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Prevention Of Diabetes Type 2

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

Perhaps you have learned that you have a high chance of developing type 2 diabetes, the most common type of diabetes. You might be overweight or have a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes. Maybe you had gestational diabetes, which is diabetes that develops during pregnancy. These are just a few examples of factors that can raise your chances of developing type 2 diabetes. Diabetes can cause serious health problems, such as heart disease, stroke, and eye and foot problems. Prediabetes also can cause health problems. The good news is that type 2 diabetes can be delayed or even prevented. The longer you have diabetes, the more likely you are to develop health problems, so delaying diabetes by even a few years will benefit your health. You can help prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by losing a modest amount of weight by following a reduced-calorie eating plan and being physically active most days of the week. Ask your doctor if you should take the diabetes drug metformin to help prevent or delay type 2 diabetes.1 How can I lower my chances of developing type 2 diabetes? Research such as the Diabetes Prevention Program shows that you can do a lot to reduce your chances of developing type 2 diabetes. Here are some things you can change to lower your risk: Lose weight and keep it off. You may be able to prevent or delay diabetes by losing 5 to 7 percent of your starting weight.1 For instance, if you weigh 200 pounds, your goal would be to lose about 10 to 14 pounds. Move more. Get at least 30 minutes of physical activity 5 days a week. If you have not been active, talk with your health care professional about which activities are best. Start slowly to build up to your goal. Eat healthy foods most of the time. Eat smaller portions to reduce the amount of calories you Continue reading >>

10 Tips To Help Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

10 Tips To Help Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

You can help reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes by understanding your risk and making changes to your lifestyle. Common risk factors include increased weight, blood pressure, cholesterol and triglyceride (blood fat) levels. Changing the habits of a lifetime isn’t easy, but it’s worth the effort. Here are some tips to help you reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes. Check your risk of diabetes. Take the Life! risk assessment test and learn more about your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. A 12+ score indicates that you are at high risk and may be eligible for the Life! program - a free Victorian lifestyle modification program that helps you reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, or call 13 RISK (13 7475). Manage your weight. Excess body fat, particularly if stored around the abdomen, can increase the body’s resistance to the hormone insulin. This can lead to type 2 diabetes. Exercise regularly. Moderate physical activity on most days of the week helps manage weight, reduce blood glucose levels and may also improve blood pressure and cholesterol. Eat a balanced, healthy diet. Reduce the amount of fat in your diet, especially saturated and trans fats. Eat more fruit, vegetables and high-fibre foods. Cut back on salt. Limit takeaway and processed foods. ‘Convenience meals’ are usually high in salt, fat and kilojoules. It’s best to cook for yourself using fresh ingredients whenever possible. Limit your alcohol intake. Too much alcohol can lead to weight gain and may increase your blood pressure and triglyceride levels. Men should have no more than two standard drinks a day and women should have no more than one. Quit smoking. Smokers are twice as likely to develop diabetes as non-smokers. Control your blood pressure. Most people can do th Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Be Prevented?

Can Diabetes Be Prevented?

en espaolSe puede prevenir la diabetes? Diabetes is a disease that affects how the body uses glucose , the main type of sugar in the blood. Glucose, which comes from the foods we eat, is the major source of energy needed to fuel the body. To use glucose, the body needs the hormone insulin . But in people withdiabetes, the body either can't make insulin or the insulin doesn't work in the body like it should. Type 1 diabetes, in which the immune system attacks the pancreas and destroys the cells that make insulin. Type 2 diabetes, in which the pancreas can still make insulin, but the body doesn't respond to it properly. In both types of diabetes, glucose can't get into the cells normally. This causes a rise in blood sugar levels , which can make someone sick if not treated. Type 1 diabetes can't be prevented. Doctors can't even tell who will get it and who won't. No one knows for sure what causes type 1 diabetes, but scientists think it has something to do with genes . But just getting the genes for diabetes isn't usually enough. In most cases, a child has to be exposed to something else like a virus to get type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes isn't contagious, so kids and teens can't catch it from another person or pass it along to friends or family members. And eating too much sugar doesn't cause type 1 diabetes, either. There's no reliable way to predict who will get type 1 diabetes, but blood tests can find early signs of it. These tests aren't done routinely, however, because doctors don't have any way to stop a child from developing the disease, even if the tests are positive. Unlike type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes can sometimes be prevented. Excessive weight gain, obesity , and a sedentary lifestyle are all things that put a person at risk for type 2 diabetes. In the Continue reading >>

4. Prevention Or Delay Of Type 2 Diabetes

4. Prevention Or Delay Of Type 2 Diabetes

Patients with prediabetes should be referred to an intensive diet and physical activity behavioral counseling program adhering to the tenets of the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) targeting a loss of 7% of body weight and should increase their moderate-intensity physical activity (such as brisk walking) to at least 150 min/week. A Follow-up counseling and maintenance programs should be offered for long-term success in preventing diabetes. B Based on the cost-effectiveness of diabetes prevention, such programs should be covered by third-party payers. B Metformin therapy for prevention of type 2 diabetes should be considered in those with prediabetes, especially in those with BMI >35 kg/m2, those aged <60 years, and women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus. A At least annual monitoring for the development of diabetes in those with prediabetes is suggested. E Screening for and treatment of modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease is suggested. B Diabetes self-management education and support programs are appropriate venues for people with prediabetes to receive education and support to develop and maintain behaviors that can prevent or delay the onset of diabetes. B Technology-assisted tools including Internet-based social networks, distance learning, DVD-based content, and mobile applications can be useful elements of effective lifestyle modification to prevent diabetes. B Lifestyle Modification Randomized controlled trials have shown that individuals at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes (impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, or both) can significantly decrease the rate of diabetes onset with particular interventions (1–7). These include intensive lifestyle modification programs that have been shown to be very effective (∼58% r Continue reading >>

How To Prevent Diabetes

How To Prevent Diabetes

What is type 2 diabetes? If you have diabetes, your blood sugar levels are too high. With type 2 diabetes, this happens because your body does not make enough insulin, or it does not use insulin well (this is called insulin resistance). If you are at risk for type 2 diabetes, you might be able to prevent or delay developing it. Who is at risk for type 2 diabetes? Many Americans are at risk for type 2 diabetes. Your chances of getting it depend on a combination of risk factors such as your genes and lifestyle. The risk factors include Having prediabetes, which means you have blood sugar levels that are higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes Being age 45 or older A family history of diabetes Being African American, Alaska Native, American Indian, Asian American, Hispanic/Latino, Native Hawaiian, or Pacific Islander Having given birth to a baby weighing 9 pounds or more Having acanthosis nigricans, a skin condition in which your skin becomes dark and thick, especially around your neck or armpits Smoking How can I prevent or delay getting type 2 diabetes? If you are at risk for diabetes, you may be able to prevent or delay getting it. Most of the things that you need to do involve having a healthier lifestyle. So if you make these changes, you will get other health benefits as well. You may lower your risk of other diseases, and you will probably feel better and have more energy. The changes are Losing weight and keeping it off. Weight control is an important part of diabetes prevention. You may be able to prevent or delay diabetes by losing 5 to 10 percent of your current weight. For example, if you weigh 200 pounds, your goal would be to lose between 10 to 20 pounds. And once you lose the weight, it is important that you don't gain it back. Following Continue reading >>

Prevention Of Type 2 Diabetes: Evidence And Strategies

Prevention Of Type 2 Diabetes: Evidence And Strategies

Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes: Evidence and Strategies Journal of Clinical Outcomes Management. 2017 April;24(4) 1. International Diabetes Federation. Diabetes facts and figures. www.idf.org/about-diabetes/facts-figures . Accessed on January 29, 2017. 2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National diabetes statistics report, 2014. www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pubs/statsreport14/national-diabetes-report-web.pdf . Accessed on January 29, 2017. 3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Number of Americans with diabetes projected to double or triple by 2050. www.cdc.gov/media/pressrel/2010/r101022.html . Accessed on January 29, 2017. 4. World Health Organization (WHO). Diabetes fact sheet. No. 312. November 2016. www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs312/en/ . Accessed on January 29, 2017. 5. Karam JG, McFarlane SI. Update on the prevention of type 2 diabetes. Curr Diab Rep 2011;11:5663. 6. Menke A, Rust KF, Fradkin J, et al. Associations between trends in race/ethnicity, aging, and body mass index with diabetes prevalence in the United States: a series of cross-sectional studies. Ann Intern Med 2014;161:32885. 7. Ford ES, Li C, Sattar N . Metabolic syndrome and incident diabetes: current state of the evidence. Diabetes Care 2008;31:1898904. 8. American Diabetes Association. Standards of medical care in diabetes2017. Diabetes Care 2017;40(Suppl. 1). 9. Kruszynska YT, Olefsky JM. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. J Investig Med 1996;44:41328.. 10. Butler AE, Janson J, Bonner-Weir S, et al. Beta-cell deficit and increased beta-cell apoptosis in humans with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes 2003;52:10210. 11. Definition and diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and intermediate hyperglycemia. Report of a WHO and IDF Consultation. 2006. 43588/ Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Your doctor’s just told you that you have prediabetes. That means there's a good chance you could get , but you don't have to. There are plenty of things you can do to try to prevent it. Focus on the things you can change, like your diet and how active you are. Don’t dwell on the things you can't do anything about, like your age or your family's medical history. Your doctor can let you know where you stand and what you can do to turn things around. Losing extra pounds, eating better, and becoming more active are some of the most important steps you can take. There are people who aren't overweight who have type 2 diabetes. But added pounds do put you at risk. In one study, being overweight or obese was the single most important thing that predicted who would get diabetes. The study results showed that over 16 years, regular exercise -- at least 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week -- and a low-fat, high-fiber diet helped prevent it. If you're at high risk for the disease, your doctor may recommend taking medication to hold it off. Several studies show that various types of diabetes drugs, along with a healthy lifestyle, can cut the odds that you'll get it One study showed that people most likely to get it could lower their odds by 31%. They took the prescription diabetes drug metformin and made lifestyle and diet changes. That's good. But the study also showed that drastic lifestyle changes are the best way to avoid diabetes. You'll need to work with a dietitian to come up with a meal plan and talk to a trainer about how to get more exercise. Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Prediabetes is a serious health condition where blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough yet to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. Approximately 84 million American adults—more than 1 out of 3—have prediabetes. Of those with prediabetes, 90% don’t know they have it. Prediabetes puts you at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. The good news is that if you have prediabetes, the CDC-led National Diabetes Prevention Program can help you make lifestyle changes to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes and other serious health problems. Causes Insulin is a hormone made by your pancreas that acts like a key to let blood sugar into cells for use as energy. If you have prediabetes, the cells in your body don’t respond normally to insulin. Your pancreas makes more insulin to try to get cells to respond. Eventually your pancreas can’t keep up, and your blood sugar rises, setting the stage for prediabetes—and type 2 diabetes down the road. Symptoms & Risk Factors You can have prediabetes for years but have no clear symptoms, so it often goes undetected until serious health problems such as type 2 diabetes show up. It’s important to talk to your doctor about getting your blood sugar tested if you have any of the risk factors for prediabetes, which include: Being overweight Being 45 years or older Having a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes Being physically active less than 3 times a week Ever having gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) or giving birth to a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds Race and ethnicity are also a factor: African Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, American Indians, Pacific Islanders, and some Asian Americans are at higher risk. Getting Tested You can get a simple blood Continue reading >>

13 Ways To Prevent Diabetes

13 Ways To Prevent Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects millions of people worldwide. Uncontrolled cases can cause blindness, kidney failure, heart disease and other serious conditions. Before diabetes is diagnosed, there is a period where blood sugar levels are high but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. This is known as prediabetes. It's estimated that up to 70% of people with prediabetes go on to develop type 2 diabetes. Fortunately, progressing from prediabetes to diabetes isn't inevitable (1). Although there are certain factors you can't change — such as your genes, age or past behaviors — there are many actions you can take to reduce the risk of diabetes. Here are 13 ways to avoid getting diabetes. Eating sugary foods and refined carbs can put at-risk individuals on the fast track to developing diabetes. Your body rapidly breaks these foods down into small sugar molecules, which are absorbed into your bloodstream. The resulting rise in blood sugar stimulates your pancreas to produce insulin, a hormone that helps sugar get out of the bloodstream and into your body's cells. In people with prediabetes, the body's cells are resistant to insulin's action, so sugar remains high in the blood. To compensate, the pancreas produces more insulin, attempting to bring blood sugar down to a healthy level. Over time, this can lead to progressively higher blood sugar and insulin levels, until the condition eventually turns into type 2 diabetes. Many studies have shown a link between the frequent consumption of sugar or refined carbs and the risk of diabetes. What's more, replacing them with foods that have less of an effect on blood sugar may help reduce your risk (2, 3, 4, 5, 6). A detailed analysis of 37 studies found that people with the highest intakes of fast-digesting carb Continue reading >>

Take Steps To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Take Steps To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes (“dy-ah-BEE-teez”) is a leading cause of disability and death in the United States. Diabetes increases the risk of serious health problems like: Blindness Nerve damage Kidney disease Heart disease Stroke The good news is that you can do a lot to prevent or delay getting type 2 diabetes, including: Watching your weight Eating healthy Staying active Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention: 5 Tips For Taking Control

Diabetes Prevention: 5 Tips For Taking Control

Changing your lifestyle could be a big step toward diabetes prevention — and it's never too late to start. Consider these tips. When it comes to type 2 diabetes — the most common type of diabetes — prevention is a big deal. It's especially important to make diabetes prevention a priority if you're at increased risk of diabetes, such as if you're overweight or you have a family history of the disease. Diabetes prevention is as basic as eating more healthfully, becoming more physically active and losing a few extra pounds. It's never too late to start. Making a few simple changes in your lifestyle now may help you avoid the serious health complications of diabetes down the road, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage. Consider the latest diabetes prevention tips from the American Diabetes Association. 1. Get more physical activity There are many benefits to regular physical activity. Exercise can help you: Lose weight Lower your blood sugar Boost your sensitivity to insulin — which helps keep your blood sugar within a normal range Research shows that aerobic exercise and resistance training can help control diabetes. The greatest benefit comes from a fitness program that includes both. 2. Get plenty of fiber It's rough, it's tough — and it may help you: Reduce your risk of diabetes by improving your blood sugar control Lower your risk of heart disease Promote weight loss by helping you feel full Foods high in fiber include fruits, vegetables, beans, whole grains and nuts. 3. Go for whole grains It's not clear why, but whole grains may reduce your risk of diabetes and help maintain blood sugar levels. Try to make at least half your grains whole grains. Many foods made from whole grains come ready to eat, including various breads, pasta products and cereals. Look Continue reading >>

International Diabetes Federation - Prevention Of Type 2 Diabetes

International Diabetes Federation - Prevention Of Type 2 Diabetes

425 million people were living with diabetes in 2017. Most of these cases are type 2 diabetes. Another 352 millionpeople were estimated to be at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes in 2017. While there are a number of factors that influence the development of type 2 diabetes, it is evident that the most influential are lifestyle behaviours commonly associated with urbanization. These include consumption of unhealthy foods and inactive lifestyles with sedentary behaviour. Randomised controlled trials from different parts of the world, including Finland, USA, China and India, have established the that lifestyle modification with physical activity and/or healthy diet can delay or prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes. Modern lifestyles are characterised by physical inactivity and long sedentary periods. Community-based interventions can reach individuals and families through campaigns, education, social marketing and encourage physical activity both inside and outside school and the workplace. IDF recommends physical activity at least between three to five days a week, for a minimum of 30-45 minutes. Taking a life course perspective is essential for preventing type 2 diabetes and its complications. Early in life, when eating and physical activity habits are established and when the long-term regulation of energy balance may be programmed, there is an especially critical window to prevent the development of overweight and reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. Healthy lifestyles can improve health outcomes at later stages of life as well. Population based interventions and policies allow healthy choices through policies in trade, agriculture, transport and urban planning to become more accessible and easy. Healthy choices can be promoted in specific settings (school, workp Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Prevention

Type 2 Diabetes Prevention

You may be able to prevent type 2 diabetes. Even if you have several of the risk factors and even if you’ve been told you have pre-diabetes, you can take action and reduce your risk of developing diabetes. Don’t delay: if you’ve been told that you’re at risk of developing diabetes, get started as soon as possible. Your healthcare provider can help you develop a plan, but it should include: Getting to—and staying at—a healthy weight: Being overweight (BMI greater than 25) increases your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, so if you’re overweight, you should take steps to lose weight. By losing 5% to 10% of your body weight, you can reduce your risk. You can do this by eating smaller portions and being more physically active, which, conveniently enough, are two other ways to prevent type 2 diabetes. Reduce portions and eat healthier: You should choose healthier food choices by reducing portions and limiting added fat and sugar. Choose more whole grains, vegetables, and lean meats and dairy products. Seek out new, healthy recipes; there are many cookbooks that offer lower-fat and healthier recipes. A terrific rule to follow is: everything in moderation. Reduce portion sizes overall. Limit your intake of alcohol; you don’t have to entirely avoid it. Eat small, well-balanced meals spread throughout the day; larger meals can make it more difficult to keep your blood glucose level in a healthy range. Exercising: Exercise is important to help prevent type 2 diabetes because it has so many benefits. It can help you lose weight, and if you’re insulin resistant, it can help your body increase its sensitivity to insulin (exercise can help you use insulin better). Plus, exercise keeps your heart strong, makes you sleep better, and can even put you in a better mood. Continue reading >>

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes In At-risk Patients

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes In At-risk Patients

Many physicians now spend less time delivering direct patient care. This is primarily due to increasing administrative responsibilities that are a result of regulatory pressures along with evolving payment and care delivery models. In the average primary care practice, up to one‑third of patients age 18 and above – and up to half age 65 and above – could be at risk for prediabetes. Physicians and their care teams play an important role in diabetes prevention. Preventing type 2 diabetes in at‑risk patients Release Date: June 2015 End Date: June 2019 At the end of this activity, participants will be able to: Define the medical condition of prediabetes and treatment options for prediabetes Identify patients with prediabetes Educate patients at‑risk for type 2 diabetes Determine roles and responsibilities regarding diabetes prevention and practice workflow Refer patients with prediabetes to an evidence‑based diabetes prevention program This activity is designed to meet the educational needs of practicing physicians and their care teams. Eighty‑six million adults in the United States have prediabetes, but 90 percent of them are undiagnosed.1 Up to 30 percent of people with prediabetes will develop diabetes within five years.2‑3 People with prediabetes also have an increased risk of heart disease and stroke.1 Early and intensive lifestyle intervention can prevent or delay diabetes in at‑risk patients2‑17 and has also demonstrated secondary prevention of microvascular and macrovascular complications. Physicians and their care teams play an important role in diabetes prevention. This diabetes prevention module presents strategies to help physicians as well as practice staff educate patients about their risk for developing diabetes and refer at‑risk patient Continue reading >>

The Prevention Or Delay Of Type 2 Diabetes

The Prevention Or Delay Of Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is one of the most costly and burdensome chronic diseases of our time and is a condition that is increasing in epidemic proportions in the U.S. and throughout the world (1). The complications resulting from the disease are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality and are associated with the damage or failure of various organs such as the eyes, kidneys, and nerves. Individuals with type 2 diabetes are also at a significantly higher risk for coronary heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, and stroke, and they have a greater likelihood of having hypertension, dyslipidemia, and obesity (2–6). There is also growing evidence that at glucose levels above normal but below the diabetes threshold diagnostic now referred to as pre-diabetes, there is a substantially increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and death (5,7–10). In these individuals, CVD risk factors are also more prevalent (5–7,9,11–14), which further increases the risk but is not sufficient to totally explain it. In contrast to the clear benefit of glucose lowering to prevent or retard the progression of microvascular complications associated with diabetes (15–18,21), it is less clear whether the high rate of CVD in people with impaired glucose homeostasis, i.e., those with impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), or diabetes, is caused by elevated blood glucose levels or will respond to treatments that lower blood glucose. Epidemiological studies have shown a clear relationship (19,20), whereas intervention trials in people with diabetes suggest, but have not demonstrated, a clear benefit of glycemic control (15,16,21,22). Additionally, there are no studies that have investigated a benefit of glucose lowering on macrovascular disease in subjects with only Continue reading >>

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