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Pre/post Test For Diabetes Education

Developing Community Health Worker Diabetes Training

Developing Community Health Worker Diabetes Training

Developing community health worker diabetes training 1Department of Family Medicine and Community Health and Search for other works by this author on: Meyers Primary Care Institute, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605, USA Search for other works by this author on: 1Department of Family Medicine and Community Health and Search for other works by this author on: Outreach Worker Training Institute of Central Massachusetts Area Health Education Center, Inc., Worcester, MA 01609, USA Search for other works by this author on: Outreach Worker Training Institute of Central Massachusetts Area Health Education Center, Inc., Worcester, MA 01609, USA Search for other works by this author on: Health Education Research, Volume 27, Issue 4, 1 August 2012, Pages 755765, W. J. Ferguson, C. A. Lemay, J. L. Hargraves, T. Gorodetsky, J. Calista; Developing community health worker diabetes training, Health Education Research, Volume 27, Issue 4, 1 August 2012, Pages 755765, We designed, implemented and evaluated a 48-hour training program for community health workers (CHWs) deployed to diabetes care teams in community health centers (CHCs). The curriculum included core knowledge/skills with diabetes content to assist CHWs in developing patient self-management goals. Our qualitative evaluation included pre/post-knowledge outcomes and encounter data from the field. CHWs and their supervisors were interviewed providing qualitative outcome data of the training process and program implementation. There were statistically significant increases in the scores of CHWs self-reported knowledge in 8 of 15 curricular domains. Qualitative analysis revealed that CHWs preferred skill-based and case-based teaching, shorter training days but more contact hours. CHWs reported that Continue reading >>

Validating A Web-based Diabetes Education Program In Continuing Nursing Education: Knowledge And Competency Change And User Perceptions On Usability And Quality

Validating A Web-based Diabetes Education Program In Continuing Nursing Education: Knowledge And Competency Change And User Perceptions On Usability And Quality

Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders Validating a Web-based Diabetes Education Program in continuing nursing education: knowledge and competency change and user perceptions on usability and quality Moattari et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.2014 Nurses as the members of health care professionals need to improve their knowledge and competencies particularly in diabetes mellitus through continuing nursing education programs. E-learning is an indirect method of training that can meet nurses educational needs. This study is aimed at validating a web-based diabetes education program through measurement of nurses knowledge and clinical competency in diabetes and nurses perception about its usability and quality. This Quasi-experimental research was conducted on a single group of 31 nurses employed in hospitals affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. We used a 125 MCQ knowledge test and Objective Structured Clinical Exam (OSCE) to measure knowledge and clinical competency of nurses in diabetes before and after intervention. A Learning Management System (LMS) was designed to provide educational content in the form of 12 multimedia electronic modules, interactive tests; a forum and learning activities. Nurses were trained for two months in this system after which the post-test was administered. Each nurse completed two questionnaires for measurement of their perceptions on usability and quality. We used descriptive statistics for demographic and descriptive data analysis. Paired t-test was used to compare pre- and post-data using SPSS. The findings showed significant differences in knowledge scores (p < 0.001), total score of clinical competencies (p < 0.001), and all ten assessed clinical competencies. The range of ratings given by participants varied on Continue reading >>

Medical Students As Diabetes Educators Bhat S, Sudeep K - Muller J Med Sci Res

Medical Students As Diabetes Educators Bhat S, Sudeep K - Muller J Med Sci Res

Bhat S, Sudeep K. Medical students as diabetes educators. Muller J Med Sci Res 2017;8:6-9 Bhat S, Sudeep K. Medical students as diabetes educators. Muller J Med Sci Res [serial online] 2017 [cited2018 Sep 21];8:6-9. Available from: As in all chronic diseases, an important component of care in diabetes is patient education. Many diabetic care programs have shown that using specially trained diabetes educators nurses, allied health-care professionals improves outcomes. Diabetes management now focuses on patient education and empowerment, which results in better glycemic control and better outcomes. [1] Diabetes self-management education (DSME) is a collaboration between the patient and the health-care professional, through which the patient with diabetes acquires the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to successfully manage their disease. [2] The American Diabetes Association (ADA) has chosen behavior change as the outcome required after diabetes education. In the West, diabetes educators play a major role in the education of patients with diabetes. In India too, the National Defense Education Program (NDEP) has trained graduates to be diabetes educators. [3] Allied health-care professionals and graduates in science have been used in various centers as diabetes educators. [4] However, to the best of our knowledge, using medical students as diabetes educators is an innovation not practiced before. We wanted to use the strength of our institute an intelligent and motivated student body to function as a diabetes educator. We developed a module to train medical students to be effective diabetes educators. The objective of this was twofold: first, to enhance patient self-management of diabetes; second, studies have shown that even among doctors, lack of knowledge about Continue reading >>

Teaching Plan For Diabetes Mellitus

Teaching Plan For Diabetes Mellitus

Please read about my new book This is a powerful antioxidant therapy which has natural ingredients to combat effects of oxidative stress to promote health and wellness. Please visit our other website by Louise Diehl, RN, MSN, ND, CCRN, ACNS-BC, NP-C Nurse Practitioner - Owner Doctor of Naturopathy Lehigh Valley Wellness Center Before you begin your teaching plan be sure to define the characteristics of the clinical site and patient population. The teaching plan should be customized to this population. This is a sample teaching plan that you can use and customize to your needs. You may want to design a pre-test and post-test to give your patients would are attending the teaching program. Based on statistics from the Centers for Disease Control website, 17.0 million people in the United States, approximately 6.2% of the population, have diabetes. Of this 17 million people, 11.1 million are diagnosed and 5.9 million are undiagnosed. In the different age groups, about 151,000 people less than 20 years of age have diabetes, approximately 0.19% of people in this age group. In the 20 and older age group 16.9 million and 8.6% of people have diabetes. The 65 and older age group has 7.0 million and 20.1% of all people with diabetes (www.cdc.gov/diabetes). The Identified Learning Need Patients with Diabetes have very comprehensive learning needs. The learning needs are focused on managing their glucose levels and preventing complications of diabetes. Learning needs for managing diabetes are complex and include: monitoring blood glucose levels, menu/food planning, exercise, medications, skin care, management of co-existing disease processes, knowledge of medications, knowledge of the disease process and how to manage hypo/hyperglycemic episodes. Many patients are diagnosed with dia Continue reading >>

Jundishapur Journal Of Health Sciences

Jundishapur Journal Of Health Sciences

1 Department of Community Nutrition, Bangladesh University of Health Sciences, Dhaka, Bangladesh 2 Department of Epidemiology, Bangladesh University of Health Sciences, Dhaka, Bangladesh 3 Diabetic Association of Bangladesh, Dhaka, Bangladesh * Corresponding author: Farzana Saleh, Department of Community Nutrition, Bangladesh University of Health Sciences, Dhaka, Bangladesh. Tel: +88-1738085007, E-mail: [email protected] Jundishapur Journal of Health Sciences: January 2017, 9 (1) ; e36058 Published Online: September 4, 2016 To Cite: Saleh F, Afnan F, Ara F, Mumu S J, Khan A A. et al. Diabetes Education, Knowledge Improvement, Attitudes and Self-Care Activities Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetes in Bangladesh, Jundishapur J Health Sci. 2017 ;9(1):e36058. doi: 10.17795/jjhs-36058 . Background: Diabetes education provided by physicians in Bangladesh has some limitations, and its impacts on self-management are unclear. These prompted the Diabetic Association of Bangladesh (BADAS) to train 100 diabetes educators to improve the diabetes self-care activities of patients and to pilot the effects of the education. Objectives: In this context, the current study aimed to assess the impact of diabetes education to improve knowledge on and attitudes towards diabetes and self-care activities in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods: The pretest-posttest study recruited 500 newly-diagnosed patients with T2DM by convenience method from 19 healthcare centers of BADAS. They received a one-hour diabetes education only once at the time of registration to the hospital. A four-part interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to assess the knowledge, attitudes, and self-care activities in the patients with diabetes. The observed changes were compared after 1 Continue reading >>

Role Of Community Health Workers In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Self-management: A Scoping Review

Role Of Community Health Workers In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Self-management: A Scoping Review

Role of community health workers in type 2 diabetes mellitus self-management: A scoping review Contributed equally to this work with: Peter Arthur Delobelle, Naomi Levitt, Thandi Puoane Affiliations: School of Public Health, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town, South Africa, Chronic Disease Initiative for Africa, Division of Diabetic Medicine and Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa Contributed equally to this work with: Peter Arthur Delobelle, Naomi Levitt, Thandi Puoane Affiliation: Chronic Disease Initiative for Africa, Division of Diabetic Medicine and Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa Contributed equally to this work with: Peter Arthur Delobelle, Naomi Levitt, Thandi Puoane Affiliation: School of Public Health, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town, South Africa Affiliation: School of Public Health, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town, South Africa These authors also contributed equally to this work. Affiliation: School of Public Health, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town, South Africa These authors also contributed equally to this work. Globally the number of people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has risen significantly over the last few decades. Aligned to this is a growing use of community health workers (CHWs) to deliver T2DM self-management support with good clinical outcomes especially in High Income Countries (HIC). Evidence and lessons from these interventions can be useful for Low- and Middle-Income countries (LMICs) such as South Africa that are experiencing a marked increase in T2DM prevalence. This study aimed to examine how CHW have been utilized to support T2DM self-management globally, their preparation for and superv Continue reading >>

Impact Of Diabetes Education Workshop On Improving Knowledge, Attitude And Practices; Interventional Study In Nurses

Impact Of Diabetes Education Workshop On Improving Knowledge, Attitude And Practices; Interventional Study In Nurses

diabetes education nurses diabetes educator Background:-Nurses are considered as best educators, counselor to patients as they are involved in patient care closely especially for chronic diseases like Diabetes Mellitus. To become a good educator one should have good knowledge about the ailment. Previous data shows nurses from various health care settings lack sufficient knowledge about diabetes and diabetes management. Experiences shows better understanding about evidence-based practices, significantly influence disease outcome. AIM: Our study aimed to assess the knowledge, attitude and practices about diabetes amongst nurses through a pilot tested questionnaire and to evaluate the impact of structured multisession diabetes education workshop in improving the above characteristics.Methods:-Total 820 nurses from various hospitals and nursing colleges were invited to attend the diabetes workshop, which was organized at a public utility hall at Nagpur, India in November 2016 on occasion of World Diabetes Day 2016. Amongst them, 505 attended the session. A well designed 6 hour structured, multisession education workshop Hello Diabetes was conducted through lectures, demonstrations and role-plays focusing various aspects of diabetes. A pilot tested questionnaire was administered (pre & post program) to evaluate knowledge, attitude and practices among them. From those attendees, 317 (63%) nurses completed the pretest questionnaire appropriately. The same questionnaire was administered as the post-test. In all, 217 (43%) completed both pretest and post-test precisely. The analysis of pre versus posttest scores in knowledge, attitude and practices was done using SPSS software 18. Association of significance was obtained with Wilcoxon Sign Rank Test for all the three categories Continue reading >>

Two-hour Postprandial Glucose

Two-hour Postprandial Glucose

Does this test have other names? Glucose, postprandial; glucose, two-hour postprandial; two-hour PPG; two-hour postprandial blood sugar What is this test? This is a blood test to check for diabetes. If you have diabetes, your body doesn't make enough insulin to keep your blood sugar in check. This means your blood sugar levels are too high, and over time this can lead to serious health problems including nerve and eye damage. This test is done to see how your body responds to sugar and starch after you eat a meal. As you digest the food in your stomach, blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels rise sharply. In response, your pancreas releases insulin to help move these sugars from the blood into the cells of muscles and other tissues to be used for fuel. Within two hours of eating, your insulin and blood glucose levels should return to normal. If your blood glucose levels remain high, you may have diabetes. Why do I need this test? You may need this test if your healthcare provider wants to see if you have diabetes or another insulin-related disorder, especially if you have symptoms such as: Frequent urination Unusual thirst Blurred vision Tiredness Repeated infections Sores that heal slowly If you're pregnant, you may have this test to screen for gestational diabetes, diabetes that can develop during pregnancy. Treating gestational diabetes reduces the risk for health problems for you and your baby. What other tests might I have with this test? Your healthcare provider may order other tests to confirm or evaluate whether you have diabetes. These may include: Fasting blood glucose test. This measures the amount of sugar in your blood. A1C (glycosylated hemoglobin) test. This measures your average blood sugar level over the last 2 to 3 months. Glucose tolerance test. This m Continue reading >>

Diabetes Practice Questions

Diabetes Practice Questions

1. The risk factors for type 1 diabetes include all of the following except: a. Diet b. Genetic c. Autoimmune d. Environmental 2. Type 2 diabetes accounts for approximately what percentage of all cases of diabetes in adults? a. 55%-60% b. 35%-40% c. 90-95% d. 25-30% 3. Risk factors for type 2 diabetes include all of the following except: a. Advanced age b. Obesity c. Smoking d. Physical inactivity 4. What percentage of women with gestational diabetes is diagnosed with type 2 diabetes following pregnancy? a. 25%-30% b. 5%-10% c. <5% d. 20%-25% 5. Untreated diabetes may result in all of the following except: a. Blindness b. Cardiovascular disease c. Kidney disease d. Tinnitus 6. Prediabetes is associated with all of the following except: a. Increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes b. Impaired glucose tolerance c. Increased risk of heart disease and stroke d. Increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes 7. Diabetics are at increased risk of heart disease if they also: a. Smoke b. Have high HDL cholesterol levels c. Take aspirin d. Consume a high-fiber diet 8. Blood sugar is well controlled when Hemoglobin A1C is: a. Below 7% b. Between 12%-15% c. Less than 180 mg/dL d. Between 90 and 130 mg/dL 9. Excessive thirst and volume of very dilute urine may be symptoms of: a. Urinary tract infection b. Diabetes insipidus c. Viral gastroenteritis d. Hypoglycemia 10. Among female children and adolescents, the first sign of type 1 diabetes may be: a. Rapid weight gain b. Constipation c. Genital candidiasis d. Insomnia 11. Untreated hyperglycemia may lead to all of the following complications except: a. Hyperosmolar syndrome b Vitiligo c. Diabetic ketoacidosis d. Coma 12. Hyperinsulinemia may be caused by all of the following except: a. An insulinoma b. Nesidioblastosis c. Insulin Continue reading >>

Diabetes To Go: An Inpatient Diabetes Survival Skills Education Program

Diabetes To Go: An Inpatient Diabetes Survival Skills Education Program

You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Diabetes To Go: An Inpatient Diabetes Survival Skills Education Program The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03023228 Information provided by (Responsible Party): Study Description Study Design Arms and Interventions Outcome Measures Eligibility Criteria Contacts and Locations More Information A learner-centered diabetes survival skills self-management education program was provided to adults with uncontrolled diabetes in the hospital and generated preliminary evidence of impact on medication adherence and a trend toward reduction in hospital and emergency department admissions. This study was a prospective, nonrandomized pilot study conducted among adults with uncontrolled diabetes admitted to the Medicine Service of an urban tertiary teaching hospital were consented to participate in a pilot study which provided diabetes survival skills education. Based on knowledge deficits identified on a diabetes knowledge pre-test the patient was directed to view video content corresponding to those deficiencies and content on sick days and diabetes complications. Evaluation measures were diabetes knowledge, medication adherence, and hospital admissions plus emergency department visits at and/or 3months before baseline and at 2 weeks and 3 months post-discharge. There was improvement in diabetes knowledge and medication adherence, which was sustained to 3 months. A trend was observed toward reduction in emergency department and/or hospital admissi Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes: Diabetes And Family Planning

Managing Diabetes: Diabetes And Family Planning

Managing Diabetes: Diabetes and Family Planning By the end of this webinar, participants will be able to: Identify three contraceptive considerations for women with diabetes; identify four diabetes-specific elements of preconception counseling Nurse Practitioners and Nurses: This activity has been approved by the Continuing Education Approval Program of the National Association of Nurse Practitioners in Women's Health for up to 1.0 contact hour, including up to 0.25 pharmacology hours. Credit can be applied toward the nursing continuing education requirements of most professional organizations and State Boards of Nursing. Physicians: The Association of Reproductive Health Professionals is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. ARHP designates this internet enduring material for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit . Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Others: A certificate of attendance will be issued indicating that this activity is accredited for 1 hour of AMA PRA Category 1 Credit. Continue reading >>

Assessment Of Group-based Diabetes Education Using The Continuing Your Journey With Diabetes Conversation Map In The Veteran Population

Assessment Of Group-based Diabetes Education Using The Continuing Your Journey With Diabetes Conversation Map In The Veteran Population

Assessment of Group-Based Diabetes Education Using the Continuing Your Journey With Diabetes Conversation Map in the Veteran Population 1Department of Veterans Affairs Nebraska Western-Iowa Health Care System, Lincoln, NE 2Creighton University School of Pharmacy and Health Professions, Omaha, NE 1Department of Veterans Affairs Nebraska Western-Iowa Health Care System, Lincoln, NE 2Creighton University School of Pharmacy and Health Professions, Omaha, NE Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer Copyright 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered. See for details. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes have been recognized as serious health concerns. The majority of cases of type 2 diabetes are preventable, and, after diagnosis, various complications can be prevented by effective self-management. Although there are multiple pharmacological interventions for the treatment of diabetes, it is difficult to achieve target A1C levels with drug therapy alone. Most patients must also implement various lifestyle modifications such as following a healthy diet and getting adequate physical activity, both of which require willingness and motivation. Therefore, patient education is an important component of diabetes management. Each patients unique needs and barriers require an individualized strategy for diabetes management ( 1 ). Diabetes self-management education is listed as one of seven crucial elements in the Joint Commission standards of care addressing diabetes care ( 2 ). The National Standards for Diabetes Self-Management Education ( 3 ) states that group education can be effective and that programs using behavioral and Continue reading >>

The Effect Of A Diabetes Self-management Program For African Americans In A Faith-based Setting (pilot Study)

The Effect Of A Diabetes Self-management Program For African Americans In A Faith-based Setting (pilot Study)

The effect of a diabetes self-management program for African Americans in a faith-based setting (pilot study) University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, North Carolina, USA University of North Carolina at Greensboro Background: Integrating spiritual principles with practical principles may be a strategy to assist persons to understand how to make positive health decisions. Faith-based programs can allow individuals to acquire the diabetes knowledge necessary to manage their disease and practice the necessary lifestyle changes within the context of their culture and community. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to test a 6-week faith-based diabetes self-management program for African American adults diagnosed with diabetes. The aim of the intervention was to increase knowledge about diabetes and diabetes self-management practices, improve lifestyle behaviors, and increase knowledge about symptom management to prevent and treat hypoglycemia for African Americans living in the southeastern United States. Methods: A quasi-experimental design with one group pre-test post-test design was used to test a 6-week pilot study of a faith-based diabetes self-management program for African American adults. The non-normality of the variables required use of a nonparametric dependent samples test. The Wilcoxon Signed Rank Tests were used to examine difference in self-efficacy, symptoms management, and diabetes self-management before and after the intervention. Results: There were significant improvements among participants in diabetes knowledge, p value=<0.001, self-efficacy, p value=0.004, diabetes symptom management, p value=0.015, and improvements in diabetes self-care activities (diet, p value=0.001, exercise, p value=0.007, and foot care, p value=0.027). Conclu Continue reading >>

Evaluation Of The Web-based Diabetes Interactive Education Programme (diep) For Patients With Type 2 Diabetes - Sciencedirect

Evaluation Of The Web-based Diabetes Interactive Education Programme (diep) For Patients With Type 2 Diabetes - Sciencedirect

Evaluation of the web-based Diabetes Interactive Education Programme (DIEP) for patients with type 2 diabetes Author links open overlay panel EvelienHeinrichab The objective in this study was to evaluate a web-based type 2 diabetes self-management education programme aimed at improving knowledge, encouraging active patient participation and providing supportive self-management tools. (1) An effect evaluation was conducted using a randomized controlled trial with a pre-test and post-test design (n=99) and a knowledge questionnaire. (2) A user evaluation was conducted using an online questionnaire (n=564) and one-on-one interviews (n=11) to examine the perceived quality, use of functionalities and use of the programme as a supportive tool in education. The effect evaluation showed a significant intervention effect (p<0.01) on knowledge. The user evaluation showed high satisfaction with the programme's content, credibility and user-friendliness. However, functionalities and self-management tools were used by less than half of the participants. The programme can improve knowledge, but it is not fully used as intended. A more optimal use of the programme is necessary for higher efficacy. The use of mostly spoken text instead of written text was highly appreciated and could be used more often for educational websites. Furthermore, health care practitioners need support in implementing new educational programmes during consultations. Continue reading >>

Community Health Interventions | Pre And Post Testing

Community Health Interventions | Pre And Post Testing

page-template-default,page,page-id-16479,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode-theme-ver-10.1.1,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.4.5,vc_responsive Clients who wish to be tested are given the opportunity to confidentially assess their HIV risks, understand why they believe they need to be tested, test is explained, and voluntary informed consent is obtained. Based on the clients answers, they are provided HIV facts, related HIV literature, suggestions on reducing risky behaviors, and assistance in developing a plan to reduce risky behavior and identify resources to assist in reducing risks. Since the agency uses Rapid test, the client will receive their results at the end of the pre-test counseling session. This test does not use blood or needles. It test the body fluid for the presence of HIV antibodies and may require a confirmatory test. Post-test counseling includes providing the client with their test results. If the client tests negative, the relevant points from the pre-test counseling are restated, they will be provided with suggestions on how to remain negative, and the plan to reduce risky behavior is reviewed. The clients are also urged to implement the plan and return in 3 months for a follow-up test. If the clients results are positive, they will be counseled on safer sex practices, condom use to prevent passing HIV to someone else, and referrals will be made. The client may be referred to the health department for a confirmatory test, provided relevant HIV literature, and linked to an HIV case management organization for care. Continue reading >>

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