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Prediabetic Always Hungry

What Is Prediabetes?

What Is Prediabetes?

This sneaky health condition has no symptoms. But it’s almost always present before you get type 2 diabetes. It means your blood sugar level is higher than normal, but not yet high enough for you to be diagnosed with the disease. About 86 million people in the U.S. over age 20 have prediabetes. And doctors see the need to diagnose it more often. Treating it can prevent more serious health problems later on. These range from type 2 diabetes to problems with your heart, blood vessels, eyes, and kidneys. By the time you’re diagnosed with diabetes, many of these problems have already taken hold. You’re most likely to get this disease if you: Had gestational diabetes or gave birth to a baby weighing more than 9 pounds Are African-American, Native American, Latino, or Pacific Islander Are overweight or obese, especially around the middle (belly fat) Have high cholesterol, high triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol, and a high LDL cholesterol Don't exercise Are older; people over age 45 are most likely to get it. You should get tested for prediabetes if you meet the criteria above and you: Had an abnormal blood sugar reading in the past Have heart disease Show signs of insulin resistance, which means your body produces insulin, but doesn't respond to it like it should Although most people with prediabetes have no symptoms, you might notice you're extra thirsty, pee a lot more, or have blurred vision or extreme fatigue. Your doctor can perform one of three different blood tests -- the fasting plasma glucose test, the oral glucose tolerance test, or the hemoglobin A1c test. The fasting plasma glucose test measures your blood sugar after an 8-hour fast. If your blood sugar level is higher than normal after the test, you may have prediabetes. The oral glucose tolerance test rec Continue reading >>

The Right Diet For Prediabetes

The Right Diet For Prediabetes

A prediabetes diagnosis can be alarming. This condition is marked by abnormally high blood sugar (glucose) most often due to insulin resistance. This is a condition in which the body doesn’t use insulin properly. It’s often a precursor to type 2 diabetes. According to the Mayo Clinic, people with prediabetes are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes within 10 years. With prediabetes, you may also be at risk of developing cardiovascular disease. However, a prediabetes diagnosis doesn’t mean you will definitely get type 2 diabetes. The key is early intervention; to get your blood sugar out of the prediabetes range. Your diet is important, and you need to know the right kind of foods to eat. How diet relates to prediabetes There are many factors that increase your risk for prediabetes. Genetics can play a role, especially if diabetes runs in your family. Excess body fat and a sedentary lifestyle are other potential risk factors. In prediabetes, sugar from food begins to build up in your bloodstream because insulin can’t easily move it into your cells. Eating carbohydrates doesn’t cause prediabetes. But a diet filled with carbohydrates that digest quickly can lead to blood sugar spikes. For most people with prediabetes, your body has a difficult time lowering blood sugar levels after meals. Avoiding blood sugar spikes can help. When you eat more calories than your body needs, they get stored as fat. This can cause you to gain weight. Body fat, especially around the belly, is linked to insulin resistance. This explains why many people with prediabetes are also overweight. You can’t control all risk factors for prediabetes, but some can be mitigated. Lifestyle changes can help you maintain balanced blood sugar levels as well as a healthy weight. Watch carbs with Continue reading >>

What Is Prediabetes?

What Is Prediabetes?

Prediabetes is a wake-up call that you’re on the path to diabetes. But it’s not too late to turn things around. If you have it (like 86 million other Americans), your blood sugar (glucose) level is higher than it should be, but not in the diabetes range. People used to call it "borderline" diabetes. Normally, your body makes a hormone called insulin to help control your blood sugar. When you have prediabetes, that system doesn't work as well as it should. You might not be able to make enough insulin after eating, or your body might not respond to insulin properly. Prediabetes makes you more likely to get heart disease or have a stroke. But you can take action to lower those risks. Your doctor will give you one of three simple blood tests: Fasting plasma glucose test. You won't eat for 8 hours before taking this blood test. The results are: Normal if your blood sugar is less than 100 Prediabetes if your blood sugar is 100-125 Diabetes if your blood sugar is 126 or higher Oral glucose tolerance test. First, you'll take the fasting glucose test. Then you'll drink a sugary solution. Two hours after that, you'll take another blood test. The results are: Normal if your blood sugar is less than 140 after the second test Prediabetes if your blood sugar is 140-199 after the second test Diabetes if your blood sugar is 200 or higher after the second test Hemoglobin A1C (or average blood sugar) test. This blood test shows your average blood sugar level for the past 2 to 3 months. Doctors can use it to diagnose prediabetes or diabetes or, if you already know you have diabetes, it helps show whether it's under control. The results are: Normal: 5.6% or less Prediabetes: 5.7 to 6.4% Diabetes: 6.5% or above You may need to take the test again to confirm the results. Lifestyle change Continue reading >>

Polyphagia: The Relationship Between Hunger And Diabetes

Polyphagia: The Relationship Between Hunger And Diabetes

Is hunger a sign of diabetes? If you don’t have diabetes, could hunger be one of the signs of diabetes? Is being hungry all of the time (polyphagia) a sign that you should go get checked for diabetes? After all, polyphagia is one of the “3 Poly’s,” is part of a triad of symptoms indicating diabetes. In addition to polyphagia, or increased hunger, the symptoms of polyuria and polydipsia are also signs of diabetes. Susan’s story Susan was constantly hunger. She never seemed to feel satisfied as she snacked off and on all day long from increasing hunger pangs. Susan’s hunger had gotten progressively worse over the past year. She noticed that she had been going to the bathroom more frequently, and wasn’t sure if she might be getting a urinary tract infection. Oddly enough, she hadn’t gained any weight. She had even lost a few pounds. She visited her primary care provider, and relayed her symptoms to the nurse. The doctor recommended that Susan be checked for several different conditions, but the one that stuck out in Susan’s mind was diabetes. She had an aunt with diabetes. She remembered how sick she got, and how she’d spend her days in the dialysis unit. Susan didn’t want diabetes, at least the kind that she knew about from her aunt. When Susan contacted TheDiabetesCouncil, she was concerned that she did indeed have diabetes. She was waiting for her test results, but she was eager to find out if hunger was a sure sign that she has diabetes? I suggest reading the following articles: We decided to look into it for Susan. Let’s see what we found. Polyphagia: What is it? With polyphagia, even after having just eaten, you will feel hunger, or find that you have cravings for particular foods that monopolize your thoughts. The definition of polyphagia, wh Continue reading >>

Pre Diabetes Symptoms

Pre Diabetes Symptoms

Here's a fact: Most people diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes had pre diabetes symptoms that if known, could have alerted them to make diet and lifestyle changes before their diagnosis. Most physicians only pay attention to fasting blood sugar when watching for diabetes. For instance, if a patient's blood sugar is between 110-125, mg/dL, it indicates prediabetes. But blood sugar results can test in normal ranges even as diabetes is developing. If people with a type 2 diabetes diagnosis knew ALL of the pre diabetic symptoms for which to watch, it could help them avoid being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is defined medically as the state in which fasting blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be classified as type 2 diabetes. Blood sugars in the prediabetic range (between 100 - 126 mg/dl) indicate insulin resistance is developing, and a metabolic syndrome diagnosis is more likely in the future. Insulin resistance (IR) is a condition in which chronically elevated blood sugar and insulin levels have resulted in an inability of body cells to respond to them normally. IR is the driving factor as insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, prediabetes and diabetes are all linked together on a continuum. Pre Diabetes Symptoms: It's Not Just About Blood Sugar Medical information about pre diabetes comes from medical associations such as the American Diabetes Association. The ADA guidelines say that prediabetes is a function of a fasting blood sugar is between 100-125 mg/dl. However, I am convinced that signs of prediabetes can be spotted even when blood tests indicated blood sugars below 100 mg/dl. I saw this in my own life. Eight years ago, I had many of the pre diabetic symptoms listed below, but my fasting blood sugar was still classified as "n Continue reading >>

Why So Hungry - Pre-diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Why So Hungry - Pre-diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Question, why am I so hungry after eating lunch, I feel like I could eat another one! pre-diabetic here, there I said it. "sugar spikes!" Your sugar goes up, your sugar comes back DOWN. And when it comes back down, even to normal, off a high, you feel low or HUNGRAY! Low-carbing and metformin fixed that for me. Thank HEAVENS. I would've eaten myself to a quick death otherwise. One possible explanation is that you ate foods high in carbohydrates -- especially refined/concentrated carbohydrates. This causes both your Blood Glucose (BG) and insulin levels to raise. We are not often told this, but insulin is a major fat storage hormone... this means that it very quickly and effectively takes those carbs and locks them away in our fat stores. I say "locks away" because another effect insulin has is to stop the body from accessing those fat stores as an energy source. Like I said fat "storage" hormone. So the BG has been quickly locked away as fat and in effect your cells are crying out for energy which is no longer available to it so you are hungry... you really are. If the case above is correct for you then one response is to eat less of the foods which drive both your BG and insulin levels up. Low carb is so good - eat more protein maybe and watch too much saturated fats - I think it's prob OK to do more fats and proteins and a very little carb for a while asyou get stable and then balance it out. starving yourself is not a good option, so you need to fill in with nuts egg avocado, veggies, moderate fruit, cheese and lean meats plus of course tuna and other oily fish like salmon etc etc. There's Continue reading >>

Surprising Symptoms Of Prediabetes

Surprising Symptoms Of Prediabetes

One of the best ways to prevent diabetes is to spot blood sugar (glucose) problems before the full-blown disease develops. But most people don’t realize that diabetes — and its precursor, prediabetes — can cause no symptoms at all or a wide range of symptoms that often are misinterpreted. Common mistake: Because diabetes is strongly linked to excess body weight, many people who are a normal weight assume that they won’t develop the disease. But that’s not always true. About 15% of people who are diagnosed with diabetes are not overweight. And paradoxically, even weight loss can be a symptom of this complex disorder in people (normal weight or overweight) who have uncontrolled high glucose levels. Shocking new finding: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now estimates that 40% of Americans ages 40 to 74 have prediabetes, and nearly two out of three Americans over age 65 have prediabetes or diabetes — most likely due to the increasing numbers of people who are overweight and inactive, both of which boost diabetes risk. However, most primary care doctors aren’t diagnosing and treating prediabetes early enough in their patients — often because they fail to order the necessary screening tests. And because the symptoms of prediabetes can be subtle, especially in its early stages, most people are not reporting potential red flags to their doctors. Fortunately, prediabetes can virtually always be prevented from progressing to diabetes if the condition is identified and treated in its early stages (by following a healthful diet, exercising regularly and taking nutritional supplements and medications, if necessary). Being overweight (defined as having a body mass index, or BMI, of 25 or higher) is perhaps the best-known risk factor for diabetes.* The mo Continue reading >>

Dealing With Hunger

Dealing With Hunger

My friend James usually manages his Type 2 diabetes quite well. He eats right, exercises, and all that good stuff. But last week, something went wrong. He had a tough Thursday at his job, worked through lunch, and got yelled at by his supervisor. Trying to fix things up, he stayed late doing paperwork and dragged himself home, looking forward to dinner and a quiet evening with his wife, Ellen. But when he got there, Ellen had gone to a program at their daughter’s school. Dinner wasn’t ready. He went to the freezer and grabbed a box of ice cream. You can imagine the rest of the story. James kept splurging, and his blood glucose levels were out of whack for three days, courtesy of what Alcoholics Anonymous founder Bill W. called H.A.L.T. (Hungry, Angry, Lonely, Tired). Bill W. knew that these were four danger situations for drinking. They apply with equal force to smoking, breaking your diet, or almost any other bad habit we are trying to change. Psychologist and diabetes educator William Polonsky says people who struggle with their diabetes “frequently blame themselves for not having enough willpower. But most people have plenty of willpower. The problem is not understanding and solving the particular problems that interfere with self-care.” Hunger is one of the most common problems. How can we deal with it? Avoiding Hunger James moved into the danger zone when he skipped lunch. “I had so much work,” he said, “and I knew the boss wasn’t happy with me. My stomach was all knotted. I didn’t feel like eating.” Those things happen, but skipping meals, especially breakfast, will lead you to grab concentrated comfort foods like sweets and fats. It will also make you grouchy and miserable. What could James have done differently? If he didn’t have time or sp Continue reading >>

Always Hungry? It Could Be Insulin Resistance

Always Hungry? It Could Be Insulin Resistance

Always hungry? It could be insulin resistance Hungry, sluggish and fatigued, no matter what you eat? You might want to read more about insulin resistance, a condition that can ultimately lead to diabetes. Always feeling sluggish, no matter what you eat? You could have insulin resistance. ~ You've eaten your lunch, but 30 minutes later you are hungry again you feel weak and shaky. You make your way down to the vending machine and try to get some energy from a chocolate bar, only to feel sluggish again soon afterwards. You might be blissfully unaware of a condition that can increase your risk for type 2 diabetes . Insulin resistance occurs when the body is unable to absorb and utilise the insulin it produces, resulting in elevated blood glucose levels. According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases , insulin is a hormone that is made in the pancreas, an organ located behind the stomach. The role of insulin is to allow cells of the body to absorb glucose to be used as fuel or stored as body fat. When your blood glucose level rises after a meal, insulin is released by the pancreas to help the liver, muscle and fat cells absorb the glucose. Insulin also lowers your blood glucose levels by reducing glucose production in the liver. If you are healthy, your insulin automatically regulates your blood glucose levels. Things go pear-shaped when the cells do not respond properly to insulin and cant absorb glucose from your bloodstream. Your body needs higher levels of insulin to help glucose to be absorbed. As your pancreas tries to keep up with the demand for more insulin, it can start failing, leading to pre-diabetes and, ultimately, type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance often shows no symptoms, or symptoms can take a while to appear. There are, Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Prediabetes definition and facts Prediabetes means your blood sugar is higher than normal, but not high enough to diagnose type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes typically has no symptoms or signs; however, it has been associated with being overweight. Usually, blood sugar is high because of insulin resistance, meaning glucose can't get into the cells to be used for energy. Prediabetes is diagnosed with blood tests. Prediabetes levels of blood sugar fall in the range of 100-125 when blood glucose is measured fasting. Prediabetes is reversible by getting healthier. Treatment for prediabetes begins with getting more physically active. All exercise helps reverse prediabetes, especially exercise that helps build muscle. Following a low glycemic index, low carb diet, and following a healthier lifestyle helps reverse prediabetes. Medications and dietary supplements also can be used in reverse prediabetes management. Without making lifestyle changes (or taking medication), the "side effect" of prediabetes is that it is likely to progress to type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is the term used to describe elevated blood sugar (glucose) that has not yet reached the threshold of a type 2 diabetes diagnosis. Consider pre-diabetes a warning sign that it is time to take your health more seriously. What is the difference between prediabetes and type 2 diabetes? Prediabetes occurs when there is too much sugar (glucose) in the blood. It is an early warning sign that the body has more sugar in the blood then it can use. Type 2 diabetes is a condition that occurs slowly over time. The pancreas cannot produce enough insulin to keep up with the increased need to move sugar into the cells for energy. Medication and lifestyle changes are necessary to manage blood sugar levels and avoid diabetes complications Continue reading >>

Five Things You Should Know About Prediabetes

Five Things You Should Know About Prediabetes

After announcing the expansion of Diabetes Stops Here and asking you which topics you’d like covered, we received a specific request for more information about prediabetes. A staggering 79 million Americans deal with this condition, and while it can lead to crippling health consequences, it can be avoided. Here are five things you should know about prediabetes: 1. What is prediabetes? Before people develop type 2 diabetes, they almost always have prediabetes, a health condition where your blood glucose is higher than normal but not as high as if you had diabetes. 2. How can I find out if I have it? Your doctor can give you a blood test to tell if you have prediabetes (the same test that’s used to test for diabetes). At your next doctor visit, ask if you should be tested for prediabetes. 3. What can I do if I have prediabetes? If you have prediabetes, there are important steps you can, and should, take. Early intervention can turn back the clock and return elevated blood glucose levels to the normal range. Losing weight is an important step for most people with prediabetes, and the amount doesn’t have to be huge to make a difference. A weight loss of just 10 to 15 pounds can really stack the odds in your favor. Coupled with 30 minutes of exercise each day and healthy food choices, you’ll be on your way. Talk with your doctor and visit our website to learn more about other ways you can prevent or reverse the condition. 4. Does this mean I’m going to develop type 2 diabetes? Prediabetes can lead to type 2 diabetes…but it doesn’t have to. Scientific studies show taking the above steps can often halt or at least slow down the progression of prediabetes so it doesn’t take a turn for the worse. 5. Where can I find help? You are not alone. It’s never too late Continue reading >>

Pre-diabetic And Always Hungry/thirsty

Pre-diabetic And Always Hungry/thirsty

I have to tell you that I am a little disturbed by what I just read. You need to talk to your doctor about all of this but the first thing you need to do is STOP DRINKING DIET POP! It is full of aspertame which is a dangerous chemical! Please also see a dietician to help you with your diet. (I find that if I drink a large glass of water prior to my meals, I fill up faster without adding calories) You need to learn to eat the good foods that will keep you feeling satisfied. Is diet soda bad for diabetes? I know aspartame isn't a great product to put in your body but I'm addicted to diet soda. I can't just quit. I've been drinking diet soda for many years now. I grew up with Diet Pepsi. So quitting isn't going to be easy, especially since I'm addicted to not only the caffeine in it but the bubbles of soda. I haven't had any adverse effects from it so (knock on wood) I probably won't have any kidney stones or whatnot from the diet soda. Hello and welcome, Brittany. You must be delirious with thirst and miserable with constant hunger. There are several blood tests that should be performed to determine what causes such extremes. You need a doctor who will listen to you, and you'll need tests which determine if you have diabetes - like an A1c, OGTT (Oral Glucose Tolerance Test) - and also the tests which determine what type of diabetes. You're young and you could be type 1, but you're heavy, so you could be type 2 . . . or anywhere in between. But I think it's imperative that you find out soon, because it sounds like it has gotten way out of control. If you can get to the source of these symptoms and make the adjustments required to remedy what is wrong, you're going to feel 100% better! Hello and welcome, Brittany. You must be delirious with thirst and miserable with consta Continue reading >>

How I Reversed My Prediabetes

How I Reversed My Prediabetes

How I Reversed My Prediabetes Three months ago I got some crappy health news: an A1C level of 5.9, which is officially in the prediabetic range. (5.7–6.4; 6.5+ is officially diabetes). The A1C test represents your average blood sugar level over the previous three months. So last week I repeated the test. This time it was 5.6, the maximum level considered normal. I am no longer prediabetic. I wrote about the first part of this journey. It was scary for me to write about issues as personal and revealing as health, diet, and body image, but the payoff to being vulnerable was so worth it. I received so much positive feedback and support, including a friend who stocked my freezer with meat that he had hunted since I had said I wanted to start eating humanely raised meat. I had so many good conversations with people as a result of that piece; I became closer to friends and professional acquaintances alike. I realized that almost everyone has thoughts and concerns about food and health and it makes us feel more connected to share it — at times and places that are appropriate, of course. Here’s what I did that resulted in a lower A1C : Tracking: I tracked everything I ate faithfully for about 80 days/11 weeks total. Initially I set a target of 2000 calories and 150 grams of total carbohydrates. Nutritionist: about 6 weeks in I went to see a nutritionist. She recommended a calorie target of just 1600 a day. This seemed incredibly difficult. I was often hungry, often exceeded the limit, but I cut my daily average to within shouting distance of that target. I also continued to limit processed carbohydrates as much as feasible. And over the course of 3 weeks I lost 5 pounds. If this is the main reason my blood sugar improved, the change probably won’t stick. Only time will Continue reading >>

Pre-diabetic Symptoms - A Must To Know For All

Pre-diabetic Symptoms - A Must To Know For All

While diabetes is a life-long metabolism disorder characterized by very high levels of glucose in the blood, prediabetes or borderline diabetes is the early stage in the development of type II diabetes.People suffering from this condition, also known as impaired glucose tolerance, have a blood glucose level that is higher than normal but not high enough for them to be treated for type II diabetes. Prediabetes usually does not have any clear symptoms and it can therefore go unnoticed and untreated. Thus, it is important to understand whether you are pre-diabetic or borderline diabetic.If an individual's blood sugar level remains above the normal limit for an extended period, prediabetes can turn into type II diabetes. Research conducted by the American Diabetes Association shows that even during the early stages in the development of type II diabetes or the prediabetes stage, an individual can suffer from long term damage to the body. The heart and circulatory system especially are vulnerable during this condition. Both diabetes and prediabetes can occur at any age and due precaution should be taken by people across age groups and ethnicities. SYMPTOMS: Many people remain asymptomatic and go unnoticed. It is becoming the major risk in our country. It was found that 1/3rd of Indian Population is unaware of the disease they have. People may experience: (RED FLAGS) Red flags of diabetes. Whole body: excessive hunger, excessive thirst, fatigue, or low blood sugar. Urinary: excessive urination or frequent urination Weight: overweight or weight gain. Also common: diabetes, peripheral neuropathy, pot belly, or vision disorder.Factors Increasing the Risk of Diabetes - Know your Status. Genetic predisposition such as a family history of pre-diabetes or type II diabetes. Polycysti Continue reading >>

Polyphagia - Increased Appetite

Polyphagia - Increased Appetite

Tweet Polyphagia is the medical term used to describe excessive hunger or increased appetite and is one of the 3 main signs of diabetes. An increase in hunger is usually a response to normal things such as intensive exercise or other strenuous activity, but polyphagia can also be the result of more severe issues such as depression or stress. Also known as hyperphagia, it is one of the three main symptoms of diabetes, along with: Polydipsia (increased thirst) and Polyuria (frequent, excessive urination) Causes of polyphagia Polyphagia can be caused by: Diabetes mellitus Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar levels) Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels) Anxiety Stress Bulimia Binge eating disorder Hyperthyroidism (raised level of thyroid hormone) Premenstrual syndrome Certain prescription drugs such as corticosteroids Some psychiatric conditions Rare medical conditions such as Kleine-Levin Syndrome and Prader-Willi Syndrome Hunger and hyperglycemia In uncontrolled diabetes where blood glucose levels remain abnormally high (hyperglycemia), glucose from the blood cannot enter the cells - due to either a lack of insulin or insulin resistance - so the body can’t convert the food you eat into energy. This lack of energy causes an increase in hunger. Simply eating will not get rid of the hungry feeling of polyphagia in people with uncontrolled diabetes, as this will just add to the already high blood glucose levels. The best way to lower blood glucose levels is to exercise as this can help to stimulate insulin production and reduce blood sugar levels. However, if the hunger persists, you may need to consult your doctor or diabetes health care team. Hunger and hypoglycemia Increased appetite can also be caused by abnormally low blood glucose (hypoglycemia). If blood glucose readings Continue reading >>

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