diabetestalk.net

Prescription Diabetic Foot Cream

Topical Medications For Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

Topical Medications For Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

Do your feet tingle, burn or itch? If so, then you might have some nerves going haywire in your feet. Millions of people are affected by neuropathy which causes the nerves in the feet and eventually the hands to start acting weird. The feet are usually affected first because those nerves are the longest and therefore the most difficult to keep healthy. Sometimes neuropathy does not hurt; it just causes a strange or numb sensation. But when neuropathy does hurt, it can feel like the limbs are being attacked by thousands of sharp needles, ice buckets or hot pokers. You might feel like you are under attack if you have painful diabetic neuropathy. Treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy should first start with supplements and gaining control of blood sugar levels. Next, the treatment usually involves medications that are ingested by mouth. These oral medications treat nerve pain. Unfortunately, these same treatments can lead to other problems like drowsiness, dizziness and difficulty concentrating, just to name a few of the common side effects. Wouldn’t it be nice if there were medications without side effects? Well, there is if you consider topical medications that can be rubbed on the feet and/or hands. Although there are many topical medications available without a prescription, the ones that might work the best for painful neuropathies are only available with a prescription. In a recent study conducted at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, researchers proved that topical clonidine applied three times daily for 12 weeks reduced the pain from diabetic neuropathy in the right candidates.1 Clonidine is an interesting drug because it is also used to treat high blood pressure and hyperhydrosis. But because of its unique action on the nervous system, clonidine is also useful Continue reading >>

Flexitol Foot Cream | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Flexitol Foot Cream | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I have recently bought some flexitol cream (contains Urea). I am also in the process of reading Dr Bernstein's book in which he says don't use Urea. I know a couple have said that they use flexitol and it does say on the tube ok for diabetics. What do you think - is it safe to use. I don't know why DrB says it's not safe. I couldn't find in Dr B's books a mention of urea, but I can understand why he would be concerned. One problem that diabetics have is a high risk of diabetic nephropathy (damage to kidney function). Urea is nephrotoxic and can therefore cause renal damage. The choice is yours but when it comes to a choice between what an unbiased endocrinologist recommends and a contradictory claim made by a manufacturer, I know which one I prefer to believe! There must be an alternative treatment that doesn't contain urea. I have always used flexitol whenever i developed cracked heels, never realised it has urea in it, DOH, it is just that I know flexitol works really fast for me, usually only need it for 3 or 4 days at a time. But now I avoid getting dry feet by using The Sanctuary's heel balm or just any of the body butters from Lush or Body Shop, every night I apply the stuff quite thickly and then put on moisturising or spa socks on, in the morning my feet are as soft as a baby's bottom! I think there are also many home made remedies around, do a search on google. Ref: DrB page 72, Skin lubricants, line 5. I'll be going with what he says. Urea is a very good moisturiser. My family are North Sea fishermen. They used to pee on their cracked hands when on the boats to get them to heal and reduce the pain. Don't know if it helps the flavour of the f Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Care Cream: Common Ingredients

Diabetic Foot Care Cream: Common Ingredients

In the battle against diabetes complications, foot care is one of the most important aspects. Taking good care of your feet often involves using an appropriate lotion or foot cream. From keeping your feet moisturized to helping you deal with peripheral neuropathy, diabetic foot care cream can help with a number of issues. What's in diabetic foot care cream? With over 14 years of diabetes experience under my belt, I have tried out my share of creams and lotions for the feet. A quick perusal of my medicine cabinet turned up several items with a wide variety of ingredients. I made a list of the most common ingredients, gleaned information on some from the packaging and turned to the power of the Internet to look up the others. Here are a few of the most popular ingredients in those foot creams, along with what they do and why you might use them: L-Arginine HCL. This ingredient comes from a naturally occurring amino acid. It warms the feet, so it can be a good idea for those who have trouble with feet that stay uncomfortably cold. Capsaicin. This natural active component of chili peppers provides slow, gentle warming upon application. This can help ease the aches and pains of the feet. Aloe. This natural cooling pain relief can also help heal wounds on the feet. Urea. This product is commonly used in lotions for the re-hydrating effect it can have on the skin. This is especially effective for areas that are extremely dry. Ammonium lactate. This ingredient calms itchy skin and leaves behind a moisturized, cool feeling. Lidocaine. This topical pain reliever can be mixed with other ingredients to provide a cooling sensation and relief of minor aches and pains. TriOxygenC. Some products include this patented formula, which helps increase oxygen flow to the skin. Retin-A. This i Continue reading >>

Peripheral Neuropathy And Diabetes

Peripheral Neuropathy And Diabetes

Pain. Tingling. Numbness. If you have a type of nerve damage from diabetes called diabetic peripheral neuropathy, chances are you've experienced these symptoms, especially in your hands and feet. The discomfort can affect your mood, sleep, and overall quality of life. Prescription medications can help. But research shows that they only ease the pain by about 30% to 50%. How can you bridge the gap? Learn how you can get relief now -- and prevent the condition from getting worse down the road. If don't manage your diabetes, your blood glucose levels get too high. Over time, excess blood sugar can damage your peripheral nerves. These connect your brain and spinal cord to the rest of your body. That could set the stage for diabetic neuropathy. If you bring your blood sugar into the healthy range (a hemoglobin A1C reading of 7% or lower), you'll reduce your risk of nerve damage by 60%, according to research from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. "Healthy blood sugar levels can slow the process and ease the pain of diabetic neuropathy," says Aaron I. Vinik, MD, PhD, the director of the research and neuroendocrine unit at Eastern Virginia Medical School. How can you keep your blood sugar in check? First, talk to your doctor. "A rapid drop can actually make the pain worse," Vinik says. Your doctor can suggest changes to gently bring your levels down into the healthy zone, like: Eat a diet high that's in fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy, and whole grains; contains a moderate amount of fish, poultry, nuts, and beans; and has a very low amount of red meat. Manage your stress levels. Exercise for at least 30 minutes, 5 days a week. If your doctor prescribes medication for your blood sugar, take it as recommended. Acetaminophen, aspirin, ibuprofe Continue reading >>

Original Article Use Of Calendula Cream Balm To Medicate The Feet Of Diabetic Patients: Case Series

Original Article Use Of Calendula Cream Balm To Medicate The Feet Of Diabetic Patients: Case Series

Abstract Introduction Different products are used on the foot injuries of diabetic patients with more or less effective results. Calendula officinalis, which is used for its effective antihaemorrhagic properties, also known to the ancient Romans, who used it directly on injuries, is used as a topical anti-inflammatory, healing, and antiseptic treatment, although this is scarcely documented. There is no study in the literature to demonstrate the effectiveness of calendula cream in the prevention and cure of foot injuries on diabetic patients. Bio Calendula, Dr. Theiss, cream balm by Naturwaren was recommended to 4 patients diagnosed with diabetes and various injuries (micro traumas) on their lower and upper limbs, which showed all the signs and symptoms of ongoing infection: lesions with pus, swollen, red edges, localised heat, and pain. The cream was to be applied twice daily, after cleansing with very mild soaps or bath&shower gel, and warm water, WITHOUT rubbing the cleanser onto the limbs. The cream was to be applied with a gentle massage, until fully absorbed, WITHOUT covering the injuries. It is well known that incorrect treatment to even small foot injuries on diabetic patients can lead to serious complications, including infections that can in turn lead to amputation. As shown in the photographs taken over different periods during the use of the cream balm, the results are excellent; the healing process is easy to see and the progress of the infection process has been blocked, reducing itching, redness, pain, dryness, the disappearance of various scars, regrowth of hair on the legs, no intolerance and great patient satisfaction. Observational studies of RCTs (Random Trial Controls) could help clinics in understanding whether or not this cream is suitable for inju Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Tips For Daily Foot Care

Diabetes: Tips For Daily Foot Care

If you have diabetes, it's essential to make foot care part of your daily self-care routine. That's because "people can develop complications before they realize they even have a problem," says Bresta Miranda-Palma, MD, a professor with the Diabetes Research Institute at the University of Miami Medical School. "I've seen people walk on a nail for weeks until infection has developed." When feet and legs have nerve damage, a small cut or wound can go unnoticed. That's why it's critical to check for problems before they get infected and lead to serious complications -- like gangrene or amputation. "Daily foot care is the most important thing," says Miranda-Palma. "About 85% of amputations can be prevented if the patient gets a wound treated in time." That means checking your feet daily and seeing a foot doctor (podiatrist) every two or three months in order to catch problems early. Daily Care you might like Wash and dry your feet with mild soap and warm water. Dry your feet thoroughly, especially between the toes, an area more prone to fungal infections. Use lotion on your feet to prevent cracking, but don't put the lotion between your toes. Do not soak feet, or you'll risk infection if the skin begins to break down. And if you have nerve damage, take care with water temperature. You risk burning your skin if you can't feel that the water is too hot. Weekly Care Trim toenails straight across with a nail clipper. You can prevent ingrown toenails if you don't round the corners of the nails or cut down the sides. Smooth the nails with an emery board. Check the tops and bottoms of your feet, using a mirror if you need it; you can also ask someone else to check your feet for you. Also, be sure to get your feet examined at every doctor's visit. When examining your feet, look for Continue reading >>

Ammonium Lactate–containing Moisturizers: A Systematic Review

Ammonium Lactate–containing Moisturizers: A Systematic Review

US Pharm. 2014;39(11):46-49. ABSTRACT: Patients with diabetes often suffer from foot complications, including ulcers, infections, and even amputations. These complications may begin as xerosis (i.e., drying of the skin). Patients are often prescribed a moisturizer to help maintain the physical-chemical barrier of the skin and to reduce complications related to xerosis. Ammonium lactate–containing moisturizers are commonly prescribed, but evidence supporting their use over other moisturizers is lacking. This suggests that any of the products evaluated in this review may be effective for reducing xerosis. Pharmacists in the community can utilize this information to make individualized and evidence-based recommendations according to cost, ease of administration, and adverse effects. Patients with diabetes often experience foot complications, such as ulcers, infections, and even amputations.1 More than half of all lower-extremity amputations in the United States are caused by diabetes or diabetes-related complications.2 These complications may begin as xerosis, which is described as reddened, dehydrated skin with scaling that resembles cracked porcelain.3 Many patients are prescribed a moisturizer to help maintain the physical-chemical barrier of the skin, which is expected to reduce complications related to foot xerosis.4 An ideal product would be low in cost, easy to administer, and well-tolerated, but would also show evidence that it prevents complications in patients with diabetes. This review was conducted to determine whether the use of ammonium lactate–containing moisturizers in patients with diabetes prevents complications such as ulcers, infections, and amputations. Available Products Moisturizers may contain an emollient, which maintains hydration by decreasin Continue reading >>

Healthibetic Cream: Can It Improve Circulation In Diabetic Feet?

Healthibetic Cream: Can It Improve Circulation In Diabetic Feet?

There is an array of foot creams on the market to treat patients with diabetes and neuropathy, some of which work better than others. HealthiBetic Foot Cream is one product that appears to be successful in reducing symptoms in patients, according to podiatrists who have prescribed the medication. HealthiBetic’s patented Transdermal L-Arginine cream, which was developed specifically for people with diabetes, increases foot temperature 5º to 8ºF and improves blood flow 33 to 35 percent, states the cream’s manufacturer, Strategic Science and Technologies, LLC. Directions call for patients to apply the moisturizing formula twice daily for seven days, followed by a once daily regimen to maintain improved blood flow. Cleveland Smith, DPM, targets common diabetic neuropathic conditions with the cream. Additionally, he uses the cream to treat “cold feet secondary to peripheral vascular disease (PVD), diminished perfusion due to aging and those of unknown etiology.” Dr. Smith, whose Family Foot Practice is located in Helena, Mont., also recommends the cream to patients to augment recovery from such conditions as vitamin B6 toxicity, vitamin B12 deficiency and other metabolically-induced neuropathy. Tony Scroggins, DPM, has also prescribed HealthiBetic Foot Cream for a variety of conditions related to diabetic peripheral neuropathy and/or PVD. He uses the cream by itself or as an adjunct to other therapies. The cream seems to work where other medications have failed, according to Dr. Scroggins. Emphasizing Pain Relief “I have had several patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy who had tried several types of treatments including medications, vitamin therapy, and Anodyne with little relief,” notes Dr. Scroggins. “After using HealthiBetic Foot Cream, they were v Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Pain

Diabetic Foot Pain

by Kenneth B. Rehm, DPM Includes photo of Dr. Kenneth B. Rehm, DPM Diabetes is one of the most common reasons people seek relief for painful feet. With diabetes, four types of foot problems may arise in the feet. Nerve Problems due to Diabetes The most common contributor to diabetic foot pain is a nerve problem called Peripheral Neuropathy. This is where the nerves are directly affected by the disease process. There are basically three types of peripheral neuropathy: sensory, motor, and autonomic neuropathy. A large percentage of pain diabetic patients complain of is due to sensory neuropathy. This can show up as "sensitive pain," where the amount of pain is not proportional to the amount of insult that is causing it. For instance, just touching the skin or putting a sheet over your feet in bed could be painful. This can be present at the same time as numbness in the feet. Sensory neuropathy symptoms can include burning, tingling or a stabbing pain. Relief is foremost on someone's mind when painful neuropathy has raised its ugly head. The first thing to do is to check your blood sugar for the past several weeks to see if there has been a trend toward high blood sugar (Editor's Note: The A1c test is traditionally employed to determine this, and should be repeated about every three months.) Persistent high blood sugar can contribute to this type of pain. Massaging your feet with a diabetic foot cream, or using a foot roller, often takes the edge off the pain. Vitamin B preparations are often recommended; and there are a variety of prescription medications that do work. Using cushioned, supportive shoes and foot support inserts is always needed to protect the feet from the pounding, rubbing and irritating pressures that contribute to neuropathic pain. Motor neuropathy can Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy Foot Cream

Diabetic Neuropathy Foot Cream

by Neuropathy Program | Aug 8, 2017 | Neuropathy Remedies | 0 comments If you have ever experienced back pain; you are not alone! In fact the most recent estimates suggest that ten percent of the worlds population suffers from back pain of one form or another. It is also likely that approximately 70% of people will suffer from this type of pain during their life. Back pain is deliberating; however the pain of diabetic neuropathy can be much worse! Whilst back pain is due to muscular aches; diabetic neuropathy is due to nerve damage; it can be tingly, burning or even stabbing. It can last for a few minutes to days; or even never-ending. Controlling the pain takes more than just standard painkillers; in fact there are a variety of ways in which you can control the pain (read also a review about a neuropathy cure ). Why Choose Diabetic Neuropathy Foot Cream? There are many different makes of diabetic neuropathy foot cream available; although most of them perform the same job. You may wish to try several different ones before you select your preferred one. Cure Chronic Peripheral Neuropathy & Diabetic Nerve Pain Now! A diabetic neuropathy foot cream will calm the pain in your foot; this is done through the use of a strong topically induced painkiller. This keeps the pain relief localized and allows it to be stronger than other pain relief options; without affecting your ability to complete other tasks. There are also a number of other benefits to be had by using diabetic neuropathy foot cream: As with most foot creams, a diabetic neuropathy treatment is designed to moisturize and hydrate the skin on your feet. This can help to sooth the pain of dry skin and allows your skin cells to be fully hydrated. As water is an exceptionally important part of the human body it is impo Continue reading >>

Medications To Treat Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Medications To Treat Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Medications are used to control the pain associated with peripheral diabetic neuropathy. Unfortunately, at this time, there aren’t any medications to treat and prevent diabetic nerve pain (another name for diabetic neuropathy); the only way to do that is through careful control of blood glucose levels. There are many medication options to relieve pain associated with peripheral nerve damage. You should work carefully with your doctor to figure out what medications are best for you. If you’d like to learn more about treatments for the other types of diabetic neuropathy, this section of the article reviews treatment options for autonomic, proximal, and focal neuropathy. Medication Warning Because of the possible interactions and side effects, always discuss medications with your doctor—even if they’re “just” over-the-counter. This is particularly important when you have diabetes because these over-the-counter medications may have interactions with other medications you’re using. Over-the-counter Medications for Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy For people in the early stages of diabetic neuropathy—when the pain isn’t severe—over-the-counter medications may be enough to relieve the pain. However, people with more advanced nerve damage may not find over-the-counter medications helpful. For diabetic neuropathy, you may want to try: Acetaminophen: This is a painkiller, also known as an analgesic. Tylenol is an example of acetaminophen, and it works by blocking pain messages to the brain. In essence, acetaminophen makes it harder for the “pain” signal to travel through the nerves and to the brain, and therefore, the brain doesn’t know that it should be feeling pain. Possible side effects include liver damage, but that’s after taking large quantities fo Continue reading >>

Prescription Pain Creams For Diabetic Neuropathy | Prescription Pain Cream

Prescription Pain Creams For Diabetic Neuropathy | Prescription Pain Cream

Topical Prescription Pain Medications for Diabetic Neuropathy Our nerves enable us to control every action we take through each day. It is thanks to the signals our brain sends through the nerves, that we are able to sense everything around us; including pain. Our mundane day to day functions depend upon the stability of our nerves and therefore it is vital for us that our nerves, and hence our nervous system is intact. A slight glitch in our nervous system can give rise to a multitude of problems that are hard to treat. According to research, around half of people with diabetes develop nerve damage, and this causes diabetic neuropathy. Symptoms often do not begin until many years after diabetes has been diagnosed. Some persons, with diabetes that develops slowly, already have nerve damage when they are first diagnosed. If you are experiencing any pain, itching, or burning sensation in your feet or your body, chances are that your nerves are damaged. Millions of people all over the globe are suffering from this problem which is known as neuropathy. If you are diabetic with poorly controlled blood sugar, your feet and eventually your hands will lose their nerve connection to the brain. Neuropathy targets your feet first, because the nerves of the feet are long and are more difficult to keep healthy. The problem d oes not mean that you will experience these pains all the time. Sometimes, your nerves make the extremities feel numb. Diabetic neuropathy is often worse than normal neuropathy because it will feel like you are under attack. The pain can be quite difficult to live with and will disrupt day to day life. Research and Trends with Topical Medications Recently, a study was conducted at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in which the researchers proved that clonidine, Continue reading >>

Zostrix Diabetic Foot Pain

Zostrix Diabetic Foot Pain

What is Zostrix Diabetic Foot Pain (capsaicin topical)? Capsaicin is the active ingredient in chili peppers that makes them hot. Capsaicin is used in medicated creams and lotions to relieve muscle or joint pain. Capsaicin used on the body causes a sensation of heat that activates certain nerve cells. With regular use of capsaicin, this heating effect reduces the amount of substance P, a chemical that acts as a pain messenger in the body. Capsaicin topical is used for temporary relief of muscle or joint pain caused by strains, sprains, arthritis, bruising, or backaches. Capsaicin topical is also used to treat nerve pain (neuralgia) in people who have had herpes zoster, or "shingles." Capsaicin topical may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Fact or Fiction? The Top 15 Osteoarthritis Myths What is the most important information I should know about Zostrix Diabetic Foot Pain (capsaicin topical)? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to chili peppers, or if you have ever had an allergic reaction to capsaicin topical. Ask a doctor or pharmacist about using capsaicin topical if you have any allergies or serious medical conditions. Do not use this medication on anyone younger than 18 years old without the advice of a doctor. Do not apply to open wounds or irritated skin, and avoid getting the medicine on contact lenses, dentures, and other items that come into contact with sensitive areas of your body. Capsaicin can cause a burning sensation, which is usually mild and should lessen over time with continued use. If the burning sensation causes significant discomfort or skin redness, wash the treated skin area with soap and cool water. Get medical attention right away if you have severe burning, pain, swelling, or blistering of the skin where Continue reading >>

Tips For Treating Diabetic Nerve Pain

Tips For Treating Diabetic Nerve Pain

Diabetes can cause long-term problems throughout your body, especially if you don’t control your blood sugar effectively, and sugar levels remain high for many years. High blood sugar can cause diabetic neuropathy, which damages the nerves that send signals from your hands and feet. Diabetic neuropathy can cause numbness or tingling in your fingers, toes, hands, and feet. Another symptom is a burning, sharp, or aching pain (diabetic nerve pain). The pain may be mild at first, but it can get worse over time and spread up your legs or arms. Walking can be painful, and even the softest touch can feel unbearable. Up to 50 percent of people with diabetes may experience nerve pain. Nerve damage can affect your ability to sleep, decrease your quality of life, and can also cause depression. Damaged nerves can’t be replaced. However, there are ways that you can prevent further damage and relieve your pain. First, control your blood sugar so the damage doesn’t progress. Talk to your doctor about setting your blood sugar goal, and learn to monitor it. You may be asked to lower your blood sugar before meals to 70 to 130 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) and your blood sugar after meals to less than 180 mg/dL. Use diets, exercise, and medications to decrease your blood sugar to a healthier range. Monitor other health risks that can worsen your diabetes, such as your weight and smoking. Ask your doctor about effective ways to lose weight or quit smoking, if necessary. Your doctor might suggest trying an over-the-counter pain reliever, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol), aspirin (Bufferin), or ibuprofen (Motrin IB, Advil), which are available without a prescription but can cause side effects. Use a low dose for a short time to control your symptoms. Other options exist for stronger Continue reading >>

The 5 Best Foot Creams

The 5 Best Foot Creams

Your feet need a little TLC if you want them to look their very best. After all, they support you every day and take on the tough streets and uncomfortable shoes that we all tend to gravitate toward. Fortunately, there are a number of powerful foot creams that can help reverse damage and revive your feet in no time. What Is Foot Cream? Foot cream is a deeply moisturizing cream that penetrates deeper into the skin to make the feet look younger, smoother, and more rejuvenated. Whether you suffer from dry feet, cracked heels, or calluses, a powerful foot cream can repair the damage and help prevent dry skin in the future. It can also help with aches and pains in the feet. Foot creams will leave your feet looking and feeling softer and more youthful in no time. Apply them to dry feet anytime, and for extra moisturization benefits, consider slathering on foot cream and wearing thick cotton socks to bed to wake up to the softest, smoothest feet imaginable. Many people also find it very effective to wear foot cream under socks before working out or sweating, as this will allow your feet to absorb more of the cream, more quickly. Pay particular attention to heels, toes, ankles, and any other dry areas of the feet to have sandal-ready feet year round. Top 5 Foot Creams O'Keeffe's for Healthy Feet The O'Keeffe's for Healthy Feet Foot Cream claims to work in a matter of days. The unscented lotion can heal dry, cracked, split skin and seals in moisture so your feet are softer and smoother than ever. The odorless formula is non greasy, non oily, and hydrates the skin better than expensive prescription-strength creams. The concentrated daily foot cream is ideal for all skin types, including diabetic feet. This is Amazon’s #1 best-seller in foot creams and lotions, one of the “mos Continue reading >>

More in diabetes