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Prevalence Of Diabetes

Prevalence Of Diabetic Retinopathy And Visual Impairment In Patients With Diabetes Mellitus In Zambia Through The Implementation Of A Mobile Diabetic Retinopathy Screening Project In The Copperbelt Province: A Cross-sectional Study

Prevalence Of Diabetic Retinopathy And Visual Impairment In Patients With Diabetes Mellitus In Zambia Through The Implementation Of A Mobile Diabetic Retinopathy Screening Project In The Copperbelt Province: A Cross-sectional Study

Prevalence of diabetic retinopathy and visual impairment in patients with diabetes mellitus in Zambia through the implementation of a mobile diabetic retinopathy screening project in the Copperbelt province: a cross-sectional study A paucity of literature exists on prevalence of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in sub-Saharan Africa. We aim to estimate the prevalence of DR and visual impairment in Zambias Copperbelt province through a cross-sectional study. All patients with a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus attending a DR screening programme were eligible to participate. Fundus photographs were graded in accordance with the DR grading system used in the UK National Health service (NHS). Visual impairment data were collected from visual acuity measurements recorded using Snellen chart. A total of 2689 patients were screened and of these, 2153 patients had a least one eye of gradable quality for analysis. Fifty-five per cent (1190/2153) of patients were male. Mean age was 56 (SD 11). Fifty-two per cent (1113/2153) showed evidence of diabetic retinopathy (DR). Thirty-six per cent of patients graded (779/2153) had sight threatening DR. Proliferative DR was found in 7% (14/208) of type 1 diabetics compared to 5% (42/921) type 2 diabetics (p = <0.001). Duration of diabetes, random blood glucose, systolic and diastolic BP, and use of insulin and oral hypoglycaemics were strongly associated with DR in univariate analysis. The associations of increased systolic BP, random blood glucose, duration of diabetes and insulin use with DR were maintained in multivariate analysis. We observed a high prevalence of sight threatening DR which is close to the upper range of estimates that currently exist on DR. This study represents further evidence of global health inequality and the scale of the Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

The number of people with diabetes has risen from 108 million in 1980 to 422 million in 2014 (1). The global prevalence of diabetes* among adults over 18 years of age has risen from 4.7% in 1980 to 8.5% in 2014 (1). Diabetes prevalence has been rising more rapidly in middle- and low-income countries. Diabetes is a major cause of blindness, kidney failure, heart attacks, stroke and lower limb amputation. In 2015, an estimated 1.6 million deaths were directly caused by diabetes. Another 2.2 million deaths were attributable to high blood glucose in 2012**. Almost half of all deaths attributable to high blood glucose occur before the age of 70 years. WHO projects that diabetes will be the seventh leading cause of death in 2030 (1). Healthy diet, regular physical activity, maintaining a normal body weight and avoiding tobacco use are ways to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. Diabetes can be treated and its consequences avoided or delayed with diet, physical activity, medication and regular screening and treatment for complications. Diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs either when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces. Insulin is a hormone that regulates blood sugar. Hyperglycaemia, or raised blood sugar, is a common effect of uncontrolled diabetes and over time leads to serious damage to many of the body's systems, especially the nerves and blood vessels. In 2014, 8.5% of adults aged 18 years and older had diabetes. In 2015, diabetes was the direct cause of 1.6 million deaths and in 2012 high blood glucose was the cause of another 2.2 million deaths. Type 1 diabetes (previously known as insulin-dependent, juvenile or childhood-onset) is characterized by deficient insulin production and Continue reading >>

Prevalence Of And Trends In Diabetes Among Adults In The United States, 1988-2012

Prevalence Of And Trends In Diabetes Among Adults In The United States, 1988-2012

Importance Previous studies have shown increasing prevalence of diabetes in the United States. New US data are available to estimate prevalence of and trends in diabetes. Objective To estimate the recent prevalence and update US trends in total diabetes, diagnosed diabetes, and undiagnosed diabetes using National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data. Design, Setting, and Participants Cross-sectional surveys conducted between 1988-1994 and 1999-2012 of nationally representative samples of the civilian, noninstitutionalized US population; 2781 adults from 2011-2012 were used to estimate recent prevalence and an additional 23 634 adults from 1988-2010 were used to estimate trends. Main Outcomes and Measures The prevalence of diabetes was defined using a previous diagnosis of diabetes or, if diabetes was not previously diagnosed, by (1) a hemoglobin A1c level of 6.5% or greater or a fasting plasma glucose (FPG) level of 126 mg/dL or greater (hemoglobin A1c or FPG definition) or (2) additionally including 2-hour plasma glucose (2-hour PG) level of 200 mg/dL or greater (hemoglobin A1c, FPG, or 2-hour PG definition). Prediabetes was defined as a hemoglobin A1c level of 5.7% to 6.4%, an FPG level of 100 mg/dL to 125 mg/dL, or a 2-hour PG level of 140 mg/dL to 199 mg/dL. Results In the overall 2011-2012 population, the unadjusted prevalence (using the hemoglobin A1c, FPG, or 2-hour PG definitions for diabetes and prediabetes) was 14.3% (95% CI, 12.2%-16.8%) for total diabetes, 9.1% (95% CI, 7.8%-10.6%) for diagnosed diabetes, 5.2% (95% CI, 4.0%-6.9%) for undiagnosed diabetes, and 38.0% (95% CI, 34.7%-41.3%) for prediabetes; among those with diabetes, 36.4% (95% CI, 30.5%-42.7%) were undiagnosed. The unadjusted prevalence of total diabetes (using the hemoglobin A Continue reading >>

The Prevalence Of Diabetes In Minority Groups – Are Some Ethnic Groups More Affected With Diabetes Than Other Groups?

The Prevalence Of Diabetes In Minority Groups – Are Some Ethnic Groups More Affected With Diabetes Than Other Groups?

A few days ago, a colleague and I were talking about diabetes and how its diagnosis has increased in great numbers in the past few years. We are all aware of the role that a healthy and active lifestyle, tight blood glucose controls and effective management plays in a person with diabetes’ life. However, as we continued discussing the many aspects of diabetes in today’s time, we paused a second to ponder over whether race or ethnicity plays any role in the diagnosis of diabetes in a person, if so, why would that be? And further, how can it be prevented? I began digging to find out what I can learn about diabetes and the role that race and ethnicity has to diabetes. I had many questions: Is this something that has been studied by experts in the field? How is race associated to diabetes and its diagnosis? What puts a certain group at higher risk and more susceptible to getting diabetes over the other group? How can high risk populations prevent further diagnosis to happen? To my wonder, a lot of studies have been conducted, research have been done and lots written on this particular topic. Today, we would like to share these important findings and studies with our readers. We will also explore the many ways that advocacy groups are looking to bring health equity to all races and ethnicity. For more informational diabetes articles read the following: Some important numbers According to the American Diabetes Association, African Americans, Mexican Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans are some of the ethnic groups who are at a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes and the complications that come with diabetes such as limb amputations, retinopathy and kidney failure.1 Here are some rather disturbing numbers when it comes to Diabetes epidemic in racial and ethn Continue reading >>

Prevalence Of Diabetes In The World, 2013

Prevalence Of Diabetes In The World, 2013

Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disease that occurs when the human body is not able to produce enough of the hormone insulin or because cells do not respond to the insulin that is produced. High blood sugar produces symptoms of frequent urination, increased thirst and hunger. All types of diabetes should be treated under a close collaboration between patients and healthcare providers in order to prevent long-term complications such as damage to the eyes, kidney, feet and heart. People with diabetes must be treated to avoid early death. The global prevalence of diabetes in adult population in 2013 is presented in this article. The estimated prevalence of diabetes in adult population (20-79 years old) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) expressed in percentages are used as metrics. An interactive data visualization was designed to explore the data and communicate the findings. Data source is the Sixth edition of the International Diabetes Federation Atlas of Diabetes. Globally in 2013, it is estimated that almost 382 million people suffer from diabetes for a prevalence of 8.3%. North America and the Caribbean is the region with the higher prevalence of 11% having 37 million people with diabetes followed by the Middle East and North Africa with a prevalence of 9.2% having 35 million people with diabetes. Western Pacific is the region with higher number of people living with diabetes (138 million), however its prevalence is 8.6%, close to the prevalence of the World. In 2013, the top 10 countries with higher prevalence of diabetes are Tokelau (37.5%), Federated States of Micronesia (35%), Marshall Islands (34.9%), Kiribati (28.8%), Cook Islands (25.7%), Vanuatu (24%), Saudi Arabia (23.9%), Nauru (23.3%), Kuwait (23.1%) and Qatar (22.9%). It is interesting to highlight that Continue reading >>

Prevalence Of Diabetes Before And After First Diagnosis Of Coronary Artery Disease

Prevalence Of Diabetes Before And After First Diagnosis Of Coronary Artery Disease

Prevalence of diabetes before and after first diagnosis of coronary artery disease He has contributed to the idea, design, data interpretation and literature search, and to the preparation, revision and approval of the manuscript. Jarle Jortveit, PhD, specialist in internal medicine and cardiac diseases and senior consultant. The author has completed the ICMJE form and reports the following conflicts of interest: He has received fees from Astra Zeneca, Boehringer-Ingelheim and Pfizer. She has contributed to the idea, design, data interpretation and literature search, and to the preparation, revision and approval of the manuscript. Anete Kaldal, specialty registrar and PhD candidate. The author has completed the ICMJE form and reports no conflicts of interest. Department of Endocrinology, Morbid Obesity and Preventive Medicine She has contributed to the idea, design, data interpretation and literature search, and to the preparation, revision and approval of the manuscript. Serena Tonstad, senior consultant at the Department of Endocrinology, Morbid Obesity and Preventive Medicine, Oslo University Hospital. The author has completed the ICMJE form and reports the following conflicts of interest: She has received fees from AstraZeneca, Boehringer-Ingelheim, Novo-Nordisk and MSD. Continue reading >>

Global Prevalence Of Diabetes

Global Prevalence Of Diabetes

Estimates for the year 2000 and projections for 2030 Abstract OBJECTIVE—The goal of this study was to estimate the prevalence of diabetes and the number of people of all ages with diabetes for years 2000 and 2030. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Data on diabetes prevalence by age and sex from a limited number of countries were extrapolated to all 191 World Health Organization member states and applied to United Nations’ population estimates for 2000 and 2030. Urban and rural populations were considered separately for developing countries. RESULTS—The prevalence of diabetes for all age-groups worldwide was estimated to be 2.8% in 2000 and 4.4% in 2030. The total number of people with diabetes is projected to rise from 171 million in 2000 to 366 million in 2030. The prevalence of diabetes is higher in men than women, but there are more women with diabetes than men. The urban population in developing countries is projected to double between 2000 and 2030. The most important demographic change to diabetes prevalence across the world appears to be the increase in the proportion of people >65 years of age. CONCLUSIONS—These findings indicate that the “diabetes epidemic” will continue even if levels of obesity remain constant. Given the increasing prevalence of obesity, it is likely that these figures provide an underestimate of future diabetes prevalence. The number of people with diabetes is increasing due to population growth, aging, urbanization, and increasing prevalence of obesity and physical inactivity. Quantifying the prevalence of diabetes and the number of people affected by diabetes, now and in the future, is important to allow rational planning and allocation of resources. Estimates of current and future diabetes prevalence have been published previously Continue reading >>

Incidence & Prevalence Of Diabetes

Incidence & Prevalence Of Diabetes

Diabetes Incidence and Prevalence According to the World Health Organization (WHO) in November 2014, about 347 million people have diabetes worldwide. WHO estimates that in 2012, approximately 1.5 million deaths were directly caused by diabetes, and more than 80 percent of these deaths occurred in low- and middle-income areas. WHO projects that by 2030, diabetes will be the seventh leading cause of death worldwide. To promote effective measures geared to reducing diabetes risk, WHO: provides guidelines for diabetes prevention develops standards for diabetes diagnosis and care works with other organizations to build diabetes awareness conducts studies on diabetes risk factors In April 2014, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) reported that the percentage of people with diabetes in the United States doubled since 1998. Nearly 1 in 10 adults have been diagnosed with the condition, and fewer people are thought to be undiagnosed—perhaps due to improved screening methods for diabetes. According to the NIH in September 2015, data from 2011–2012 showed that 12 to 14 percent of adults in the United States had diabetes. This research also showed that more than half of Asian Americans, nearly half of Hispanic Americans, and 25–36 percent of all adults with diabetes didn't know they had it. It also showed that 36 to 38 percent of all adults had prediabetes (blood glucose levels higher than normal but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) identified an area of the United States where the incidence of type 2 diabetes is higher than in other parts of the country. This "diabetes belt" is located primarily in 15 states in the South East region. According to the CDC, obesity and lack of physical activity account for a Continue reading >>

Diabetes Atlas Global Estimates Of The Prevalence Of Diabetes For 2010 And 2030

Diabetes Atlas Global Estimates Of The Prevalence Of Diabetes For 2010 And 2030

Abstract We estimated the number of people worldwide with diabetes for the years 2010 and 2030. Methods Studies from 91 countries were used to calculate age- and sex-specific diabetes prevalences, which were applied to national population estimates, to determine national diabetes prevalences for all 216 countries for 2010 and 2030. Studies were identified using Medline, and contact with all national and regional International Diabetes Federation offices. Studies were included if diabetes prevalence was assessed using a population-based methodology, and was based on World Health Organization or American Diabetes Association diagnostic criteria for at least three separate age-groups within the 20–79 year range. Self-report or registry data were used if blood glucose assessment was not available. The world prevalence of diabetes among adults (aged 20–79 years) will be 6.4%, affecting 285 million adults, in 2010, and will increase to 7.7%, and 439 million adults by 2030. Between 2010 and 2030, there will be a 69% increase in numbers of adults with diabetes in developing countries and a 20% increase in developed countries. Conclusion These predictions, based on a larger number of studies than previous estimates, indicate a growing burden of diabetes, particularly in developing countries. Continue reading >>

High Prevalence Of Diabetes And Intermediate Hyperglycemia The Brazilian Longitudinal Study Of Adult Health (elsa-brasil)

High Prevalence Of Diabetes And Intermediate Hyperglycemia The Brazilian Longitudinal Study Of Adult Health (elsa-brasil)

Schmidt et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.2014 The global burden of diabetes mellitus and other chronic diseases is high, and 80% of those with diabetes now live in low and middle income countries. Yet, little information is available regarding prevalence of diabetes and intermediate hyperglycemia in these countries, especially when a full range of diagnostic tests is employed. The purpose of this study is to provide a full accounting of these prevalences in a large, free-living Brazilian population. We report baseline data (2008-2010) from the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil), a cohort study of 15,105 civil servants aged 35-74years. Diabetes mellitus was ascertained by self-report of diagnosis, medication use, fasting glucose, an oral glucose tolerance test, and/or glycated hemoglobin. Cut-offs for diabetes and intermediate hyperglycemia followed the recommendations of the World Health Organization and the American Diabetes Association. Adjusted prevalences were estimated through logistic regression. With this full accounting, 19.7% (19.0%-20.3%) had diabetes mellitus, 50.4% being previously undiagnosed. Frequencies of intermediate hyperglycemia according to various criteria ranged from 16.1% to 52.6%. Diabetes or intermediate hyperglycemia was present in 79.1% of participants when using the most comprehensive definitions. The burden was greatest in the elderly, the obese, non-whites, and those with less formal education (p < 0.001). That four of every five free-living individuals aged 35-74years working in selected public institutions in six Brazilian state capitals presented either diabetes or intermediate hyperglycemia highlights the advanced stage of the obesity diabetes epidemic in urban Brazil and indicates the need for urgent action. Continue reading >>

Global Prevalence Of Diabetes: Estimates For The Year 2000 And Projections For 2030.

Global Prevalence Of Diabetes: Estimates For The Year 2000 And Projections For 2030.

Abstract OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to estimate the prevalence of diabetes and the number of people of all ages with diabetes for years 2000 and 2030. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Data on diabetes prevalence by age and sex from a limited number of countries were extrapolated to all 191 World Health Organization member states and applied to United Nations' population estimates for 2000 and 2030. Urban and rural populations were considered separately for developing countries. RESULTS: The prevalence of diabetes for all age-groups worldwide was estimated to be 2.8% in 2000 and 4.4% in 2030. The total number of people with diabetes is projected to rise from 171 million in 2000 to 366 million in 2030. The prevalence of diabetes is higher in men than women, but there are more women with diabetes than men. The urban population in developing countries is projected to double between 2000 and 2030. The most important demographic change to diabetes prevalence across the world appears to be the increase in the proportion of people >65 years of age. CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate that the "diabetes epidemic" will continue even if levels of obesity remain constant. Given the increasing prevalence of obesity, it is likely that these figures provide an underestimate of future diabetes prevalence. Continue reading >>

Prevalence Of Diabetes In Adolescents Aged 12 To 19 Years In The United States, 2005-2014

Prevalence Of Diabetes In Adolescents Aged 12 To 19 Years In The United States, 2005-2014

Prevalence of Diabetes in Adolescents Aged 12 to 19 Years in the United States, 2005-2014 1Social & Scientific Systems, Silver Spring, Maryland 2National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland Copyright 2016 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use. JAMA. 2016;316(3):344-345. doi:10.1001/jama.2016.8544 Few data are available on the prevalence of diabetes among adolescents in the United States, particularly the percentage of those undiagnosed. 1 , 2 The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of diabetes, the percentage of those who were unaware of their diabetes, and the prediabetes prevalence among adolescents using nationally representative data. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) is a series of 2-year stratified, multistage probability surveys representative of the civilian, noninstitutionalized US population, which include in-person interviews and examinations in mobile centers. 3 We used data from 2005-2014 (in which all relevant glucose data were available) from adolescents aged 12 to 19 years who were randomly selected for the morning examination session after fasting. The response rate among adolescents was 83% for the interview and 81% for the examination. Written informed consent was obtained from participants aged 18 to 19 years; among participants aged 12 to 17 years, written assent was obtained and written informed consent from parents/guardians. The research ethics boards of the National Center for Health Statistics approved all protocols. A questionnaire was used to collect demographic information. 3 Participants were asked if they had ever been diagnosed with diabetes by a doct Continue reading >>

Prevalence Of Diabetes Among Migrant Women And Duration Of Residence In The United Arab Emirates: A Cross Sectional Study

Prevalence Of Diabetes Among Migrant Women And Duration Of Residence In The United Arab Emirates: A Cross Sectional Study

Prevalence of Diabetes among Migrant Women and Duration of Residence in the United Arab Emirates: A Cross Sectional Study Syed M. Shah , Raghib Ali , Tom Loney , Faisal Aziz , Iffat ElBarazi , Salma Al Dhaheri , M. Hamed Farooqi , Iain Blair Affiliation: Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates Affiliations: Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates, Public Health Research Center, New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates Affiliation: Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates Affiliation: Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates Affiliation: Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates Affiliation: Ambulatory Health Services, SEHA, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates Affiliation: Dubai Diabetes Center, Dubai Health Authority, Dubai, United Arab Emirates Affiliation: Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates The prevalence rate of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is one of the highest in United Arab Emirates (UAE), however data for the expatriate population is limited. This study aimed to identify the prevalence of T2DM amongst migrant women and test the hypothesis that acculturation (measured by years of residency) is associated with an increased risk of T2DM. This was a cross-sectional study and we recruited a representative sample Continue reading >>

Prevalence Of Diabetes And Relationship With Socioeconomic Status In The Thai Population: National Health Examination Survey, 20042014

Prevalence Of Diabetes And Relationship With Socioeconomic Status In The Thai Population: National Health Examination Survey, 20042014

Prevalence of Diabetes and Relationship with Socioeconomic Status in the Thai Population: National Health Examination Survey, 20042014 1Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Rama VI Rd., Ratchathewi, Bangkok, Thailand 2Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand 3Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand 4Epidemiology Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla, Thailand 5College of Public Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand 6Ramathibodi School of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand Correspondence should be addressed to Wichai Aekplakorn ; [email protected] Received 15 April 2017; Accepted 9 January 2018; Published 1 March 2018 Copyright 2018 Wichai Aekplakorn et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Objective. To determine the prevalence and trend of diabetes, related glycemic control, and influential socioeconomic (SES) factors in the Thai population aged 20 years during 20042014. Methods. Data from the Thai National Health Examination Survey 2004, 2009, and 2014 were used. Age-adjusted prevalence was calculated, and the associations of education levels with prevalence of diabetes and glycemic control were examined using logistic regression. Results. Age-adjusted prevalence of diabetes increased from 7.7% in 2004 to 7.8% in 2009 and 9.9% in 2014 (8.9% among men and 10.8% among women). Proportions of undiagnosed diabetes were slightly decreased but remained high in 2014 (51.2% for men and 41.3% for women Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevalence

Diabetes Prevalence

Tweet Since 1996, the number of people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK has risen from 1.4 million to 3.5 million. Taking into account the number of people likely to be living with undiagnosed diabetes, the number of people living with diabetes in the UK is over 4 million. Diabetes prevalence in the UK is estimated to rise to 5 million by 2025. Type 2 diabetes in particular has been growing at the particularly high rate and is now one of the world’s most common long term health conditions. UK diabetes prevalence Currently, the number of people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK is estimated to be 3.5 million. [16] It is predicted that up to 549,000 people in the UK have diabetes that is yet to be diagnosed. This means that, including the number of undiagnosed people, there is estimated to be over 4 million people living with diabetes in the UK at present. This represents 6% of the UK population or 1 in every 16 people having diabetes (diagnosed and undiagnosed). The prevalence of diabetes in the UK (for adults) is broken down as follows: How many people have diabetes in the UK Country Number of People England 2,913,538 Northern Ireland 84,836 Scotland 271,312 Wales 183,348 The majority of these cases are of type 2 diabetes, which has been linked to increasing cases of obesity. Statistics suggest that a slightly higher proportion of adult men have diabetes. Men account for 56 per cent of UK adults with diabetes and women account for 44 per cent. World diabetes prevalence It is estimated that 415 million people are living with diabetes in the world, which is estimated to be 1 in 11 of the world’s adult population. 46% of people with diabetes are undiagnosed. The figure is expected to rise to 642 million people living with diabetes worldwide by 2040. Prevalence across Continue reading >>

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