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Preventing And Managing Diabetes

Kare11.com | Tips For Preventing And Managing Diabetes

Kare11.com | Tips For Preventing And Managing Diabetes

Tips for preventing and managing diabetes Registered Dietitian offers tips for prevention and management of diabetes. GOLDEN VALLEY, Minn. - Nearly 30 million American children and adults have diabetes, and about 7 million of them don't know it, according to the Centers for Disease Control. In addition, 86 million people have prediabetes - and are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Diabetes is a major cause of heart disease and stroke. Registered Dietitian Pat Baird, MA, RDN, says the good news is that diabetes is preventable and manageable. The latest nutrition guidelines from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) are actually quite similar to the healthy eating recommendations for everyone else. Gone are forbidden foods, and even the word "diet" is deliberately avoided. Instead, they say "that there is not a 'one-size-fits-all' eating pattern for those with diabetes." The emphasis is to look at "eating patterns and meal plans." The myth that sugar causes diabetes is commonly accepted by many people. All starches and sugars can fit in a personalized plan. That's just what ADA stresses: tailor goals to individual preferences, economics, religious and cultural patterns, etc. Continue reading >>

North Carolina’s Guide To Diabetes Prevention And Management

North Carolina’s Guide To Diabetes Prevention And Management

Manage weight | Live tobacco free | Participate in lifestyle change programs | Participate in diabetes education | Adhere to treatment plan | Get adequate sleep Introduction The number of North Carolinians who have or who are at risk for diabetes is growing. The financial burden, human suffering and loss of productivity that are a part of this disease are real and will get worse if more people do not take action now. While diabetes can present challenges on a daily basis, it is now evident that steps can be taken to prevent or delay the onset of diabetes or manage existing diabetes with or without complications. All North Carolinians have a role in these efforts. We can all have a positive impact on the lives of those at risk for or with diabetes. This guide includes basic information about diabetes, its effects on the North Carolina population, and suggestions on how individuals can prevent and manage the disease. The guide also includes specific strategies for community groups, employers and health care providers to help people manage their risk for developing diabetes, gain and maintain control of diabetes, and reduce risks for diabetes-related complications. North Carolina’s Guide to Diabetes Prevention and Management 2015- 2020 Sustained high blood glucose levels over time can cause damage to blood vessels, resulting in serious health complications such as high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke, blindness, kidney failure and amputations.2 Persons with diabetes also have an increased risk for other diabetes complications: hearing loss, sleep apnea, periodontal disease, certain forms of cancer including colorectal and breast, sexual dysfunction and cognitive impairments including dementia.3 There are four primary types of diabetes: prediabetes; type 1 d Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Preventing Complications

Diabetes: Preventing Complications

Diabetes complications can be divided into two types: acute (sudden) and chronic (long-term). This article discusses these complications and strategies to prevent the complications from occurring in the first place. Acute complications Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) Hyperglycemic hyperosmolar non-ketotic syndrome (HHNS) Acute complications of diabetes can occur at any time in the course of the disease. Chronic complications Cardiovascular: Heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, stroke Eye: Diabetic retinopathy, cataracts, glaucoma Nerve damage: Neuropathy Kidney damage: Nephropathy Chronic complications are responsible for most illness and death associated with diabetes. Chronic complications usually appear after several years of elevated blood sugars (hyperglycemia). Since patients with Type 2 diabetes may have elevated blood sugars for several years before being diagnosed, these patients may have signs of complications at the time of diagnosis. Basic principles of prevention of diabetes complications: Take your medications (pills and/or insulin) as prescribed by your doctor. Monitor your blood sugars closely. Follow a sensible diet. Do not skip meals. Exercise regularly. See your doctor regularly to monitor for complications. Results from untreated hyperglycemia. Blood sugars typically range from 300 to 600. Occurs mostly in patients with Type 1 diabetes (uncommon in Type 2). Occurs due to a lack of insulin. Body breaks down its own fat for energy, and ketones appear in the urine and blood. Develops over several hours. Can cause coma and even death. Typically requires hospitalization. Nausea, vomiting Abdominal pain Drowsiness, lethargy (fatigue) Deep, rapid breathing Increased thirst Fruity-smelling breath Dehydration Inadequate insulin administration (not getting Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention: 5 Tips For Taking Control

Diabetes Prevention: 5 Tips For Taking Control

Changing your lifestyle could be a big step toward diabetes prevention — and it's never too late to start. Consider these tips. When it comes to type 2 diabetes — the most common type of diabetes — prevention is a big deal. It's especially important to make diabetes prevention a priority if you're at increased risk of diabetes, such as if you're overweight or you have a family history of the disease. Diabetes prevention is as basic as eating more healthfully, becoming more physically active and losing a few extra pounds. It's never too late to start. Making a few simple changes in your lifestyle now may help you avoid the serious health complications of diabetes down the road, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage. Consider the latest diabetes prevention tips from the American Diabetes Association. 1. Get more physical activity There are many benefits to regular physical activity. Exercise can help you: Lose weight Lower your blood sugar Boost your sensitivity to insulin — which helps keep your blood sugar within a normal range Research shows that aerobic exercise and resistance training can help control diabetes. The greatest benefit comes from a fitness program that includes both. 2. Get plenty of fiber It's rough, it's tough — and it may help you: Reduce your risk of diabetes by improving your blood sugar control Lower your risk of heart disease Promote weight loss by helping you feel full Foods high in fiber include fruits, vegetables, beans, whole grains and nuts. 3. Go for whole grains It's not clear why, but whole grains may reduce your risk of diabetes and help maintain blood sugar levels. Try to make at least half your grains whole grains. Many foods made from whole grains come ready to eat, including various breads, pasta products and cereals. Look Continue reading >>

Prevention Of Diabetes Mellitus

Prevention Of Diabetes Mellitus

Tweet When people talk about prevention of diabetes, it is usually about preventing type 2 diabetes. In the majority of cases, type 2 diabetes is brought on by lifestyle factors which can often be prevented. These include an unbalanced diet, lack of activity, lack of sleep, stress, smoking and alcohol. By making lifestyles changes, you can decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes prevention overview Leading doctors and researchers point to excessive levels of insulin as the likely reason why insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes develops. Strategies such as low-carb diets and exercise help to reduce levels of insulin and are therefore effective for preventing type 2 diabetes from developing. There are a number of risk factors for diabetes, some of which are preventable, such as weight gain around the middle (central obesity), high cholesterol/triglyceride levels and high blood pressure. Losing weight, adopting more activity into your day, stopping smoking and reducing alcohol intake can also help towards lowering the risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus and improving your all-round health. Diet and preventing type 2 diabetes Diet is the most important part of lifestyle change. The adage that you can’t outrun a bad diet is true. It is much easier to lose weight on a good diet even if you are struggling to do exercise, than it is through exercise if you’re eating a poor diet. Effective diets to prevent type 2 diabetes are those that do not cause your body to produce a lot of insulin. Carbohydrate has the biggest demand on insulin and so any diet that helps reduce carbohydrate intake will help towards reducing your risk of type 2 diabetes. Cutting out sugary food and drink and refined grains such as white bread and white rice is a good Continue reading >>

Preventing Diabetes Problems

Preventing Diabetes Problems

Diabetes can damage blood vessels and lead to heart disease and stroke. You can do a lot to prevent heart disease and stroke by managing your blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels; and by not smoking. Hypoglycemia occurs when your blood glucose drops too low. Certain diabetes medicines make low blood glucose more likely. You can prevent hypoglycemia by following your meal plan and balancing your physical activity, food, and medicines. Testing your blood glucose regularly can also help prevent hypoglycemia. Diabetic neuropathy is nerve damage that can result from diabetes. Different types of nerve damage affect different parts of your body. Managing your diabetes can help prevent nerve damage that affects your feet and limbs, and organs such as your heart. Diabetic kidney disease, also called diabetic nephropathy, is kidney disease caused by diabetes. You can help protect your kidneys by managing your diabetes and meeting your blood pressure goals. Diabetes can cause nerve damage and poor blood flow, which can lead to serious foot problems. Common foot problems, such as a callus, can lead to pain or an infection that makes it hard to walk. Get a foot checkup at each visit with your health care team. Diabetes can damage your eyes and lead to low vision and blindness. The best way to prevent eye disease is to manage your blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol; and to not smoke. Also, have a dilated eye exam at least once a year. Diabetes can lead to problems in your mouth, such as infection, gum disease, or dry mouth. To help keep your mouth healthy, manage your blood glucose, brush your teeth twice a day, see your dentist at least once a year, and don’t smoke. Having diabetes can increase your chance of having bladder problems and changes in sexu Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Prevention & Treatment

Type 2 Diabetes Prevention & Treatment

XIAFLEX® is a prescription medicine used to treat adults with Dupuytren's contracture when a "cord" can be felt. It is not known if XIAFLEX® is safe and effective in children under the age of 18. Do not receive XIAFLEX® if you have had an allergic reaction to collagenase clostridium histolyticum or any of the ingredients in XIAFLEX®, or to any other collagenase product. See the end of the Medication Guide for a complete list of ingredients in XIAFLEX®. XIAFLEX® can cause serious side effects, including: Tendon rupture or ligament damage. Receiving an injection of XIAFLEX® may cause damage to a tendon or ligament in your hand and cause it to break or weaken. This could require surgery to fix the damaged tendon or ligament. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have trouble bending your injected finger (towards the wrist) after the swelling goes down or you have problems using your treated hand after your follow-up visit Nerve injury or other serious injury of the hand. Call your healthcare provider right away if you get numbness, tingling, increased pain, or tears in the skin (laceration) in your treated finger or hand after your injection or after your follow-up visit Hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis. Severe allergic reactions can happen in people who receive XIAFLEX® because it contains foreign proteins. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of these symptoms of an allergic reaction after an injection of XIAFLEX®: hives swollen face breathing trouble chest pain low blood pressure dizziness or fainting Increased chance of bleeding. Bleeding or bruising at the injection site can happen in people who receive XIAFLEX®. Talk to your healthcare provider if you have a problem with your blood clotting. XIAFLEX® may not b Continue reading >>

Evidence-based Nutrition Guidelines For The Prevention And Management Of Diabetes

Evidence-based Nutrition Guidelines For The Prevention And Management Of Diabetes

Evidence-based nutrition guidelines for the prevention and management of diabetes Evidence-based nutrition guidelines for the prevention and management of diabetes Our set of nutrition recommendations for adults with diabetes and those at risk of Type 2 diabetes have been written for healthcare professionals who are supporting them. A key strategy applied in these current guidelines was to formulate recommendations from the available evidence highlighting the importance of foods, rather than focusing on individual nutrients, wherever possible. An individualised approach to diet taking into consideration the persons personal and cultural preferences People eat more of certain foods such as vegetables, fruits, wholegrains, fish, nuts and pulses People eat less red and processed meat, refined carbohydrates and sugar sweetened beverages. These nutrition guidelines are relevant to people at risk of developing Type 2 diabetes and people with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Special considerations have also been discussed for Gestational diabetes and Cystic Fibrosis- Related diabetes. Children are not included in the scope of these guidelines. The International Society of Paediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD) clinical practice guidelines have been adopted by us. Wefirst published dietary recommendations for people with diabetes in 1982, with subsequent updates in 1992, 2003 and 2011. The previous evidence-based guidelines, published in 2011, had included studies published up to August 2010. The 2018 guidelines incorporate existing evidence and additional studies published between January 2010 and July 2017, although an exception was made to include a major UK study of diabetes remission, published in December 2017. Continue reading >>

What Are The Prevention And Management Of Diabetes?

What Are The Prevention And Management Of Diabetes?

Lots of Diseases that are caused due to poor lifestyle habits are referred to as the lifestyle diseases. Nowadays, Such diseases are usually accelerated by unhealthy ways of living life. Most of them result due to a sedentary lifestyle, unhealthy eating habits and lack of physical activities. Some Lifestyle diseases like obesity, asthma , hypertension, hair loss , heart diseases, back pain, diabetes and so on. It is a really very dangerous disease and it is common lifestyle disease. If it is not controlled, it can lead to renal failure, loss of vision, amputation of limbs, and cardiovascular diseases. Diabetes is such a disease that causes sugar to build up in our blood. When our body does not produce sufficient amount of insulin or when insulin does not work properly, this disease occurs. There are two types of diabetes- Type I and Type II. Currently, type 1 disease cannot be prevented. However, researchers are looking into the autoimmune process and environmental factors that lead people to develop type 1 diabetes to help prevent type 1 diabetes in the future. Evidence, including large-scale randomised control trials, shows type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed in up to 58 per cent of cases by maintaining a healthy weight, being physically active and following a healthy eating plan The feeling of tiredness, need to urinate more, the numbness in hands and feet, blurred vision, excessive weight gains or weight loss, not the healing of wounds, etc., are common symptoms. People with obesity usually fall prey to diabetes. Prevention and Management of Diabetes Type 2 Regular exercises- Exerciseplays a very significant role not only in preventing the Type II but also managing it. Walking is also a simple and effective exercise that many people can enjoy. Maintain a he Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention And Management Resources

Diabetes Prevention And Management Resources

General Public, Health Care Providers and Other Health Professionals The American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) The AADE is a multi-disciplinary professional membership organization dedicated to improving diabetes care through innovative education, management and support. Practice and patient resources, research, news and publications, and other materials are available at the AADE website. American Association of Diabetes Educators American Diabetes Association (ADA) This organization funds research and delivers services to help prevent diabetes and help those who have diabetes live healthier lives. The ADA website includes basic information about diabetes, diabetes risk tests, information about living with diabetes, among other services. American Diabetes Association American Medical Association (AMA) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): Preventing Type 2 Diabetes: A Guide This guide provides information to help health care providers refer patients with prediabetes to an evidence-based diabetes prevention program. American Medical Association (AMA) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): Preventing Type 2 Diabetes: A Guide Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) – Diabetes Page The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Diabetes page includes basic information about diabetes prevention and control, diabetes programs and initiatives, and data and statistics relating to diabetes in the United States. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Diabetes Centers for Disease Control (CDC) National Diabetes Prevention Program (NDPP) On the CDC NDPP page, people can learn about prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, how to join a CDC-recognized diabetes prevention lifestyle change program to help prevent or delay type 2 diabet Continue reading >>

Preventing Diabetes Naturally (type 2, Diet, Causes, Symptoms)

Preventing Diabetes Naturally (type 2, Diet, Causes, Symptoms)

Type 2 diabetes prevention tips and facts While genetics plays an important role in the development of diabetes, an individual still has the ability to influence their health to prevent type 2 diabetes. There is no known way to prevent type 1 diabetes. This article focuses on ways to control risk factors for type 2 diabetes. People should watch their weight and exercise on a regular basis to help reverse prediabetes, and prevent the development of type 2 diabetes. Diet is important because it helps with weight loss. Some foods such as nuts in small amounts provide health benefits in blood sugar regulation. There is no single recommended diabetes prevention diet, but following a sound nutrition plan and maintaining a healthy weight are important steps in preventing the disease. Exercise is even more beneficial with weight loss in the prevention of type 2 diabetes. Smoking is harmful in many ways including increasing the risk of cancer and heart disease. It also increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. There are medications available that have been shown in large trials to delay or prevent the onset of overt diabetes. Metformin (Glucophage) is recommended by the American Diabetes Association for prevention of diabetes in high-risk people. The coming years will be very exciting regarding the advances in the field of prevention of diabetes. However, the cornerstone of therapy will likely remain a healthy lifestyle. There are two major forms of diabetes - type 1 and type 2. This article focuses specifically on the prevention of type 2 diabetes since there is no know way to prevent type 1 diabetes. This form of diabetes is virtually a pandemic in the United States. This information reviews the risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes and reviews key points regardi Continue reading >>

Black Men And Diabetes: Preventing It, Managing It

Black Men And Diabetes: Preventing It, Managing It

Black Men and Diabetes: Preventing It, Managing It African Americans have a 50% chance of developing diabetes, but most black men pay little heed to the warnings -- and pay the price. Fortunately, type 2 diabetes is both preventable and manageable. Brian (not his real name) had always been athletic in junior high and high school, but when he started to put on some weight in his mid-20s, he didn't worry too much about it. He didn't have time. Later, as a single man and small-business owner in his early 40s, Brian ate most of his meals in junk food at his desk and rarely exercised. He'd been diagnosed with high blood pressure and high cholesterol about five years earlier, but he paid little attention when his brother, a doctor, warned him that his weight and his family history of diabetes put him in a high-risk category. Then he walked into his doctor's office weighing 330 pounds -- even at his 6'4" height, 100 pounds more than his ideal weight . When the doctor measured his blood sugar , it registered at a whopping 550 milligrams per deciliter, or about five times higher than normal. "You just don't see that kind of blood sugar ," marvels Lenore Coleman, PharmD, CDE, founder of Black and Brown Sugar, a diabetes information web site for minority populations, and author of the forthcoming Healing Our Village: A Self-Care Guide to Diabetes Control. Brian, like millions of other black men, has type 2 diabetes . Diabetes is the fifth deadliest disease in the U.S., and it's hitting black communities especially hard. If current trends continue, black men will be facing an epidemic of diabetes by the year 2050. Approximately 2.7 million or 11.4% of all African Americans aged 20 years or older have diabetes -- but at least one-third of them don't know it. The average African Ame Continue reading >>

Prevention & Treatment Of Diabetes

Prevention & Treatment Of Diabetes

If you have a family history or other risk factors for diabetes or if you have been diagnosed with prediabetes, there are a number of healthy living tips you can follow to prevent or delay the onset of diabetes. If you have already been diagnosed with diabetes, these same tips can slow the progression of the disease. Many studies show that lifestyle changes, such as losing weight, eating healthy and increasing physical activity can dramatically reduce the progression of type 2 diabetes and are important to controlling type 1 diabetes. These lifestyle changes can help minimize other risk factors as well, such as high blood pressure and blood cholesterol, which can have a tremendous impact on people with diabetes. In many instances, lifestyle changes must be complemented by a regimen of medications to control blood glucose levels, high blood pressure and cholesterol as well as to prevent heart attack and stroke. By working with your health care team, you can set personal treatment goals, monitor your critical health numbers, and successfully manage diabetes while preventing complications from diabetes. This content was last reviewed August 2015. Continue reading >>

To Your Health: Preventing And Managing Diabetes

To Your Health: Preventing And Managing Diabetes

To Your Health: Preventing and managing diabetes Editors note: This series will be written by practitioners from Summit Medical Group on health-related topics. This months author is endocrinologist Dr. Alessia Roehnelt . She has specialized training in neck ultrasound aspirations and is an accomplished researcher in the field of Cushings disease. She enjoys cooking, staying active and spending time with her family. As an endocrinologist, half of my practice is devoted to treating patients with diabetes. Unfortunately, it is a growing problem in this country the number of adults living with diabetes in the U.S. has more than tripled in the last two decades. To make matters worse, every year my patients are getting younger. Type 2 diabetes is no longer a disease of middle aged or elderly adults. In fact, more than a third of adults in the U.S. have prediabetes, a condition of high blood sugars that often progresses into full-blown diabetes. Fortunately, detecting it earlyand taking the appropriate steps to manage itcan reverse the process. In the beginning stages of prediabetes or diabetes, patients typically have no symptoms. In fact, 90 percent of people with prediabetes do not even know they have the disease. This is why it is so important to follow up with annual physicals even if you are feeling well. Symptoms usually only appear when diabetes is very out of control, including feeling thirsty all the time, urinating more than usual, feeling very fatigued and changes in your vision throughout the day. The two biggest risk factors for developing diabetes include having a family member with diabetes or being overweight. If you fall into one or both of these categories, it is never too early to start screening for diabetes. Ive seen many young, healthy, active 20-someth Continue reading >>

Prevention And Management Of Type 2 Diabetes: Dietary Components And Nutritional Strategies

Prevention And Management Of Type 2 Diabetes: Dietary Components And Nutritional Strategies

Go to: Nutrition transition and global dietary trends At a macro-level, the type 2 diabetes epidemic has been attributed to urbanization and environmental transitions, including work pattern changes from heavy labor to sedentary occupations, increased computerization and mechanization, and improved transportation. Economic growth and environmental transitions have led to drastic changes in food production, processing, and distribution systems and increased the accessibility of unhealthful foods.3 Fast food restaurant establishments have experienced exponential global expansion in recent decades. This increased availability of fast foods has contributed to unhealthful diets with high calorie content; large portion sizes; and large amounts of processed meat, highly refined carbohydrates, sugary beverages, and unhealthy fats. Another key component in the food system transition has been the saturation of large chain supermarkets, which displace fresh local food and farm shops and serve as a source of highly processed foods, high-energy snacks, and sugary beverages.3 Parts of the world undergoing epidemiological transition have experienced a livestock revolution, which leads to increased production of beef, pork, dairy products, eggs, and poultry.3,4 Based on the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization data, this change has been especially drastic in Asian countries (Figure 1).4 Another characteristic of nutrition transition is increased refinement of grain products. Milling and processing whole grains to produce refined grains such as polished white rice and refined wheat flour reduce the nutritional content of grains, including their fiber, micronutrients, and phytochemicals. Continue reading >>

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