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Prediabetes Diet Plan

A Practical, Empowering Guide To Managing And Reversing Prediabetes Through Diet And Exercise, From A Registered Dietitian.

A Practical, Empowering Guide To Managing And Reversing Prediabetes Through Diet And Exercise, From A Registered Dietitian.

Affecting 86 million Americans, prediabetes often develops into full-blown type 2 diabetes, one of the leading causes of death in the United States. Increasingly diagnosed by doctors, prediabetes is a condition in which blood sugar levels are elevated, but not yet high enough to be labeled diabetes. While diabetes cannot be cured, prediabetes can be reversed, so it is critical to take action at an early stage. In straightforward, jargon-free language, The Prediabetes Diet Plan explains insulin resistance (the underlying cause of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes) and offers a comprehensive strategy of diet and lifestyle change, which has been proven more effective than medication. With sections on meal planning, grocery shopping, dining out, supplements, and exercise, this book empowers you to make healthier everyday choices that can effect real change on your insulin levels and overall well-being. Continue reading >>

The Prediabetes Diet Everyone Should Follow

The Prediabetes Diet Everyone Should Follow

Skip the sugary sodas and processed food, and opt for whole foods like fruits and vegetables, whole grains, lean meats, low-fat dairy, and healthy fats like olive oil and avocado, Experts believe the number of people living with diabetes will rise dramatically over the next 40 years. If current trends continue, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as many as one in three adults could have the disease by 2050. And about 79 million American adults now have prediabetes, a condition marked by above-normal blood sugar levels that aren't high enough to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. If there's a silver lining to these alarming statistics, it's that there's plenty you can do to prevent the disease or slow the progression, including eating a balanced diet. Everyone can benefit from a healthy eating plan aimed at containing prediabetes, regardless of whether you're at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes, says Barbara Borcik, RD, a certified diabetes eductor at the Diabetes & Nutrition Center at Northwest Hospital in Randallstown, Md. 7 Golden Rules of Healthy Eating Here are seven sound diet principles that can keep your blood sugars from creeping upward, among other health benefits. Skip the sugary drinks. No sweet tea. No juice. No soda. No sweetened lemonade. No mocha latte coffee creations. "My number one recommendation to people is: Don't drink your sugar," Borcik says. Sugary drinks provide nothing more than empty calories, and they won't help you feel full. "All the sugary drinks out there are a real risk factor for obesity," she stresses. Pull back on portions. You still can eat many of the foods you like, just have smaller amounts of them, Borcik says, adding that this is especially true for starchy foods like white rice, white potat Continue reading >>

A Healthy Diet For Prediabetes

A Healthy Diet For Prediabetes

Source: Web exclusive, September 2011 Prediabetes: What does it mean? A diagnosis of prediabetes is a warning sign about your health, but it’s not a life sentence. Prediabetes means having blood sugar levels that are higher than normal but not yet in the territory of diabetes ‘ and you can easily make changes that will improve your health and lower your risk of developing diabetes and its related complications. ‘Diet, in combination with activity, can have a considerable impact on the development of Type 2 diabetes,’ says New Brunswick-based registered dietitian Michelle Corcoran, who works with clients who have prediabetes, Type 1 diabetes or Type 2 diabetes. And according to the Canadian Diabetes Association, two large studies have shown that by cutting calories, reducing fat intake and exercising at least 150 minutes a week, the number of participants who progressed from prediabetes to diabetes was lowered by 58 percent. That said, prediabetes is a diagnosis that should be taken seriously. While not everyone diagnosed with prediabetes will develop Type 2 diabetes, many will’and people with prediabetes are at higher risk for heart disease and stroke. Losing weight will make a difference, if you need to’a drop of even five to 10 percent can lower your risk, Corcoran says. Follow these healthy diet guidelines to improve the health of everyone in the family, no matter what their current situation. Whole grains for a healthy diet Consuming whole grains has been shown to lower your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, says Corcoran: ‘People who consume three servings a day are almost one-third less likely to develop Type 2 diabetes than those who consume three servings a week.’ Boost your intake by choosing whole-grain products rather than refined wherever p Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Foods For Your Prediabetes Diet Plan

The Best And Worst Foods For Your Prediabetes Diet Plan

Slide 1 of 10: Highly refined grains like bagels made from white flour and cereals are bad breakfast choices because they lack the fiber that blunts your blood sugar response. (Besides, some cereals are packed with sugar; you have to look at the nutrition label carefully.) You can still eat these on occasion, but you should aim to limit these in your diet, says Jill Weisenberger, RD, author of Diabetes Weight Loss Week By Week. Bacon also shouldn't be an 'everyday food,' she says. 'People think, 'oh, it doesn't have carbs,' but there are so many things about it that are not a good idea for prediabetics,' she says. For one, it's linked to colon cancer, something people with type 2 diabetes are already at an increased risk of. Continue reading >>

Prediabetes Diet: The Ultimate Plan To Avoid Diabetes

Prediabetes Diet: The Ultimate Plan To Avoid Diabetes

Want to avoid diabetes? Here's an easy-to-follow healthy eating plan that can help without making you feel deprived. If you’ve been diagnosed with prediabetes, it’s time to find a healthy, realistic eating plan—one you can follow for life—to prevent or at least delay the onset of diabetes and related health conditions such as cardiovascular and kidney diseases. Each year, up to 10% of people who are diagnosed with prediabetes go on to develop diabetes. But just as many get their blood sugar levels back to normal. How it turns out for you may depend, in great part, on lifestyle choices you make, including how you eat. For many people with prediabetes, preventing diabetes means losing weight. Your goal now is to eat balanced meals and snacks that not only improve your glucose metabolism but also help you get to and maintain a healthy weight, if you’re not already there. According to the American Diabetes Association, losing just 7% of your body weight can lower your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. That’s just 15 pounds if you weigh 200 pounds; 10 or 11 pounds if you currently weigh 150 pounds. A diet to prevent diabetes is good for the whole family, so there’s no need to buy and prepare special foods just for one person. Just like anyone else who wants to be healthy, you need to avoid (or at least greatly limit) all the usual sugary and fatty junk food suspects: cakes, candies, sodas, pastries, and chips, along with deep-fried foods, cold cuts, heavy sauces and gravies and flavored coffee drinks. Overall, being on a prediabetes diet simply means paying attention to portion sizes and nutritional balance. While some food choices are better than others, you have a lot of leeway and few restrictions on a prediabetes diet. The good news is you can choose whet Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Prediabetes definition and facts Prediabetes means your blood sugar is higher than normal, but not high enough to diagnose type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes typically has no symptoms or signs; however, it has been associated with being overweight. Usually, blood sugar is high because of insulin resistance, meaning glucose can't get into the cells to be used for energy. Prediabetes is diagnosed with blood tests. Prediabetes levels of blood sugar fall in the range of 100-125 when blood glucose is measured fasting. Prediabetes is reversible by getting healthier. Treatment for prediabetes begins with getting more physically active. All exercise helps reverse prediabetes, especially exercise that helps build muscle. Following a low glycemic index, low carb diet, and following a healthier lifestyle helps reverse prediabetes. Medications and dietary supplements also can be used in reverse prediabetes management. Without making lifestyle changes (or taking medication), the "side effect" of prediabetes is that it is likely to progress to type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is the term used to describe elevated blood sugar (glucose) that has not yet reached the threshold of a type 2 diabetes diagnosis. Consider pre-diabetes a warning sign that it is time to take your health more seriously. What is the difference between prediabetes and type 2 diabetes? Prediabetes occurs when there is too much sugar (glucose) in the blood. It is an early warning sign that the body has more sugar in the blood then it can use. Type 2 diabetes is a condition that occurs slowly over time. The pancreas cannot produce enough insulin to keep up with the increased need to move sugar into the cells for energy. Medication and lifestyle changes are necessary to manage blood sugar levels and avoid diabetes complications Continue reading >>

The Weight Watchers Program*

The Weight Watchers Program*

Recognized as a National Diabetes Prevention Program by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).** Positive lifestyle changes, such as losing weight and being more physically active, not only lower your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, but also improve your overall well-being and the well-being of your family.*** Numerous expert panels recommend lifestyle changes as a key strategy for weight loss, and highlight that group support and trained Leaders are critical keys to success.‡ Weight Watchers has been tested in those with prediabetes and the results show significant weight loss and improvements in blood sugar control in 6 months, and most importantly, sustained those improvements over 12 months.† PROVEN PROGRAM You'll make healthier food choices and discover fun ways to move more each day to help you lose weight. SUPPORT Real-world weight-loss strategies from a trained Leader and members just like you. FLEXIBILITY You can start the program at any time. The DPP curriculum is incorporated in the standard Weight Watchers program, which is repeated frequently through the year. There numerous times and locations so you can find the meeting that fits your life. * The Weight Watchers program and guidance is not intended as a substitute for medical diagnosis or treatment; you should always consult your physician or health care provider about any health care issues. ** Weight Watchers has received pending recognition from the CDC as a provider of diabetes prevention services as of August 2015. ***CDC Website. “About Prediabetes & Type 2 Diabetes.” † Marrero et al. Comparison of commercial and self-initiated weight loss programs in people with prediabetes: a randomized controlled trial. Am J Public Health 2016;106(5):949-956. ‡ Jensen MD et al. 2013 Continue reading >>

Meal Plans For Diabetes And Pre-diabetes

Meal Plans For Diabetes And Pre-diabetes

A healthy eating plan for Type 2 Diabetes is the same recommendation for most of us. There is no need to buy special foods or cook separate meals. Your daily food intake should include the following foods: 5-6 serves of breads and cereals and other starchy foods. 2-3 serves of milk products or alternatives. 1-2 serves meat or vegetarian alternatives. This daily food guide is based on a 60 years plus overweight active individual. The following food groups provide a guide to a serving size of foods that are nutritionally similar (e.g. 1 slice of bread has similar carbohydrate amount to cup of cooked rice). Foods can be swapped or exchanged for another within the same group. cup cooked kidney beans, chickpeas, kidney beans, borlotti beans etc (85g) 1 medium potato or 2 new/baby potatoes (such as Carisma) (125g) large ear of corn or cup corn kernels (90g) 1 medium piece of fruit (apple, orange, banana) 2 small pieces of fruit (apricot, plum, kiwi fruit) 20 g dried fruit (6 apricot halves, 6 prunes or dates, 1 Tbs sultanas) Some hints and tips to include high protein, low GI foods at each meal. Kick start your day with a good breakfast to help sustain your energy levels and concentration throughout the morning.A healthy breakfast will prime your metabolism to start burning fat right away.A higher protein lower GI breakfast is an ideal food combo to get you off to a healthy start: Smart Carbs traditional oats, natural muesli, low GI breakfast cereals, toast made with grainy low GI breads or authentic sourdough, fruit loaf; baked beans or canned sweetcorn. Protein Power reduced fat milk or yoghurt on their own or made into a fruit smoothie, eggs, ricotta or cottage cheese, tofu, nuts and nut spread, lean slices of ham or bacon and smoked salmon. Fruit and Vegetables fresh, fr Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Create Your Healthy-eating Plan

Diabetes Diet: Create Your Healthy-eating Plan

Your diabetes diet is simply a healthy-eating plan that will help you control your blood sugar. Here's help getting started, from meal planning to exchange lists and counting carbohydrates. Definition A diabetes diet simply means eating the healthiest foods in moderate amounts and sticking to regular mealtimes. A diabetes diet is a healthy-eating plan that's naturally rich in nutrients and low in fat and calories. Key elements are fruits, vegetables and whole grains. In fact, a diabetes diet is the best eating plan for most everyone. Purpose If you have diabetes or prediabetes, your doctor will likely recommend that you see a dietitian to help you develop a healthy eating plan. The plan helps you control your blood sugar (glucose), manage your weight and control risk factors for heart disease, such as high blood pressure and high blood fats. When you eat excess calories and fat, your body responds by creating an undesirable rise in blood glucose. If blood glucose isn't kept in check, it can lead to serious problems, such as a dangerously high blood glucose level (hyperglycemia) and long-term complications, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage. You can help keep your blood glucose level in a safe range by making healthy food choices and tracking your eating habits. For most people with type 2 diabetes, weight loss also can make it easier to control blood glucose and offers a host of other health benefits. If you need to lose weight, a diabetes diet provides a well-organized, nutritious way to reach your goal safely. Diet details A diabetes diet is based on eating three meals a day at regular times. This helps your body better use the insulin it produces or gets through a medication. A registered dietitian can help you put together a diet based on your health goals, tas Continue reading >>

Pre Diabetes Diet Plan

Pre Diabetes Diet Plan

It’s estimated that almost 50% of the American population has diabetes or prediabetes – a condition where blood sugar is higher than normal levels. It is accompanied by insulin resistance, a risk factor for full-blown diabetes, and other health complications. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data estimates the recent prevalence of total diabetes, diagnosed diabetes and undiagnosed diabetes’ US trends to be 12-14% among US adults. So, neither should you shrug off your doctor’s advice, nor should you be taking your elevated blood sugar levels lightly. Generally, the power of a pre-diabetes diet plan, for getting those numbers back on track, is underestimated. Prediabetes is diagnosed when fasting blood sugar levels range from 100 to 125 mg/dl, or hemoglobin A1C levels range from 5.7 to 6.4%. One needs to undergo regular prediabetes tests to be sure. But, with the right pre-diabetes diet plan, one starts to feel the difference in their energy levels soon enough. MORE: Take the Prediabetes Risk Test This is a chance to take control. Simple and daily lifestyle changes, like a balanced diet and regular exercise, that help you lose weight go a long way towards warding off the risk of progressing to full-blown type 2 diabetes. Pre-Diabetes Diet Plan: Changes You Need To Make Today If you already have pre-diabetes, you are likely to develop type 2 diabetes (T2D) within the next 10 years unless you make some changes, starting from today. It’s time to adopt a new pre-diabetes diet plan built on some basic principles: Don’t Skip Breakfast You may barely make it to office on time, but that doesn’t mean you skip breakfast. That means you wake up earlier! A healthy breakfast starts your day on the right note. It gives your metabolism the kick-sta Continue reading >>

Diet Tips For Prediabetes

Diet Tips For Prediabetes

In a person with prediabetes, blood sugar levels are raised but not yet to within the ranges of diabetes. Although not a lot is known about how many people have prediabetes, one study found that the condition affects 1 in 3 adults in the UK. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the same prediabetes rates affect Americans. Without treatment, an estimated 15-30 percent of those with prediabetes go on to develop type 2 diabetes 5 years after diagnosis. Many prediabetes prevention plans revolve around two key lifestyle factors - a healthy diet and regular exercise. The results of the Diabetes Prevention Program, run in the United States since 2001, suggest that losing an average of 15 pounds in the first year of a prediabetes prevention plan reduces the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 58 percent over 3 years. Researchers from John Hopkins University also found that a combination of diet and exercise help. When both were used to achieve a total body weight loss of 10 percent or more in the first year of a prevention plan, the risk of type 2 diabetes fell by 85 percent within 3 years. Contents of this article: The prediabetes diet There are a few different ways to plan a prediabetes diet. The Mayo Clinic suggests diets filled with low-fat, low-calorie, high-fiber, foods. That means lots of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean meats and protein-packed legumes. It also means avoiding artificial sugars, added sugars, and fats. To help guide meal plans, the Glycemic Index (GI) is a useful tool. It ranks foods by the rate at which they affect blood sugar levels. Some carbohydrates are digested slowly, gradually releasing sugar into the bloodstream. Others are processed quickly, causing a quick rise in blood sugar levels. Because prediabetes pr Continue reading >>

Your 5-week Diabetic Diet Meal Plan

Your 5-week Diabetic Diet Meal Plan

The Outsmart Diabetes Diet is based on new research that found four specific nutrients—fiber, vitamin D, omega-3s, and calcium—work together to help balance blood sugar and encourage weight loss. Build your daily diabetic diet meal plan by choosing one breakfast, one lunch and one dinner, plus two snacks—any combination gets you approximately 1,400 calories a day and a healthy dose of the "Fat-Fighting 4." Remember to eat about every 3 hours and practice portion control. Prevention Premium: What Every Woman Knows About Erectile Dysfunction Follow this mix and match diabetic diet meal plan—adapted from The Outsmart Diabetes Diet—for the next five weeks to help fight fat, maintain healthy blood sugar levels, boost energy, and reduce your diabetes risk. BREAKFAST Fruity bagel breakfast: Spread 1 Tbsp light cream cheese and 1 tsp 100% fruit spread on ½ of a whole grain bagel. Serve with 1 c fat-free milk. Crunchy yogurt: Combine 6 oz fat-free light yogurt, ¼ c granola cereal, 1 Tbsp ground flax seed, and 1 Tbsp chopped nuts. Add ground cinnamon and/or sugar substitute to taste. Eggs and English muffin: Scramble 1 egg in a pan coated with 1 tsp canola or olive oil; top with ¼ c chopped tomato, onion, and chile salsa. Serve with toasted 100% whole grain English muffin, spread with 2 Tbsp low-fat (1%) cottage cheese, and 1 c fat-free milk. Instead of scrambled eggs, try poaching an egg: Good Morning Blend: Stir together 6 ounces fat-free yogurt, 2 Tbsp dried mixed fruit, 2 Tbsp ground flax seed and 2 Tbsp chopped almonds, walnuts, or pecans. Nutty Oatmeal: Top ½ c cooked oatmeal with ¼ c walnuts or other nuts; add ground cinnamon and/or sugar substitute to taste. Serve with 1 c fat-free milk or calcium-enriched soy or rice beverage. Bagel and cream cheese: Sprea Continue reading >>

Prediabetes: 7 Steps To Take Now

Prediabetes: 7 Steps To Take Now

Getting diagnosed with prediabetes is a serious wake-up call, but it doesn't have to mean you will definitely get diabetes. There is still time to turn things around. “It’s an opportunity to initiate lifestyle changes or treatments, and potentially retard progression to diabetes or even prevent diabetes,” says Gregg Gerety, MD, chief of endocrinology at St. Peter’s Hospital in Albany, N.Y. Making these seven changes in your daily habits is a good way to start. Becoming more active is one of the best things you can do to make diabetes less likely. If it's been a while since you exercised, start by building more activity into your routine by taking the stairs or doing some stretching during TV commercials, says Patti Geil, MS, RD, author of What Do I Eat Now? “Physical activity is an essential part of the treatment plan for prediabetes, because it lowers blood glucose levels and decreases body fat,” Geil says. Ideally, you should exercise at least 30 minutes a day, five days a week. Let your doctor know about your exercise plans and ask if you have any limitations. If you're overweight, you might not have to lose as much as you think to make a difference. In one study, people who had prediabetes and lost 5% to 7% of their body weight (just 10-14 pounds in someone who weights 200 pounds) cut their chances of getting diabetes by 58%. See your doctor every three to six months, Gerety says. If you're doing well, you can get positive reinforcement from your doctor. If it's not going so well, your doctor can help you get back on track. "Patients like some tangible evidence of success or failure," Gerety says. Continue reading >>

Should You Follow A Prediabetes Diet Plan?

Should You Follow A Prediabetes Diet Plan?

Before I offer answers to the questions about what to eat if you have pre diabetes and whether you should follow a pre diabetes diet plan, let’s get clear on what pre diabetes is, who’s at risk and actions to take that can help prevent type 2 diabetes. What is Pre Diabetes? Pre diabetes occurs when blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes.1 (Pre diabetes refers to the condition that typically occurs before one develops type 2 diabetes.) The number of people estimated to have pre diabetes is simply staggering. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) puts the estimate at 84 million Americans. That’s one out of three adults at risk for diabetes! Most people don’t know they have pre diabetes because often there are no symptoms, nor have they been tested for it or told they have it.1 November is American Diabetes Month®. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) now recommends that all adults over 45 years of age be screened for pre diabetes.2 Other risk factors for pre diabetes or type 2 diabetes include being overweight or obese, having one or more parents or siblings who have or had type 2 diabetes or women who have had gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy).2 Pre Diabetes Tests According to the ADA, any of the following lab tests with the corresponding results can be used to diagnose pre diabetes:2 Fasting Blood Glucose: 100-125 mg/dL 2 hours after the start of an oral glucose tolerance test: 140-199 mg/dL A1c test (A1c approximates an average of all the ups and downs of blood glucose over the previous two to three months): 5.7 to 6.4 percent People can develop pre diabetes and have it for several years or more before blood glucose levels rise high enough to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

The Right Diet For Prediabetes

The Right Diet For Prediabetes

A prediabetes diagnosis can be alarming. This condition is marked by abnormally high blood sugar (glucose) most often due to insulin resistance. This is a condition in which the body doesn’t use insulin properly. It’s often a precursor to type 2 diabetes. According to the Mayo Clinic, people with prediabetes are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes within 10 years. With prediabetes, you may also be at risk of developing cardiovascular disease. However, a prediabetes diagnosis doesn’t mean you will definitely get type 2 diabetes. The key is early intervention; to get your blood sugar out of the prediabetes range. Your diet is important, and you need to know the right kind of foods to eat. How diet relates to prediabetes There are many factors that increase your risk for prediabetes. Genetics can play a role, especially if diabetes runs in your family. Excess body fat and a sedentary lifestyle are other potential risk factors. In prediabetes, sugar from food begins to build up in your bloodstream because insulin can’t easily move it into your cells. Eating carbohydrates doesn’t cause prediabetes. But a diet filled with carbohydrates that digest quickly can lead to blood sugar spikes. For most people with prediabetes, your body has a difficult time lowering blood sugar levels after meals. Avoiding blood sugar spikes can help. When you eat more calories than your body needs, they get stored as fat. This can cause you to gain weight. Body fat, especially around the belly, is linked to insulin resistance. This explains why many people with prediabetes are also overweight. You can’t control all risk factors for prediabetes, but some can be mitigated. Lifestyle changes can help you maintain balanced blood sugar levels as well as a healthy weight. Watch carbs with Continue reading >>

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