diabetestalk.net

Pre Diabetes Test

Prevent Diabetes

Prevent Diabetes

Diabetes Risk Test Prediabetes means your blood glucose (sugar) is higher than normal, but it's not too late to lower your risk. Type 2 diabetes can be delayed or prevented by making changes such as exercising, eating a healthy diet, and controlling your weight. Type 2 diabetes is a serious disease that can cause heart attack, stroke, blindness, kidney failure, or loss of feet or legs. Take this test to find out if you could be at risk. Results will be e-mailed to you, and we encourage you to take them to your healthcare provider to discuss the results. You can also download a hard copy by clicking here. Continue reading >>

Hawaii Department Of Health Encourages Public To Test For Prediabetes

Hawaii Department Of Health Encourages Public To Test For Prediabetes

HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) - It is estimated that one in every two adults in Hawaii has prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, and many have not been diagnosed and may be unaware that they have it. To increase prevention and awareness, the Hawaii Department of Health is launching a new innovative media campaign on March 27 to encourage Hawaii adults to take an online Diabetes Risk Test at PreventDiabetesHawaii.com and share the results with their doctor or health care provider. Actor and comedian Frank De Lima, who has type 2 diabetes, is the spokesperson for the campaign and will appear in television ads and in print ads in malls across the state. "Prediabetes is a serious health condition that puts people at risk for type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke, and the good news is you can reverse prediabetes with basic lifestyle changes," said Health Director Dr. Virginia Pressler. "Type 2 diabetes can be prevented, so it's very important for people to get screened early and take action. Prediabetes refers to having a blood sugar that is above the normal level, but not high enough to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. Without effective intervention, 15 to 30 percent of adults with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years. Native Hawaiians, Other Pacific Islanders, and Filipinos have the highest rates of type 2 diabetes, followed by Japanese. Furthermore, people of Asian descent tend to develop prediabetes at a lower body weight than other ethnicities, making them especially susceptible. "Your risk for prediabetes is increased if you are overweight, 45 years or older, have a parent or sibling with type 2 diabetes, are not physically active, smoke, and ever had gestational diabetes," said Lola Irvin, Administrator for the Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promot Continue reading >>

How To Tell If You Have Prediabetes

How To Tell If You Have Prediabetes

Kali Nine LLC via Getty Images Dear Savvy Senior, My 62-year-old sister was recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and was surprised when the doctor told her that she’s probably had it or prediabetes for many years. My question is what determines prediabetes and how can you know if you have it? —Surprised Senior Dear Surprised, Underlying today’s growing epidemic of type 2 diabetes is a much larger epidemic called prediabetes, which is when the blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. The National Institutes of Health estimates that as many as 79 million Americans today have prediabetes. Left untreated, it almost always turns into type 2 diabetes within 10 years. And, if you have prediabetes, the long-term damage it can cause — especially to your heart and circulatory system — may already be starting. But the good news is that prediabetes doesn’t mean that you’re destined for full-blown diabetes. Prediabetes can actually be reversed, and diabetes prevented, by making some simple lifestyle changes like losing weight, exercising, eating a healthy diet and cutting back on carbohydrates. Or, if you need more help, oral medications may also be an option. Get Checked? Because prediabetes typically causes no outward symptoms, most people that have it don’t realize it. The only way to know for sure is to get a blood test. Everyone age 45 years or older should consider getting tested for prediabetes, especially if you are overweight with a body mass index (BMI) above 25. See cdc.gov/bmi to calculate your BMI. If you are younger than 45 but are overweight, or have high blood pressure, a family history of diabetes, or belong to an ethnic group (Latino, Asian, African or Native American) at high risk for diabetes, you too Continue reading >>

Pre Diabetes

Pre Diabetes

Diabetes & Related Conditions – Pre Diabetes When you have pre–diabetes, your blood sugar (glucose) is higher than normal, but not high enough to be considered diabetes. The problem is that this condition puts you at a higher risk of getting diabetes. Diabetes is more than a “touch of sugar.” It is a serious disease that can negatively affect your health in many ways. Today over 25 million Americans have diabetes. But even greater numbers of Americans have pre–diabetes. And the numbers continue to grow. Is it a new condition? Pre–diabetes is a new name for an old condition. It used to be called “impaired glucose tolerance” (IGT) or “impaired fasting glucose” (IFG). These terms also mean that blood glucose levels are a bit raised. We know much more about this condition today. Pre-diabetes is a health problem Having pre–diabetes means you are at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes. About half the people who have pre–diabetes, develop type 2 diabetes within 10 years. But even pre–diabetes can have bad effects on your health. For example, people with pre–diabetes have 1.5 times more risk of heart and blood vessel disease. This includes high blood pressure, stroke, and heart attack. Diabetes can be prevented When you have pre–diabetes and make lifestyle changes, it is possible to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes. In a national study called the Diabetes Prevention Program, doctors looked at a large number of overweight people who were at high risk for diabetes. Here is what they found: Losing weight and being physically active can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes. How likely am I to get pre-diabetes? The same risk factors increase your chances of getting pre–diabetes or diabetes. You are more likely to get pre–diabetes or diabetes if you Continue reading >>

What Is Pre-diabetes?

What Is Pre-diabetes?

What Should I Do If I Have It? Are you one of the estimated 54 million people in this country who have pre-diabetes? If you have pre-diabetes, you are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes and also are at increased risk of developing heart disease. Pre-diabetes is a condition in which blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as full-blown diabetes. Those with pre-diabetes are at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes within a decade unless they adopt a healthier lifestyle that includes weight loss and more physical activity. First, let's define what "pre-diabetes" is and is not. Diabetes is defined as having a fasting plasma blood glucose level of 126 mg/dl or greater on two separate occasions. If diabetes symptoms exist and you have a casual blood glucose taken at any time that is equal to or greater than 200 mg/dl, and a second test shows the same high blood glucose level, then you have diabetes. In general, people who have a fasting plasma blood glucose in the 100-125 mg/dl range are defined as having impaired fasting glucose. If your doctor gives you an oral glucose tolerance test, and at two-hours your blood glucose is 140-199 mg/dl, you have "impaired glucose tolerance". Either of these is medical terminology for what your doctor is probably referring to when he says you have "pre-diabetes." Be sure to ask your doctor what your exact blood sugar test results are when he tells you that you have "pre-diabetes." Some physicians are not as familiar as they should be with the new national guidelines for diagnosing diabetes. They may be telling you that you have pre-diabetes, when in fact you have actual diabetes. Among those who should be screened for pre-diabetes include overweight adults age 45 and older and those u Continue reading >>

Risk Test May Put Too Many In Unhelpful 'prediabetes' Category

Risk Test May Put Too Many In Unhelpful 'prediabetes' Category

(Reuters Health) - A widely supported web-based risk test suggests that 8 out of 10 people aged 60 years and older in the U.S. are at high risk for so-called prediabetes – but it may not be helpful to label so many people as “high risk,” researchers say. The term prediabetes refers to having elevated blood sugar that does not reach the threshold for type 2 diabetes, but it is considered a sign that a person might be headed in that direction. Older age, obesity and family history increase the risk of prediabetes, which in turn increases risk for diabetes, heart disease and stroke, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Scientific societies need to be careful when they publicly announce a risk calculator or widget, said lead author of the new study, Dr. Saeid Shahraz, an investigator in the Predictive Analytics and Comparative Effectiveness Center at Tufts Medical Center in Boston. “Our findings show that this risk engine identifies a lot of normal people as having prediabetes,” Shahraz told Reuters Health. “Second, even the person who has prediabetes doesn’t necessarily progress toward diabetes,” he said. “Overall we think this is putting too much pressure on society of creating or pushing toward more disease labels for the healthy population.” The researchers used existing data from the 2013-2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey of adults aged 18 and older without diabetes to calculate risk scores for prediabetes based on seven factors: age, sex, history of gestational diabetes, family history of diabetes, history of high blood pressure, physical activity and weight. All factors were worth one risk point except weight and age, which were worth from one to three points. About 10,000 respondents who were repr Continue reading >>

Prediabetes Symptoms And Diagnosis

Prediabetes Symptoms And Diagnosis

What is prediabetes? About 41 million Americans between the ages of 40 and 74 have "prediabetes." Prediabetes is a condition that can be considered an early, yet potentially reversible stage of the development of type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is sometimes called impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose (IGT/IFG), depending upon the test that yielded the abnormal result. In prediabetes, a person's blood sugar (glucose) levels are slightly higher than the normal range, but not high enough for a true diagnosis of diabetes. People with prediabetes have a significant risk of developing full-blown diabetes. In the Diabetes Prevention Program study, about 11% of people with prediabetes developed type II diabetes each year during the three year follow-up time of the study. Importantly, people with prediabetes generally have no symptoms of the condition. Testing for Pre Diabetes Doctors generally use one of two different blood tests to diagnose diabetes and prediabetes. One is called the fasting plasma glucose test (FPG) in which a person's blood glucose level is measured first thing in the morning before breakfast. The normal fasting blood glucose level is below 100 mg/dl. A person with prediabetes has a fasting blood glucose level between 100 and 125 mg/dl. If the fasting blood glucose level is to 126 mg/dl or above, a person is considered to have diabetes. The second test used in the diagnosis of diabetes is the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), although this test is no longer commonly used as in the past. This test may be used to diagnose gestational diabetes in pregnant women. In this test, a person's blood glucose is measured in the morning after fasting overnight and again two hours after drinking a glucose-rich beverage. The normal value for blood glucose Continue reading >>

Five Things You Should Know About Prediabetes

Five Things You Should Know About Prediabetes

After announcing the expansion of Diabetes Stops Here and asking you which topics you’d like covered, we received a specific request for more information about prediabetes. A staggering 79 million Americans deal with this condition, and while it can lead to crippling health consequences, it can be avoided. Here are five things you should know about prediabetes: 1. What is prediabetes? Before people develop type 2 diabetes, they almost always have prediabetes, a health condition where your blood glucose is higher than normal but not as high as if you had diabetes. 2. How can I find out if I have it? Your doctor can give you a blood test to tell if you have prediabetes (the same test that’s used to test for diabetes). At your next doctor visit, ask if you should be tested for prediabetes. 3. What can I do if I have prediabetes? If you have prediabetes, there are important steps you can, and should, take. Early intervention can turn back the clock and return elevated blood glucose levels to the normal range. Losing weight is an important step for most people with prediabetes, and the amount doesn’t have to be huge to make a difference. A weight loss of just 10 to 15 pounds can really stack the odds in your favor. Coupled with 30 minutes of exercise each day and healthy food choices, you’ll be on your way. Talk with your doctor and visit our website to learn more about other ways you can prevent or reverse the condition. 4. Does this mean I’m going to develop type 2 diabetes? Prediabetes can lead to type 2 diabetes…but it doesn’t have to. Scientific studies show taking the above steps can often halt or at least slow down the progression of prediabetes so it doesn’t take a turn for the worse. 5. Where can I find help? You are not alone. It’s never too late Continue reading >>

Do You Have Pre-diabetes? Take This One Minute Video Test To Find Out…

Do You Have Pre-diabetes? Take This One Minute Video Test To Find Out…

It's been called a global epidemic - but most people don't realise they're on their way to diabetes until its too late. Now a one-minute test will warn people whether they are risk of pre-diabetes with a simple seven-question quiz. It's estimated that one in three adults in the UK and US have pre-diabetes - meaning they are on the verge of suffering from the full-blown illness. But because pre-diabetes does not normally cause any symptoms, millions are unaware they have it unless they undergo blood tests at the GP. Scroll down for video Those with pre-diabetes have blood sugar levels that are so high they are on the verge of type 2 diabetes. Despite not having an official diagnosis, they are at a higher risk of complications such as kidney failure, nerve damage and sight problems. Crucially, many could prevent both pre-diabetes and the full illness by making small lifestyle changes to lose weight and exercise more. The video test was put together by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in partnership with the American Medical Association and the American Diabetes Association. The government-backed advert has been launched to raise awareness of the disease and get the public to consider how their lifestyle choices can affect their risk. The quiz consists of seven simple questions about lifestyle and medical history. In it, the doctor asks viewers to count on their hands, raising one finger at a time, every time they answer a question with a 'yes.' The test questions include: Are you a man? Are you over 60? Are you inactive? Are you overweight? Does type 2 diabetes run in your family? Anyone holding up more than five fingers by the end of the test is advised to see a doctor and get checked for pre-diabetes. TAKE THE TEST BY WATCHING THE VIDEO HERE An estimated Continue reading >>

Pre-diabetes Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Pre-diabetes Impaired Glucose Tolerance

In pre-diabetes (impaired glucose tolerance), your blood sugar (glucose) is raised beyond the normal range. Whilst this raised glucose level is not so high that you have diabetes, you are at increased risk of developing diabetes when you have pre-diabetes. You are also at increased risk of developing conditions such as heart disease, peripheral arterial disease and stroke (cardiovascular diseases). If pre-diabetes is treated, it can help to prevent the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The most effective treatment is lifestyle changes, including eating a healthy balanced diet, losing weight if you are overweight, and doing regular physical activity. What is pre-diabetes? Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. If you have pre-diabetes (impaired glucose tolerance), your blood sugar (glucose) is raised beyond the normal range but it is not so high that you have diabetes. However, if y Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Your body gets energy from the glucose in your blood. A hormone called insulin helps the cells in your body use glucose. If you have prediabetes, this process does not work as well. Glucose builds up in your bloodstream. If the levels get high enough, you can develop type 2 diabetes. Having diabetes increases the risk for certain health problems. This is because high glucose levels in the blood can damage the blood vessels and nerves. This can lead to heart disease and stroke. If you have prediabetes, damage may already be occurring in your blood vessels. Having prediabetes is a wake-up call to take action to improve your health. Your health care provider will talk with you about your condition and your risks from prediabetes. To help you prevent diabetes, your provider will likely suggest certain lifestyle changes: Eat healthy foods. This includes whole grains, lean proteins, low-fat dairy, and plenty of fruits and vegetables. Watch portion sizes and avoid sweets and fried foods. Lose weight. Just a small weight loss can make a big difference in your health. For example, your provider may suggest that you lose about 7% of your body weight. So, if you weigh 200 pounds (90 kilograms), your goal would be to lose about 14 pounds (6.3 kilograms). Your provider may suggest a diet or you can join a program to help you lose weight. Get more exercise. Aim to get at least 30 to 60 minutes of moderate exercise at least 5 days a week. This can include brisk walking, riding your bike, or swimming. You can also break up exercise into smaller sessions throughout the day. Take medicines as directed. Depending on your other risk factors, your provider may prescribe medicines to lower cholesterol or blood pressure or to help prevent diabetes. You can't tell that you have prediabetes bec Continue reading >>

Prediabetes Test Measures And Results To Be Sure!

Prediabetes Test Measures And Results To Be Sure!

Do you want to be very sure that you’re doing ok on the prediabetes front? Here is a Prediabetes Test method that is used by medical experts who believe you can never be too careful with blood sugar. Step 1 Get yourself a good quality home glucometer. It will help you monitoring the glucose levels regularly. Step 2 Fast overnight. Twelve hours is a must. So if you ate dinner at 7pm, nothing except water till 7am. Take the first reading. This is called your Fasting Blood Glucose or FBG. Note this down. Step 3 Take the next blood sugar reading just before starting lunch Step 4 Eat your typical lunch. Once you’re done with lunch, do not eat anything else for the next 3 hours. After one hour of lunch, test for sugar and note it down. Step 5 Two hours after lunch, test again Step 6 Last test due: 3hrs after lunch Repeat these tests for two days, recording what you ate and what you measured for each test. Now that you know how to test for diabetes at home, read on to find out what these test results mean. What Are We Measuring in Prediabetes Test? The first test (Fasting Blood Sugar or FBG) tells us how much sugar is floating in your blood after you’ve fasted for 12 hours. It should be at its lowest at this point. Remember: The American Diabetes Association classifies anyone with fasting blood sugar between 100-126 mg/DL or the equivalent of HbA1c between 5.7-6.4% as having prediabetes. We, however, know that sugar can do serious damage (cardiac damage, risk of cancer etc.) at far lower levels than this. So doctors keen to protect their patients from even slight prediabetes damage want to see a number less than 86 mg/DL on this test. Maintain a diabetes test results chart at a place you can see daily and fill in the numbers regularly to keep track of your blood sugar le Continue reading >>

Testing For Prediabetes

Testing For Prediabetes

First, find out if you are at risk for prediabetes: Review the risk factors on this page; or Take this simple online risk test If you are at risk for prediabetes, talk to your doctor about getting a laboratory blood test. There are several different blood tests: Diabetes Risk Panel : Predicts how likely you are to get diabetes in your lifetime Diabetes Risk Panel with Score : Predicts how likely you are to get diabetes within eight years ASCVD Risk Panel with Scores : Predicts how likely you are to get atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, a disease that clogs the arteries in your heart. This is important because many patients with diabetes get strokes, heart attack, and heart disease If you don't have prediabetes, your doctor may still recommend you get tested in the future–maybe in a few years–to make sure things don’t get worse. If you do have prediabetes: Talk to your doctor about your diagnosis You may need to take more tests Your doctor might recommend medication For those with prediabetes, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends joining a lifestyle-change program to help encourage healthy eating, increase physical activity, and lose weight. Continue reading >>

The Kraft Prediabetes Profile

The Kraft Prediabetes Profile

Meridian Valley Lab’s Kraft Prediabetes Profile is a timed test that measures the patient’s insulin response to a measured glucose challenge and return to baseline over a 4-hour period. This test looks at patterns of insulin response rather than a strict cut-off point for glucose. These patterns delineate the severity of insulin resistance, as a patient progresses from normal insulin sensitivity to postprandial hyperinsulinemia to the insulinopenic state found in beta-cell exhaustion. This spectrum of insulin response allows the clinician to identify insulin resistance early in its development. (This holds true even when fasting and 2 hour post-challenge glucose levels are normal and fasting insulin is below 10μIU/mL.) The resulting evaluation of insulin resistance severity can be used to monitor efficacy of treatment. Interpreting The Kraft Prediabetes Profile The Kraft Prediabetes Profile measures patterns of insulin activity after drinking a glucose challenge. Dr. Kraft identified five patterns of insulin response that begins with normal sensitivity and progresses to severe insulin resistance and then finally to an insulinopenic state. The five patterns of insulin response correspond with the timing of the insulin peak after the glucose challenge. Normally, insulin peaks quickly after a meal (or glucose challenge in this case) and then drops precipitously back to baseline (Pattern I). As insulin resistance becomes more severe, the insulin response to glucose peaks later and later (Patterns II-IIIB). In Pattern IV, insulin is high in the fasting state and rises even further in attempt to keep blood sugar under control. Islet cell exhaustion is illustrated by Pattern V, or insulinopenia, in which the patient’s pancreas is no longer able to produce an adequate am Continue reading >>

New Campaign Urges Millions To Check For Prediabetes

New Campaign Urges Millions To Check For Prediabetes

Are you at risk from prediabetes? Millions of Americans are and don't even know it. Prediabetes is a condition that can lead to type 2 diabetes, so stopping it is important. Now four big players in the world of health are joining forces to raise awareness and share prevention messages. They're using a little humor along the way, too. Together, the American Diabetes Association, the American Medical Association, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Ad Council have launched the first national public service advertising (PSA) campaign to raise awareness about prediabetes. "Eighty-six million people have prediabetes and only 10 percent know they have it," CDC Diabetes Translation Director Ann Albright told CBS News. That's more than one in three Americans, she added. "No one is excused from prediabetes." People with prediabetes have higher than normal blood glucose (sugar) levels, but not high enough yet to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The ad campaign walk people through a few questions so they can find out, even as they watch the videos, if they're at risk. In one of the ads, a slightly goofy doctor asks viewers to count off on their hands, raising one finger at a time, every time they answer a question with a "yes." The questions: Are you a man? Are you over 60? Are you inactive? Are you overweight? Does type 2 diabetes run in your family? And so on. If you're holding up more than five fingers by the end of the ad, you need to see a doctor and get checked for prediabetes. "People are actually taking action when they're viewing the PSA," said Albright. In other ads, the doctor talks to some typical prediabetes patients - the busy mom, the guy stuck in traffic, the slightly tubby "bacon lover" - who are surprised to hear they're not exempt. Now that Continue reading >>

More in diabetes