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Prevalence Of Type 2 Diabetes Uk 2016

Type 1 Diabetes Facts And Figures

Type 1 Diabetes Facts And Figures

The incidence of type 1 diabetes is growing at an alarming rate. View the latest figures and links to national public information resources below. Quick facts Approximately 400,000 people are currently living with type 1 diabetes in the UK, with over 29,000 of them children Incidence is increasing by about four per cent each year, particularly in children under five, with a five percent increase each year in this age group over the last 20 years Type 1 diabetes affects 97 per cent of all children with diabetes in England 90 per cent of people diagnosed with type 1 diabetes have no family history of the condition Although it used to be referred to as ‘juvenile diabetes’, around half of newly diagnosed cases are in people over the age of 18 The UK has one of the highest rates of type 1 diabetes in the world, for reasons that are currently unknown A person with type 1 diabetes will have around 65,000 injections and measure their blood glucose over 80,000 times in their lifetime Public information resources National Diabetes Audit – One of the largest annual clinical audits in the world. It measures the effectiveness of diabetes care against National Institute of Clinical Excellence clinical guidelines and quality standards. Quality and Outcomes Framework – This is the annual programme that details GP practice achievement results and rewards practices for the achievement of quality care. The QOF awards practices achievement points for managing some of the most common chronic diseases, diabetes being one. Continue reading >>

Prescribing For Diabetes England 2006/07 To 2016/17

Prescribing For Diabetes England 2006/07 To 2016/17

Author: Prescribing and Medicines Team, NHS Digital Responsible Statistician: Ian Bullard Prescribing for Diabetes reports on and examines prescribing trends on medicines prescribed in primary care in England for the treatment and monitoring of diabetes during the period April 2006 to March 2017. Key findings  Drugs used in diabetes (British National Formulary (BNF) section 6.1) now make up 11.0 per cent of total primary care net ingredient costs (NIC) and 4.7 per cent of prescription items (See Figure 1).  In the financial year 2016/17 there were 52.0 million items prescribed for diabetes at a total net ingredient cost of £983.7 million. Up from 28.9 million prescription items and £572.4 million in 2006/07.  Antidiabetic drugs (BNF section 6.1.2) make up 45.1 per cent of the total £983.7 million net ingredient cost of drugs used in diabetes and accounts for 72.0 per cent of prescription items for all diabetes prescribing. Copyright © 2017 Health and Social Care Information Centre. NHS Digital is the trading name of the Health and Social Care Information Centre. All other prescribing, £7,979.0m Insulins, £349.1m Antidiabetic Drugs, £443.7m Diagnostic and monitoring devices, £187.0m Other drugs used in diabetes, £4.0m Drugs used in diabetes, £983.7m Figure 1: Diabetes prescribing as a proportion of all prescribing England Measures used in this report Net Ingredient Cost (NIC) - NIC is the basic cost of a drug. It does not take account of discounts, dispensing costs, fees or prescription charges income, so the amount the NHS spent will be slightly different. Items - Prescriptions are written on a prescription form known as a FP10. Each single item written on the form is counted as a prescription item. Prescribing for Diab Continue reading >>

Diabetes Incidence And Historical Trends

Diabetes Incidence And Historical Trends

Type 1 Diabetes Incidence There are approximately 500,000 children aged under 15 with type 1 diabetes in the world (Patterson et al. 2014); in 2013 alone, 79,000 more children developed type 1 (IDF Diabetes Atlas 2013). Worldwide, the incidence of type 1 diabetes increased, on average, 3% per year between 1960 to 1996 in children under age 15 (Onkamo et al. 1999). Between 1990 and 1999, incidence increased in most continents, with a rise of 5.3% in North America, 4% in Asia, and 3.2% in Europe. This trend is especially troubling in the youngest children; for every hundred thousand children under age 5, 4% more were diagnosed every year, on average, worldwide (Diamond Project Group 2006). In the U.S., the latest data show that the prevalence of type 1 diabetes increased by 21% in children between 2001 and 2009 (Dabelea et al. 2014), and the incidence of type 1 diabetes in non-Hispanic whites increased by 2.7% per year between 2002 and 2009 (Lawrence et al. 2014). More recent numbers show that overall, type 1 diabetes incidence in children increased by 1.8% per year between 2002 and 2012 (Mayer-Davis et al. 2017). Those numbers are from the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study, which has study centers in 5 U.S. states. The CDC collects nation-wide data on diabetes, but does not differentiate between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. A study of a large population of U.S. patients with commercial health insurance found that type 1 (and type 2) prevalence increased between 2002-2013 in children (Li et al. 2015). Another study of U.S. patients-- both children and adults-- with commercial health insurance found that the type 1 diabetes incidence rate increased 1.9% in children between 2001 and 2015, and varied by area. The incidence decreased during that same time period in adults, al Continue reading >>

Report 2a: Complications And Mortality (complications Of Diabetes)

Report 2a: Complications And Mortality (complications Of Diabetes)

England and Wales • V0.22 • 7 March 2017 The Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership (HQIP). The National Diabetes Audit is commissioned by the Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership (HQIP) as part of the National Clinical Audit Programme (NCA). HQIP is led by a consortium of the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges, the Royal College of Nursing and National Voices. Its aim is to promote quality improvement, and in particular to increase the impact that clinical audit has on healthcare quality in England and Wales. HQIP holds the contract to manage and develop the NCA Programme, comprising more than 30 clinical audits that cover care provided to people with a wide range of medical, surgical and mental health conditions. The programme is funded by NHS England, the Welsh Government and, with some individual audits, also funded by the Health Department of the Scottish Government, DHSSPS Northern Ireland and the Channel Islands. NHS Digital is the new name for the Health and Social Care Information Centre. NHS Digital managed the publication of the 2015-2016 annual report. Diabetes UK is the largest organisation in the UK working for people with diabetes, funding research, campaigning and helping people live with the condition. 2 Prepared in collaboration with: The national cardiovascular intelligence network (NCVIN) is a partnership of leading national cardiovascular organisations which analyses information and data and turns it into meaningful timely health intelligence for commissioners, policy makers, clinicians and health professionals to improve services and outcomes. Supported by: Introduction 3 • This report from the National Diabetes Audit (NDA) covers complications of diabetes. It does not include diabetic eye disease or hypoglycaemia because Continue reading >>

:: Leicestershire Diabetes :: Reports And Statistics The Nhs Health Check Programme Let's Get It Right (sept 12)

:: Leicestershire Diabetes :: Reports And Statistics The Nhs Health Check Programme Let's Get It Right (sept 12)

Reports and statistics The NHS Health Check Programme Let's Get It Right (Sept 12) Reports and statistics The NHS Health Check Programme Let's Get It Right (Sept 12) Diabetes is the number one health threat in the UK. Currently 3.7 million people are living with the condition, with a further seven million at high risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. Its a condition that costs the NHS over 10 billion a year, yet 80 per cent of these costs are spent on complications that are, with good care, avoidable. The number of people with Type 2 diabetes in the UK is rising rapidly and is set to reach five million by 2025. Half of the people with Type 2 diabetes already have serious complications when they are diagnosed. It is imperative that we take action now to stem the rising tide of Type 2 diabetes and the massive human and economic costs associated with this serious long-term condition. A key aspect of tackling the rise in Type 2 diabetes and its devastating and costly complications is to bridge the gap between anticipated prevalence and those diagnosed. Currently about 850,000 people with Type 2 diabetes remain undiagnosed and the gap between actual and expected rates is closing only very slowly. The NHS Health Check programme, launched four years ago by the Department of Health in England, has huge potential to detect people with Type 2 diabetes and to identify those at high risk, who can then be given support and lifestyle interventions to reduce their risk and prevent onset of the condition. Diabetes UK is disappointed that, so far, this potential has not been realised. Read the rest of the article on the Diabetes Uk website Continue reading >>

Trends In Incidence, Prevalence And Prescribing In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Between 2000 And 2013 In Primary Care: A Retrospective Cohort Study

Trends In Incidence, Prevalence And Prescribing In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Between 2000 And 2013 In Primary Care: A Retrospective Cohort Study

Abstract Objective To investigate trends in incident and prevalent diagnoses of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and its pharmacological treatment between 2000 and 2013. Design Analysis of longitudinal electronic health records in The Health Improvement Network (THIN) primary care database. Outcome measures The incidence and prevalence of T2DM between 2000 and 2013, and the effect of age, sex and social deprivation on these measures were examined. Changes in prescribing patterns of antidiabetic therapy between 2000 and 2013 were also investigated. Results Overall, 406 344 individuals had a diagnosis of T2DM, of which 203 639 were newly diagnosed between 2000 and 2013. The incidence of T2DM rose from 3.69 per 1000 person-years at risk (PYAR) (95% CI 3.58 to 3.81) in 2000 to 3.99 per 1000 PYAR (95% CI 3.90 to 4.08) in 2013 among men; and from 3.06 per 1000 PYAR (95% CI 2.95 to 3.17) to 3.73 per 1000 PYAR (95% CI 3.65 to 3.82) among women. Prevalence of T2DM more than doubled from 2.39% (95% CI 2.37 to 2.41) in 2000 to 5.32% (95% CI 5.30 to 5.34) in 2013. Being male, older, and from a more socially deprived area was strongly associated with having T2DM, (p<0.001). Prescribing changes over time reflected emerging clinical guidance and novel treatments. In 2013, metformin prescribing peaked at 83.6% (95% CI 83.4% to 83.8%), while sulfonylureas prescribing reached a low of 41.4% (95% CI 41.1% to 41.7%). Both remained, however, the most commonly used pharmacological treatments as first-line agents and add-on therapy. Thiazolidinediones and incretin based therapies (gliptins and GLP-1 analogues) were also prescribed as alternate add-on therapy options, however were rarely used for first-line treatment in T2DM. Conclusions Prevalent cases of T2DM more than doubled between 2000 an Continue reading >>

Trends In Type 2 Diabetes Incidence And Mortality In Scotland Between 2004 And 2013

Trends In Type 2 Diabetes Incidence And Mortality In Scotland Between 2004 And 2013

Trends in type 2 diabetes incidence and mortality in Scotland between 2004 and 2013 1Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics, University of Edinburgh, Teviot Place, Edinburgh, EH8 9AG UK 1Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics, University of Edinburgh, Teviot Place, Edinburgh, EH8 9AG UK 1Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics, University of Edinburgh, Teviot Place, Edinburgh, EH8 9AG UK 1Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics, University of Edinburgh, Teviot Place, Edinburgh, EH8 9AG UK 2Information Services Division, NHS National Services Scotland, Edinburgh, UK 3Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK 4Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK 5Division of Cardiovascular & Diabetes Medicine, University of Dundee, Dundee, UK 6Metabolic Unit, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh, UK Stephanie H. Read, Email: [email protected] . Received 2016 Mar 28; Accepted 2016 Jun 24. Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. This article has been corrected. See Diabetologia. 2016 November; 59(11): 2492 . This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. The relative contribution of increasing incidence and declining mortality to increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes in Scotland is unclear. Trends in incidence and mortality rates are described for type 2 diabetes in Scotland between Continue reading >>

Freedom Of Information (foi):diabetes Statistics

Freedom Of Information (foi):diabetes Statistics

You asked Please could you provide me with the most upto date figure of diabetes diagnose in the UK. Also, the figures for type 1 and type 2 diabetes. If possible also, diabetes statistics for West Midlands. We said Thank you for your request. The requested information is not held by the Office for National Statistics. We suggest that you contact the Department of Health or NHS England to see what information they are able to provide. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Data Reveals Hotspots For Cases

Type 2 Diabetes: Data Reveals Hotspots For Cases

Type 2 diabetes: Data reveals hotspots for cases These are external links and will open in a new window Prescriptions for type 2 diabetes have risen by a third in England in the last five years from 26 million to 35 million a year, according to NHS data. The analysis of the data also shows there are hotspots for the disease in London and Lincolnshire, with the London borough of Newham having twice the national average of prescriptions. Diabetes UK said it was a good sign that the disease was being diagnosed. The next step was getting people to "manage their condition better". The figures that were looked at by data analysis company Exasol stretched to more than 700 million rows on spreadsheets and included every prescription handed out by pharmacies in England from August 2010 to July 2016. A mapping of the data shows large variations across the country. London boroughs have three of the highest prescribing areas - with Tower Hamlets and Harrow as well as Newham in the top 10. There is also a hotspot in the East Midlands - with Lincolnshire having two of the top three highest prescribing areas - in East Lindsey and South Holland. Krishna Sarda, the engagement communities manager for Diabetes UK, told the BBC both Lincolnshire and London had similarities in their populations. "Lincolnshire is such a huge patch. It's also got a very large migrant population and a very large working class population," he said. "In London and the East Midlands there is a very large BME (black and minority ethnic) population and ethnic minorities are between two to four times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes." He said both areas have done a lot of work around prevention and raising awareness of the condition. "One of the consequences of doing a lot of prevention and raising awareness Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes – where the body's immune system attacks and destroys the cells that produce insulin type 2 diabetes – where the body doesn't produce enough insulin, or the body's cells don't react to insulin Type 2 diabetes is far more common than type 1. In the UK, around 90% of all adults with diabetes have type 2. During pregnancy, some women have such high levels of blood glucose that their body is unable to produce enough insulin to absorb it all. This is known as gestational diabetes. Pre-diabetes Many more people have blood sugar levels above the normal range, but not high enough to be diagnosed as having diabetes. This is sometimes known as pre-diabetes. If your blood sugar level is above the normal range, your risk of developing full-blown diabetes is increased. It's very important for diabetes to be diagnosed as early as possible because it will get progressively worse if left untreated. When to see a doctor Visit your GP as soon as possible if you experience the main symptoms of diabetes, which include: urinating more frequently than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired weight loss and loss of muscle bulk cuts or wounds that heal slowly blurred vision Type 1 diabetes can develop quickly over weeks or even days. Many people have type 2 diabetes for years without realising because the early symptoms tend to be general. Causes of diabetes The amount of sugar in the blood is controlled by a hormone called insulin, which is produced by the pancreas (a gland behind the stomach). When food is digested and enters your bloodstream, insulin moves glucose out of the blood and into cells, where it's broken down to produce ene Continue reading >>

3.8 Million People In England Now Have Diabetes

3.8 Million People In England Now Have Diabetes

The new Diabetes Prevalence Model, produced by the Public Health England (PHE) National Cardiovascular Intelligence Network (NCVIN) and launched today at the PHE Conference at Warwick University, estimates the total number of adults with both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes in England. Whilst 3.8 million people are estimated to have both types of diabetes, approximately 90% of diabetes cases are Type 2; this is largely preventable or manageable by lifestyle changes and also provides additional benefits for health and wellbeing. The likelihood of developing Type 2 diabetes is increased by being overweight (although family history, ethnicity and age can also increase risk). The figures reiterate that diabetes is an increasing burden of ill health, underlining the need for urgent action to lessen the impact on individuals, as well as the health and social care system supporting them. The model suggests that 1 in 4 people with diabetes, an estimated 940,000, are unaware of their condition. The disease can lead to serious complications including foot amputation and kidney disease, and is associated with an increased risk of stroke and heart attack. John Newton, Chief Knowledge Officer at PHE, said: The number of people with diabetes has been steadily increasing and tackling it is fundamental to the sustainable future of the NHS. Diabetes can be an extremely serious disease for those that have it and treating it and its complications costs the NHS almost £10 billion a year. Developing Type 2 diabetes is not an inevitable part of aging, we have an opportunity through public health to reverse this trend and safeguard the health of the nation and the future of the NHS. The proportion of people who have diabetes increases with age: 9% of people aged 45 to 54 have diabetes, but for ov Continue reading >>

Examining Trends In Type 2 Diabetes Incidence, Prevalence And Mortality In The Uk Between 2004 And 2014

Examining Trends In Type 2 Diabetes Incidence, Prevalence And Mortality In The Uk Between 2004 And 2014

The full text of this article hosted at iucr.org is unavailable due to technical difficulties. Examining trends in type 2 diabetes incidence, prevalence and mortality in the UK between 2004 and 2014 Centre for Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety, Division of Pharmacy and Optometry, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre (MAHSC), Manchester, UK Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Tripoli, Tripoli, Libya Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Gastroenterology, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK Manchester Diabetes Centre, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre (MAHSC), Manchester, UK E-mail address: [email protected] Centre for Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety, Division of Pharmacy and Optometry, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre (MAHSC), Manchester, UK Professor Darren M. Ashcroft, Centre for Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety, University of Manchester, Stopford Building, Manchester, UK M13 9PT. Centre for Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety, Division of Pharmacy and Optometry, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre (MAHSC), Manchester, UK Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Tripoli, Tripoli, Libya Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Gastroenterology, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, Manchester, Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevalence Soars To 3.8 Million People In England

Diabetes Prevalence Soars To 3.8 Million People In England

One in four people with diabetes, an estimated 940,000, are unaware of their condition according to a new Diabetes Prevalence Model, produced by the Public Health England (PHE) National Cardiovascular Intelligence Network (NCVIN) and launched today at the PHE Conference at Warwick University, which estimates the total number of adults with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes in England. Whilst 3.8 million people are estimated to have both types of diabetes, approximately 90% of diabetes cases are type 2; this is largely preventable or manageable by lifestyle changes and also provides additional benefits for health and wellbeing. The likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes is increased by being overweight (although family history, ethnicity and age can also increase risk). The figures reiterate that diabetes is an increasing burden of ill health, underlining the need for urgent action to lessen the impact on individuals, as well as the health and social care system supporting them. The disease can lead to serious complications including foot amputation and kidney disease, and is associated with an increased risk of stroke and heart attack. John Newton, Chief Knowledge Officer at PHE, said: "The number of people with diabetes has been steadily increasing and tackling it is fundamental to the sustainable future of the NHS. Diabetes can be an extremely serious disease for those that have it and treating it and its complications costs the NHS almost £10 billion a year. "Developing type 2 diabetes is not an inevitable part of aging, we have an opportunity through public health to reverse this trend and safeguard the health of the nation and the future of the NHS." The proportion of people who have diabetes increases with age: 9% of people aged 45 to 54 have diabetes, but for ov Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevalence

Diabetes Prevalence

Tweet Since 1996, the number of people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK has risen from 1.4 million to 3.5 million. Taking into account the number of people likely to be living with undiagnosed diabetes, the number of people living with diabetes in the UK is over 4 million. Diabetes prevalence in the UK is estimated to rise to 5 million by 2025. Type 2 diabetes in particular has been growing at the particularly high rate and is now one of the world’s most common long term health conditions. UK diabetes prevalence Currently, the number of people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK is estimated to be 3.5 million. [16] It is predicted that up to 549,000 people in the UK have diabetes that is yet to be diagnosed. This means that, including the number of undiagnosed people, there is estimated to be over 4 million people living with diabetes in the UK at present. This represents 6% of the UK population or 1 in every 16 people having diabetes (diagnosed and undiagnosed). The prevalence of diabetes in the UK (for adults) is broken down as follows: How many people have diabetes in the UK Country Number of People England 2,913,538 Northern Ireland 84,836 Scotland 271,312 Wales 183,348 The majority of these cases are of type 2 diabetes, which has been linked to increasing cases of obesity. Statistics suggest that a slightly higher proportion of adult men have diabetes. Men account for 56 per cent of UK adults with diabetes and women account for 44 per cent. World diabetes prevalence It is estimated that 415 million people are living with diabetes in the world, which is estimated to be 1 in 11 of the world’s adult population. 46% of people with diabetes are undiagnosed. The figure is expected to rise to 642 million people living with diabetes worldwide by 2040. Prevalence across Continue reading >>

Five Million People At High Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes, New Figures Estimate

Five Million People At High Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes, New Figures Estimate

Five million people in England have blood sugar levels indicating a high risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, according to a new report published today. The Public Health England (PHE) report provides the most up to date estimate of how many people over 16 in England have a high risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. It was commissioned by the NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme (NHS DPP) run by NHS England, (PHE) and Diabetes UK, and compiled by PHE’s National Cardiovascular Health Intelligence Network (NCVIN). The NHS DPP will support people in reducing their risk of developing Type 2 diabetes by helping them lose weight, be more active and have a healthier diet. The new estimate further underlines the need to act on Type 2 diabetes, especially as it already results in 22,000 early deaths and costs the NHS £8.8billion every year. An evidence review also published today by PHE shows programmes similar to the NHS DPP can be successful in preventing 26% of people at high risk of Type 2 diabetes from going on to develop the condition. People supported by diabetes prevention programmes lose on average 1.57kg more weight than those not on a programme aiming to significantly reduce diabetes risk. Both reports have shaped what the NHS DPP will offer – at least nine months of information, support, group and one to one sessions on weight loss, physical activity and diet. Practitioners, clinicians, academics and the public are currently being consulted on a proposed outline of the programme. Consultation responses will further inform the programme, with a phased national rollout starting in 2016. For more information visit the PHE website. Continue reading >>

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