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Programs For Type 1 Diabetes

Selecting An Insulin Program For Type 1 Diabetes

Selecting An Insulin Program For Type 1 Diabetes

For people with Type 1 diabetes, is there really anything more personal and significant in your life than your insulin program? In a way, your insulin program defines your lifestyle. It can either dictate your meal, sleep, and activity schedules, or it can set you up for successful control of your diabetes. Unfortunately, most people are given little choice or education on how to select the insulin program that best meets their needs. As a matter of fact, many people probably put more thought and effort into choosing a car — perhaps because they have a better idea of what they’re looking for. So what should you look for in an insulin program, and how do you know if the one you’re following is really the best one for you? Read on for some tips on this important decision. What’s in an insulin program? Every insulin program for people with Type 1 diabetes should include a basal, or “background,” insulin. Basal insulin is necessary to cover the liver’s secretion of glucose throughout the day and night, which provides the cells with a continuous supply of glucose to burn for energy. Insufficient basal insulin at any time will result in a sharp rise in blood glucose level and can also lead to the buildup of ketones, acidic by-products of fat-burning that can accumulate in large amounts if no glucose is being burned simultaneously. If high blood glucose and ketones are not treated promptly, a life-threatening condition called diabetic ketoacidosis can develop. Each person’s basal insulin requirements are unique, but typically they are higher during the early morning and lower in the middle of the day. This is due to the nighttime production of blood-sugar-raising hormones and to the enhanced insulin sensitivity that comes with daytime physical activity. Basal i Continue reading >>

For People With Type 1 Diabetes (t1d)

For People With Type 1 Diabetes (t1d)

The Herbert Family Program for young adults with t1d The program focuses on meeting the unique needs of young adults with t1d (ages 18-30). It addresses the financial, psychological, social and physical aspects of type 1 diabetes that challenge not only the patient but also their family and support networks. Services available: Social opportunities to meet and interact with others who have type 1 diabetes Individual and group counseling following consultation Insurance and community resource information Diabetes education including diabetes self-management education, meter pump and sensor training and management and medical nutrition therapy Preconception, pregnancy, and post-natal counseling and education Psychological healthy and support by a licensed clinical social worker If you are interested in the Herbert Family Program and/or our events please also visit us on Facebook. T1D event calendar If your child has T1D please visit our partner the PADRE Foundation for events and news. Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Live a healthy life with Type 1 Diabetes. Choose exercise guidelines and self-management solutions that are specific for your diabetes treatment. Using this Website This website can help you learn about, and live a healthy life with type 1 diabetes. It is divided into 3 main sections: The modules can be read in any order. However, if you are newly diagnosed, it is best to start at the beginning in Understanding Diabetes, and work your way through the material. Below you will find a guide to each module. As you will see, depending upon your individual therapy, you can choose exercise guidelines and self-management sections that are specific for your diabetes treatment. Additionally, throughout the program, Self-assessment quizzes are available to help you monitor your progress, and how much you are learning. The Modules are: Additional modules: Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes | Helmsley Charitable Trust

Type 1 Diabetes | Helmsley Charitable Trust

There are no current Helmsley T1D funding opportunities. Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a life-altering autoimmune disease that afflicts nearly two million people in the U.S. alone. There currently is no cure and the number of annual diagnoses is on the rise. It is perhaps the only disease in which patients are required to monitor their condition constantly and make their own dosing decisions with a drug that, if improperly administered, can kill them. It is a dangerous and relentless 24/7 grind, and research shows that the vast number of people with T1D are failing to properly and safely manage their disease. With T1D, the body attacks its own insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Insulin is a hormone that enables the body to metabolize and use glucose. Elevated glucose levels can be immediately life-threatening in severe cases, but more commonly they can result in a range of serious long-term health complications, including blindness, amputations, heart disease and kidney disease. T1D is managed today by a rigorous regimen of monitoring glucose levels either by pricking ones skin multiple times per day or wearing a subcutaneous continuous glucose monitor and then administering insulin via injection or an insulin pump. None of this process is automated currently, which means end users (or their caregivers) must play the role of a pancreas. Continue reading >>

Special Diabetes Programs

Special Diabetes Programs

The American Diabetes Association has long been a leader and partner in efforts to increase the federal commitment to cure and prevent diabetes and to address the diabetes epidemic in disproportionately impacted populations. Since 1997, a key component of these efforts has been the Special Diabetes Program for Indians (SDPI) at the Indian Health Service (IHS) and the Special Statutory Funding Program for Type 1 Diabetes Research (SDP-type1) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). These two programs represent a significant contribution from the federal government to combat, prevent and cure diabetes. Both of these vital programs require periodic Congressional re-authorization. In February 2018, Congress renewed the Special Diabetes Programs for two years and it is now set to expire in September 2019. Timely, multi-year renewals allow us to build on the programs advances in its initial years by accelerating the translation of the discoveries already made into treatments and cures for the benefit of all Americans living with diabetes. Special Statutory Funding Program for Type 1 Diabetes Research (SDP-type 1) SDP-type 1 is special funding for research on the prevention and cure of type 1 diabetes. It provides researchers the chance they need to carry out long-term research that can have an impact on thousands of lives. SDP-type 1 has led to real advances in many areas of type 1 diabetes research. The program has created significant research opportunities that are helping to improve the lives of people living with diabetes, prevent the onset of the disease in others, and bring us closer to a cure for this costly and growing disease. Special Diabetes Program for Indians (SDPI) SDPI gives Indian health programs and tribal communities the resources and tools they need to Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Special Statutory Funding Program

Type 1 Diabetes Special Statutory Funding Program

Type 1 Diabetes Special Statutory Funding Program Type 1 Diabetes Special Statutory Funding Program The Special Statutory Funding Program for Type 1 Diabetes Research, or Special Diabetes Program, is a special appropriation that supports research on the prevention and cure of type 1 diabetes and its complications. Since 1998, the Special Diabetes Program has enabled the creation of unique, innovative, and collaborative research consortia and clinical trials networks . These have made significant research progress as noted in program reports and also generated numerous research resources for use by the broad scientific community. The NIDDK administers the Special Diabetes Program on behalf of the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services, in collaboration with multiple NIH Institutes and Centers and the CDC, and with input from the Diabetes Mellitus Interagency Coordinating Committee . Learn more about the Programs background . The Special Diabetes Program supplements type 1 diabetes research supported by the NIDDK and NIHs regular appropriation. Therefore, the links on this site do not represent the entirety of type 1 diabetes research supported by the NIDDK and the NIH, but rather focus only on research supported by the Special Diabetes Program. Learn more about NIDDK diabetes research . Clinical Trials Recruiting Patients and Families Opportunities for participation in human research studies on type 1 diabetes Continue reading >>

The Type 1 Diabetes Video Series Program You Deserve To Know About.

The Type 1 Diabetes Video Series Program You Deserve To Know About.

7 Type 1 diabetes foundation videos + 6 personalised videos + customised articles and tips Type 1 Diabetes - The foundation program - the first 7 videos you will receive Dr Sultan takes a journey through the ages and reveals how type 1 diabetes was viewed across history. Ancient Rome, India and then onto ancient and not so ancient methods used to control sugar until ultimately the discovery of insulin heralded a new era in modern medicine. Dr Sultan continues the journey through type 1 with the development and evolution of insulins and onto modern theories about the development of type 1 from genetics to environment to risks for future generations. Dr Sultan explains what diabetes is, the difference between type 1 and type 2 and how some people can have both. What are the factors that cause glucose levels to rise and fall? How to understand how to work out your insulin dose and adjust it to take into account food, work and activity. Together we explore the science and misconceptions around food and exercise by focusing on body fat storage, blood glucose, carbohydrate, food volume, protein, fats, fibre, alcohol, energy intake and excess, and important features of physical activity to better control glucose levels and have more predictable and stable readings. How to count carbs and why it is so critical to achieving more stable readings. Dr Sultan has an open and honest conversation about diabetes complications including the symptoms of heart disease, stroke, nerve damage, eye disease, kidney disease, and feet problems. Find out how and why type 1 causes complications and what you need to know to manage yourself. Understanding what to look for can help you to reduce your risks moving forward. How do insulin pumps work and what are the advantages that they offer? Who the Continue reading >>

Adults With Type 1 Diabetes

Adults With Type 1 Diabetes

Adults with Type 1 Diabetes Integrated Diabetes Services 2018-03-13T19:54:42+00:00 Intensive Care for Adults with Type 1 Diabetes These days, it seems that healthcare systems and the general public focus plenty of attention on the type-2 diabetes epidemic and all the little kids with diabetes. What about the multitudes of adults who have type-1? Well, youve found the place that is dedicated to you. Integrated Diabetes Services is owned and operated by adults with type 1 diabetes, so we get it when it comes to diabetes care. Unlike most hospital-based programs, our diabetes management services dont stop at providing basic education. We teach you the tricks of the trade that make living with diabetes and managing blood sugars easier than ever. We also have the experience and expertise to help you fine-tune your insulin doses, whether youre an experienced pump user or simply taking injections. We take pride in being technologically-savvy (almost as much as teenagers!), so we can offer insight on the latest products and devices, and make use of communication tools that allow consultations to be held from your home, office, or wherever you choose. Our team of diabetes educators has passion for helping other adults with diabetes. We know that diabetes doesnt take breaks or vacations, so we make ourselves available to you above-and-beyond the usual call of duty. Need help preparing for a surgical procedure? Well guide you. Having lows during a new type of workout? Well offer specific adjustments. Not sure which pump to choose? Well direct you to the most helpful information. In virtually all cases, we respond to your questions and concerns within hours, not days or weeks. Since 1995, Integrated Diabetes Services has helped thousands of adults with type 1 diabetes to do the fo Continue reading >>

Behavioral Programs For Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis Free

Behavioral Programs For Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis Free

Abstract Background: Whether behavioral approaches for self-management programs benefit individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus is unclear. Purpose: To determine the effects of behavioral programs for patients with type 1 diabetes on behavioral, clinical, and health outcomes and to investigate factors that might moderate effect. Data Sources: 6 electronic databases (1993 to June 2015), trial registries and conference proceedings (2011 to 2014), and reference lists. Study Selection: 36 prospective, controlled studies involving participants of any age group that compared behavioral programs with usual care, active controls, or other programs. Data Extraction: One reviewer extracted and another verified data. Two reviewers assessed quality and strength of evidence (SOE). Data Synthesis: Moderate SOE showed reduction in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) at 6 months after the intervention compared with usual care (mean difference, −0.29 [95% CI, −0.45 to −0.13] percentage points) and compared with active controls (−0.44 [CI, −0.69 to −0.19] percentage points). At the end of the intervention and 12-month follow-up or longer, there were no statistically significant differences in HbA1c (low SOE) for comparisons with usual care or active control. Compared with usual care, generic quality of life at program completion did not differ (moderate SOE). Other outcomes had low or insufficient SOE. Adults appeared to benefit more for glycemic control at program completion (−0.28 [CI, −0.57 to 0.01] percentage points) than did youth (−0.12 [CI, −0.43 to 0.19] percentage points). Program intensity appeared not to influence effectiveness; some individual delivery appears beneficial. Limitations: All studies had medium or high risk of bias. There was scarce evidence for man Continue reading >>

Grants - Type 1 Diabetes | Helmsley Charitable Trust

Grants - Type 1 Diabetes | Helmsley Charitable Trust

Harnessing the power of collaboration and patient engagement, T1D Exchange speeds the search for treatments and a cure. Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a life-altering autoimmune disease that afflicts nearly two million people in the U.S. alone. There currently is no cure and the number of annual diagnoses is on the rise. It is perhaps the only disease in which patients are required to monitor their condition constantly and make their own dosing decisions with a drug that, if improperly administered, can kill them. It is a dangerous and relentless 24/7 grind, and research shows that the vast number of people with T1D are failing to properly and safely manage their disease. With T1D, the body attacks its own insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Insulin is a hormone that enables the body to metabolize and use glucose. Elevated glucose levels can be immediately life-threatening in severe cases, but more commonly they can result in a range of serious long-term health complications, including blindness, amputations, heart disease and kidney disease. T1D is managed today by a rigorous regimen of monitoring glucose levels either by pricking ones skin multiple times per day or wearing a subcutaneous continuous glucose monitor and then administering insulin via injection or an insulin pump. None of this process is automated currently, which means end users (or their caregivers) must play the role of a pancreas. Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes In The Workplace

Type 1 Diabetes In The Workplace

Living with type 1 diabetes is a full time job; a full time job that doesn't provide a paycheck. Even worse, having a chronic illness such as type 1 diabetes oftentimes makes it extremely difficult to work full time or to even secure a job that offers insurance. The scary fact is a lot of people who actually need insurance don't get it (because they are constantly denied coverage) and living with type 1 diabetes is very expensive. As noted on the American Diabetes Association website, "People with diagnosed diabetes incur average medical expenditures of about $13,700 per year, of which about $7,900 is attributed to diabetes. People with diagnosed diabetes, on average, have medical expenditures approximately 2.3 times higher than what expenditures would be in the absence of diabetes." Our brilliant co-founder Erin Williams came up with a list of resources for you to use if you are struggling to pay for your prescriptions. There are a couple of ways to begin this process; you can connect with a Patient Assistance Program or work with a doctor to contact one of the drug companies directly. Either process will take a little time, a little paperwork but it's worth it to make sure you get the medications you deserve without going in to debt! There is help available for type 1 diabetics who can't afford their supplies and prescriptions. These programs, frequently called Patient Assistance Programs (or PAPs for short), are designed to help those in need obtain their medicines at little to no cost. This is a great article that explains how PAPs work: "Pharmaceutical Companies Helping Patients Get Their Medicines" by Richard J. Sagall, M.D. (article located here and here) If you need help finding a Patient Assistance Program, or you're just not quite sure where to begin looking, Continue reading >>

Special Diabetes Program

Special Diabetes Program

Your voice has been heard! Join us in thanking Congress for passing a renewal of the Special Diabetes Program! The Special Diabetes Program (SDP) is a critical program that provides $150 million annually for type 1 diabetes (T1D) research at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the countrys premier medical research agency. The SDP was renewed on February 9, 2018 and will expire on September 30, 2019. In June 2016, Senate Diabetes Caucus Co-Chairs Susan Collins (R-ME) and Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH), and Congressional Diabetes Caucus Co-Chairs Tom Reed (R-NY) and Diana DeGette (D-CO) invited their colleagues to join them on bipartisan support letters to Senate and House Leadership recognizing the important contributions of the SDP. Thanks to the dedication and persistence of JDRF Advocates whomet with, and contacted their U.S. Representative and Senators, asking them to sign the SDP support letters we achieved amazing results this year with 75 Senators and 356 Representatives signing on. To read the final letters, complete with legislators signatures, click the links below! Congress created the SDP back in 1997, thanks to the bipartisan leadership of U.S. House Speaker Newt Gingrich and Clinton White House Chief of Staff Erskine Bowles, after a Congressional Diabetes Research Working Group reported serious limitations in diabetes researchfor T1D in particularlargely due to inadequate funding. The SDP consists of two initiatives: one to advance T1D research at the National Institutes of Health (NIH); and the other to fund treatment, education and prevention programs for American Indian and Alaska Native populations, who are disproportionately affected by type 2 diabetes. Since its inception, the SDP has shown tangible results by helping scientists make significant advances Continue reading >>

Adult Diabetes Program

Adult Diabetes Program

The University of Colorado Adult Diabetes Program is comprised of inpatient and outpatient management that interact in all aspect of diabetes management. The program is being developed under the leadership of Boris Draznin, MD, PhD , The Celeste and Jack Grynberg Professor of Medicine. The inpatient segment of the program is headed by Cecilia Low Wang, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine. The Glucose Management Team under Dr. Low Wangs leadership provides diabetes management and resident and fellow education at the University Hospital 24 hours a day 365 days a year. The Outpatient Diabetes Practice in the Anschutz Outpatient Pavilion is a multidisciplinary diabetes team that includes physicians, nurse educators, and dietitian educators. The Director of the Clinic is Michael McDermott, M.D ., Professor of Medicine. Our diabetes educators are available by phone, fax, or email to communicate with patients interested in improving their blood glucose control through intensive therapy. Since diabetes is a disease which patients manage themselves, each of our providers strives to teach the latest information to assure that patients are making informed decisions. Our diabetes self-management education program has been accredited by the American Diabetes Association. These standards ensure patients that they are receiving the latest information, which empowers them to take control of their diabetes through knowledge and teamwork. The inpatient Glucose Management Team (GMT) at the University of Colorado Hospital was started in 2008. The mission of the UCH GMT is to help inpatient clinical departments improve outcomes through better glycemic control. In many patients, management of inpatient diabetes and/or stress hyperglycemia can be complex with many changing factors and the ne Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Program

Type 1 Diabetes Program

#1 Ranked Children's Hospital by U. S. News & World Report The Diabetes Program at Boston Childrens Hospital is dedicated to empowering children to lead a normal life through the effective management of their diabetes. Diabetes is a chronic condition that affects the bodys ability to use glucose (sugar) to provide energy. Diabetes can either be caused by too little insulin ( type 1 diabetes ) or a combination of too little insulin and resistance to the action of insulin ( type 2 diabetes ). The most common form of diabetes in children, adolescents and young adults is type 1 diabetes: Type 1 diabetes(also known as juvenile diabetes)is an autoimmune disease that occurs when the body attacks the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose enter the cells of the body, where it is used as a source of fuel. Without insulin, glucose cannot enter the cells. Instead, it builds up in the bloodstream and makes blood sugar levels very high. Children with type 1 diabetes must have daily injections of insulin to keep their blood sugar levels within the normal range. Managing your childs diabetes can be a challenging task, but in our program, you have access to our entire team of experts. Well help you with medical evaluation, dietary consultation, education, counseling and behavior modification and long-term care. Continue reading >>

Nih Special Funding Program For Type 1 Diabetes Research Progress Report Summary

Nih Special Funding Program For Type 1 Diabetes Research Progress Report Summary

NIH Special Funding Program for Type 1 Diabetes Research Progress Report Summary Source: Special Statutory Funding Program for Type 1 Diabetes Research, Progress Report, June 2016. NIH. The United States government has set aside a budget each year since 2008 to support type 1 diabetes research, named the "Special Statutory Funding Program for Type 1 Diabetes Research." A progress report was released in June and key takeaways are summarized below. Congress established this program to spur research that would prevent, cure, manage, and reduce complications of type 1 diabetes. It is administered by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), in collaboration with multiple NIH Institutes and Centers, the CDC, and the US Department of Health and Human Services. The program addresses six long-term goals which are discussed in greater detail along with progress highlights by goal in the table below. A link to the full NIH report can be found at the bottom of this summary. $2.4 billion has been spent since program inception in 1998. While detailed, project-specific allocation information is not provided, the program shows a preference for funding large, multi-center projects, studies, and networks. Technology advances, such as the artificial pancreas and improved CGM devices, receive significant attention. There appears to be some importance attached to bringing solutions to market in the near term, but it does not appear to be a driving factor. Major areas of progress as noted in the NIH report: Blood Sugar Control Devices: Significant advances in the artificial pancreas (AP), insulin pumps, and CGM. AP is identified as being on a 'fast track' to FDA approval. Beta Cell Replacement: Advances in ability for large-scale laboratory production of Continue reading >>

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