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Prevention Of Diabetes

Combined Diet And Physical Activity Promotion Programs For Prevention Of Diabetes: Community Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement Free

Combined Diet And Physical Activity Promotion Programs For Prevention Of Diabetes: Community Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement Free

Abstract Description: Community Preventive Services Task Force recommendation on the use of combined diet and physical activity promotion programs to reduce progression to type 2 diabetes in persons at increased risk. Methods: The Task Force commissioned an evidence review that assessed the benefits and harms of programs to promote and support individual improvements in diet, exercise, and weight and supervised a review on the economic efficiency of these programs in clinical trial, primary care, and primary care–referable settings. Population: Adolescents and adults at increased risk for progression to type 2 diabetes. Recommendation: The Task Force recommends the use of combined diet and physical activity promotion programs by health care systems, communities, and other implementers to provide counseling and support to clients identified as being at increased risk for type 2 diabetes. Economic evidence indicates that these programs are cost-effective. The Community Preventive Services Task Force makes recommendations about community- and system-based interventions, determined by the Task Force to be of public health importance in preventing illness, injury, or premature death. The Task Force bases its recommendations on a systematic review of the evidence on effectiveness and also considers additional benefits, potential harms, and applicability to settings and populations other than those studied. For interventions with evidence of effectiveness, the Task Force also conducts a systematic review of the evidence on economic efficiency, including assessments on program costs, cost-effectiveness, and cost–benefit ratios. The Task Force recognizes that a decision to implement an evidence-based intervention involves more consideration than evidence alone. Potential imp Continue reading >>

Ymca's Diabetes Prevention Program

Ymca's Diabetes Prevention Program

More than 200 Ys across the country help thousands of people reduce their risk for developing type 2 diabetes with YMCA’s Diabetes Prevention Program. This small-group program helps people with prediabetes eat healthier, increase their physical activity and lose weight, which can delay or even prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes. What is Diabetes? Diabetes is a chronic disease that causes blood sugar levels to rise higher than normal. Diabetes affects more than 29 million people. A condition called prediabetes occurs when blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough for a type 2 diabetes diagnosis. More than 86 million Americans have prediabetes and are at risk of developing diabetes. Diabetes has no cure, but prediabetes can be reversed. Chances are you know at least one person with diabetes and probably more than one with prediabetes. To find out if you are at risk, take this quick test. Then share the test with friends and family. The Y Can Help If you find out you or someone you know is at risk for developing diabetes, the YMCA's Diabetes Prevention Program can help. Find out if a Y near you runs the program. Continue reading >>

13 Ways To Prevent Diabetes

13 Ways To Prevent Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects millions of people worldwide. Uncontrolled cases can cause blindness, kidney failure, heart disease and other serious conditions. Before diabetes is diagnosed, there is a period where blood sugar levels are high but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. This is known as prediabetes. It's estimated that up to 70% of people with prediabetes go on to develop type 2 diabetes. Fortunately, progressing from prediabetes to diabetes isn't inevitable (1). Although there are certain factors you can't change — such as your genes, age or past behaviors — there are many actions you can take to reduce the risk of diabetes. Here are 13 ways to avoid getting diabetes. Eating sugary foods and refined carbs can put at-risk individuals on the fast track to developing diabetes. Your body rapidly breaks these foods down into small sugar molecules, which are absorbed into your bloodstream. The resulting rise in blood sugar stimulates your pancreas to produce insulin, a hormone that helps sugar get out of the bloodstream and into your body's cells. In people with prediabetes, the body's cells are resistant to insulin's action, so sugar remains high in the blood. To compensate, the pancreas produces more insulin, attempting to bring blood sugar down to a healthy level. Over time, this can lead to progressively higher blood sugar and insulin levels, until the condition eventually turns into type 2 diabetes. Many studies have shown a link between the frequent consumption of sugar or refined carbs and the risk of diabetes. What's more, replacing them with foods that have less of an effect on blood sugar may help reduce your risk (2, 3, 4, 5, 6). A detailed analysis of 37 studies found that people with the highest intakes of fast-digesting carb Continue reading >>

Diabetes Risk Factors & Prevention

Diabetes Risk Factors & Prevention

Risk Factors Risk factors are characteristics that can predispose you to developing a condition or disease. Just because you have one or more risk factors does not mean you will get diabetes. Risk factors for type 1 diabetes are not as clearly defined as for type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes risk factors include: Family history of diabetes Autoimmune disease, where the body mistakenly attacks the insulin-producing cells Environmental factors Type 2 diabetes risk factors include: Age of 45 years or older Obesity Family history of diabetes Diabetes during pregnancy Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) Physical inactivity Being a Native American, African American, Hispanic/Latino American, Asian American, or a Pacific Islander How can Diabetes be Prevented? Type 1 diabetes: There are no known methods to prevent type 1 diabetes. Several clinical trials are currently in progress. Type 2 diabetes: Research studies in the United States and abroad have found that lifestyle changes can prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes among high-risk adults (those with IGT and other high-risk characteristics). Lifestyle interventions included diet and moderate-intensity physical activity (such as walking for 2 1/2 hours each week). For both sexes and all age and racial and ethnic groups, the development of diabetes was reduced 40% to 60% during these studies that lasted 3 to 6 years. Studies have also shown that medications have been successful in preventing diabetes in some population groups. Diabetes Prevention Study The Diabetes Prevention Study conducted in Finland (3) involved 522 middle-aged, overweight people with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). The study subjects were divided into two groups: An intervention group who received individual counseling aiming to help them lose weig Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Currently there is no way to prevent , but ongoing studies are exploring ways to prevent diabetes in those who are most likely to get it. People who have a parent, brother, or sister with type 1 diabetes and are willing to participate in one of these studies should talk with their doctors. People who have type 1 diabetes can help prevent or delay the development of complications by keeping their blood sugar in a target range. They also need regular medical checkups to detect early signs of complications. If complications are treated early, the damage may be stopped, slowed, or possibly reversed. People who have other health problems along with diabetes, such as high blood pressure or high cholesterol, need to treat those conditions. Also, not smoking can reduce the risk of complications. Having other health problems can increase the risk for complications from diabetes. Get a flu vaccine every year. When you have the flu, it can be harder to manage your blood sugar. It's a good idea to get a pneumococcal vaccine for pneumonia and a vaccine for hepatitis B. You may need or want additional immunizations if certain situations raise your chance for exposure to disease. Continue reading >>

Prevention Of Diabetes Mellitus Type 2

Prevention Of Diabetes Mellitus Type 2

Main article: Diabetes mellitus type 2 Prevention of diabetes mellitus type 2 can be achieved with both lifestyle changes and use of medication.[1] The American Diabetes Association categorizes prediabetes as a high-risk group that has glycemic levels higher than normal but does not meet criteria for diabetes. Without intervention people with prediabetes progress to type 2 diabetes with a 5% to 10% rate. Diabetes prevention is achieved through weight loss and increased physical activity, which can reduce the risk of diabetes by 50% to 60%.[2] Lifestyle[edit] Many interventions to promote healthy lifestyles have been shown to prevent diabetes. A combination of diet and physical activity promotion through counselling and support programs decrease weight, improve systolic blood pressure, improve cholesterol levels and decrease risk of diabetes.[2] Increasing physical activity may be helpful in preventing type 2 diabetes, particularly if undertaken soon after a carbohydrate rich meal that increases blood sugar levels.[3][4][5] The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends maintaining a healthy weight, getting at least 2½ hours of exercise per week (several brisk sustained walks appear sufficient), having a modest fat intake (around 30% of energy supply should come from fat), and eating sufficient fiber (e.g., from whole grains). Some preliminary evidence suggests that resistant starch, used as a substitute for refined carbohydrate, may increase insulin sensitivity[6] and may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes.[7] The U.S. Food and Drug Administration requires claims that resistant starch can reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes to be qualified with a declaration that scientific evidence in support of this claim is limited.[8] Foods with low glycemic index rich in fiber Continue reading >>

Prevention Of Diabetes Mellitus

Prevention Of Diabetes Mellitus

Tweet When people talk about prevention of diabetes, it is usually about preventing type 2 diabetes. In the majority of cases, type 2 diabetes is brought on by lifestyle factors which can often be prevented. These include an unbalanced diet, lack of activity, lack of sleep, stress, smoking and alcohol. By making lifestyles changes, you can decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes prevention overview Leading doctors and researchers point to excessive levels of insulin as the likely reason why insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes develops. Strategies such as low-carb diets and exercise help to reduce levels of insulin and are therefore effective for preventing type 2 diabetes from developing. There are a number of risk factors for diabetes, some of which are preventable, such as weight gain around the middle (central obesity), high cholesterol/triglyceride levels and high blood pressure. Losing weight, adopting more activity into your day, stopping smoking and reducing alcohol intake can also help towards lowering the risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus and improving your all-round health. Diet and preventing type 2 diabetes Diet is the most important part of lifestyle change. The adage that you can’t outrun a bad diet is true. It is much easier to lose weight on a good diet even if you are struggling to do exercise, than it is through exercise if you’re eating a poor diet. Effective diets to prevent type 2 diabetes are those that do not cause your body to produce a lot of insulin. Carbohydrate has the biggest demand on insulin and so any diet that helps reduce carbohydrate intake will help towards reducing your risk of type 2 diabetes. Cutting out sugary food and drink and refined grains such as white bread and white rice is a good Continue reading >>

Prevention Of Diabetes With Mediterranean Diets: A Subgroup Analysis Of A Randomized Trial

Prevention Of Diabetes With Mediterranean Diets: A Subgroup Analysis Of A Randomized Trial

Abstract Background: Interventions promoting weight loss can reduce the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Whether dietary changes without calorie restriction also protect from diabetes has not been evaluated. Objective: To assess the efficacy of Mediterranean diets for the primary prevention of diabetes in the Prevención con Dieta Mediterránea trial, from October 2003 to December 2010 (median follow-up, 4.1 years). Participants: Men and women without diabetes (3541 patients aged 55 to 80 years) at high cardiovascular risk. Intervention: Participants were randomly assigned and stratified by site, sex, and age but not diabetes status to receive 1 of 3 diets: Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO), Mediterranean diet supplemented with nuts, or a control diet (advice on a low-fat diet). No intervention to increase physical activity or lose weight was included. Measurements: Incidence of new-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus (prespecified secondary outcome). Results: During follow-up, 80, 92, and 101 new-onset cases of diabetes occurred in the Mediterranean diet supplemented with EVOO, Mediterranean diet supplemented with mixed nuts, and control diet groups, respectively, corresponding to rates of 16.0, 18.7, and 23.6 cases per 1000 person-years. Multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios were 0.60 (95% CI, 0.43 to 0.85) for the Mediterranean diet supplemented with EVOO and 0.82 (CI, 0.61 to 1.10) for the Mediterranean diet supplemented with nuts compared with the control diet. Limitations: Randomization was not stratified by diabetes status. Withdrawals were greater in the control group. Conclusion: A Mediterranean diet enriched with EVOO but without energy restrictions reduced diabetes risk among persons with high cardiovascular risk. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention

Diabetes Prevention

Have a Beer We're not suggesting you host a "Get Drunk for Diabetes" party, but knocking back a couple every now and then might lower your risk for type 2. A recent study published in the American Journal of Epidemiology showed a link between moderate alcohol consumption and lower diabetes risk. Cheers to that! Host a Tea Party Drinking tea may help fight diabetes. Chinese researchers found that polysaccharides, a type of carbohydrate found in tea, helps control blood glucose levels. Added bonus: The study also showed that polysaccharides help wrangle free radicals that contribute to cancer and arthritis. Opt for black tea; it's best at glucose management. Keep Things Short Short bursts of exercise can reduce your risk of diabetes, say Scottish researchers. In their study, men sprinted on a stationary bike for 30 seconds, rested for 4 minutes, and then repeated the routine three to five more times. After six workouts, the men's insulin sensitivity improved by 23 percent. “High-intensity sprints prime your muscle fibers to respond better to insulin,” says study author James Timmons, Ph.D. If you're not tiring toward the end of each sprint, you're bicycling with too little resistance. Eat Your Broccoli Mom made you finish it for a reason, though she may not have realized it at the time: The mineral chromium, found in broccoli and grapefruit, helps regulate blood glucose levels. One study found that insulin sensitivity was twice as good in people consuming the most chromium than in those who ate less. Milk the Benefits In a 12-year study of more than 41,000 men, Harvard scientists found that eating one serving of dairy each day decreases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 9 percent. The researchers think that the calcium found in dairy may be involved. Hit the O Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Prediabetes is a serious health condition where blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough yet to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. Approximately 84 million American adults—more than 1 out of 3—have prediabetes. Of those with prediabetes, 90% don’t know they have it. Prediabetes puts you at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. The good news is that if you have prediabetes, the CDC-led National Diabetes Prevention Program can help you make lifestyle changes to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes and other serious health problems. Causes Insulin is a hormone made by your pancreas that acts like a key to let blood sugar into cells for use as energy. If you have prediabetes, the cells in your body don’t respond normally to insulin. Your pancreas makes more insulin to try to get cells to respond. Eventually your pancreas can’t keep up, and your blood sugar rises, setting the stage for prediabetes—and type 2 diabetes down the road. Symptoms & Risk Factors You can have prediabetes for years but have no clear symptoms, so it often goes undetected until serious health problems such as type 2 diabetes show up. It’s important to talk to your doctor about getting your blood sugar tested if you have any of the risk factors for prediabetes, which include: Being overweight Being 45 years or older Having a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes Being physically active less than 3 times a week Ever having gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) or giving birth to a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds Race and ethnicity are also a factor: African Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, American Indians, Pacific Islanders, and some Asian Americans are at higher risk. Getting Tested You can get a simple blood Continue reading >>

Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program (mdpp) Expanded Model

Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program (mdpp) Expanded Model

Background Diabetes affects more than 25 percent of Americans aged 65 or older, and its prevalence is projected to increase approximately two-fold for all U.S. adults (ages 18-79) by 2050 if current trends continue. We estimate that Medicare spent $42 billion more in the single year of 2016 on beneficiaries with diabetes than it would have spent if those beneficiaries did not have diabetes; per-beneficiary, Medicare spent an estimated $1,500 more on Part D prescription drugs, $3,100 more for hospital and facility services, and $2,700 more in physician and other clinical services for those with diabetes than those without diabetes (estimates based on fee-for-service, non-dual eligible, over age 65 beneficiaries). Fortunately, type 2 diabetes can usually be delayed or prevented with health behavior changes. The Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program (MDPP) expanded model is a structured behavior change intervention that aims to prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes among Medicare beneficiaries with an indication of prediabetes. This model is an expansion of the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) model test, which was tested through the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation’s Health Care Innovation Awards. The final rule establishing the expansion was finalized in the Calendar Year (CY) 2017 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (PFS) final rule published in November 2016. On November 2, 2017, CMS issued the CY 2018 PFS final rule, which established policies related to the set of MDPP services, including beneficiary eligibility criteria, the MDPP payment structure, and supplier enrollment requirements and compliance standards aimed to enhance program integrity. The MDPP Expanded Model The Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program expanded model is a structured intervention with t Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention

Diabetes Prevention

While Type 1 diabetes is not preventable, Type 2 diabetes can be with weight loss and moderate physical activity. The following links have important information about diabetes and prevention. Bogus diabetes products are flooding the marketplace, especially the internet. Be cautious when you see bold product claims which make unrealistic promises. Watch this video to learn more. “An estimated 86 million Americans over age 20 have prediabetes. 15-30% of people with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years and they are more likely to have a heart attack or stroke. The risk of death for adults with diabetes is 59% higher than for adults without diabetes. (National Diabetes Education Program) Diabetes Prevention Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - Preventing Diabetes Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality - Diabetes Prevention National Institutes of Health - Cardiac Bypass Surgery Prediabetes The CDC is a great resource for prediabetes, and general diabetes prevention. Look at the following links for tips on prediabetes, facts, and other helpful information. Food Labeling Food can make a big difference with diabetes management. The FDA is proposing to update the Nutrition Facts label found on most food packages in the United States. The Nutrition Facts label, introduced 20 years ago, helps consumers make informed food choices and maintain healthy dietary practices. Learn more about healthier food options, labeling, and nutrition below. Healthy Lifestyle and Healthy People 2020 Lifestyle is important in diabetes management. This box includes information about being active and healthy, as well as several initiatives and campaigns from across the government. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Healthy People 2020 initiative, aims to i Continue reading >>

Prevention & Treatment Of Diabetes

Prevention & Treatment Of Diabetes

If you have a family history or other risk factors for diabetes or if you have been diagnosed with prediabetes, there are a number of healthy living tips you can follow to prevent or delay the onset of diabetes. If you have already been diagnosed with diabetes, these same tips can slow the progression of the disease. Many studies show that lifestyle changes, such as losing weight, eating healthy and increasing physical activity can dramatically reduce the progression of type 2 diabetes and are important to controlling type 1 diabetes. These lifestyle changes can help minimize other risk factors as well, such as high blood pressure and blood cholesterol, which can have a tremendous impact on people with diabetes. In many instances, lifestyle changes must be complemented by a regimen of medications to control blood glucose levels, high blood pressure and cholesterol as well as to prevent heart attack and stroke. By working with your health care team, you can set personal treatment goals, monitor your critical health numbers, and successfully manage diabetes while preventing complications from diabetes. This content was last reviewed August 2015. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention Program (dpp)

Diabetes Prevention Program (dpp)

On this page: The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) was a major multicenter clinical research study aimed at discovering whether modest weight loss through dietary changes and increased physical activity or treatment with the oral diabetes drug metformin (Glucophage) could prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes in study participants. At the beginning of the DPP, participants were all overweight and had blood glucose, also called blood sugar, levels higher than normal but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes—a condition called prediabetes. The DPP found that participants who lost a modest amount of weight through dietary changes and increased physical activity sharply reduced their chances of developing diabetes. Taking metformin also reduced risk, although less dramatically. The DPP resolved its research questions earlier than projected and, following the recommendation of an external monitoring board, the study was halted a year early. The researchers published their findings in the February 7, 2002, issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. DPP Study Design and Goals In the DPP, participants from 27 clinical centers around the United States were randomly divided into different treatment groups. The first group, called the lifestyle intervention group, received intensive training in diet, physical activity, and behavior modification. By eating less fat and fewer calories and exercising for a total of 150 minutes a week, they aimed to lose 7 percent of their body weight and maintain that loss. The second group took 850 mg of metformin twice a day. The third group received placebo pills instead of metformin. The metformin and placebo groups also received information about diet and exercise but no intensive motivational counseling. A fourth group was t Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

Overview: Types of Diabetes Mellitus Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common disease in which the blood sugar (glucose) is abnormally elevated. Normally, the body obtains glucose from food, and additional glucose is made in the liver. The pancreas produces insulin, which enables glucose to enter cells and serve as fuel for the body. In patients with diabetes, glucose accumulates in the blood instead of being properly transported into cells. Excess blood sugar is a serious problem that may damage the blood vessels, heart, kidneys, and other organs. About 5-10% of patients with diabetes are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus, an autoimmune disorder in which the immune system mistakenly attacks the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas, causing the organ to no longer produce insulin. Type 1 DM most commonly occurs in children or young adults, and the incidence of new cases is increasing. Approximately 90-95% of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes mellitus, which occurs when the body becomes unable to use the insulin produced by the pancreas. This condition is also called insulin resistance. The prevalence of type 2 DM is increasing dramatically worldwide. In the past, type 2 DM was associated with adulthood; however, it is rapidly increasing in children because of the rise in childhood obesity. Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) occurs during pregnancy. This form of diabetes usually resolves after delivery, but patients with GDM have an increased risk of developing type 2 DM later in life. Causes and Risk Factors Type 1 DM is an autoimmune disorder and the exact cause is unknown. Causes may include genetic factors, environmental factors, and viruses. For type 2 DM, the major risk factors include a family history of type 2 DM, increased age, obesity, and a sed Continue reading >>

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