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Prediabetes And Wine Consumption

Alcohol And Diabetes

Alcohol And Diabetes

Alcohol and the heart Alcohol and diabetes Alcohol and the liver Alcohol and cancer Alcohol and women Alcohol and allergy Alcohol and older people Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disorder in the blood level of insulin, a pancreatic hormone, that helps convert blood glucose into energy. Diabetes occurs when the pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin, or the insulin it does produce doesn’t work properly. Insulin is a hormone that transfers glucose from the bloodstream into the cells to be used for energy. If you have diabetes, your body cannot make proper use of this glucose so it builds up in the blood instead of moving into your cells. The chances of developing diabetes may depend on a mix of your genes and your lifestyle. It’s a manageable condition. But when it’s not well managed, it is associated with serious complications including heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney disease, nerve damage and amputations. In 2014, it was estimated that 29 million Americanse have diabetes (9.3% of the population) and 21 million of these have been diagnosed. Data reported by researchers from the CDC in the journal Population Health Metrics (November 2010) showed three scenarios for projected prevalence of diabetes in the year 2050 predicting that diabetes in the US population could rise to between 21% and 33% in 2050) It is estimated 95% of Americans with diabetes have type 2 diabetes, while 5% have type 1 diabetes (CDC). The total economic burden of diabetes in the US, including direct and indirect costs, was estimated to be $245 billion in 2012. There are two main types of diabetes Type 1 diabetes develops if the body can’t produce enough insulin, because insulin-producing cells in the pancreas have been destroyed. It can happen: because of genetic factors when a viru Continue reading >>

Alcohol Consumption And Risk Of Pre-diabetes And Type 2 Diabetes Development In A Swedish Population.

Alcohol Consumption And Risk Of Pre-diabetes And Type 2 Diabetes Development In A Swedish Population.

Abstract AIMS: Alcohol is a potential risk factor of Type 2 diabetes. However, more detailed information on effects of alcohol types and early phases of Type 2 diabetes development seems warranted. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of alcohol consumption and specific alcoholic beverages on the risk of developing pre-diabetes and Type 2 diabetes in middle-aged Swedish men and women. METHODS: Subjects, who at baseline had normal glucose tolerance (2070 men and 3058 women) or pre-diabetes (70 men and 41 women), aged 35-56 years, were evaluated in this cohort study. Logistic regression was performed to estimate the risk [odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI)] to develop pre-diabetes and Type 2 diabetes at 8-10 years follow-up, in relation to self-reported alcohol intake at baseline. Adjustment was performed for several risk factors. RESULTS: Total alcohol consumption and binge drinking increased the risk of pre-diabetes and Type 2 diabetes in men (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.00-2.03 and OR 1.67, 95% CI 1.11-2.50, respectively), while low consumption decreased diabetes risk in women (OR 0.41, 95% CI 0.22-0.79). Men showed higher risk of pre-diabetes with high beer consumption (OR 1.84, 95% CI 1.13-3.01) and of Type 2 diabetes with high consumption of spirits (OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.27-3.24). Women showed a reduced risk of pre-diabetes with high wine intake (OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.43-0.99) and of Type 2 diabetes with medium intake of both wine and spirits (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.24-0.88 and OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.31-0.97, respectively), whereas high consumption of spirits increased the pre-diabetes risk(OR 2.41, 95% CI 1.47-3.96). CONCLUSION: High alcohol consumption increases the risk of abnormal glucose regulation in men. In women the associations are more complex: decrea Continue reading >>

Prediabetes, Diabetes, And Wine Drinking

Prediabetes, Diabetes, And Wine Drinking

A recent study on adults and their risk of developing prediabetes or Type 2 diabetes in conjunction with alcohol consumption showed that low or medium consumption of alcohol (beer, wine, and spirits) actually decreased the risk in women. For men, the results were a little more straightforward: the general consumption of alcohol, especially in higher amounts, increased of prediabetes risk measurably. But a new study brings into question whether or not wine, a long-standard part of many American and European diets, may actually help people with prediabetes and diabetes to improve their health. Prediabetes and a Glass of Wine a Day According to the study, which was reported in the Annals of Internal Medicine in 2015, people with diabetes who drank one glass of red or white wine a night (as opposed to a glass of mineral water) saw health benefits and an improvement in measurements associated with diabetes. Red wine drinkers, especially, saw significant improvements in both diabetes-related issues and heart health. (White wine drinkers saw an improvement in their triglyceride levels, but red wine drinkers saw an improvement in cholesterol and lipid, or fat, metabolism.) The wine drinkers overall saw that, after two years of drinking one glass of wine a night, they had fewer signs of metabolic syndrome, which can include high blood sugar and hypertension. This study only focused on people with diabetes, and many other studies show the benefits of wine drinking on people without the disease, but there is little conclusive evidence on the effects of wine drinking on people with prediabetes. However, the health goal for those with prediabetes is to prevent the development of full-fledged diabetes. This means that efforts should focus on lowering blood glucose levels and regulati Continue reading >>

Moderate Alcohol Consumption And Diabetes – Benefits Are Found In New Study

Moderate Alcohol Consumption And Diabetes – Benefits Are Found In New Study

There have been several studies that have connected excessive drinking to type 2 diabetes. However, there are no studies that have actually looked at the drinking patterns and frequency and diabetes. Danish researchers have thus tried to understand the connection and explore if moderate alcohol consumption has a beneficial effect on diabetes. This new study was published this week in the journal Diabetologia. This was a cohort study where the participants were followed up for a period of time. The data came from the Danish Health Examination Survey 2007–2008. The participants in the study were 28,704 men and 41,847 women – a total of 76,484. They were followed up for an average of 4.9 years. To look at their alcohol consumption patterns they were given questionnaires to fill. The patterns noted included frequency of alcohol intake, frequency of binge indulgences, consumption of wine, beer and other spirits and their quantities. Average alcohol consumption units were calculated for every person based on these to assess the weekly alcohol intake. Alongside the information of how many of these individuals developed diabetes was obtained from Danish National Diabetes Register. Hazards of developing diabetes and its association with alcohol consumption were calculated using statistical tools and software. Results showed that during the years of follow up of the participants, 859 men and 887 women developed diabetes. The risk of development was lowest with those who reported consumption of 14 drinks/week among men and 9 drinks/week among women compared to people who did not take alcohol at all. The risk of diabetes was significantly lower for those who took three to four drinks a week compared to those who took less than one drink a week. Other factors that may influence Continue reading >>

Does Wine Help Or Harm People With Diabetes?

Does Wine Help Or Harm People With Diabetes?

With commentary from study author Meir Stampfer, MD, DrPH, professor of epidemiology and nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Doctors have long faced a paradox when advising their patients with type 2 diabetes on drinking alcohol. Moderate drinking has been shown to reduce the risk of heart disease, which would benefit people with diabetes who are at increased risk of the disease. Yet, people with diabetes have traditionally been advised to reduce their alcohol consumption to help better control their glucose levels. Now preliminary results of a new study presented at the European Congress on Obesity in Prague, found that adults with diabetes may be able to safely drink in moderation and reap the heart benefits. The study randomly assigned 224 patients with controlled type 2 diabetes to have either mineral water, white wine or red wine (about a 5-ounce serving of wine) with dinner every night for two years. All patients were following a healthy Mediterranean diet with no calorie restrictions. Researchers found that red-wine drinkers had a modest improvement in high-density lipoproteins (HDL), the good cholesterol, and also had improved apolipoprotein A1, a component of HDL. Those who drank red or white wine also saw modest improvements in glucose metabolism. Drinking one 5-ounce serving of red or white wine wasn’t associated with any negative effect on medication use, blood pressure or liver function tests. “Obviously excess drinking is harmful, but there is no good evidence to discourage moderate consumption among diabetics who have no other contraindication,” says Meir Stampfer, MD, DrPH, professor of epidemiology and nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and one of the authors of the study. “This first long-term large scale alc Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Alcohol

Diabetes And Alcohol

If you have diabetes, drinking alcohol may cause your blood sugar to either rise or fall. Plus, alcohol has a lot of calories. If you drink, do it occasionally and only when your diabetes and blood sugar level are well-controlled. If you are following a calorie-controlled meal plan, one drink of alcohol should be counted as two fat exchanges. It is a good idea to check with your doctor to see if drinking alcohol is safe for you. Here are some other ways that alcohol can affect diabetes: While moderate amounts of alcohol may cause blood sugar to rise, excess alcohol can actually decrease your blood sugar level -- sometimes causing it to drop into dangerous levels, especially for people with type 1 diabetes. Beer and sweet wine contain carbohydrates and may raise blood sugar. Alcohol stimulates your appetite, which can cause you to overeat and may affect your blood sugar control. Alcoholic drinks often have a lot of calories, making it more difficult to lose excess weight. Alcohol may also affect your judgment or willpower, causing you to make poor food choices. Alcohol can interfere with the positive effects of oral diabetes medicines or insulin. Alcohol may increase triglyceride levels. Alcohol may increase blood pressure. Alcohol can cause flushing, nausea, increased heart rate, and slurred speech. These may be confused with or mask the symptoms of low blood sugar. People with diabetes who drink should follow these alcohol consumption guidelines: Do not drink more than two drinks of alcohol in a one-day period if you are a man, or one drink if you are a woman. (Example: one alcoholic drink = 5-ounce glass of wine, 1 1/2-ounce "shot" of liquor or 12-ounce beer). Drink alcohol only with food. Drink slowly. Avoid "sugary" mixed drinks, sweet wines, or cordials. Mix liquor Continue reading >>

Can Prediabetes Be Reversed?

Can Prediabetes Be Reversed?

Can You Reverse Pre-Diabetes? Yes, in many cases it is possible to reverse a prediabetes diagnosis IF you are prepared to make some serious lifestyle changes. There are very few diseases or conditions which we have the power to cure ourselves, you are lucky that this is one of them! If you've just been diagnosed with prediabetes, you may be feeling shocked or even a little scared - particularly if your doctor has discussed the possible consequences. According to results from one large-scale study called the Diabetes Prevention Program, every year after diagnosis you have an 11 percent chance of developing type 2 diabetes. And although you are not likely at this stage to develop diabetes complications such as eye disease or kidney damage, you are at greater risk of developing a stroke or heart attack compared to those with normal blood sugar levels. So how can you reverse prediabetes? Well, a person with prediabetes has high levels of sugar in their blood - if you measured your blood sugar before eating it would be in the region of 100-125 mg/dl (5.5-7 mmol/L). A person with normal healthy blood sugar is less than 100 mg/dl (5.5 mmol/L). Your aim is to reduce it consistently to this level. For more details see, what is a normal blood sugar count? 4 Step Program To Reversing Prediabetes 1. Lose 5 to 7 percent of your total bodyweight. So if you weigh 200 pounds, that works out at about 10 to 14 pounds of weight loss. To make things easier, consider joining an an online weight loss program, or a program in your area. Finding support will make this journey much easier. 2. Exercise 30 minutes a day, 5 times a week (total of 150 minutes of exercise). Ideally choose an aerobic exercise that builds up a light sweat such as fast walking, swimming or cycling. See diabetes prevent Continue reading >>

Prediabetes Diet : Alcohol

Prediabetes Diet : Alcohol

Use discretion when drinking alcohol if you have prediabetes. Alcohol is a source of poor quality calories that in excess can be disruptive to your metabolism. Alcohol is one of those “cheat items” that should be consumed sparingly and intelligently. If you are already a full type 2 diabetic and you choose to drink alcohol, only do so when you know your blood sugar level is well-controlled. It’s a good idea to discuss this with your doctor to be sure drinking alcohol is acceptable for you. Other metabolic problems can be affected by alcohol use (your uric acid level for example). Guidelines There are three basic food groups: fats, proteins, and carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are broken down into sugar. It is essential to have all three food groups in your diet to have good nutrition. You should strive to incorporate all three groups in each meal…more Serving Size People with diabetes or metabolic syndrome (pre-diabetes) must eat only the amount of food necessary, and mix foods from the three food groups. It is beneficial to eat…more Creating A Plan There are a number of ways to approach your diet whether you are a diabetic, someone with metabolic syndrome simply overweight. One way may work for some, and another way for others. …more Foods To Avoid Diabetes and metabolic syndrome increases your risk of heart disease and stroke. Insulin resistance, poor lipid levels, high blood pressure and excess body weight all act toward accelerating the development of atherosclerosis (“hardening of the arteries”)…more Supplements Diabetes and metabolic syndrome are accompanied by inflammation, increased blood sugar, insulin resistance, oxidative stress, hormonal imbalances, and other sources of bodily stress such excessive body weight…more Follow the Nutrientology b Continue reading >>

Can I Have One Or Two Glasses Of Wine?

Can I Have One Or Two Glasses Of Wine?

Can a prediabetes person have one or two glasses of wine? hi jeff, i suppose it would depend on how big the glasses are, but as i love red wine, i would say 2 it takes a wise person to know they know nothing trying my hardest to control my diabetes with diet there are more stars in the universe, than every single grain of sand on this planet. this is a fact. Wine is fine in moderation, and according to recent studies may actually be good for you in moderation. There are cautions against taking metofrmin and consuming alcochol, and you should be aware that alcohol does prevent the liver from releasing glucose and raising your BG level, but if you test after drinking (especially before bed) and even better eat when you drink, you should be fine Insulin (avg): 19.8 U (35% bolus); CHO (avg): 87g; BG (avg): 97 mg/dl; SD: 31 Tests (avg): 5.1; High: 168; Low: 51; highs>140: 3; lows<70: 10 I have pre-diabetes too and have 1 glass of red wine with dinner every night. Does nothing for my bg. Or maybe lowers it a bit. I think with moderation you can. Continue reading >>

Can A

Can A "pre-diabetic" Drink Wine Or Beer? If So, How Much?

Can a "pre-diabetic" drink wine or beer? If so, how much? Can a "pre-diabetic" drink wine or beer? If so, how much? My mom has recently been diagnosed with "pre-diabetes", and wants to know if she can still drink wine? Or beer? Is light beer better, or is there a type of wine that is better? How can I find out how much sugar and carbs are in each of these beverages? My Type 2 Diabetes almost killed me. 3 years ago, I fell into a diabetic coma. When I woke up, the doctor told me had to amputate my legs. But I discovered a way to destroy my diabetes. more info here: It comes from research from Newcastle University in England and so far, over 39,264 people have used it to reverse their diabetes. Big Pharma Invested Millions To HIDE This Diabetes Cure watch the video here:> Big Pharma are quivering at the thought of this Diabetes cure becoming public. But why haven't you heard of it? It has the power to bring down the money hungry $245 billion diabetes meds industry. And they are investing millions to hide this from you. If you or a loved one suffers from diabetes then the following FREE presentation will be the most important thing you have watched this year. Diabetes a disease that not wish on anyone. I was sick with diabetes for 11 years, could not have a normal life. but I managed to revert my diabetes with this treatment: >> I recommend it because thanks to this method I could revert my diabetes. I too was diagnosed with pre diabetes and needed to know what liquor was safe for me , thanks for the information. Thank you for this. I was just diagnosed with what the doctor calls pre-diabetes. I am not a carb eater, exercise 4x week, no family history, crazy eating habits (don't eat enough). I am of Cape Verdean decent, don't smoke and was shocked by the diagnosis. I know Continue reading >>

Pre Diabetes & Alcohol

Pre Diabetes & Alcohol

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Discussion in ' Prediabetes ' started by Nick15192 , Dec 12, 2017 . I have been diagnosed pre diabetes for a few years now can anyone give me some advice on having a drink (alcohol, coffee & tea etc) I have also recently started getting pins and needles in my lower forearm and hand. Could this be nerve damage or something, I went for a test for carpul tunnel but hospital said was minor. You were diagnosed with pre diabetes a few years ago, but what have your review HbA1cs been like since then? Are you still monitored at your surgery? As for drinks, it depends on whether you need to lose weight or not. Alcoholic drinks have many calories. However, the good news is that red wine and most spirits (whisky, vodka) are OK for diabetics as long as any mixers are sugar free. Tea and coffee are also fine, but milk can be difficult. You could try cream in coffee as that is good, and in tea if you like creamy tea. Personally I don't. so have just a dash of milk. No sugar of course. Low-carb alcohol: . Low-carb drinks in general: . Concerning alcohol, I (try to) avoid beer altogether (it is basically liquid bread). Dry wine, and certain spirits, are fine. For a low-carb diet, avoid grain-based foods. Beer is just another of those grain-based foods, like bread. That is how I understand the "liquid bread" description. If someone knows better please correct me.... Dr Malhotra called beer liquid bread and I took it to mean that since flour has a higher GI than table sugar then beer was similar or at least just as likely to raise your blood sugar. My personal opinion is that when anyone shows me a low carb beer (or any beer for that matter) I ask them if they intend t Continue reading >>

Have You Got Pre-diabetes? One In Three Of Us Is On The Brink Of Full Diabetes - Which Cuts Six Years Off Your Life. And Fat Or Slim, You May Be A Victim

Have You Got Pre-diabetes? One In Three Of Us Is On The Brink Of Full Diabetes - Which Cuts Six Years Off Your Life. And Fat Or Slim, You May Be A Victim

The figures are grim. More than one in three adults has ‘pre-diabetes’ and has no idea they’re at risk, according to research just published in the British Medical Journal. As a result, Britain is facing a type 2 diabetes epidemic of unprecedented proportions. Type 2 diabetes, the kind that develops in adulthood and is linked to lifestyle, is not a condition to be dismissed lightly— it can reduce life expectancy and lead to complications such as blindness and amputation that seriously affect quality of life. Pre-diabetes is a term used to indicate you have raised blood sugar levels and are therefore at greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes in future. The rapid rise in the numbers said to be affected by pre-diabetes — three times what they were a decade ago — has come as a shock even to medics. Scroll down for video ‘This study has taken us all by surprise — it’s been a bit of a health bombshell,’ says Dr Stephen Lawrence, a GP and clinical adviser on diabetes to the Royal College of General Practitioners. The figures are ‘alarming’, says Simon O’Neill, director of policy at Diabetes UK. ‘It’s worse than we expected.’ It must be acknowledged that some specialists aren’t convinced that pre-diabetes exists. ‘It’s nonsense,’ says Craig Currie, professor of applied pharmacoepidemiology, Institute of Primary Care and Public Health at Cardiff University. ‘Either you have type 2 diabetes or you don’t have type 2 diabetes. I think this is simply a scare tactic to make people take notice.’ However, the consensus is that raised blood sugar levels, whether they’re labelled pre-diabetes or not, are not healthy. So, how can you tell if you are at risk — and what can you do to protect yourself? We talked to the experts... HOW CAN Continue reading >>

Alcohol & Prediabetes

Alcohol & Prediabetes

When your blood sugar is higher than normal, but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes, it's called prediabetes. This is because without intervention it can progress to diabetes. An estimated 37 percent of adults aged 20 or older have prediabetes, according to the 2009 to 2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Being overweight, not getting enough exercise, smoking and even alcohol consumption influence the risk of prediabetes, according to the American Heart Association. Understanding Prediabetes While glucose is vital to your health, it damages your body when too much of it remains in the blood. That's why your pancreas releases a hormone called insulin, which allows glucose to get into your cells and out of your bloodstream. When your body fails to respond properly to insulin, glucose levels rise. A normal fasting glucose level is less 100 milligrams per deciliter. Prediabetes is when your glucose is between 100 and 125 milligrams per deciliter, and diabetes occurs when your fasting glucose is 126 milligrams per deciliter or higher. Alcohol Prediabetes Risk and Progression Researchers in Sweden investigated the influence of different types of alcohol on the risk of prediabetes and the progression to Type 2 diabetes. The study involved 2,140 men and 3,099 women between the ages of 35 and 56 who had normal glucose or prediabetes. In men, a high total alcohol consumption and binge drinking raised the risk of both prediabetes and the progression to Type 2 diabetes. In addition, men who reported a high consumption of beer saw an increased risk of prediabetes, and men who drank a high amount of spirits had an increased risk of Type 2 diabetes. For women, high intakes of hard liquor increased the risk of prediabetes. The study results were published in Continue reading >>

Red Wine And Type 2 Diabetes: Is There A Link?

Red Wine And Type 2 Diabetes: Is There A Link?

Adults with diabetes are up to two to four times as likely to have heart disease than people who don’t have diabetes, says the American Heart Association. Some evidence suggests that drinking moderate amounts of red wine could lessen the risk of heart disease, but other sources caution people with diabetes against drinking, period. So what’s the deal? A few words on diabetes More than 29 million people in the United States have diabetes. That’s nearly 1 in 10 people, according to figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Most cases of the disease are type 2 diabetes — a condition in which the body doesn’t make enough insulin, uses insulin incorrectly, or both. This can cause high levels of sugar in the blood. People with type 2 diabetes must control this sugar, or blood glucose, with a combination of medications, like insulin, and lifestyle changes, such as diet and exercise. Diet is key to diabetes management. Found in many foods such as breads, starches, fruits, and sweets, carbohydrate is the macronutrient that causes blood sugar levels to go up. Managing carbohydrate intake helps people manage their blood sugar. But contrary to popular belief, alcohol may actually cause blood sugar levels to go down instead of up. How red wine affects blood sugar According to the American Diabetes Association, drinking red wine — or any alcoholic beverage — can lower blood sugar for up to 24 hours. Because of this, they recommend checking your blood sugar before you drink, while you drink, and monitoring it for up to 24 hours after drinking. Intoxication and low blood sugar can share many of the same symptoms, so failing to check your blood glucose could cause others to assume you’re feeling the effects of an alcoholic beverage when in realit Continue reading >>

Ada: Red Wine Ingredient Benefits Prediabetes

Ada: Red Wine Ingredient Benefits Prediabetes

Resveratrol, the compound in red wine potentially responsible for its beneficial cardiovascular effects, may also benefit patients with prediabetes, researchers say…. In a small and preliminary study, older patients with impaired fasting glucose taking a resveratrol supplement had improvements in postprandial glucose and insulin resistance, according to Jill P. Crandall, MD, of Albert Einstein College of Medicine in Bronx, N.Y., and colleagues. "There have been a lot of reports of its benefits in a number of disease states," which is why researchers decided to investigate resveratrol in prediabetes, Crandall stated. But she cautioned that, "This is just the beginning. The findings need to be confirmed in bigger studies." Previously, resveratrol has shown beneficial effects on insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity, and glucose tolerance, but only in animal models. Its antioxidant and cardioprotective effects in humans are more well known. However, trials of resveratrol by companies such as Pfizer and GlaxoSmithKline, which have focused on the supplement’s anti-aging abilities, have not had promising results. "It is a small study and needs to be confirmed, as other studies with this drug have been negative," Vivian Fonseca, MD, of Tulane University, mentioned. For their study, the researchers recruited 10 patients ages 60 to 80 who had impaired glucose tolerance. Over four weeks, patients took one of three doses of resveratrol (1g, 1.5g, or 2g) with a standard meal that included 110 grams of carbohydrates, 20 grams of protein, and 20 grams of fat. Main outcomes included glucose and insulin area under the curve, as well as calculated measures of insulin sensitivity and secretion. These parameters were assessed at mealtime and 30, 60, 120, and 180 minutes later. Endoth Continue reading >>

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