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Pre Workout Supplements For Type 2 Diabetics

Fuel Up: What To Eat When You Work Out

Fuel Up: What To Eat When You Work Out

When you have type 2 diabetes, you want to get the most bang for your exercise buck. You’ll need to fuel up the right way before, during, and after you work out. If you can manage your diabetes with diet and exercise alone, you don’t need a pre-workout snack any more than someone without the disease. But if you take insulin or a drug that pushes your pancreas to make it, you might have to think before you snack. What to eat depends on a few things: How high your blood sugar is before you work out How long you’ll be at it What time of day you plan to do it How your body reacts to exercise Check your blood sugar. If your reading is between 200 and 300 mg/dl and you’ve already eaten at least once that day, you probably don’t need to eat anything. But you do need to check for ketones if it’s over 250. Your body makes them when it burns fat for fuel instead of sugar. Don’t exercise if you have them. If your reading is over 300, ask your doctor if exercise is OK. Otherwise, grab a snack with 15-30 grams of carbs. The lower your blood sugar is before you start and the longer you plan to work out, the larger your snack should be, up to 30 grams of carbs. You’ll probably have to try a few options and amounts to see what works best. These snacks offer 15 grams of carbs with little prep time: 1 small piece of fresh fruit (4 ounces) 1 slice of bread (1 ounce) or 1 (6-inch) tortilla 1/2 cup of oatmeal 2/3 cup of plain fat-free yogurt or sweetened with sugar substitutes These have 30 grams of carbs: 1/2 peanut butter sandwich (1 slice whole wheat bread with 1 tablespoon peanut butter) and 1 cup milk 1 English muffin and 1 teaspoon low-fat margarine 3/4 cup whole grain, ready-to-eat cereal and 1/2 cup fat-free milk Continue reading >>

Mrsupplement.com.au - Diabetes & Bodybuilding - Information Articl

Mrsupplement.com.au - Diabetes & Bodybuilding - Information Articl

A bodybuilding program has many benefits for people of a wide range of ages. These benefits spread across physical, physiological and mental domains. Diabetes affects 171 million people worldwide and for a good proportion of them, they can combat the damaging effects of diabetes with a good resistance exercise program. There is a large amount of people living with diabetes around the world, so it's highly possible that you know someone or will know someone in the future with diabetes. Knowing about diabetes and how bodybuilding can help with this condition will prove to be a lifesaver. Type 1 Diabetes This is where an organ called the pancreas which produces insulin to help you get rid of blood sugar cant produce any insulin anymore. (Requires injections). Type 2 Diabetes This is where your body doesnt react to insulin as well and so needs more insulin to get rid of blood sugar. Gestational Diabetes This is the form of diabetes that can sometimes occur during pregnancy. As a diabetic, the struggle to manage your blood sugar levels is a constant battle. Exercise helps get glucose into the cells and converts muscle glycogen to energy maintaining blood glucose at a more consistent level. Resistance exercise on its own or weight lifting has been shown in two notable large scale reviews to help with glycaemic control and insulin sensitivity1,2. Additionally, with an increased muscle mass, your ability to utilise or store excess blood glucose increases.Having diabetes also puts you at risk of cardiovascular issues such as heart disease and other problems with the blood vessels. Recent studies have shown that resistance training can help dramatically with such issues. One review showed that exercise training was able to decrease the risk of hospitalisation from heart failure Continue reading >>

Protein Supplements: Whey

Protein Supplements: Whey

The goal of last week’s protein post was to “refresh” your memory about protein: what it does, where it’s found, and how much you need. That being said, the subject of protein is hot enough to fuel debates regarding who needs more and what’s the best way to get it. As I mentioned last week, there are some people who do need more protein, namely endurance athletes, people who are ill or malnourished, and older adults. Most of us, though, don’t need a whole lot more protein than what’s recommended to stay healthy. And we already know that since we don’t need all that much, we tend to get more than enough from our daily food intake. However, if, for whatever reason, you don’t think you’re getting enough protein and/or you don’t happen to care for the usual protein food sources (meat, poultry, fish, eggs), then it’s possible that you could benefit from a supplement. And here’s the tricky part, because trying to choose a protein supplement is about as daunting as deciding what flavor ice cream to order is for a child. There are so many choices and so many forms of supplements. This week, we’ll look at one of the most popular supplements: whey. Whey Protein What it is: “Little Miss Muffet sat on a tuffet, eating her curds and whey…” Do you remember that nursery rhyme? The whey that Miss Muffet was enjoying at the time is the same whey that’s commonly found in today’s protein drinks and powders. Whey is one of the two main proteins found in milk and it makes up about 20% of milk protein (casein makes up the other 80%). Drilling down a little more, there are three types of whey protein: whey isolate, whey concentrate, and hydrolysate whey protein. Each type of whey protein contains different amounts of fat, cholesterol, lactose, and bioacti Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Take Supplements If You Have Diabetes?

Is It Safe To Take Supplements If You Have Diabetes?

You will find supplements for anything and everything these days. Even when you do not suffer from an ailment, supplements are suggested to keep you healthy and ailment-free. According to CDC, use of supplements is common among US adult population – over 50% adults used supplements during 2003-2006, with multivitamins/multiminerals being the most commonly used. So when you are a diabetic, especially if you have prediabetes and type-2 diabetes, you may find yourself confronting a large number of options for supplements that claim to support, reduce and even cure your diabetes. Diabetes is quite a frustrating disorder and you may find yourself tempted to try out these supplements one after another. But is it really safe to take supplements when you are a diabetic? Let us find out. But before that you need to understand what exactly supplements are. Defining Supplements As the name suggests, a supplement is anything that adds on to something. A dietary supplement is therefore something that one takes in addition to one’s diet to get proper nutrition. US Congress in the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act defines dietary supplements as having the following characteristics: It is a product that is intended to supplement the diet; It contains one or more dietary ingredients (including vitamins, minerals, herbs and other botanicals, amino acids, and other substances) or their constituents; It is intended to be taken by mouth as a pill, capsule, tablet, or liquid; It is not represented for use as a conventional food or as sole item of a mean or a diet; and, It is labeled on the front panel as being a dietary supplement. Now let us look at some general benefits and risks of taking supplements. We will discuss these in context of diabetes later in the article. Benefit Continue reading >>

Supplements For Diabetics

Supplements For Diabetics

Diabetes is a condition people face when the body goes through an abnormally high blood glucose levels. This is caused by a person having a difficult time producing or making use of insulin. The American Diabetes Association shows that you should keep the amount of sugar and saturated fat rather low in you diet. If you are diabetic and also weight lifting, you need to choose the right supplements that fit your dietary needs. Pre-Workouts Many people take pre-workouts before a workout in order to increase energy and strength. For diabetics, you should choose a pre-workout that is caffeine free. Caffeine may interfere with glucose levels in the body and makes it hard for people to control their blood sugar. You can Build Your Own Stim-Free Pre-Workout on Campusprotein.com to take your workouts to the next level, minus the added caffeine and stimulants. Protein Powder There are many more benefits for diabetics when it comes to adding protein powder to your diet. Although protein is a great way to build and maintain muscle, it can also help lower blood glucose levels.Choosing the right protein powder is very important, you want to stay away from ones with added sugars or fat. Whey isolates will be your best choice, they contain minimal fats and easily digestible protein. Wheyhas the ability to boost metabolic rate, improve insulin and blood sugar metabolism, and help maintain appetite that may benefit many people. Here are some of the best protein options: Protein Bars Protein bars are a great source of low-glycemic carbohydrates, containing a good source of fiber and little amounts of sugar contained. They are a great way to kill candy or sweet cravings without having an effect on blood sugar levels. Eating bars in moderation, are great to use as a meal supplement or a wor Continue reading >>

6 Of The Best Dietary Supplements For A Diabetic Diet—and 3 You Should Avoid

6 Of The Best Dietary Supplements For A Diabetic Diet—and 3 You Should Avoid

Should I take supplements? From cinnamon and magnesium to herbal formulas claiming to smack down high blood sugar, “diabetes-friendly” supplements are popping up in health food stores and drugstores and in the medicine cabinets of more and more people with diabetes. More than 50 percent of people with diabetes say they’ve used dietary supplements, according to one 2011 study—and at least one in four has given herbal remedies a try. The big question: Should you? “People with diabetes may be looking for something that seems less potent than a medication or something that will treat other health issues beyond blood sugar control, such as high cholesterol,” notes Laura Shane-McWhorter, PharmD, a University of Utah professor of pharmacotherapy and author of The American Diabetes Association Guide to Herbs & Nutritional Supplements: What You Need to Know from Aloe to Zinc. But experts are reluctant to recommend supplements to people with diabetes for two important health reasons. First, there’s virtually no research on long-term safety. Second, no supplement controls blood sugar as effectively as diabetes drugs (in combination with a healthy lifestyle). “There are no miracle treatments for diabetes,” Shane-McWhorter says. “The most important thing to know if you have diabetes is that no supplement will take care of it for you. Diabetes is a condition that can be well-controlled with a healthy lifestyle plus medication if needed. A supplement can’t replace those.” And new science is changing the supplement landscape. In consulting the latest research as well as supplement experts for this report on the best-studied and most widely used supplements, we found that some popular pills—chromium, we’re talking about you—aren’t living up to their reput Continue reading >>

Bodybuilding With Diabetes

Bodybuilding With Diabetes

When I tell people I'm diabetic, they look at me like I'm joking. They find it hard to believe that here is this muscled up guy, with relatively low body fat, who is a diabetic. Often times when we think of a diabetic we think of someone who has made poor food choices their whole life, is overweight, and often lazy. Well things aren't always as they appear. I was diagnosed with diabetes over a year ago, and was borderline diabetic the year prior. I have asked myself over and over again what could have caused this. Was it steroid use over the years? Was it massive food consumption and carbs? Was it just in my cards since I have a family history of auto immune disorders (my mother has chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia)? The thing is I'll never know. My best guess is a perfect storm of limited sleep, excessive dieting which caused my liver to dump glucose into my body instead of food, and elevated cortisol levels for far too long. You see, I never really stopped dieting after this show I competed in back in 2009. I stayed very lean year round, and ate like I was contest prepping all the time. But that's neither here nor there, it is what it is now. Just before I was diagnosed with diabetes I noticed how thirsty I was all the time. It was worse at night, I just could not drink enough water to satisfy myself. I could literally drink 5-6 20 ounce bottles of water within an hour, and still felt thirsty. I also noticed how tired I was. I would wake up, go to the gym, and an hour later I felt like going back to sleep again. Then when it really was time to go to sleep at night, I could not fall asleep for shit!! I tossed and turned, woke up every couple hours, and day in and day out this was how it was for a couple months. I also noticed how irritable I was after eating a Continue reading >>

Pre Workout Supplement

Pre Workout Supplement

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. does anyone know about this pre workout stuff called jacked and the intra workout supplement called xtend,im a type 1 and i was wondering if they were safe because both claim to have no sugar Yeah, how could a product called "jacked" be all bad! As an aside...methamphetamine has no sugar in it, either. i was asking for some useful feedback not a smart remark Details: Ultra-Intense Muscle-Gorging Strength, Energy, Power and Endurance. Proprietary Blend: Arginine Alpha-Ketoglutarate, Creatine Monohydrate, Beta Alanine, Caffeine, 1,3-Dimethylamylamine (Geranium [stem]), Shizandrol A). Directions: Stir 1-3 Ultra-Concentrated scoops with 4-8 ounces of cold water and consume 30-45 minutes before beginning activity. Due to extreme potency, it's highly recommended to assess tolerance by using a 1 or 1.5 scoop serving before consuming full dose, especially if you are sensitive to stimulants. Some individuals may find 1, 1.5 or 2 scoops per serving is the ideal dose for workout domination. DO NOT EXCEED 3 SCOOPS IN ANY 24 HOUR PERIOD. Well, that sounds safe to me...I mean, it doesn't mention sugar. I'd throw down like a full glass and go out and rip trees out by their trunks. I'd bench press a Volkswagen Beetle, if I could. Does it have anything to do with diabetes? I think I'd have to ask a doctor about that...but you're welcome to poll the rest of the iron-pumpers, here. I used Jacked a while back for a period of about 3 months. I'm a Type-1 who lifts weights and swims 3-4 days per week. I can't say that I noticed any real benefits outside of the mild stimulant effect of the caffeine. I can however, Continue reading >>

8 Protein Drinks For People With Diabetes

8 Protein Drinks For People With Diabetes

Protein shakes and smoothies are all the rage these days. These popular pre- and post-workout drinks can include almost any ingredient under the sun, so if you have diabetes, it’s natural to wonder how they’ll affect your blood sugar. That said, there’s no reason to shy away from these drinks. There are countless diabetes-friendly recipes available online. Here, we round up our top eight protein shake and smoothie recipes for people with diabetes. Protein drinks 101 In general, protein drinks are made from protein powder and a liquid. Depending on your dietary needs, this liquid may be: water dairy milk nut milk rice milk seed milk Other protein add-ins include: cottage cheese yogurt nut butters raw nuts Sweeteners, fresh or frozen fruit, and fresh vegetables may also be added. No one food is off-limits if you have diabetes. Still, it’s important to limit refined carbohydrates that are more likely to spike your blood sugar. Eating fat with carbohydrates may help slow digestion. This can slow down the length of time it takes sugar to hit your bloodstream. Sources of fat that taste great in protein drinks include: nut butters raw nuts hemp seeds flaxseeds chia seeds avocados If possible, add fiber to your protein drink. It helps slow your body’s absorption of sugar. Oatmeal, ground flaxseed, chia seeds, and wheat bran are high in fiber and are protein-drink friendly. Some protein drink recipes call for maple syrup or Stevia. Maple syrup is high in sugar, but can be enjoyed sparingly. Stevia is a non-nutritive, no-calorie sweetener that won’t raise your blood sugar. When making shakes and smoothies, use the least amount of sweetener possible. Many pre-made protein shakes and smoothies are loaded with refined sugar. Your best bet is to make them at home where yo Continue reading >>

Using Caffeine And Creatine In Your Workout

Using Caffeine And Creatine In Your Workout

As a physically active individual in today’s world, you are likely to be bombarded with all sorts of claims about nutritional supplements that will enhance your athletic performance. In reality, very few have been scientifically proven to have any effect on athletic performance. Here are two known to work and special concerns about their use by diabetic athletes: Caffeine Caffeine is a central nervous system stimulant found naturally in many foods and drinks such as coffee, tea, cocoa and chocolate. Caffeine directly stimulates the nervous system and increases arousal. At the same time, it increases levels of circulating free fatty acids (blood fats) and provides an alternate fuel source for your exercising muscles. Improves Training Performance Caffeine also stimulates the release of calcium in contracting muscle, allowing for greater force production and muscular strength. Research studies have found increases in performance in events primarily using the immediate, short-term, and aerobic energy systems. Doses of caffeine in legal limits may actually improve running times in various length events from one mile up to marathons. A legal amount, according to the International Olympic Committee, is an intake of less than 800 mg, depending on your body size and weight. For comparison, a five oz. cup of coffee contains 100 to150 mg, a cup of tea 50 mg, a can of cola 40 mg, a cup of cocoa five mg, a No Doz tablet 100 mg and a Vivarin tablet 200 mg. Abstaining from caffeine intake for two to three days prior to using it for sports usually increases its effectiveness, as you will be less habituated to its effects. The down side of its use is its diuretic effect, which causes you to lose more water through your urine. High blood sugar can increase your water losses as well. Y Continue reading >>

Muscle Building Supplement For Diabetic Patients

Muscle Building Supplement For Diabetic Patients

Most of the people think that those who suffered from diabetes cannot workout or take muscle building supplements like others but having diabetes is not a problem for you if you want to build your muscles. But the diabetic patients have to follow some precautions and when it comes to gaining muscles. Strong muscles more efficiently collect nutrients and oxygen from the blood as compared to weak ones, which means any physical activity you can do, will put less strain and cardiac work on your heart. This will also good for the heart as they also improve weight control and to the hormone insulin it helps the body to remain sensitive. Here are some tips and muscle building supplements that help you to build lean and strong muscles without affecting your diabetes. Load up on Protein or Protein Bars: For healthy muscle building and muscle growth, protein intake is vital. Protein of your body is constantly drains and reserves for other uses like producing the hormones that result in less protein available for the building of muscles. As you body breaks down old proteins, you need to store and build new proteins faster. Those who are suffering from diabetes can consume protein about 1 gram per pound of the body, which is roughly the maximum amount of protein that your body can use in a day. Good sources of protein as a muscle building supplement for diabetic patients are Tuna, chicken, milk, eggs, cottage cheese and protein shakes. Protein bars is also a healthy muscle building supplement for diabetic patients. As most of the protein bars are high in sugar and saturated fats to overcome the taste of healthy ingredients. However, there are also some proteins bars available that contain low-sugar and low-fat which may not significantly impact your level of blood glucose. Proteins Continue reading >>

Recommended Weight Lifting Supplements For Diabetics

Recommended Weight Lifting Supplements For Diabetics

Diabetes is a medical condition in which you experience abnormally high blood glucose levels because your body has trouble producing or using insulin. The American Diabetes Association explains that you should limit saturated fat intake and keep sugar intake low, as that can rapidly increase your blood sugar levels. Because many weight lifting supplements contain both of these nutrients, you need to choose supplements carefully and consult a doctor before using any. Many protein bars are high in saturated fat and sugar to overcome the taste of healthy ingredients. However, there are some low-fat, low-sugar protein bars available that may not significantly impact your blood glucose levels. Protein bars such as Doctor's CarbRite Diet bars and Allmax Isofemme bars, which have 6 g or less of fat and 1 g or less of sugar per bar, may support weight lifting because they are high in protein. Both bars use sugar alcohols, which provide fewer calories than sugar and don't cause quick increases in your blood sugar levels. Weight gainers are high-calorie, high-protein supplements that come in powdered form. Unfortunately, many of these weight gainers use sugar and fat to increase the calorie content. Try to find weight gainers that provide fiber and have low sugar and low fat content, such as Cytosport Cytogainer. This supplement contains only 7 g of sugar, 6 g of fat and 4 g of fiber in each 570-calorie serving. Protein powders tend to contain between 100 and 200 calories per serving, and offer primarily protein and much fewer grams of fat and carbohydrates than weight gainers. However, these powder still may contain added sugars and saturated fat. For this reason, you may want to choose a whey protein isolate, a type of protein powder with very little fat and at least 90 percent Continue reading >>

7 Exercise Tips For Diabetics

7 Exercise Tips For Diabetics

Experts are forever expounding on the benefits of exercise for people with diabetes—and with good reason. A regular workout regimen can help a diabetic lose weight, and also plays an important role in helping the body better manage blood sugar levels. According to Lori McCourt-Stull, an occupational therapist for Fox Rehabilitation, losing just five pounds can dramatically improve a diabetic's glucose management capabilities. However, the American Council on Exercise says that those who suffer from the metabolic disorder need to take steps to prevent the advantages of physical activity from being nullified by issues of unsafe sugar levels and injury. The primary problem facing diabetics during exercise is blood sugar that drops too low—a condition known as hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia can come on quickly and, according to the National Institutes of Health, may include symptoms such as: confusion, dizziness and weakness. If a person becomes severely hypoglycemic, they can fall into a coma, have a seizure, and may even die. The one thing every diabetic should do The best way for someone with diabetes to stay safe while working out is to make sure they check their blood sugar levels before, during and after exercise, according to McCourt-Stull. "While low blood sugar is more often the impact of exercise, some people do experience a rise in glucose levels," she says. Typically, increases are only seen when a person engages in activities that produce an adrenaline surge—such as a competitive sporting event, or weightlifting—but it's good to be aware that blood sugar can fluctuate in both directions during exercise. McCourt-Stull, herself a diabetic, also points out that testing blood glucose (sugar) levels is critical because the exertion of exercise may mask signs of Continue reading >>

Bodybuilding With Diabetes

Bodybuilding With Diabetes

Not only will bodybuilding assistance to avoid the start of adult diabetes, which is one of the most widespread diseases today, however it will likewise really play an important role. Here is why bodybuilding is a must You check out details about bodybuilding, and then you read information about diabetes. However really hardly ever do you read info about the two together. One thing lots of people miss is the connection in between bodybuilding and diabetes. While if you have diabetes, getting associated with bodybuilding is not instantly going to treat you however the advantages of a regular strength training program as far as diabetes is worried are incredible. Not only will bodybuilding assistance to avoid the onset of adult diabetes, which is one of the most prevalent diseases today, but it will also really play an essential role in managing it in those who are currently affected. Here is why bodybuilding is a must if this disease is something you are interested in. Among the first reasons weight-lifting is helpful when attempting to handle diabetes is due to the fact that of the fact it assists to reduce the total body weight through the reduction of body fat tissue. Unlike cardio training which has a higher propensity to minimize both fat and muscle mass, weight training truly assists with the promotion of lean body mass while dieting, thus helps prevent this muscle mass loss. Because having a high body fat level is strongly associated with the start of diabetes, keeping this factor under control is extremely important. See also: Diabetes Weight Loss: Causes of Unexplained Weight Loss Next, bodybuilding drastically increases your blood sugar control as when weight lifting, the muscle tissues are primed to suck up any excess glucose in the blood. Furthermore, becaus Continue reading >>

Supplements For Type - 2 Diabetics

Supplements For Type - 2 Diabetics

I am a Type - 2 Diabetic for 4-5 years now... I am into Amateur BodyBuilding since last 1 year. Since then I have been able to successfully manage my Diabetes. Now I want to grow... My Coach has advised me to take Creatine Monohydrate and Stanazolol. My Question here is that is it okay for me to take any of these above supplements. If yes, any specified dosage... My training is very intense and regular, so no problems in digesting or utilizing the above stuff... I am a Type - 2 Diabetic for 4-5 years now... I am into Amateur BodyBuilding since last 1 year. Since then I have been able to successfully manage my Diabetes. Now I want to grow... My Coach has advised me to take Creatine Monohydrate and Stanazolol. My Question here is that is it okay for me to take any of these above supplements. If yes, any specified dosage... My training is very intense and regular, so no problems in digesting or utilizing the above stuff... Stanozolol (winstrol) is a steroid not a supplement, ur coach is an idiot I am a Type - 2 Diabetic for 4-5 years now... I am into Amateur BodyBuilding since last 1 year. Since then I have been able to successfully manage my Diabetes. Now I want to grow... My Coach has advised me to take Creatine Monohydrate and Stanazolol. My Question here is that is it okay for me to take any of these above supplements. If yes, any specified dosage... My training is very intense and regular, so no problems in digesting or utilizing the above stuff... Creatine is fine to use and should be a STAPLE in your supplement regime especially if you are resistance training. ~5g a day is all you need to dose. Either: a) have half pre and post-resistance training, or b) dose all post-resistance training. Stanazol is a steroid (as already mentioned by br4v0), and certainly NOT some Continue reading >>

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