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Pre Diabetes Nerve Tingling

Prediabetes May Damage Nerves More Than Thought

Prediabetes May Damage Nerves More Than Thought

HealthDay Reporter may cause more nerve damage than previously believed, researchers say. "The results of this new study add urgency to the need for more screening of those with the condition and faster intervention," said senior study author Dr. Michael Polydefkis, a professor of neurology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. The study included 62 people, including 52 with tingling and pain in their hands and feet -- a condition known as neuropathy. Diabetes is a common cause of neuropathy, the researchers said. Thirteen participants had prediabetes, meaning their blood sugar levels were higher than normal but not yet at the point of diabetes. Over three years, the researchers found that those with prediabetes had damage over the entire length of small sensory nerve fibers, rather than just at the longest ends first. The findings challenge current understanding of prediabetes-related nerve damage, the researchers said. The study was published online April 11 in the journal JAMA Neurology. "I liken small-fiber neuropathy to the canary in the coal mine," Polydefkis said in a university news release. "It signals the beginning of nerve deterioration that with time involves other types of nerve fibers and becomes more apparent and dramatically affects people's quality of life," he explained. According to the American Diabetes Association, you can reduce your risk of progressing from prediabetes to diabetes by losing 7 percent of your body weight (for example, 14 pounds if you weigh 200 pounds) and by exercising moderately 30 minutes a day, five days a week. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic Neuropathy

Print Overview Diabetic neuropathy is a type of nerve damage that can occur if you have diabetes. High blood sugar (glucose) can injure nerve fibers throughout your body, but diabetic neuropathy most often damages nerves in your legs and feet. Depending on the affected nerves, symptoms of diabetic neuropathy can range from pain and numbness in your extremities to problems with your digestive system, urinary tract, blood vessels and heart. For some people, these symptoms are mild; for others, diabetic neuropathy can be painful, disabling and even fatal. Diabetic neuropathy is a common serious complication of diabetes. Yet you can often prevent diabetic neuropathy or slow its progress with tight blood sugar control and a healthy lifestyle. Symptoms There are four main types of diabetic neuropathy. You may have just one type or symptoms of several types. Most develop gradually, and you may not notice problems until considerable damage has occurred. The signs and symptoms of diabetic neuropathy vary, depending on the type of neuropathy and which nerves are affected. Peripheral neuropathy Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Your feet and legs are often affected first, followed by your hands and arms. Signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy are often worse at night, and may include: Numbness or reduced ability to feel pain or temperature changes A tingling or burning sensation Sharp pains or cramps Increased sensitivity to touch — for some people, even the weight of a bed sheet can be agonizing Muscle weakness Loss of reflexes, especially in the ankle Loss of balance and coordination Serious foot problems, such as ulcers, infections, deformities, and bone and joint pain Autonomic neuropathy The autonomic nervous system controls your hea Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy Symptoms

Diabetic Neuropathy Symptoms

The symptoms of diabetic neuropathy depend on what type of neuropathy you have. Symptoms are dependent on which nerves have been damaged. In general, diabetic neuropathy symptoms develop gradually; they may seem like minor and infrequent pains or problems at first, but as the nerves become more damaged, symptoms may grow. Don’t overlook mild symptoms. They can indicate the beginning of neuropathy. Talk to your doctor about anything you notice—such as any pain, numbness, weakness, or tingling—even if it seems insignificant. Your pain may mean the control of your diabetes could be improved, which will can help slow down the progression of your neuropathy. Pain and numbness are also important warning signs to take very good care of your feet, so you can avoid wounds and infections that can be difficult to heal and even raise risk for amputation. 1 Peripheral Neuropathy Symptoms Peripheral neuropathy affects nerves leading to your extremities—the feet, legs, hands, and arms. The nerves leading to your feet are the longest in your body, so they are the most often affected nerves (simply because there’s more of them to be damaged). Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy symptoms include: Pain Burning, stabbing or electric-shock sensations Numbness (loss of feeling) Tingling Muscle weakness Poor coordination Muscle cramping and/or twitching Insensitivity to pain and/or temperature Extreme sensitivity to even the lightest touch Symptoms get worse at night. 2, 3 Autonomic Neuropathy Symptoms The autonomic nervous system is in charge of the "involuntary" functions of your body. It keeps your heart pumping and makes sure you digest your food right—without you needing to think about it. Autonomic neuropathy symptoms i Continue reading >>

Burning Or Tingling Feet May Be Warning Of Pre-diabetes

Burning Or Tingling Feet May Be Warning Of Pre-diabetes

Video available Newswise — Adult onset, or type 2 diabetes, is a growing problem in the United States. Researchers estimate that about 10 percent of Americans will develop diabetes during their lifetime and about twice that number will develop a milder form of diabetes called impaired glucose tolerance, or pre-diabetes. Diabetes and pre-diabetes often do not present any symptoms until a complication arises, making the disease difficult for patients to detect. Physicians already know that people with pre-diabetes can prevent or delay the onset of diabetes with lifestyle changes such as weight loss and exercise. Likewise, people with pre-diabetic neuropathy may be able to reduce their risk for developing severe nerve disease. They may even be able to reverse the neuropathy. Researchers at the University of Michigan Health System are investigating neuropathy, or nerve damage characterized by a persistent tingling, burning or numbness in the hands and feet, as an early warning sign of pre-diabetes. Their preliminary research also suggests that lifestyle modifications, including weight loss and regular exercise, may be able to prevent further nerve damage among patients with pre-diabetes and " very possibly " reverse the damage. "Adult onset, or type 2 diabetes, is a considerable problem in the United States, as well as in many western countries," says James Russell, M.D., a U-M associate professor of Neurology. "We estimate that about 16 to 20 million Americans already have pre-diabetes but, in fact, this may be an underestimate." UMHS, which is very active in diabetes research, is conducting a study, along with universities such as the University of Utah and Yale, that looks at neuropathy associated with impaired glucose tolerance. "People may notice they have an increas Continue reading >>

9 Early Signs Of Diabetes You Must Know (#2 Is So Often Overlooked)

9 Early Signs Of Diabetes You Must Know (#2 Is So Often Overlooked)

Diabetes is sneaky. The early symptoms can go unnoticed for months or years. In fact, 1 in 3 people with type 2 diabetes don’t know they have it. 1 in 3. Most actually do experience the early signs but don’t realise or understand what they are. Early detection and treatment can have a profound impact on your long-term health. A 3-year delay in diagnosis increases your relative risk of heart disease by 29% (1). Therefore by knowing what to look for, you can take control of the situation before it takes control of you. Diabetes Symptoms In Adults and Children Diabetes is the term given to blood sugar (glucose) levels that are too high for a sustained period of time. The signs or symptoms of high blood sugar are typically the same for both children and adults. Patients with type 1 diabetes usually develop symptoms over a sudden, short period of time. The condition is often diagnosed in an emergency setting. Type 2 diabetes on the other hand progresses quite slowly. Symptoms tend to come on gradually, which is why they are often overlooked. Some don’t experience any early symptoms at all. The following early signs of diabetes are the most common: 1. Increased urination is arguably the most common A significant increase in how often you urinate (Polyuria) is a tell-tale symptom of high blood sugar. As a point of reference, the average person pees 4 to 7 times in a 24-hour period. Waking up during the night to go, even though you already went right before bed, is a common red flag. Why does this happen?: Your kidneys are working overtime to expel the excess sugar in your blood. Sugar that the kidneys are unable to absorb must be urinated out. Therefore high sugar levels leads to more urination. 2. Excessive thirst is one of the classic early signs of diabetes Drinking u Continue reading >>

Nerve Damage Found In Prediabetics

Nerve Damage Found In Prediabetics

The pain shot across the tops of Michael Jackson's feet as if someone was pounding him with a sledgehammer, sometimes becoming so unbearable he couldn't sleep. The aerospace engineer blamed it on arthritis until his primary care physician ruled that out. Tests for Lupus and Lou Gherig's disease also came back negative. Finally, a doctor cut a small sample of skin from one of Jackson's feet and counted the nerve fibers under a microscope. Jackson suffered from significant nerve damage stemming from prediabetes — a condition in which people have high blood glucose levels but not enough to be classified as diabetes. Doctors have known for a while that those with prediabetes can experience mild weakness, numbness and pain from nerve damage, but a new Johns Hopkins study suggests that so-called neuropathy is much more significant than once thought. Like Jackson, patients can experience excruciating pain more typically associated with full-blown diabetes. About 50 percent of people with diabetes have neuropathy, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. The numbness associated with neuropathy can contribute to some diabetics' eventual need for amputation. Diabetics tend to have poor blood circulation, which can lead to infection and ulcers. A patient may not notice an injury or infection due to lack of feeling, leading to amputation. The Johns Hopkins researchers say their findings provide evidence that patients should be screened for prediabetes and neuropathy much earlier than once thought. The medical community also needs to do a better job at treating and diagnosing those with prediabetes, the researchers concluded. An estimated one in three Americans — 86 million people — have prediabetes, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Co Continue reading >>

Borderline Diabetes Foot Pain: Pre Diabetes Diet To Save The Feet

Borderline Diabetes Foot Pain: Pre Diabetes Diet To Save The Feet

Borderline Diabetes Foot Pain: Pre Diabetes Diet to save the feet Will you be able to reverse Pre Diabetes/ Borderline diabetes foot pain? If you are pre diabetic it means that the high blood sugar may start to do some really bad things to the body. I always tell the diabetic to try to reverse this fast as permanent damage can be done to the body. The eyes,kidney and legs can all be lost with this illness. Remember that Pre diabetes/Borderline Diabetes foot pain is serious business. If you have full diabetes the damage can spread faster as more bad glucose is circulating longer in the body The nerves are small and thin but when they go they bring pain. When the nerves are losing the fight, there will be symptoms such as tingling in the toes. There may be numbness in the legs and feet. When numbness sets in, it is a danger sign that the foot may be lost. At this point a reversal of the blood sugar is critical. These are small warning signs of a coming bigger problem. The main problem is that since the nerves are so small once they have become damaged they are nearly impossible to reverse. Pre Diabetes or Borderline Diabetes foot pain is serious since diabetic nerve damage is almost impossible to repair. It is a must to remove this high glucose out the body as naturally and fast From experience I can tell you that there are no diabetes medications that can reverse this nerve damage. It is best to try to cure this naturally and bring the nerves back to life. This is the oly way the pain will leave. It is important that I mention that recently 2 more diabetes medications were removed from the market due to the damage it was doing to the heart. I do not know how so doctors can still prescribed this dangerous drugs. It is best to treat Pre Diabetes or Borderline Diabetes foo Continue reading >>

Pre Diabetes Symptoms Trio – Tingling, Nausea And Dizziness

Pre Diabetes Symptoms Trio – Tingling, Nausea And Dizziness

Pre diabetes is not necessarily a condition on its own. It is more a signal of a problem that demands immediate attention. It is a precursor in many cases to a diagnosis of diabetes. However, unlike most medical conditions, pre diabetes serves as an early warning system to a potential medical condition. It is a sign that some changes need to be made in order to prevent a future diagnosis of diabetes. It really can be considered a blessing because it provides people an opportunity to change their lifestyle quickly and severely and potentially delay or even stop the development of full blown diabetes. Few diseases provide this early window, and unfortunately some people miss it entirely and receive a diagnosis of diabetes before realizing that while their blood sugar was above 100 mg/dL to 125 mg/dL, they may have had an opportunity to stop the disease’s progression. This is often because pre diabetes symptoms can be rationalized, dismissed or missed entirely. For many people, pre diabetes comes and goes without any of the early signs of diabetes ever becoming apparent. These include early symptoms like fatigue and increased thirst. Fatigue is a symptom of many health conditions and also a result of a hectic life, and therefore is often discounted as a disease symptom at all. An increase in urination and thirst, both early signs of diabetes, can also be easily discounted due to lifestyle or other existing health conditions, and these pre diabetes symptoms are often easily overlooked or not addressed until they become severe. But, there are some pre diabetes symptoms that some people experience that may provide a more clear indication that something is wrong or headed in the wrong direction. Three in particular, especially if encountered together, should bring about caus Continue reading >>

What Is Pre-diabetes? When Does It Become Diabetes?

What Is Pre-diabetes? When Does It Become Diabetes?

Many people who develop type 2 diabetes have pre-diabetes first. Blood glucose levels are higher than normal with pre-diabetes but not high enough to be considered diabetes. Making positive lifestyle changes with pre-diabetes can prevent or delay getting type 2 diabetes. Symptoms of pre-diabetes may include thirst; blurry vision; tingling or numbness in the feet or hands; frequent urination; recurring bladder, gum or skin infections; bruises and cuts that are slow to heal; and extreme fatigue. If you experience any of these symptoms, talk to your doctor about pre-diabetes testing. Many times there are no symptoms at all. Blood testing may hold the answer. Three tests are done by a medical professional to determine if you have pre-diabetes. They may include the A1C test, the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) or the fasting plasma glucose test (FPG). If your blood glucose level is abnormal after testing, you have pre-diabetes. On the A1C test, pre-diabetes is considered between 5.7 and 6.4 percent and diabetes occurs at 6.5 percent or higher. The OGTT test, pre-diabetes is between 140 mg/dl and 199 mg/dl with diabetes over 200 mg/dl. The FPG test, pre-diabetes is between 100 mg/dl and 125 mg/dl and a diagnosis of diabetes is 126 ml/dl two separate times within a few weeks. Your doctor will review your test results. Pre-diabetes and diabetes happens to people of all races and ages but some groups are at a higher risk. Diabetes is more common for the aged population, African Americans, Native Americans, Latinos and Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders. Family history and certain health conditions can increase your risk including gestational diabetes during pregnancy, high blood pressure and high cholesterol. Another risk factor for developing pre-diabetes is being overweight Continue reading >>

Think I Have Prediabetes And Neuropathy. Scared

Think I Have Prediabetes And Neuropathy. Scared

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Think I have prediabetes and neuropathy. Scared I have had numbness in my right foot across my toes and half of the foot for 3-4 days now, before I had a pain in the centre of my foot for a couple of weeks. I have a lot of risk factors for diabetes: overweight, smoke, alcohol... I haven't seen a doctor and don't want to because I'm scared. I don't know what my blood sugar is, haven't had it done for a few years. I know it's not advisable to not see a doctor but how bad is this? And can I still turn it around? I've put on a lot of weight - 2 stone or more I'd guess - in the last few years doing shift work as I struggle to eat healthily or at all at work, resulting in eating too much later, drinking too much etc. I have an active job and I'm sure with planning I could make my diet healthier and lose 1-2 stone with not much trouble. I've done it before. Can numbness be reversed? Anyone else in the same boat? You need to be diagnosed and to take it from there ..... I don't know whether you can reverse numbness unfortunately. Fingers crossed. It is NEVER too late to make positive changes, which can have huge impact on your future health. I would suggest that you do make that doctor's appointment, and go and discuss things with them. There are many different reasons why you might have lost feeling in your toes, and yes, neuropathy is one, but there are others, including pinched nerves, bad backs, bad neck, and so on. But you really need an expert opinion and a proper diagnosis. If it does prove that your blood glucose is out of wack, then this forum is the best place for information and support, and lots of us have all sorts of suggestions on diet, exercise Continue reading >>

Can Prediabetes Cause Neuropathy?

Can Prediabetes Cause Neuropathy?

Neuropathy can be found developing eventually in approximately 50% of all diabetes patients. What about in prediabetes?… Diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) is the most common neuropathy in the Western world, developing eventually in approximately 50% of all diabetes patients. DPN is most commonly characterized by a progressive loss of distal sensation correlating with loss of sensory axons, followed, in severe cases, by motor weakness and motor axonal loss. As with most complications of diabetes, duration and severity of hyperglycemia is directly correlated with degree of symptomatology. However, given that up to 18% of patients with newly diagnosed diabetes already have symptoms of pain in their lower extremities, is DPN occurring during the prediabetic stage? When attempting to answer this question, it’s enlightening to look at the relationship between DPN and impaired glycemia (IG). IG characterizes the prediabetic stage, and includes impaired fasting glucose and/or an abnormal oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). The correlation of DPN with IG is important for two reasons; it could potentially alter how the diagnosis of diabetes should be made and it would provide a reason to treat IG with medications versus the currently recommended approach of lifestyle change alone. This correlation has been controversial due to methodologic concerns and varied results. However, one recent study set out to clarify this controversy, hypothesizing that since IG typically evolves into type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), that IG itself causes micro-vessel complications. In this trial, Mayo Clinic researchers identified 174 patients with IG (fasting glucose 100 to126 mg/dL, 2-hour OGTT glucose levels 140 to 200 mg/dL and HbA1c <6.5%), 218 patients with newly diagnosed overt diabetes, and 1 Continue reading >>

Types Of Peripheral Neuropathy - Pre-diabetic/diabetic

Types Of Peripheral Neuropathy - Pre-diabetic/diabetic

Types of Peripheral Neuropathy - Pre-diabetic/Diabetic Pre-diabetes / Impaired Glucose Tolerance (IGT) A link exists between pre-diabetes (also known as impaired glucose tolerance or IGT) and peripheral neuropathy. Approximately 10% of adults in America have what is being called "pre-diabetes" or "borderline diabetes"a condition where the body has higher than normal blood sugar levels, but not high enough to be diagnosed as true diabetes. If left untreated, people with pre-diabetes are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and nerve damage (which could result in peripheral neuropathy). People with pre-diabetes or IGT can significantly reduce their risk of developing type 2 diabetes through diet, exercise, and learning to control their blood sugar levels. (Not all symptoms and signs may be present.) People with IGT often have no symptoms. People who actually have diabetesand who therefore are at greater risk of developing peripheral neuropathyoften don't realize it because the symptoms of diabetes come on so gradually. The symptoms of diabetes and its complications include: Tingling or numbness in the hands or feet Here are the symptoms to watch for the development of peripheral neuropathy. Continue reading >>

Could Slightly High Blood Sugar Cause Neuropathy?

Could Slightly High Blood Sugar Cause Neuropathy?

My glucose levels usually run between 120 and 135 with a nonfasting blood test, though do not have a diagnosis of diabetes. I suffer greatly with my feet and been told by a podiatrist that it is neuropathy. Is it possible that my high glucose levels are causing the neuropathy? Dear Terry, Thanks for your question. I like to think of blood glucose values as a spectrum of numbers with no clear cutoff between nondiabetic and diabetic. In similar manner there is a gray area of blood glucose that defines pre-diabetes. Many people use blood sugar and blood glucose interchangeably. The definition of diabetes has changed over time. The numbers you quote might very well be considered diagnostic of diabetes today whereas they were not 20 years ago. In 1997, the American Diabetes Association definition of normal blood glucose decreased from 120 to 110 mg/dL (6.1 mmol/L). In 2002, the American Diabetes Association defined a normal fasting blood glucose as less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L). Today we consider fasting blood sugars of 100 mg/dl to 125mg/dl to be in the realm of glucose intolerance which is sometimes called pre-diabetes. These patients are at increased risk for developing frank diabetes. Several fasting glucose levels over 125 or a single random glucose over 200 mg are considered diagnostic of diabetes. There are other tests used to make the diagnosis of pre-diabetes or diabetes. Pre-diabetes is defined as a blood sugar of 140 to 199 mg/dL (7.8 to 11.0 mmol/L) two-hour after drinking 75 grams of an oral glucose solution. The diagnosis of diabetes is confirmed with a blood sugar of 200 mg/dL or greater, two hours after ingestion of the glucose solution. Hemoglobin A1C is a blood test that gives an estimate of blood sugar levels over the previous three months. Persons with Continue reading >>

Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Diabetic neuropathy, or nerve damage caused by diabetes, is one of the most common known causes of neuropathy. It is one of many complications associated with diabetes, with nearly 60 percent of diabetics having some form of nerve damage. It is a progressive disease that can involve loss of sensation, as well as pain and weakness, in the feet and sometimes in the hands. Peripheral neuropathy may be more prevalent in people who have difficulty managing their blood sugar levels, have high blood pressure, are overweight, and are over 40 years old. A clinical examination may identify early signs of neuropathy in diabetics without symptoms. Today, doctors are exploring a link between pre-diabetes (also known as impaired glucose tolerance or IGT) and peripheral neuropathy. Approximately 10% of adults in America have what is being called “pre-diabetes” or “borderline diabetes”—a condition where the body has higher than normal blood sugar levels, but not high enough to be diagnosed as true diabetes. If left untreated, people with pre-diabetes are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and nerve damage (which could result in peripheral neuropathy.) People with pre-diabetes or IGT can significantly reduce their risk of developing type 2 diabetes through diet, exercise and learning to control their blood sugar levels. Pre Diabetes Symptoms & Signs (Not all symptoms and signs may be present.) People with IGT often have no symptoms. People who actually have diabetes—and who therefore are at greater risk of developing peripheral neuropathy—often don’t realize it because the symptoms of diabetes come on so gradually. Pre Diabetic symptoms and its complications include: Frequent urination Blurred vision Constant thirst Fatigue Frequent infections Cuts and Continue reading >>

Prediabetes’ #1 Symptom

Prediabetes’ #1 Symptom

If you are wondering whether you could have prediabetes, it may seem logical to ask: “What are its symptoms?” Unfortunately, unlike many chronic conditions, the single most common symptom of prediabetes is actually no symptom at all, which is why nearly 90% of people are not aware they have it. So being on the lookout for obvious signs is actually a very unreliable way to find out if you are at risk. Prediabetes is a condition in which blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not yet high enough to be considered type 2 diabetes. But unless lifestyle changes are made, many people who are newly diagnosed with prediabetes will worsen and convert to full-blown type 2 diabetes within a few years. That’s why prediabetes should really be thought of as simply an earlier stage of type 2 diabetes. But while prediabetes might come without obvious, external symptoms, that does not make it harmless. In fact, evidence suggests that some people with prediabetes are already experiencing internal damage – the tiny vessels that supply blood to your eyes, kidneys, and nerve may already be starting to be harmed. In other words, it must be taken seriously. So what is the best way to find out if you are at risk? It takes less than a minute to take the CDC’s prediabetes screening test. If it turns out that you are at high risk, take comfort in knowing that while prediabetes might be hard to spot from the outside, it doesn’t mean it’s hard to treat. In fact, Prevent has helped the majority of our participants reduce their excess weight and other risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes. That said, if you already know you have prediabetes, you should also be on the lookout for signs of type 2 diabetes. A 2011 study surveyed people in early stages of diabetes to find out w Continue reading >>

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