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Can This Be Pre Diabetes?

Can This Be Pre Diabetes?

One isolated test isn't conclusive. However, that 177 spike is indicative of a poorly functioning glucose metabolism. Have you read Blood Sugar 101 yet? A very informative, and accurate, site for all things diabetic. You might want to spend some time there learning all you can about diabetes. If you are concerned about readings being high, especially after consuming a high-carb meal, then you might want to do more testing, and of more typical meals, following the "eat to your meter" method of testing - before the meal, 1hrpp and 2hrpp (as you did). Then, if any reading is above 140, reduce the carb load for subsequent meals (this is assuming that you are counting and know how many grams of carbs is in your meals and snacks). Or, if you want a diagnosis, ask your doctor for an OGTT (oral glucose tolerance test). FYI - the fasting level is usually the last to be affected by diminishing glucose metabolism, so it can be "normal" while all along the post-meal can be too high. . . . I had a bowl of white rice for breakfast knowing this would spike my blood sugar. My morning fasting was 86 my 1 hour was 177 and my 2 hour was 147. After reading several things I'm now concerned I'm pre diabetic. The 177 may be of concern because it means that you definitely go up there, and you aren't back down very far after 2 hrs. An HbA1c blood test can tell you if you regularly have high levels over the past ~90days. Sounds like you can easily have good control with proper diet. Bad news is that there is no such thing as being "pre-diabetic" you either are or you are not. If you are, there is no cure, but it can be controlled. If you are concerned see your doctor only he can give you a proper diagnosis. We all do not agree on much the medical profession does on diabetes, but they are the be Continue reading >>

Prediabetes - Forums

Prediabetes - Forums

Hi! Well I've had all the T-Tapp dvd's for a few years but has never been consistent. I'm 38 and just found out my A1C puts me in the prediabetes range. I'm basically in a fight for my life. My glucose has always been stellar, but I'm glad this was finally caught (years of asking my normal Dr to test me for diabetes and come to find out she never ran my A1C). It's was 6.0 . I know hoedowns help with blood sugar, but I'm ready to go "all in" on a program that will help me. Even though I've never been consistent I've always gained pounds while doing T-Tapp (maybe 2 months at a time). I'm just worried that gaining weight even though I drastically changed my diet, will push me into diabetic range. Thoughts? Suggestions? Welcome back. I would not worry about weight gain due to muscle gain. How do you determine muscle gain vs fat gain,? You look at your size. If your size stays exactly the same, no puffy face or swelling feet, and the clothes actually fit looser, you are gaining muscle and losing water weight and fat. T-Tapp is the best workout you can use to get rid of diabetes. How? Gaining muscles. Once you have muscles, you have your insulin spike insurance. Keep doing T-Tapp for 3 months to 6 months, I am sure you will see inches loss, then weight loss and all in a sudden, a lot of your problems are resolving. If you manage your food with the Glycemic Load, I am sure you will be fine in no time. I was prediabetes,I was 38 too. I am no longer at risk. I have a lot of lean T-Tapp Muscles. I suspect you overtrained and had too much inflammation a few years ago and therefore, you were not consistent. This time, this "all in" should be focusing on long term lifestyle change. You will workout 6 out of 7 days per week forever. I want you to understand and watch for over traini Continue reading >>

Pre-diabetes And Polyneuropathy

Pre-diabetes And Polyneuropathy

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ & read the forum rules . To view all forums, post or create a new thread, you must be an AAPC Member . If you are a member and have already registered for member area and forum access , you can log in by clicking here . If you've forgotten your username or password use our password reminder tool . To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. We are given: "Polyneuropathy is due to prediabetes...." If Prediabetes is coded to R73.09, it is considered a sign and symptom and not a disease- so would G63 be appropriate? Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated!! Based on how the AADE and CMS are going to start treating prediabetes in 2018, it wouldn't shock me to see a move from 'R' to 'E' sometime in the next 18-24 months By Dfreddie in forum Medical Coding General Discussion By cmercado0526 in forum Internal Medicine By [email protected] in forum Diagnosis Coding AAPC forums are a benefit of membership. Joining AAPC grants you unlimited access, allowing you to post questions and participate with our community of over 150,000 professionals. In addition to full participation on AAPC forums, as a member you will be able to: Access to the largest healthcare job database in the world. Join over 150,000 members of the healthcare network in the world. Be a part of an industry leading organization that drives the business side of healthcare. Save anywhere from 10%-50% with exclusive member discounts on courses, books, study materials, and conferences. Access to discounts at hundreds of restaurants, travel destinations, retail stores, and service providers. AAPC members also have opportunities to save on heath, life, and liability insurance. Become a member of a local ch Continue reading >>

The Douglas County Health Department Holds Prediabetes Forum For Employers

The Douglas County Health Department Holds Prediabetes Forum For Employers

The Douglas County Health Department holds prediabetes forum for employers Next Tuesday, the Douglas County Health Department is holding a free forum called, The Prediabetes Predicament: What Business Leaders Can Do To Take Action. Celeste Ehrenberg, Community Health Planner for the Douglas County Health Department, says the program is funded through a Chronic Disease Prevention Grant the department receives. She says this is part of the health departments efforts to stem the tide of people who end up with Type 2 diabetes. Ehrenberg says the event will teach businesses why prediabetes needs to be addressed and offer them implementation suggestions and assistance. Shelby Braun, Community Health Educator, says its important to get ahead of the disease. "Today, about one in three adults have prediabetes and about 90% of these individuals dont know they have prediabetes. And, without intervention, many people with prediabetes can go on to develop Type 2 diabetes within five years. So its very important to help these 90% of people who dont know theyre prediabetic, to make them aware they are and that they can take action in enough time. The Prediabetes forum takes place next Tuesday at 11:30 in the UNO Community Engagement Center. To find out if youre at risk, theres a test available online at DoIHavePreDiabetes.org . Continue reading >>

Health Discussion Forum | Pre-diabetes | Does This Mean I Have Pre-diabetes?

Health Discussion Forum | Pre-diabetes | Does This Mean I Have Pre-diabetes?

Home Forums Diabetes Pre-diabetes Does this mean I have pre-diabetes? Submitted by velu on 20 Aug 2010 | Last updated 8 July 2011 I have some general symptoms including being constantly thirsty, peeing a lot and noticed skin change in my armpits which I recognized as Acanthosis Nigricans. So I bought a glucose meter and start testing my blood sugar level. My fasting blood sugar was 92, one hour after food it was 166, 2 hours later it was 110 and 3 hours later it was 102. Roughly two hours after eating dinner it was 156. Some background: my grandfather had type 2 diabetes and 7 years ago during my pregnancy I had the gestational diabetes test. I dont have gestation diabetes though my doctor did tell me that my numbers were too high. So I am wondering if it's possible I have been having pre-diabetes. I don't have health insurance so if it's possible I'd expect some advice beyond "seeing doctor". BG reading of 166 one hour after food is a little high. So is the 156 after two hours of supper. Jenny Ruhl, quite famous among members of English language e-forums related to diabetes, has a website 'Blood Sugar 101' where she recommends that diabetics try to limit their BG level to less than 140 after 1 hour of a major meal and less than 120 after two hours. Most healthy non-diabetics have their BG around 90 after two hours of a major meal. Acanthosis Nigricans, I have read, is due to increased circulating insulin which again is due to insulin resistance. In pre-diabetes and early stages of diabetes, the pancreas is still able to produce a lot of insulin to compensate for the increased insulin resistance. Some of this insulin "seeps" into the skin and since insulin is a growth hormone it causes the skin to thicken and the pigmentation to increase. Here is a Wikipedia article on Continue reading >>

Prediabetes Or Borderline Diabetes

Prediabetes Or Borderline Diabetes

Causes and risk factors of prediabetes The following factors indicate or contribute to a higher risk of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes: Being overweight or obese Having a close family member with type 2 diabetes Being of South Asian, African Caribbean or Middle Eastern descent Having high blood pressure levels Having high cholesterol levels (non-HDL cholesterol) A strong contributing cause of prediabetes is believed to be the accumulation of fat around internal organs such as the pancreas and liver. This type of fat is known as visceral fat. Signs of prediabetes As people with prediabetes have only slightly higher than normal blood sugar levels, the symptoms of prediabetes are likely to be subtle and may only be noticeable at certain times, such as following a meal. Symptoms you may notice include: Tiredness after meals –particularly meals with a high amount of carbohydrate Hunger through the day or following meals Difficulty thinking or brain fog Acanthosis nigricans – dark areas of skin commonly found around the neck, armpits, elbows and knuckles Treating prediabetes Treatment for prediabetes will center around lifestyle changes, in the same way as treatment for type 2 diabetes does. Lifestyle changes include: Losing weight – if you are overweight Having a healthy, balanced and usually low calorie diet Taking regular exercise If you have high blood pressure or cholesterol levels, your doctor may prescribe blood pressure or cholesterol lowering medications. In some cases, your doctor may prescribe a medication called metformin which has a modest effect in lowering blood glucose levels. Progression to type 2 diabetes Pre-diabetes is a critical stage in the development of diabetes. Developing insulin resistance this ‘pre-diabetic’ will, in most cases, lead to Continue reading >>

The Prediabetes Diet Everyone Should Follow?

The Prediabetes Diet Everyone Should Follow?

The Prediabetes Diet Everyone Should Follow? Any Critiques? More than a few things really jump out? (the title makes me giggle) Medically Reviewed by Farrokh Sohrabi, MD Experts believe the number of people living with diabetes will rise dramatically over the next 40 years. If current trends continue, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as many as one in three adults could have the disease by 2050. And about 79 million American adults now have prediabetes, a condition marked by above-normal blood sugar levels that arent high enough to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. If theres a silver lining to these alarming statistics, its that theres plenty you can do to prevent the disease or slow the progression, including eating a balanced diet. Everyone can benefit from a healthy eating plan aimed at containing prediabetes, regardless of whether youre at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes, says Barbara Borcik, RD, a certified diabetes eductor at the Diabetes & Nutrition Center at Northwest Hospital in Randallstown, Md. Here are seven sound diet principles that can keep your blood sugars from creeping upward, among other health benefits. Skip the sugary drinks. No sweet tea. No juice. No soda. No sweetened lemonade. No mocha latte coffee creations. My number one recommendation to people is: Dont drink your sugar, Borcik says. Sugary drinks provide nothing more than empty calories, and they wont help you feel full. All the sugary drinks out there are a real risk factor for obesity, she stresses. Pull back on portions. You still can eat many of the foods you like, just have smaller amounts of them, Borcik says, adding that this is especially true for starchy foods like white rice, white potatoes, and pasta. Cut out high-calorie, junky snacks, a Continue reading >>

Patientslikeme | Prediabetes Symptoms, Treatments & Patient Forums

Patientslikeme | Prediabetes Symptoms, Treatments & Patient Forums

5 evaluations from prediabetes patients report major effectiveness of Metformin for prediabetes (23%) 6 evaluations from prediabetes patients report moderate effectiveness of Metformin for prediabetes (27%) 3 evaluations from prediabetes patients report slight effectiveness of Metformin for prediabetes (14%) 0 evaluations from prediabetes patients report none effectiveness of Metformin for prediabetes (0%) 8 evaluations from prediabetes patients report that they could not tell effectiveness of Metformin for prediabetes (36%) 1 evaluation from a prediabetes patient reports severe overall side effects for Metformin (2%) 7 evaluations from prediabetes patients report moderate overall side effects for Metformin (16%) 9 evaluations from prediabetes patients report mild overall side effects for Metformin (21%) 25 evaluations from prediabetes patients report no overall side effects for Metformin (59%) diarrheanauseadiarrheanauseabowel problemsdrowsinessgastroparesisheavy periodsneck movement dizziness (cervicogenic dizziness)stomach painweight loss 7more 1 evaluation from a prediabetes patient reports major effectiveness of Duloxetine for depressed mood (33%) 0 evaluations from prediabetes patients report moderate effectiveness of Duloxetine for depressed mood (0%) 1 evaluation from a prediabetes patient reports slight effectiveness of Duloxetine for depressed mood (33%) 1 evaluation from a prediabetes patient reports none effectiveness of Duloxetine for depressed mood (33%) 0 evaluations from prediabetes patients report that they could not tell effectiveness of Duloxetine for depressed mood (0%) 2 evaluations from prediabetes patients report severe overall side effects for Duloxetine (9%) 2 evaluations from prediabetes patients report moderate overall side effects for Duloxe Continue reading >>

Normal Or Prediabetes? - Airline Pilot Central Forums

Normal Or Prediabetes? - Airline Pilot Central Forums

Welcome to Airline Pilot Forums - Connect and get the inside scoop on Airline Companies If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ . Join our community today and start interacting with existing members. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free. I recently did a blood glucose tolerance test I had previously done just a fasting test and came in at 100 so my doc asked me to do blood glucose tolerance test and the A1c I see the 5.7 is in the pre diabetes range but everything else looks normal. I will do the A1c again in maybe 60 days to see.. Position: faa sr. medical examiner (HIMS) at present your are ok ... though you did not report the presence or absence of glucose in your urine. Note your family history and attend to your lifestyle ... make appropriate changes and monitor as u r doing My Internal Medicine doc calls an A1C of 6.4 at the very top of the yellow arc for diabetes. I think 5.7-6.4 was the yellow range if I remember correctly. A person I work with has insulin dependent Type II and some literature she has gives an A1C of 7.0 as the thrshold for diabetes. I think 5.7-6.4 was the yellow range if I remember correctly. Correct. Make a lifestyle change now and get the fasting down too. That 98 is on high side of normal-ish. Diet (cut simple carbs) and exercise. I recently did a blood glucose tolerance test I had previously done just a fasting test and came in at 100 so my doc asked me to do blood glucose tolerance test and the A1c I see the 5.7 is in the pre diabetes range but everything else looks normal. I will do the A1c again in maybe 60 days to see.. A close buddy had a similar situation. Basically, don't get overly stressed yet. Walk every day or as much as possible, less (or zero) white food products (milk, bread, sugar, pasta), more Continue reading >>

Eating Properly With Prediabetes

Eating Properly With Prediabetes

I have completely whacky blood sugars too. I have extreme insulin resistance, and a pancreas that just won't give up and when it finally decides to make insulin, it makes it big time, sending me into a hypo, which makes my adrenaline levels go crazy as I have manic adrenal gland too. I live like a kind of yo-yo unless I keep my carbs down to about 20 grams a day and my stress levels down, which is tricky as I'm doing 24 hour nursing at the moment. In my experience , I need to eat sufficiently little carbohydrate to keep me *just* in ketosis else my blood sugars and adrenaline levels yo-yo to the point that my mood swings and brain fog are intolerable. It's not actually compulsory to eat meat - fish is good. And eggs. And home made coleslaw made with grated cabbage and zuccini is a good 'filler'. I also have to totally ban bread and biscuits from the house else I end up pigging out on them - if you've ever had a hypo, you'll know how impossible it is to resist! But one thing I've found is that if I'm in good ketosis and have been stable all week, I get away with one day a week on a 'fruit fast' and can stuff myself with whatever fruit I like so long as I only do it for one day and eat nothing but fruit for that day. Your milage might vary on that though. When I first figured out what was wrong with me I had a terrific battle with pretty well everyone as not even the doctors believed it was my blood sugars and in any case they didn't approve of low carb diets at the time, so I was left figuring it all out by myelf. Go for lots of salads. Have cheese or cream with any berries you eat. Keep your stress levels down - adrenaline causes a release of blood sugar and sets the whole thing yo-yo-ing. I've found that the longer I stay low carb, the more I can get away with - the i Continue reading >>

Douglas County Health Department Will Host Free Prediabetes Forum Feb. 6

Douglas County Health Department Will Host Free Prediabetes Forum Feb. 6

Douglas County Health Department will host free prediabetes forum Feb. 6 by Staff, Douglas County Health Department Prediabetes is a growing workforce issue associated with significant health and financial consequences, but employers across Nebraska are making strides to become leaders in diabetes prevention efforts. On Tuesday, Feb. 6, Douglas County Health Department , in partnership with WELLCOM , will host The Prediabetes Predicament: What Business Leaders Can Do To Take Action from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the University of Nebraska Omaha Barbara Weitz Community Engagement Center, 6001 Dodge Street. This free event is open to the public and will highlight the actions that area businesses are taking to reduce prediabetes among employees. Attendees will have the opportunity to receive assistance in implementing select action items in their worksites, such as programs and educational tools.Thanks to our sponsor Omada Health , free lunch is included for all who register. Now is the time for local businesses to address this potentially devastating health issue before it strikes your bottom line, said Douglas County Health Director, Dr. Adi Pour. We look forward to beginning our work together on Feb. 6. Why Prevention of Diabetes Matters to Employers If no lifestyle changes occur, people with prediabetes face the risk of progressing to Type 2 diabetes in as little as five years . A study published in 2002 found that businesses spend an average of $4,410 more for employees living with diabetes, compared to those who dont.In addition, indirect costs associated with diabetes in the United States includes increased absenteeism ($5 billion), reduced productivity while at work ($20.8 billion) and inability to work due to diabetes-related disability ($21.6 billion). Although th Continue reading >>

Why We Created The Diabetes & Pre-diabetes Forum

Why We Created The Diabetes & Pre-diabetes Forum

Why we created the Diabetes & Pre-Diabetes Forum I am so happy for you! That is fantastic! I am so enjoying great numbers - I took a page out of my own book and I did what I preach. although I am still on medication, I have never had 85-90 fasting blood sugars and have it return to that within 2 hours after eating. Sparking with the nutrition guide is really working for me, preparing my food at home and if I go out, ordering a veggie salad and determining mostly to use oil and vinegar has been helpful. I also will order cooked veggies as I am not full time raw - I stay satisfied. I also have eliminated anything not naturally sweetened and if I want to add something, it is done with stevia. As the weight reduces, I know that the medication will too as I am only doing gentle flow yoga now. I do hope we continue on this journey together. It is worth healing. Edited by: SWEETLIPS at: 3/14/2014 (10:17) Thank you for having this forum to discuss diabetes and pre-diabetes. My blood test numbersmare going the wrong way and I need to get more diligent about this.I appreciate how open you all are. chris I have to be diligent about caring for myself. 100 DAYS OF WEIGHT LOSS is a great way for me to keep focused. Day 1 is July 1, 2017. Build habits to produce success. Most of these habits I have at least tried before but did not sustain. First habit: delay eating by using a timer. LONG TERM GOAL: Reduce A1C,BP,tryglicerides,and weight.Evening Eating Sabotage Myself Frustration ..Help! www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/groups_i "It was a really bad time in my life. My parents and all of my teachers accused me of just being lazy. I'd like to see how THEY would feel with a blood sugar of 1000!" My niece can relate to your experience, Marie. During her teenage years she seemed so tired all Continue reading >>

Is This Celiac Disease, Ncgs, Or Pre-diabetes?

Is This Celiac Disease, Ncgs, Or Pre-diabetes?

Is This celiac disease, Ncgs, Or Pre-Diabetes? Ok, so I have been experimenting with what I eat and how I feel afterwards. The other day I ate 2 cups of Post Bran Flakes and I felt absolutely horrible. I became irritable, cranky, fatigued, had a lot of trouble making decisions and concentrating, and just felt "woozy." This effect lasted for 6 hours, with the worst of it occuring about 1-3 hours after eating it. My fiance said my eyes looked puffy as though I had cried but I certainly had not cried. I had not been rubbing my eyes either. Then I skipped a few days of the bran flakes, but still had some foods containing gluten. I felt better. And then I had 1 cup of the same cereal this morning and I feel irritable, cranky, fatigued, and have trouble concentrating. I'm also experiencing dry eyes and blurry vision. It's difficult to know if this effect is being caused by the gluten or the carbohydrates. I have posted a list of my other sympotoms on a diabetes forum (can I reveal which forum this is?) which sound a lot like diabetes but I don't have high blood sugar. A1C = 5.2% and serum blood glucose 4 hours after a bowl of cereal was 107. What do you guys think? By the way I have not done any celiac disease or NCGS testing at this point. Ok, so I have been experimenting with what I eat and how I feel afterwards. The other day I ate 2 cups of Post Bran Flakes and I felt absolutely horrible. I became irritable, cranky, fatigued, had a lot of trouble making decisions and concentrating, and just felt "woozy." This effect lasted for 6 hours, with the worst of it occuring about 1-3 hours after eating it. My fiance said my eyes looked puffy as though I had cried but I certainly had not cried. I had not been rubbing my eyes either. Then I skipped a few days of the bran flakes, bu Continue reading >>

Prediabetes And Increased Risk For Diabetes And Other Health Problems

Prediabetes And Increased Risk For Diabetes And Other Health Problems

SHARE RATE★★★★★ If you have prediabetes, you have blood sugar levels that are elevated (higher than normal), but not high enough to for the diagnosis of diabetes. However, your risk of developing type 2 diabetes is dramatically increased. You are not alone, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 1 in 3 adults over the age of 20 in the US has prediabetes. Approximately 70% of these will develop type 2 diabetes at some point in the future.1 Learning that you have prediabetes can be scary. However, there is a positive side to this discovery. Getting this news means that you have caught a serious health condition in the early stages while it is developing. This gives you time and motivation to make life changes that can prevent progression to type 2 diabetes. Look at it this way, you have a second chance to take positive steps that can make a powerful difference in protecting you from health problems like heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, vision problems, and other complications that are common with type 2 diabetes. The earlier you take action to manage your elevated blood glucose, the better chance you will have at slowing down or even stopping the progression to type 2 diabetes. Research has shown that people who have prediabetes who lose weight and get regular physical activity can prevent or delay progression to type 2 diabetes and, in some cases, even get their blood glucose levels to return to the normal range. Additionally, elevated blood glucose and prediabetes are often part of a set of interrelated health problems, including high blood pressure and abnormal lipids (elevated triglycerides, and decreased high-density lipoprotein [HDL] cholesterol). In many people these health problems, along with increased body weight, Continue reading >>

Hitting The Brakes On Health Care Spending: An Initiative To Stop Prediabetes In Its Tracks

Hitting The Brakes On Health Care Spending: An Initiative To Stop Prediabetes In Its Tracks

Hitting the Brakes on Health Care Spending: An Initiative to Stop Prediabetes in its Tracks For many employers, diabetes is one of their top medical expenditures and contributes to lost productivity and an increase in absenteeism. Where does prediabetes fit into this cost equation? While not as costly, prediabetes can have a meaningful impact on medical spend and remains significantly under-identified. Nine out of ten individuals with prediabetes are unaware of their condition. Most individuals with prediabetes have had no prior history and will not be identified through traditional testing. Find out how Interactive Health is addressing this gap in prediabetes risk identification among employees and translating it into meaningful health care dollars for employees and employers alike. Gaps in prediabetes risk identification in worksite settings when using traditional approaches How to identify and track the true number of individuals in your employee population who are at risk for prediabetes Ways to uncover key cost drivers for employers at different levels of health risk and identify relevant cost savings opportunities that can impact your overall business The evaluation of a large health system case study who took this advanced approach to risk identification, combined with a comprehensive wellness program, and the results that they achieved Continue reading >>

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