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Processed Meat Diabetes

How To Reduce Your Risk Of Diabetes: Cut Back On Meat

How To Reduce Your Risk Of Diabetes: Cut Back On Meat

You probably know that eating too much sugar and fat increases your risk of getting type 2 diabetes . But research increasingly shows that a food you might not expect meat can dramatically raise your chances as well. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy Your body needs protein. But if you have diabetes or a risk of diabetes its wise to cut back onyour meat intake to improve your health. A recent study from the Journal of the American Medical Association examined the deaths of nearly 700,000 people in 2012 from heart disease, stroke and type 2diabetes. They found that nearly 50 percent of the deaths were related to poor nutritional choices . For people who already had diabetes, their risk of death increased if they consumed more processed meats. Another study released this spring from researchers in Finland analyzed the diets ofmore than 2,300 middle-aged men, ages 42 to 60. At the outset, none of the participants had type 2 diabetes. In the follow-up, after 19 years 432 participants did. Researchers found that those who ate more animal protein and less plant protein had a 35 percent greater risk of getting diabetes. This included any kind of meat processed and unprocessed red meat, white meats and variety meats, which include organ meats such as tongue or liver. The study concluded that choosing plant and egg proteins may help prevent type 2 diabetes. And a final study out of Harvard University found that people who ate a single serving of red meat each day had a 19 percent higher risk of getting type 2 diabetes than those who didnt. An even smaller-sized serving of processed red meat, such as one hot dog or two slices of bacon, in Continue reading >>

A Diabetes Link To Meat

A Diabetes Link To Meat

Right Now | Getting the Red out [extra:Extra] Read more about Harvard’s “Healthy Eating Plate.” Also: Red-meat consumption is already linked to higher levels of colorectal cancer and cardiovascular disease (atherosclerosis, heart disease, and stroke). Now researchers from Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) have added an increased risk of type 2 (adult onset) diabetes to that list. The incurable illness occurs when the body’s ability to control blood glucose levels by means of insulin secretion becomes impaired, either because of “insulin resistance” (when insulin fails to trigger effective glucose uptake by muscle or other tissues), or because production of insulin by beta cells in the pancreas declines. The HSPH investigators, led by professor of epidemiology Frank Hu and research fellow An Pan, analyzed data from three longitudinal studies of male and female healthcare professionals who were followed for 14 to 28 years. After adjusting for other risk factors, the researchers found that a daily serving of red meat no larger than a deck of cards increased the risk of adult-onset diabetes by 19 percent. Processed red meat proved much worse: a daily serving half that size—one hot dog, or two slices of bacon, for example—was associated with a 51 percent increase in risk. (The average 10-year risk of getting diabetes for U.S. adults is around 10 percent.) Why is red meat harmful? “Saturated fat, which can lead to cardiovascular disease, is really just the beginning of the story,” explains Hu. Even though it is “difficult to pinpoint one compound or ingredient” as mechanistically linked to diabetes risk, three components of red meat—sodium, nitrites, and iron—are probably involved. Sodium is well known to increase blood pressure, but it also c Continue reading >>

Effect Of Processed And Unprocessed Meats In Diabetes

Effect Of Processed And Unprocessed Meats In Diabetes

Can meat consumption increase glucose intolerance and insulin resistance? Obesity is a growing epidemic in the United States and is one of the major contributing factors for diseases such as diabetes. Managing obesity can be challenging and obtaining the benefits from dietary approaches can be difficult. Various factors affect these dietary approaches, including the content of each macronutrient. Macronutrients play an important role in normal metabolic functions of the body. Some diets focus on carbohydrate content, others on the amounts of fats or proteins. Each diet is different and each food group provides different nutritional value. Due to recent advances in food production, meat and sugars have become part of our everyday diets. The impact of sugars in diabetes patients is well-established; however, other food groups lack this evidence to highlight the impact they have in diabetes. Various studies have pointed to the fact that meat can greatly contribute to obesity and ultimately diabetes. For example, the SUN project followed 18,527 people for a mean of 8.84 years through questionnaires. In this study, Amelia Mari-Sanchis and colleagues sought to understand the effects of processed meats in healthy individuals and their risk of developing type 2 diabetes. After the follow-up period, a cox regression analysis adjusted for confounders highlighted the association between meat consumption and the incidence of type 2 diabetes. It was found that 146 patients who consumed more than three servings of meat per day significantly increased the risk of diabetes (HR 1.85; 95% CI 1.03-3.31; P<0.031). This research ultimately found that processed meats can predispose patients to develop diabetes secondary to obesity (noted as an increase in body mass index). Similarly, a recen Continue reading >>

Red Alert: Processed And Red Meat

Red Alert: Processed And Red Meat

Last year, the World Health Organization (WHO) gave its verdict on the cancer risks of red and processed meat, putting our meat-eating habits in the spotlight. With the evidence stacking up, what does this mean for meat eaters with diabetes? With the help of Cancer Research UK, we go behind the headlines to explain the facts. What’s the story? After assessing more than 800 studies, the WHO broke the news that processed meat is being classified a ‘definite’ cause of cancer, and red meat being a ‘probable’ cause. The headlines that resulted made many people wonder if red and processed meats should be avoided. The week after the news broke, supermarket sales of pre-packaged sausages fell 15.7 per cent and pre-packed bacon by 17 per cent, compared to 2014. But, although this latest announcement is significant, the link between certain types of meat and some forms of cancer – particularly bowel cancer – isn’t new: the evidence has been growing for decades, and is supported by thorough research. In fact, bowel cancer is more common among people who eat the most red and processed meat. Cancer Research UK has looked at what this announcement means and how red and processed meat affect your risk developing cancer. What is red and processed meat? Red meat is any meat that’s a dark red colour before it’s cooked – such as beef and lamb. Pork is also classed as a red meat. Processed meat is meat that’s been cured, salted, smoked, or otherwise preserved in some way (such as bacon, sausages, hot dogs, ham, salami, and pepperoni). However, this doesn’t include fresh burgers or mince – putting meat through a mincer doesn’t mean it becomes ‘processed’ unless it is modified further. Both of these types of meat are distinct from white meats (such as fresh Continue reading >>

Study Suggests Processed Meat A Real Health Risk

Study Suggests Processed Meat A Real Health Risk

Study suggests processed meat a real health risk CHICAGO (Reuters) - Eating bacon, sausage, hot dogs and other processed meats can raise the risk of heart disease and diabetes, U.S. researchers said on Monday in a study that identifies the real bad boys of the meat counter. Hot dogs are cooked in New York April 15, 2009. REUTERS/Eric Thayer Eating unprocessed beef, pork or lamb appeared not to raise risks of heart attacks and diabetes, they said, suggesting that salt and chemical preservatives may be the real cause of these two health problems associated with eating meat. The study, an analysis of other research called a meta-analysis, did not look at high blood pressure or cancer, which are also linked with high meat consumption. To lower risk of heart attacks and diabetes, people should consider which types of meats they are eating, said Renata Micha of the Harvard School of Public Health, whose study appears in the journal Circulation. Processed meats such as bacon, salami, sausages, hot dogs and processed deli meats may be the most important to avoid, Micha said in a statement. Based on her findings, she said people who eat one serving per week or less of processed meats have less of a risk. The American Meat Institute objected to the findings, saying it was only one study and that it stands in contrast to other studies and the U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans. At best, this hypothesis merits further study. It is certainly no reason for dietary changes, James Hodges, president of the American Meat Institute, said in a statement. Most dietary guidelines recommend eating less meat. Individual studies looking at relationships between eating meat and cardiovascular diseases and diabetes have had mixed results. But studies rarely look for differences in risk betwee Continue reading >>

Does Consuming Red Meat Increase Your Type 2 Diabetes Risk?

Does Consuming Red Meat Increase Your Type 2 Diabetes Risk?

We’ve always been told to make sure you eat your meat, especially red meat as it is chalk full of important vitamins and nutrients such as iron, B12, zinc and protein. But red meat is also full of other things that might not be as beneficial to us. You may be aware that too much red meat is high in saturated fat, which in turn raises your cholesterol. Higher levels of bad cholesterol (LDL) are associated with a higher risk of developing heart disease. But it was found during many research studies that a higher consumption of red meat can also lead to an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Across the world, type 2 diabetes is reaching epidemic levels, affecting almost 400 million from all over. In the United States, more than 21 million people have been diagnosed with another 8.1 million undiagnosed or unaware that they have type 2, as estimated by the CDC. The Data Doesn’t Lie Recent studies conducted by researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health have determined a link between consuming red meat in excess and the increase in incidences of Type 2 diabetes. The study found that those who are eating more red met, roughly 3 ½ servings or more each week, had an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 50% within the next four years. When you think about an increase by 50% this is substantial. The study’s co-author, Frank Hu, who is a professor of epidemiology and nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health stated this was “a really large and significant increase”. While these results are quite alarming, researchers did find that those who decreased their consumption of red meat, lowered this risk by 14% during their 10-year follow-up. Let’s take a deeper look into what this study truly has revealed. I advise reading the following: W Continue reading >>

Does Processed Meat Increase The Risk Of Diabetes?

Does Processed Meat Increase The Risk Of Diabetes?

Does Processed Meat Increase the Risk of Diabetes? This week we start out with a headline that may bring good news some time in the future for those of us with type 1 diabetes. We read with interest that a human test for the treatment of diabetes with leptin was announced by Dr. Roger Unger, who has been researching diabetes at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School. Leptin is a hormone that is linked to appetite, and in fact has been used to control weight. It is given with other medications to type 2 diabetics to control weight and blood glucose levels. People have thought that leptin might be of benefit for type 1 diabetes control, but Dr. Unger and his group was the first to show a relationship in animals. The author will use leptin delivered by an insulin pump after research that showed that diabetic mice thrived after this treatment. In their mouse studies, the mice were injected with just insulin, insulin and leptin, and only leptin. The found that the insulin and leptin and only leptin treatments lowered the fluctuation of blood glucose levels, as well as cholesterol levels, and the mice did not gain as much weight from fat as controls. The group asked to start human trials last year. Please remember that the road to our seeing this on the market is long and complicated. No one can estimate how this process will go, but we will continue to look for articles about the trials and bring them to you. Processed Meat Increases the Risk of Diabetes? Our next two headlines come from the American Heart Association's annual meeting on cardiovascular disease, epidemiology, and prevention in San Francisco. For years we have been told to limit the amount of red meats in our diets, as well as processed products which use preservatives like sausages, cold cuts, b Continue reading >>

Does Red Meat Cause Diabetes?

Does Red Meat Cause Diabetes?

Our body needs protein to build and repair bones, muscles, skin and blood. We also use protein to make enzymes, hormones and other body chemicals essential for proper body functioning. Red meat, poultry, seafood, eggs, dairy, beans and peas, soy products, nuts and seeds are considered part of the protein food group. Several studies[1],[2],[4] have suggested that eating too much red and processed meats can increase your risk of Type 2 diabetes. Red meat includes pork, beef, mutton and veal. Processed meats are meats that are preserved by curing, salting, smoking, drying or canning. Hot dogs, bacon, ham, sausages, corned beef and canned luncheon meat are examples of processed meats. ​ In one study,[3] researchers observed a group of middle-aged men and women for four years. They found that those who increased their red meat intake by half a serving a day had a 48 percent higher risk of developing Type 2 diabetes than if they had not changed their diet. Those who reduced their red meat intake, on the other hand, had a lower risk. Processed red meat is especially bad for your health[4]. It is believed that the preservatives, additives and chemicals (e.g. nitrites, nitrates) that are added to the meat during manufacturing can harm your pancreas (organ that produces insulin) and increase insulin resistance. As red meat is a source of saturated fat, cholesterol, animal protein and haem-iron (iron containing substance), scientists suspect these substances in red meat may also contribute to the increased diabetes risk. How and why this is so is still unclear. Some think that iron overload in the body can promote insulin resistance and raise blood glucose levels. Related: Let's Talk Turkey What Can I Do to Prevent Diabetes? Eat a Variety of Healthy Protein-rich Foods. Add varie Continue reading >>

Processed Meats | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Processed Meats | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community is ham, chicken, chorizo ok on LCHF diet or not? bit confused My personal preference is to keep processed meats to a minimum - any colour, any meat, especially those low quality ones which are basically mushed up shreds of gloop stuck together with chemicals. Luncheon meat. Cheap frankfurters. Cheap chicken and pork where the slices are a uniform pink or white. That kind of thing. But I don't include good quality products in that. Some ham, chicken and chorizo are excellent quality (usually reflected in the price), and while I might not eat chorizo every day, I don't have a problem enjoying it occasionally. The name LCHF refers to the low carb, and the high fat parts, and doesn't mention protein at all, so we can follow LCHF and be vegan, or eat whatever kind of meat we prefer, and still keep to the spirit of the LC and the HFness. I've started to watch my salt intake BC of blood pressure problems and find that processed meats are incredibly salty. Many are also implicated in cancer studies where they contain nitrates etc. Think like most things moderation is the way to go. douglas99 I reversed my Type 2 Well-Known Member is ham, chicken, chorizo ok on LCHF diet or not? bit confused Processed meats aren't good, and you can include bacon in that. Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) Well-Known Member I like bacon but I defrost it in hot water - separating the rashers and leaving it to simmer for a minute or so. It takes out the salt, and it must remove the soluble preservatives too, the nitrates and nitrites. I sieve it out, pouring the water down the sink and then tip it back into the pan and cook as usual. I eat some processed deli turkey and chicken slic Continue reading >>

Processed Meats And Type 2 Diabetes Risk| American Institute For Cancer Research (aicr)

Processed Meats And Type 2 Diabetes Risk| American Institute For Cancer Research (aicr)

Q: I know sausage and hot dogs are linked with colon cancer risk. Is it true that theyre linked with risk of diabetes, too? A: Yes, several large population studies now link greater consumption of processed meats with increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Processed meats are those that are salted, cured or smoked, or contain preservatives (such as nitrite- or nitrate-based products). Common examples of processed meat in the United States are bacon, sausage, hot dogs, canned meats and ham. Risk of type 2 diabetes increases with overweight, so processed meats that are high in calories could explain part of the link to diabetes risk. However, even after adjusting for weight and some other aspects of eating habits, people who consume the most processed meat show from 20 to over 60 percent greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes compared to those who ate the least. That translates to about a 20 to 30 percent increase in risk for each 2-ounce daily serving, equal to about one regular hot dog. Researchers say that nitrosamine compounds that form within our gut from nitrite-based preservatives may not only increase cancer risk, they may also damage the cells of the pancreas responsible for producing insulin. Many processed meats are high in saturated fat, which is linked with development of insulin resistance, meaning insulin is less effective in controlling blood sugar. Another potential explanation for the diabetes link involves formation of compounds called Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs) that happens during processing and in home or restaurant cooking. AGEs seem to increase low-grade inflammation and oxidative stress and may promote insulin resistance, all together producing a metabolic environment that can lead to type 2 diabetes. At some point, research may clarify Continue reading >>

Red Meat, Processed Meat Linked To Diabetes Risk

Red Meat, Processed Meat Linked To Diabetes Risk

Red Meat, Processed Meat Linked to Diabetes Risk Red Meat, Bacon, Hot Dogs May Increase Risk for Type 2 Diabetes Aug. 9, 2011 -- Red meat, particularly processed red meats like bacon, sausage, and hot dogs, may increase a persons risk of developing type 2 diabetes . The more processed or unprocessed red meat a person eats, the greater the risk, according to a new study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition . Type 2 diabetes is linked with obesity . It occurs when they body does not produce enough of the hormone insulin , or the cells do not use insulin properly. Insulin helps the body use glucose or blood sugar for energy. When blood sugar remains elevated with diabetes , complications such as heart disease , blindness, and nerve and kidney damage can occur. In the study, participants who ate one 3.5-ounce serving of non-processed red meat a day, such as steak or hamburger, were almost 20% more likely to develop type 2 diabetes . Those who ate half of this amount of processed meat, such as two slices of bacon or one hot dog, had a 51% increased risk for developing diabetes . The amount is not huge, but the risk is pretty high, says Frank B. Hu, MD, PhD, a professor of nutrition and epidemiology at Harvard School of Public Health in Boston. Regular consumption of red meat, especially processed, is associated with an increased risk for type 2 diabetes. The findings are important given the rising epidemic of diabetes and the increasing consumption of red meat. But an industry group disputes the findings of the study. "A significant body of research shows lean beef plays a beneficial role in a healthy diet, including reducing type 2 diabetes [and] there is simply nothing in this recent Harvard study that should change how people enjoy nutrient-rich beef as part of Continue reading >>

Red And Processed Meat Consumption And Risk Of Incident Coronary Heart Disease, Stroke, And Diabetes Mellitus. A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

Red And Processed Meat Consumption And Risk Of Incident Coronary Heart Disease, Stroke, And Diabetes Mellitus. A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

Journal of the American Heart Association Red and Processed Meat Consumption and Risk of Incident Coronary Heart Disease, Stroke, and Diabetes Mellitus. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Renata Micha, Sarah K. Wallace, Dariush Mozaffarian Red and Processed Meat Consumption and Risk of Incident Coronary Heart Disease, Stroke, and Diabetes Mellitus. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Renata Micha, Sarah K. Wallace and Dariush Mozaffarian Circulation. 2010;, originally published May 17, 2010 Log in to Email Alerts with your email address. Thank you for your interest in spreading the word on Circulation. NOTE: We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it, and that it is not junk mail. We do not capture any email address. Enter multiple addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas. (Your Name) has sent you a message from Circulation (Your Name) thought you would like to see the Circulation web site. Red and Processed Meat Consumption and Risk of Incident Coronary Heart Disease, Stroke, and Diabetes Mellitus. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Renata Micha, Sarah K. Wallace and Dariush Mozaffarian Circulation. 2010;, originally published May 17, 2010 Continue reading >>

Eating Processed Meat Every Day Could Up Diabetes Risk

Eating Processed Meat Every Day Could Up Diabetes Risk

Tap here to turn on desktop notifications to get the news sent straight to you. 08/10/2011 05:53 pm ETUpdatedDec 06, 2017 Eating Processed Meat Every Day Could Up Diabetes Risk Those steaks and sausages may be wreaking havoc on your body's ability to produce and use insulin properly, a new study suggests. A new study conducted by Harvard researchers shows that people who eat one 3.5-ounce serving of processed meat -- equivalent to two slices of bacon, or a hot dog -- every day have a 51 percent increased risk of Type 2 diabetes. And people who eat one 100-gram serving of red, unprocessed meat -- the size of a deck of cards -- a day have a 19 percent increased risk of Type 2 diabetes, according to the study. Type 2 diabetes affects more than 25 million people in the U.S., and occurs when the body is unable to produce enough or use the hormone insulin, which is necessary in order for the body to use blood sugar for energy. As a result, the blood contains high levels of sugar. The disease is linked with obesity, and can lead to kidney damage, blindness, stroke and heart disease, according to the National Institutes of Health. Researchers examined the health and diet data of about 37,000 men for 20 years and 80,000 women for 28 years, who were part of large, separate studies. They also combined the data from those studies with data from past studies that included nearly 445,000 people, 28,000 of whom developed Type 2 diabetes. "The findings are important given the rising epidemic of diabetes and the increasing consumption of red meat," study researcher Dr. Frank B. Hu, M.D., Ph.D., a professor of nutrition and epidemiology at Harvard, told WebMD. Processed meat might have this effect on diabetes risk because of its high levels of nitrate preservatives, which could in turn Continue reading >>

Red And Processed Meat Consumption And Risk Of Incident Coronary Heart Disease, Stroke, And Diabetes: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

Red And Processed Meat Consumption And Risk Of Incident Coronary Heart Disease, Stroke, And Diabetes: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

Red and processed meat consumption and risk of incident coronary heart disease, stroke, and diabetes: A systematic review and meta-analysis Renata Micha , RD, PhD, Sarah K. Wallace , BA, and Dariush Mozaffarian , MD, DrPH Department of Epidemiology (RM, SKW, DM), Harvard School of Public Health; Division of Cardiovascular Medicine and Channing Laboratory (DM), Department of Medicine, Brigham and Womens Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA Corresponding author: Renata Micha, R.D., Ph.D., 677 Huntington Ave Bldg 3-913, Boston, MA 02115, Phone: 617-432-7518, Fax: 617-566-7805, [email protected] The publisher's final edited version of this article is available free at Circulation See other articles in PMC that cite the published article. Meat consumption is inconsistently associated with development of coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, and diabetes, limiting quantitative recommendations for consumption levels. Effects of meat intake on these different outcomes, and of red vs. processed meat, may also vary. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of evidence for relationships of red, processed, and total meat consumption with incident CHD, stroke, and diabetes. We searched for any cohort, case-control study or randomized trial that assessed these exposures and outcomes in generally healthy adults. Of 1,598 identified abstracts, 20 studies met inclusion criteria, including 17 prospective cohorts and 3 case-control studies. All data were abstracted independently in duplicate. Random-effects generalized least squares models for trend estimation were used to derive pooled dose-response estimates. The 20 studies included 1,218,380 individuals and 23,889 CHD, 2,280 stroke, and 10,797 diabetes cases. Red meat intake was not associated with CHD (n=4 Continue reading >>

The Truth About Red Meat And Diabetes

The Truth About Red Meat And Diabetes

Not all red meat is created equal – some isn’t even good enough to even be considered food. Yet when a news article talks about red meat being bad for you, you can bet the author (or the study behind the news) failed to distinguish between processed meat and unprocessed meat, as well as overcooked meat and properly cooked meat. That’s not even considering grass-fed meat vs. industrial meat, which I’ve blogged about extensively. “Red-meat-is-bad” articles don’t always deserve a rebuttal because *most* red meat actually is bad for you. However, it’s a major mistake to say all red meat is bad for you. This post serves to confront misleading headlines about red meat and diabetes risk. Let’s ask a few questions, see what the science actually says, and talk about the Bulletproof recommendations. Processed meats like hot dogs, bologna, deli meats etc. contain high omega-6’s, often have mold toxins called mycotoxins, and nitrates that can combine with bad gut bacteria. All of these can be correlated with an increased risk of diabetes. Instead, insist on eating grass fed, low toxin meat to promote good health and optimize performance. Research Doesn’t Distinguish Between Processed Red Meat and Unprocessed Red Meat When articles suggest red meat causes chronic diseases like diabetes, you would expect a high degree of specificity and accuracy. Unfortunately all you get are alarming headlines and half-truths. When you see blog posts like “Hot Dogs, Bacon and Red Meat Tied to Increased Diabetes Risk,” you should ask yourself how the authors justify lumping hot dogs (a blend of soy, wheat, MSG, and cast off animal parts) in with meat and what the study design looked like. Of course, the recent news about diabetes referenced a study that did not distinguish h Continue reading >>

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