputation. People with diabetes are up to five times more likely to have cardiovascular disease, such as a stroke, than those without diabetes. Diabetes Type 1 Treatment If you have type 1 diabetes, you'll need to eat a healthy, balanced diet. Loose weight, if you're overweight, and maintaining a healthy weight. Stopping smoking (if you smoke) and drinking alcohol in moderation. Diabetes Type 1 - learn about the similarities and differences between diabetes type 1 and diabetes 2 with dr. type 1 diabetes | nucleus health. Type 1 diabetes (disease or medical condition) Video Download 3GP, MP4, HD MP4, And Watch type 1 diabetes (disease or medical condition) Video Learn about the similarities and differences between diabetes type 1 and diabetes 2 with dr. Alternative: diabetes type 1 is curable. The condition affects about 3 million people in the united states alone and everyone with type 1 diabetes — including celebrities — must replace their insulin every day.. This is my story on how i got type 1 diabetes 16 years ago and how i felt as well as how i dealt with it growing up. Gina was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when she was nine years and has been dependent on insulin ever since. Did you ask yourself why type 1 diabetes mellitus is incurable? Diabetes Mellitus (Disease Or Medical Condition) · Type 2 Diabetes (Disease Or Medical Condition) · Type 1 Diabetes (Disease Or Medical Condition). Type 1 diabetes (disease or medical condition) Video Download 3GP, MP4, HD MP4, And Watch type 1 diabetes (disease or medical condition) Video. Effects of chromium picolinate on food intake DIABETES TYPE 1 LIFE EXPECTANCY ] The REAL cause of Diabetes (and the solution) Donate Today. Medtronic Diabetes Supplies Diabetes Type 1 Life Expectancy ::The 3 Step Trick that Reverses Diabetes Permanently in As Little as 11 Days. Diabetes type 1 life expectancy borderline diabetes. The condition affects about 3 million people in the united states alone and everyone with type 1 diabetes — including celebrities — must replace their insulin every day.. This is my story on living with type 1 diabetes - i share with you how i got diagnosed the medication i take and what i need to do on a daily basis to keep healthy. Gina was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when she was nine years and has been dependent on insulin ever since. The condition affects about 3 million people in the united states alone and everyone with type 1 diabetes — including celebrities — must replace their insulin every day.. Gina was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when she was nine years and has been dependent on insulin ever since. Knowing the signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes can make a big difference in getting your child treatment before they become very ill. Type 1 diabetes is a condition in which your pancreas does not produce insulin a hormone your body needs to maintain proper blood sugar levels. In type 1 diabetes beta cells of the pancreas are destroyed by the immune system by mistake. In type 2 diabetes the pancreas produces enough insulin but something goes wrong either with receptor binding or insulin signaling inside the target cells. Typically obesity inactive lifestyle and unhealthy diet are associated with higher risk of type 2 diabetes. If you have type i diabetes your goal is to keep your blood glucose within a normal range. Diabetes mellitus pathophysiology and nursing nclex lecture review on diabetes type 1 and diabetes type 2. Diabetes Type 1 Diet,Diabetes Type 1,Living With Diabetes Type 1,Type 1 Diabetes,diabetes,health,type 1 diabetes (disease or medical condition),diabetes type 1 vs type 2,diabetes type 1 symptoms,diabetes type 1 cure,diabetes type 1 and 2 cure in 72 hrs,diabetes type 1 treatment,diabetes type 1 story,diabetes type 1 causes,type 1 diabetes cure,type 1 diabetes symptoms,type 1 diabetes diet,type 1 diabetes diagnosis story,type 1 diabetes ketogenic diet,piles

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Overview Type 2 diabetes, once known as adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition that affects the way your body metabolizes sugar (glucose), your body's important source of fuel. With type 2 diabetes, your body either resists the effects of insulin — a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into your cells — or doesn't produce enough insulin to maintain a normal glucose level. More common in adults, type 2 diabetes increasingly affects children as childhood obesity increases. There's no cure for type 2 diabetes, but you may be able to manage the condition by eating well, exercising and maintaining a healthy weight. If diet and exercise aren't enough to manage your blood sugar well, you also may need diabetes medications or insulin therapy. Symptoms Signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly. In fact, you can have type 2 diabetes for years and not know it. Look for: Increased thirst and frequent urination. Excess sugar building up in your bloodstream causes fluid to be pulled from the tissues. This may leave you thirsty. As a result, you may drink — and urinate — more than usual. Increased hunger. Without enough insulin Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. antiquedave

    The progression of type 2 diabetes means your pancreas will produce less insulin as t

    The progression of type 2 diabetes means your pancreas will produce less insulin as time goes on. Nothing more, nothing less.
    This is a comment from another post that interested me and I'd like to know how others define the progression of Diabetes.
    I know I'm a newbie but in everything I've read in the past 3 months I've come away with the conclusion that in spite of your best efforts there are aspects of the disease that will progress. You can slow it down but you can't stop it entirely.
    That each of us is different as to what we can tolerate for food, how we benefit from exercize, how our meds impact our D and which systems in our bodies will be impacted more severely from our D.
    If it is simply that our pancreas produces less insulin as time goes on where does Insulin resistance fit into that theory?

  2. Jimmy Cowboy

    Hi Dave, I'm pretty new to this also, having been just diagnosed in March, 2009. My A1c was then 8.91, last week it's down to 5.7. Almost strictly through diet change.
    What has prompted my diet change is that I've read that if you can maintain near non-diabetic BG and A1c readings, you can significantly slow down, or ever stop the progression.
    I might also add, that I've read that even in a non-diabetic person, the pancreas starts to be less effective as you age. Same with all our other organs.
    Both of us being about the same age, mid-50s throws another angle into this equation. That being, how many of the complications that manifest due to poorly managed diabetes won't also manifest just do to aging. Almost all the diabetes complications are also age related complications.
    My Dad was also T2, starting about our age now, mid-50s. And he lived to be 82. He had some of symptoms of diabetes. High blood pressure, poor circulation etc. But still functioned rather well for another 30 years. Did the complications of diabetes get him? Or old age?
    If we live long enough, we'll die of something.
    I'm betting on the theory that by diet changes, life style changes, we can dramatically arrest the progress of diabetes to maybe even the point where it won't be an issue. Sure it will still be there, but if we treat it with the proper respect and stick to our diets and exercise, yes, we can slow the advancement, or even stop it.
    Or maybe it's wishful thinking, but I'm willing to give it my best shot!!

  3. Shanghaied Guy

    Originally Posted by antiquedave
    The progression of type 2 diabetes means your pancreas will produce less insulin as time goes on. Nothing more, nothing less.
    This is a comment from another post that interested me and I'd like to know how others define the progression of Diabetes.
    If it is simply that our pancreas produces less insulin as time goes on where does Insulin resistance fit into that theory? Dave,
    There is much that we do not know.
    We know that deteriation of pancreatic function progresses in most T2's over time, but we do not know exactly why this happens. The popular theory was that your beta cells in the pancreas are "exhausted" from producing so much insulin in the in insulin resistant T2 body, but science suggests it is much more complicated than this.
    There is a school of thought which is well reflected in the Blood Sugar 101 website that believes that strictly controlling your BGs may halt the progression or at least slow it down. I am one of the people who believe that strictly controlling BGs will help and hope that it will halt the progression of my BG. After 13 years, my BGs are better than ever and I do not require exogenous insulin. There's hope.
    There are other people less optimistic than me. Some people here in DD Land report that after a period of very good control they suffered a sudden deterioration of pancreatic function. The person who you quote had such an experience. Differences in experience suggest there is a strong genetic component. My father had the D for over 40 years and his pancreatic function did not further detiorate, but he is now dying of heart disease, the number one complication from T2.
    My advice is do everything you can to control your BGs. It will reduce your chances of diabetic progression and diabetic complications. If you have a family history of heart disease, I would advise you to also read about preventing coronary artery disease.
    Be well.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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