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Probiotics Diabetes Type 2

Could A Probiotic Pill Cure Diabetes?

Could A Probiotic Pill Cure Diabetes?

More than 29 million people in the US have diabetes, and it is the seventh-leading cause of death in the country. But could a cure be on the horizon? According to researchers from Cornell University in Ithaca, NY, it could - in the form of a probiotic pill. In a proof-of-principle study published in the journal Diabetes, senior author John March and colleagues from Cornell reveal how they were able to reduce blood glucose levels in diabetic rats using a common bacteria found in the human gut. Diabetes is a condition in which the pancreas is either unable to produce enough of the hormone insulin, the body's cells do not effectively respond to the hormone, or both. As a result, blood glucose levels rise higher than normal - known as hyperglycemia. This can cause a number of complications, including stroke, heart disease and nerve damage. Diabetes prevalence has risen in the US in recent years, increasing from 25.8 million people affected in 2010 to 29.1 million in 2012. But with the findings of their study, March and colleagues say they may be one step closer to a cure for the condition. The researchers engineered a common strain of "friendly" human gut bacteria called Lactobacillus to secrete Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) - a hormone that releases insulin in response to food. Lactobacillus is a probiotic often used to prevent and treat diarrhea, as well as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), Crohn's disease and some skin disorders. Engineered probiotic reduced blood glucose levels by up to 30% Each day for 90 days, the team orally administered the modified probiotic to a group of diabetic rats. They monitored its effects on blood glucose levels, comparing the outcomes with diabetic rats that did not receive it. At the end of the 90 days, the researchers found the rats that Continue reading >>

Probiotics And Diabetes: Can Probiotics Help?

Probiotics And Diabetes: Can Probiotics Help?

The word “bacteria” is enough to make most people cringe. And the knowledge that there are about 39 trillion bacteria in the human body can seem horrifying (there are more bacteria in the body than there are cells!). Yes, there are the bad, harmful bacteria that can cause disease and illness. But there are also the helpful, good bacteria that research increasingly indicates play a role in health promotion and disease prevention. Microbiome 101 We all have bacteria in our digestive tract. While it’s unpleasant to think about, the reality is that they’re there to stay. The collection of bacteria, fungi, viruses, and parasites (called microorganisms) in our gut is called the microbiome. Some are potentially harmful, but many of them are the good guys with the potential to help fight off illness and chronic disease. Everyone’s microbiome is unique; in other words, no two people have the same microbiome. That’s because the microbiota is determined, initially, by your DNA. When you’re born, you’re exposed to your mother’s microorganisms during delivery, and, if you’re breastfed, through your mother’s breast milk. Over time, the environment and your diet influence the type of microorganisms. For example, people who eat foods of animal origin have a very different microbiome (or gut flora) than those who eat plant-based foods. Research has shown that people who eat a typical American diet have less diverse microbiota than those eating a plant-based diet. The more diversity you have in your gut, the more likely you are to have better digestion, nutrient absorption, and a healthy immune system. Other factors affect it as well, including antibiotics (which tend to wipe out the good bacteria along with the bad) and illness. An imbalance of bacteria is thought Continue reading >>

Surprising Benefits Of Probiotics And Prebiotics For Diabetes

Surprising Benefits Of Probiotics And Prebiotics For Diabetes

For holistic practitioners, the gut has always been central to health. In naturopathic medicine, for example, student physicians have long been taught to heal gut first—that health simply cannot be achieved without a healthy digestive system that can take in nutrients, digest them, absorb them and then eliminate the waste. One of the first aspects of digestive health that is commonly addressed is the health of the microbiome—the collection of bacteria that live in our guts in a symbiotic and mutualistic relationship with us. Symbiotic mutualism is the phrase used to describe the mutually beneficial relationship between these gut bacteria and us. Many people are surprised to learn that there are more bacteria in our bodies than our own human cells–some estimates suggest that there are 10 times as many bacterial cells in our body than our own cells! The microbiome affects overall health, weight and can significantly affect the risk of diseases such as heart disease, cancer, mental health, diabetes, obesity, stroke and other conditions., There are over 1000 different species of bacteria in the healthy microbiome. In general, the more diversity that exists in the microbiome, the better it is for our health. The bacteria in our guts produce or help to produce vitamins, neurotransmitters such as serotonin that can affect mood and are critically important in training or educating out immune systems to respond to dangerous pathologic bacteria, viruses and other infectious organisms.[1] To give just one example regarding the importance of the microbiome, when scientists transfer gut bacteria from thin, lean mice to the guts of obese mice, those obese mice begin to lose weight and over time, resemble the lean mice![2] The Microbiome and Diabetes A dysfunctional gut microbio Continue reading >>

Probiotics For Diabetics

Probiotics For Diabetics

Probiotics are friendly bacteria that are found in foods such as yogurt and in pill supplements and are important for good health. In recent research, probiotics have proven to be important to type 1 and type 2 diabetics. The hope is that using probiotics to alter the type of bacteria in the gut may prevent Type 1 diabetes, and that probiotics may one day be a part of the treatment strategy for Type 2 diabetics. Video of the Day Probiotics are live, active bacteria that are also referred to as cultures. In your digestive tract there is a layer of healthy bacteria. Gut or intestinal flora are healthy bacteria that contribute to colon health and the health of your whole body, says AskDrSears.com. Two of the most common strains include Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium. Probiotics promote healthy digestion by making your digestive tract a more acidic environment, thus discouraging harmful bacteria that cause stomach upset. Type 1 Diabetes Probiotics have important applications for both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Researchers at the University of Florida reported in May 2011 that probiotics can prevent or delay the onset of Type 1 diabetes. Your gut is your body's largest immune system, and taking probiotics is a way of fighting off illness and autoimmune diseases such as Type 1 diabetes. The gut flora in Type 2 diabetics may be different from people without diabetes. So say the authors of a report published in Feb. 2010 by "PLoS One," who suggest there is a link between metabolic diseases and the composition of bacterial populations in the intestines. In addition, the report notes that the balance of some bacteria is highly dependent on blood sugar levels. They suggest that gut bacteria should be factored into strategies to control diabetes. Probiotics may help prevent and Continue reading >>

The Health Benefits Of Probiotics For Diabetics

The Health Benefits Of Probiotics For Diabetics

OK, so there I was researching some information the other day for a particular blog post, and I came across an article pertaining to probiotics. The fact that I’m not great at multi-tasking, I was immediately sidetracked and became submerged in the world of probiotics and all their amazing health benefits. So what are these little gems all about? How do we go about getting them in our diet? What about other alternatives to increasing the amount that we get? Let’s take a closer look! Well, first off, what are probiotics? Probiotics are microorganisms—such as bacteria, viruses, and yeasts—that can be seen only under a microscope and that are often referred to as “healthy” or “good” bacteria. According to the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) and defined by the World Health Organization, probiotics are “live microorganisms, which, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host.” The benefits of incorporating probiotics into one’s diet have been widely speculated, as little evidence exists to support the long-term health benefits. Despite the lack of formal evidence, the probiotic trend has swept the health and diet industries for their potential cleansing benefits, immune boosting powers, and nutritional value. Benefits of Probiotics Probiotics are believed to protect us in two ways. The first is the role is how probiotics play in our digestive tract. We know that our digestive tract needs a healthy balance between the good and bad bacteria, so what gets in the way of this? It looks like our lifestyle is both the problem and the solution. Foods high in probiotics (Kombucha, Kefir, pickles, tempeh, just to name a few) are an amazing way to start getting more into your system, but poor food ch Continue reading >>

Probiotics Have Adjunctive Role In Diabetes Care

Probiotics Have Adjunctive Role In Diabetes Care

Nearly a decade ago, microbiome researchers began publishing reports suggesting that bacteria in the intestines play a role in glucose metabolism. Recent studies support that thesis, and provide a basis for use of probiotics as adjunctive treatments for people with type 2 diabetes. The notion that microflora can affect insulin sensitivity has its roots in a landmark study by Nadja Larsen and colleagues at the University of Copenhagen. The Danish team showed that people with T2D have striking compositional changes in their intestinal flora compared to non-diabetic subjects. Moreover, they found that the ratio of Bacteroidetes (“bad” bacteria) to Firmicutes (“good” bacteria) significantly correlated with reduced glucose tolerance (Larsen N, et al. PLoS One. 2010 Feb 5;5(2):e9085). Since then, many groups have explored the use of probiotic supplements to alter the microbial ecosystem to improve insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism. A number of these studies are turning up positive findings. Small, Meaningful Changes In a study published in late 2016, 46 patients with type 2 diabetes who were already on insulin therapy were randomly assigned to receive low-dose or high-dose Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 supplements, or a placebo for 12 weeks. The low-dose probiotic regimen provided 108 colony-forming units (CFU) per day; the high-dose preparation contained 1010 CFU. The patients took the probiotics in addition to standard insulin treatments. At the end of the study, those on the highest dose of L.reuteri had increases in insulin sensitivity index (ISI) scores, as well as higher serum levels of deoxycholic acid (DCA)—a secondary bile acid--compared with baseline measures. No such changes were seen in the patients on the placebo or the low-dose probiotic. Th Continue reading >>

Probiotics And Diabetes: What Amazing New Research Reveals

Probiotics And Diabetes: What Amazing New Research Reveals

Diabetes is a dietary and digestive disorder. Clearly, it’s about elevated blood sugar levels. But hey, it’s also more than that. The food we eat feeds the bacteria in our gut. Eat too many carbs/processed foods and you feed the wrong bacteria. Often, diabetics get the disease by doing exactly that. Too much sugar simply translates into the overgrowth of bad bacteria (like yeast). So, it comes as no surprise that probiotics (good gut bacteria) and diabetes are closely linked. Direct Impact Of Probiotics On Diabetes Probiotics play a huge role in digestion. Many of us are ignorant about the importance and benefits of probiotics. Probiotics, or good gut bacteria, should ideally comprise at least 80% of the total gut bacteria. If you are diabetic, adding probiotics, as either food or supplements, can change things dramatically. Of course, you also need to eat the right diet to feed the right bacteria after that. Some of the best probiotics for diabetics modify disturbances in their metabolisms positively. There is strong scientific evidence supporting the fact that consuming probiotics helps decrease the serum cholesterol level and improves insulin sensitivity. RELATED: Meditation And Type 2 Diabetes Probiotics and Diabetes: The Science Behind It How does probiotics help diabetics? Probiotics are live microorganisms which, when administered in correct dosages and form, give you a ton of health benefits. Probiotic supplements have been proven to have positive effects on cardio-metabolic parameters in patients with Type 2 Diabetes. According to research conducted at Loughborough University, probiotics prevent insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is often caused by consuming foods that contain trans fats for a long time. The study found that a high trans-fat and process Continue reading >>

Probiotics For The Management Of Diabetes

Probiotics For The Management Of Diabetes

Can probiotics improve A1c’s, plus much more? Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease caused by insulin resistance and subsequent decline in peripheral glucose uptake. Obesity, sedentary lifestyle, and unhealthy behaviors are the most common risk factors of T2DM. It was estimated that diabetes prevalence was 4% in 2010 and was expected to reach 5.4% by 2025. The problem of T2DM is predicted to double in the near future. T2DM leads to serious complications such as nervous system disorders, kidney diseases, and eye problems; thus prevention and treatment should be considered a priority. For centuries, one of the most effective methods of maintaining the balance of intestinal microbiome was the use of probiotics, defined as live microorganisms which, when administered in sufficient amounts, confer health benefit on the host. Products containing probiotic bacteria have been increasingly utilized to prevent or treat numerous disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, and chronic idiopathic constipation, obesity, allergic and pulmonary disease, and various types of diarrhea. It has been suggested that probiotics may positively modify metabolic disturbance. There are evidence that probiotic ingestion or supplementation might decrease serum cholesterol level and improve insulin sensitivity. Some studies have evaluated the positive health effects of probiotic dairy products. The purpose of this study is to assess probiotics for the management of diabetes: the ability of probiotics to modify cardio metabolic risk factors in type 2 diabetic subjects. It was performed according to PRISMA guidelines. Randomized controlled trials were used in adults with T2DM. The outcomes of interest were fasting plasma glucose (FPG), insulin concentration, insul Continue reading >>

I Have Diabetes. Can I Take Friendly Bacteria?

I Have Diabetes. Can I Take Friendly Bacteria?

Maybe this is a question you are used to hearing from your diabetic customers. No evidence exists to suggest that people with diabetes should not take probiotics. Diabetes is an autoimmune disease that compromises the body's production of insulin. Type 1 diabetes (insulin-dependent diabetes) usually occurs in younger individuals, and makes up less than 15% of all cases of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes (insulin-resistant diabetes) is much more common, and tends to affect people over the age of 30. Research into probiotics and their effects on patients with diabetes remains relatively sparse. Many people believe that probiotics can be beneficial for diabetics, as probiotic bacteria can improve immunity and should therefore help to correct autoimmune diseases such as diabetes. Furthermore some evidence suggests that the use of probiotics may lower the risk of contracting diabetes in the first instance, by supporting immunity and helping the body to maintain a healthy weight. Research on probiotics and Type 2 diabetes suggests that probiotics can help weight control in patients who are insulin-resistant. There is very little research into Type 1 diabetes and probiotics, but no evidence exists to suggest that probiotics should not be taken. Although we don’t add sugar as a sweetener to any of our products, diabetics should also note that a small amount of fructose is present in ‘Bifidobacteria & fibre’ (formerly known as ‘For maintaining regularity’). There is just 1.6g of fructose in each sachet (by comparison, an average apple has about 10g of fructose), but diabetics may need to factor this into their daily intake of carbohydrate, especially if taking multiple sachets each day. The fructose is present to ensure an even distribution of the bacteria and prebiotic fibr Continue reading >>

Effect Of Probiotic On Insulin Resistance In Type 2 Diabetes Patients

Effect Of Probiotic On Insulin Resistance In Type 2 Diabetes Patients

You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Effect of Probiotic on Insulin Resistance in Type 2 Diabetes Patients The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03434860 Information provided by (Responsible Party): Nazarii Kobyliak, Bogomolets National Medical University Study Description Study Design Arms and Interventions Outcome Measures Eligibility Criteria Contacts and Locations More Information Probiotics have beneficial effect on obesity related disorders in animal models. Despite a large number of animal data, randomized placebo-controlled trials (RCT) concluded that probiotics have a moderate effect on glycemic control-related parameters. However, effect of probiotics on insulin resistance are inconsistent. In this double-blind single center RCT, effect of alive multistrain probiotic vs. placebo on insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes patient will be assessed. Type2 Diabetes Insulin Resistance Probiotic Dietary Supplement: probiotic Dietary Supplement: placebo In this single-center double blind, placebo controlled, parallel group study, type 2 diabetes patients from the Kyiv City Clinical Endocrinology Center will be selected. They will be randomly assigned to receive multiprobiotic "Symbiter" or placebo for 8-weeks administered as a sachet formulation in double-blind treatment. Randomization will be done by the study statistician based on a computer-generated list. The groups will be homogeneous according to age, sex and diagnostic criteria. The assignment of groups will be blin Continue reading >>

Both Types Of Diabetes Could Be Cured By A Daily Probiotic Pill That 'rewires' The Body, Scientists Claim

Both Types Of Diabetes Could Be Cured By A Daily Probiotic Pill That 'rewires' The Body, Scientists Claim

A simple probiotic pill that 'rewires' the body could cure both types of diabetes, scientists claim. The new drug, which contains live bacteria from the human gut, has been shown to drastically lower blood sugar levels. The pancreas is the organ which controls glucose levels in the body in healthy individuals. But scientists at Cornell University in New York discovered a protein secreted from a human probiotic could shift that control from the pancreas to the upper intestine. Scroll down for video The breakthrough, which relies on 'rewiring' the body, could, the Cornell team hope, pave the way for a cure for both type 1 and 2 diabetes. Professor John March, who led the new research, said their findings are a 'proof of principle' which could prove the first step to developing a cure. He told the Express: 'If it works really well in people, it could be that they just take the pill and wouldn't have to do anything else to control their diabetes. 'It's likely, though, that it will be used in conjunction with some other treatment.' Diabetes is a life-long health condition where there is too much glucose in the blood because the body cannot use it properly. The pancreas of a diabetes sufferer is unable to produce any insulin, or not enough. It can also be the case the insulin produced is unable to work properly. Insulin is essential to the body, acting as the key that unlocks the door to the body's cells so glucose can enter and provide energy. With diabetes, the body is unable to use glucose as fuel and instead glucose builds up in the blood. Professor March's team engineered a strain of lactobacillus, a human probiotic commonly found in the gut, to secrete a peptide - a hormone that releases insulin in response to food entering the body. The scientists then gave a group of Continue reading >>

Review Effect Of Probiotics On Glucose Metabolism In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Meta-analysis Of Randomized Controlled Trials

Review Effect Of Probiotics On Glucose Metabolism In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Meta-analysis Of Randomized Controlled Trials

Abstract Our aim was to investigate the effects of probiotics on glucose metabolism in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus using a meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials. Online databases Embase, Web of Science, and PubMed were searched until August 2014 to identify eligible articles. Finally, 7 trials were included. Probiotic consumption significantly changed fasting plasma glucose (FPG) by −15.92 mg/dL (95% confidence interval [CI], −29.75 to −2.09) and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) by −0.54% (95% CI, −0.82 to −0.25) compared with control groups. Subgroup analysis was conducted to trials with non-yogurts control. Meta-analysis of trials with multiple species of probiotics found a significant reduction in FPG (weighted mean difference [WMD]: −35.41 mg/dL, 95% CI: −51.98 to −18.89). The duration of intervention for ≥8 weeks resulted in a significant reduction in FPG (WMD: −20.34 mg/dL, 95% CI: −35.92 to −4.76). Subgroup analysis of trials with species of probiotics did not result in a significant meta-analysis effect. Furthermore, the duration of intervention <8 weeks did not result in a significant reduction in FPG. The results also showed that probiotic therapy significantly decreased homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and insulin concentration (WMD: −1.08, 95% CI: −1.88 to −0.28; and WMD: −1.35 mIU/L, 95% CI: −2.38 to −0.31, respectively). The present meta-analysis suggests that consuming probiotics may improve glucose metabolism by a modest degree, with a potentially greater effect when the duration of intervention is ≥8 weeks, or multiple species of probiotics are consumed. Continue reading >>

Effectiveness Of Probiotics In Type 2 Diabetes: A Meta-analysis.

Effectiveness Of Probiotics In Type 2 Diabetes: A Meta-analysis.

Effectiveness of probiotics in type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis. Pol Arch Med Wewn. 2015;125(11):803-13. Epub 2015 Oct 2. INTRODUCTION: An increasing number of studies suggest that the use of probiotics may have a beneficial effect in patients with type 2 diabetes. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to assess the ability of probiotics to modify selected cardiometabolic risk factors in subjects with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, and Scopus databases were thoroughly reviewed up to January 2015 to search for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that examined the effect of probiotics on selected modifiable cardiometabolic parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes. The following endpoints were considered: fasting plasma glucose (FPG), insulin concentration, insulin resistance, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), as well as the levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density and high-density lipoprotein cholesterols, and C-reactive protein (CRP). A total of 571 RCTs were initially identified, of which 8 trials with 438 individuals were selected for meta-analysis. The effects of probiotics were calculated for each parameter. RESULTS: The meta-analysis showed a significant effect of probiotics on reducing HbA1c levels (standardized mean difference [SMD], -0.81; confidence interval [CI], -1.33 to -0.29, P = 0.0023; I2 = 68.44%; P = 0.0421 for heterogeneity) and HOMA-IR (SMD, -2.10; CI -3.00 to -1.20, P <0.001; I2 = 82.91%; P = 0.0029 for heterogeneity). Supplementation with probiotics did not have a significant effect on FPG, insulin, and CRP levels as well as the lipid profile. CONCLUSIONS: Our meta-analysis suggests that probiotic supplementation might improve, at least to some extent, metabolic control in subjects with type 2 diabetes. However, l Continue reading >>

Probiotics Can Help You Normalize Glucose Levels

Probiotics Can Help You Normalize Glucose Levels

When it comes to regulating blood sugar in the body, we instinctively think of the foods we’re eating and how they can help keep us on track. While it’s true that dietary changes are one of the first actions taken when looking to maintain healthy blood glucose and feel healthier, intriguing research is asserting that taking probiotics can also help keep blood sugar levels in check. A world beneath the microscope To understand how good bacteria influences glucose levels and benefits you in numerous other ways, you must first look at where the bacteria resides: your microbiome. Home to trillions of bacteria, your microbiome hosts the delicate balance of microorganisms that comprise 90% of your body. And a great majority of these microbes live within the gut environment. The intestinal tract contains a vast array of metabolites that are naturally produced by your resident gut microbes. Metabolites are little molecules from our bacteria that interact with the cells in your body, and their job is to detect and send chemical messages to your other organs to keep you functioning healthfully. It’s quite the intricate communication system! The bacteria that live within your gut produce proteins that have an assertive influence on these chemical detectors. When the gut microbiome is out of balance, your microbes might not be optimally collaborating with your cells - which can cause all sorts of issues, including the fluctuation of glucose levels and energy homeostasis. What causes our microbiomes to be thrown off-kilter? Factors like age, chronic stress, a diet high in processed foods, exposure to antibiotics, and excessive hygiene practices in our western culture can deplete our good flora, creating a microbial imbalance in our gut. Often, if the good bacteria are wiped ou Continue reading >>

Probiotic Reduces Bacterial Translocation In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomised Controlled Study

Probiotic Reduces Bacterial Translocation In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomised Controlled Study

Gut bacterial translocation to the blood may play an important role in the development of insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. Here, we performed an interventional randomised control study to investigate whether probiotics could reduce bacterial translocation and cause changes in the gut microbiota. Seventy Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes were randomised to two groups: the probiotic group drank Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota-fermented milk, while the control group ingested no probiotics. The trial was conducted for 16 weeks. At baseline, 8 and 16 weeks, the gut microbiota composition in feces and blood, fecal organic acids, and other biochemical parameters were measured. At the end of the study, the fecal counts of the Clostridium coccoides group and Clostridium leptum subgroup in the probiotic group were significantly higher than in the control group. As expected, the fecal counts of total Lactobacillus were significantly higher in the probiotic group. Intriguingly, the total count of blood bacteria was significantly lower in the probiotic group. However, fecal organic acids were comparable between the two groups. Our results showed that probiotic administration reduced bacterial translocation and altered the gut microbiota in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Over the past decades, the incidence of diabetes has increased worldwide1. A great change in dietary habits characterized by an increased intake of fat is considered to be responsible for the dramatic rise in metabolic diseases2. In this situation, the gut microbiota is a great topic in the research of this field. Short-chain fatty acids formed from the fermentation of dietary fiber by the gut microbiota have been found to be associated with incretin secretion3, intestinal gluconeogene Continue reading >>

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