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Pre Diabetes Fatigue

Many Miss Prediabetes Wake-up Call

Many Miss Prediabetes Wake-up Call

Type 2 diabetes doesn’t usually appear all of a sudden. Many people have a long, slow, invisible lead-in to it called prediabetes. During this period, blood sugar levels are higher than normal. However, they’re not high enough to cause symptoms or to be classified as diabetes. It’s still possible at this stage to prevent the slide into full-blown diabetes. Think of prediabetes as a wake-up call. Unfortunately, few people ever hear the alarm. A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that among Americans age 20 and older, only 10% of those with prediabetes know they have it. Given that as many as 73 million Americans have prediabetes, that’s a lot of missed opportunities to prevent the ravages of diabetes. One reason many people don’t know that they may be headed toward diabetes is they’ve never had their blood sugar tested. This simple test isn’t part of routine preventive care. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends blood sugar “screening” only in individuals with high blood pressure. (Screening means hunting for hidden disease in the absence of any outward signs or symptoms.) That’s important, because recommendations from the Task Force, an independent panel of experts, are used by many health-care organizations to determine preventive care. In addition, Task Force recommendations will help determine what services are covered under the Affordable Care Act. Expanding the net The American Diabetes Association and other organizations recommend routine blood sugar testing in people at high risk for developing diabetes. These include: everyone over age 45 younger people who are overweight and who also have one of these diabetes risk factors: little or no physical activity family history of diabetes high blood pre Continue reading >>

Borderline Diabetes Symptoms To Look Out For

Borderline Diabetes Symptoms To Look Out For

Diabetes is a very serious illness, if it’s caught early enough you can help lessen the complications. Learn these borderline diabetes symptoms to look out for. Diabetes develops over time. If you catch it late, the complications can often be severe. But catching symptoms of diabetes early on can lessen these complications considerably. But what are borderline diabetes symptoms? According to experts, these symptoms are very easy to miss. If you’re not looking out for them, it will be easy for you to ignore them. Here are some borderline diabetes symptoms for you to look out for. When should I be looking out for borderline diabetes symptoms? If you’re concerned, you should always be looking out for these symptoms. But people who are at risk for diabetes should be particularly vigilant. These people include: People with a family history of diabetes People who are overweight Those who don’t eat healthy foods Physically inactive people Older people People with high blood pressure These are just a few people who should be extra cautious about having diabetes. But there is still much research being done, especially with type 1 diabetes, so if you have any concerns, it’s better to be cautious. What are some borderline diabetes symptoms? There are some symptoms that might signal borderline diabetes. However, it’s important to note that while you may have some of these borderline diabetes symptoms, it’s also just as likely that you don’t show any symptoms at all. If your doctor is concerned, even if you’re showing none of these symptoms, please defer to their opinion. That said, these are some borderline diabetes symptoms you may experience: Darkened Skin If you’re suffering from borderline diabetes, some patches of skin may appear darker than usual. These pa Continue reading >>

Pre Diabetes Symptoms

Pre Diabetes Symptoms

Here's a fact: Most people diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes had pre diabetes symptoms that if known, could have alerted them to make diet and lifestyle changes before their diagnosis. Most physicians only pay attention to fasting blood sugar when watching for diabetes. For instance, if a patient's blood sugar is between 110-125, mg/dL, it indicates prediabetes. But blood sugar results can test in normal ranges even as diabetes is developing. If people with a type 2 diabetes diagnosis knew ALL of the pre diabetic symptoms for which to watch, it could help them avoid being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is defined medically as the state in which fasting blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be classified as type 2 diabetes. Blood sugars in the prediabetic range (between 100 - 126 mg/dl) indicate insulin resistance is developing, and a metabolic syndrome diagnosis is more likely in the future. Insulin resistance (IR) is a condition in which chronically elevated blood sugar and insulin levels have resulted in an inability of body cells to respond to them normally. IR is the driving factor as insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, prediabetes and diabetes are all linked together on a continuum. Pre Diabetes Symptoms: It's Not Just About Blood Sugar Medical information about pre diabetes comes from medical associations such as the American Diabetes Association. The ADA guidelines say that prediabetes is a function of a fasting blood sugar is between 100-125 mg/dl. However, I am convinced that signs of prediabetes can be spotted even when blood tests indicated blood sugars below 100 mg/dl. I saw this in my own life. Eight years ago, I had many of the pre diabetic symptoms listed below, but my fasting blood sugar was still classified as "n Continue reading >>

8 Ways To Beat Fatigue

8 Ways To Beat Fatigue

If youre napping more often, constantly dragging, and feel like a productive life is passing you by, take these steps to reduce physical and mental fatigue and improve the quality of your life. Written by Susan McQuillan, MS, RDN, CDN Feeling tired all the time? It might be time to take some steps to increase your energy level. Fatigue is a common complaint from people with diabetes, especially those with type 2 diabetes. Sure, some of it has to do with your disease, but making better lifestyle choices could greatly improve the way you feel. By routinely monitoring your blood sugar, eating well, getting enough of the right type of exercise, taking steps to reduce stress and maintain good mental health, staying hydrated, controlling inflammation in your body, and getting enough sleep, you can boost your energy levels much closer to normal. High blood glucose levels interfere with circulation, and prevent your body from moving glucose out of your blood and into energy-making cells, resulting in fatigue. Low blood glucose levels also cause fatigue because you simply dont have enough fuel for cells to use to make energy. Monitor your blood levels and always eat balanced meals that contain vegetables or fruit, whole grains and protein, to avoid extreme highs and lows . Nothing sends your blood sugar skyrocketing like a piece of cake, a pastry or a candy bar. Avoid processed foods and junk foods that are pure sugar or mostly sugar. Instead, satisfy your sweet tooth with natural sources of sugar, like apples, oranges and other fresh fruit, which also contain vitamins, minerals and fiber. Choose whole-grain muffins and other baked goods that are also high in fiber. The fiber in whole foods helps slow down digestion and absorption of sugar into your bloodstream. Dehydration is Continue reading >>

Regaining Your Energy With Type 2 Diabetes: Tips To Prevent Fatigue

Regaining Your Energy With Type 2 Diabetes: Tips To Prevent Fatigue

No, it's not your imagination: Taking care of yourself when you have type 2 diabetes can be exhausting. Diabetes-related fatigue is common, and you may be feeling it from a variety of sources — your type 2 diabetes symptoms themselves, exhaustion from the responsibilities of managing diabetes daily, ineffective diabetes management, or even from other underlying conditions. Understanding Diabetes-Related Fatigue There are strong associations between diabetes and testosterone levels, kidney disease, and other health complications, all of which can cause you to become very tired, says Ronald Tamler, MD, medical director of the Mount Sinai Clinical Diabetes Institute at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. There’s also a link between diabetes and depression, he adds, and depression is a common cause of extreme fatigue. According to a study published in June 2014 in the journal Current Diabetes Report, depressive symptoms affect up to one-third of people with diabetes. The research also found that depression not only impairs quality of life but also adds to the difficulties experienced in diabetes self-management. "The research highlights a wide range of potential explanations for the association between diabetes and depression, which include having a sedentary lifestyle, eating a diet high in refined sugars, sleeping poorly, and experiencing brain dysfunction due to low and high blood sugars, as well as chronic inflammation that is associated with diabetes," says David Lam, MD, associate director of the Mount Sinai Diabetes Center at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. Other causes of fatigue from diabetes include cells being deprived of sugar, high blood sugar, dehydration from increased urination, loss of calories, and sleep apnea. Graham McMahon, bachelor of med Continue reading >>

What Causes Diabetes Fatigue?

What Causes Diabetes Fatigue?

Fatigue is one of the most common disabling diabetes symptoms. Diabetes fatigue can disrupt and interfere with all aspects of daily living. What causes diabetes fatigue, and why is it so common? We’ve written about fatigue before and received tons of great comments on those posts. But this time let’s go deeper and find the whole range of causes and solutions, even if it takes a few weeks. Hopefully, everyone will find something that might help them, because this is a serious problem. For example, Melanie wrote, “[Fatigue] really takes a toll on my family and things we can do. I just want to have the energy to play with my son and to do things around the house or with friends…I can’t drive more than 30 minutes because my husband is afraid I will fall asleep…and wreck [the car]. (I have dozed while driving before.)” Maria commented, “Fatigue is a constant and I have had to learn to do only what I can. I don’t push myself anymore as I pay for it dearly. I get tired of explaining why I don’t feel good, don’t want to do anything. Some understand and some don’t.” And Jan wrote, “I sleep from midnight to noon each day. Then I get depressed because I wasted half a day.” Because of my multiple sclerosis (MS), I live with fatigue sometimes, and I know how limiting it is. I know how difficult it can be to manage. There are more than 15 known causes for fatigue. It helps to figure out what is causing yours, so you can address it. Here are some possibilities. First, diabetes can directly cause fatigue with high or low blood sugar levels. • High blood glucose makes your blood “sludgy,” slowing circulation so cells can’t get the oxygen and nutrients they need. Margaret commented, “I can tell if my sugars are high in the morning, because ‘grogg Continue reading >>

Do You Recognize These 11 Early Warning Signs Of Borderline Diabetes?

Do You Recognize These 11 Early Warning Signs Of Borderline Diabetes?

What You Need To Know- Borderline Diabetes Diabetes does not just develop overnight. Borderline diabetes may have no symptoms at all, or you may experience 1 or more of the symptoms described below. You can prevent diabetes if you identify borderline diabetes early. What You Need To Do- Borderline Diabetes If you have any of the symptoms described below then get checked out by your health care provider. If you are in a high risk group than you also should be screen for prediabetes, even if you do not have symptoms. I was stopped at a local function recently and the person I was speaking to told me she was recently diagnosed with borderline diabetes. My acquaintance was very concerned because she read and heard about many of the complications of diabetes; and she wanted to know what this meant for her. She asked me things like “do I need to check my blood sugar all the time now,” “do I need to eat differently,” and “am I going to have to start taking medications?” While I discuss the answers to many of these particular questions in a previous post, I am always struck, in this day of the news coverage of obesity and the diabetes epidemic, how many people have not heard of borderline diabetes and its complications. What Is Borderline Diabetes? Actually, there is no medical diagnosis called “borderline diabetes.” Rather, borderline diabetes refers to a medical condition called prediabetes. This is when your blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not yet high enough to be diagnosed with type II diabetes. People with borderline diabetes or prediabetes are more likely to develop type II diabetes and may already have some of the signs or symptoms of diabetes. Many times patients with borderline diabetes (prediabetes) will not have any signs or symptoms. Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

What Is Prediabetes? Prediabetes is a “pre-diagnosis” of diabetes—you can think of it as a warning sign. It’s when your blood glucose level (blood sugar level) is higher than normal, but it’s not high enough to be considered diabetes. Prediabetes is an indication that you could develop type 2 diabetes if you don’t make some lifestyle changes. But here's the good news: . Eating healthy food, losing weight and staying at a healthy weight, and being physically active can help you bring your blood glucose level back into the normal range. Diabetes develops very gradually, so when you’re in the prediabetes stage—when your blood glucose level is higher than it should be—you may not have any symptoms at all. You may, however, notice that: you’re hungrier than normal you’re losing weight, despite eating more you’re thirstier than normal you have to go to the bathroom more frequently you’re more tired than usual All of those are typical symptoms associated with diabetes, so if you’re in the early stages of diabetes, you may notice them. Prediabetes develops when your body begins to have trouble using the hormone insulin. Insulin is necessary to transport glucose—what your body uses for energy—into the cells via the bloodstream. In pre-diabetes, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or it doesn’t use it well (that’s called insulin resistance). If you don’t have enough insulin or if you’re insulin resistant, you can build up too much glucose in your blood, leading to a higher-than-normal blood glucose level and perhaps prediabetes. Researchers aren’t sure what exactly causes the insulin process to go awry in some people. There are several risk factors, though, that make it more likely that you’ll develop pre-diabetes. These are Continue reading >>

Dealing With Diabetes Fatigue

Dealing With Diabetes Fatigue

“My days have been getting shorter,” Ron (who has Type 2 diabetes) told me. “I sleep ten hours a night and still need naps in the day. Even when I’m awake, I’m dragging. What can I do?” Ron’s doctor wasn’t much help. At his last appointment six weeks ago, Ron’s A1c was 8.1, and the doc started him on nateglinide (brand name Starlix), but his energy level hasn’t improved. At family picnics, he just watches or naps while the others play softball. “I’m starting to feel depressed, like life is passing me by” he told me. Excessive tiredness like Ron’s is often called fatigue. It’s one of the classic symptoms of diabetes and many other illnesses. But what causes it and what can you do about it? Most experts blame insulin resistance for the fatigue. If your cells are resisting glucose, they won’t have enough fuel, so they tire out. At the same time, the glucose level in your blood will be higher than normal, so blood flows less well (similar to if there were sugar in your car’s gas tank), which could also be tiring. Hypoglycemia (low blood glucose) can also cause fatigue. Blood glucose is far from the whole story, though. Inflammation makes people very tired. Part of the inflammatory response includes cytokines and white blood cells that influence the nervous system and tell us to sleep. That’s why people are so tired with the flu; our immune systems are trying to get us to rest. If you have chronic inflammation, which many people with diabetes do, that could cause fatigue. Infection is another source of fatigue. Our bodies need all the energy they can get to fight the invading germs, so less energy is available for other things. Infection also causes inflammation and can raise blood glucose levels. So someone in Ron’s situation should inv Continue reading >>

Prediabetes’ #1 Symptom

Prediabetes’ #1 Symptom

If you are wondering whether you could have prediabetes, it may seem logical to ask: “What are its symptoms?” Unfortunately, unlike many chronic conditions, the single most common symptom of prediabetes is actually no symptom at all, which is why nearly 90% of people are not aware they have it. So being on the lookout for obvious signs is actually a very unreliable way to find out if you are at risk. Prediabetes is a condition in which blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not yet high enough to be considered type 2 diabetes. But unless lifestyle changes are made, many people who are newly diagnosed with prediabetes will worsen and convert to full-blown type 2 diabetes within a few years. That’s why prediabetes should really be thought of as simply an earlier stage of type 2 diabetes. But while prediabetes might come without obvious, external symptoms, that does not make it harmless. In fact, evidence suggests that some people with prediabetes are already experiencing internal damage – the tiny vessels that supply blood to your eyes, kidneys, and nerve may already be starting to be harmed. In other words, it must be taken seriously. So what is the best way to find out if you are at risk? It takes less than a minute to take the CDC’s prediabetes screening test. If it turns out that you are at high risk, take comfort in knowing that while prediabetes might be hard to spot from the outside, it doesn’t mean it’s hard to treat. In fact, Prevent has helped the majority of our participants reduce their excess weight and other risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes. That said, if you already know you have prediabetes, you should also be on the lookout for signs of type 2 diabetes. A 2011 study surveyed people in early stages of diabetes to find out w Continue reading >>

Extreme Tiredness (fatigue)

Extreme Tiredness (fatigue)

Tweet In the medical world, extreme tiredness and exhaustion that doesn’t disappear with rest or sleep is known as fatigue and this can be a telling symptom of diabetes. Causes of fatigue There are many things that can cause you to fell fatigued. The most common and obvious is a lack of sleep. Most adults need between 6 and 8 hours of sleep a day, but this can vary quite a lot from person to person. It's also important to remember that most people require less sleep as they get older. Other common causes of fatigue include: Anaemia - a condition that occurs when you don't have enough red blood cells Cancer - most types of cancer cause fatigue to a certain degree Chronic Fatigue Syndrome - a condition that causes unexplained exhaustion and fatigue Depression - constant tiredness is a major indicator of depression or emotional stress Diabetes - sudden and extreme tiredness is one of the main symptoms of diabetes mellitus Infections - fatigue can be brought on by various infections such as the flu (influenza) Coeliac Disease - an autoimmune condition in which inflammation in the lining of the small intestine affects the body’s ability to absorb nutrients properly. Diabetes and fatigue With diabetes, fatigue is caused by a number of factors, including: High blood sugar levels, either from a lack of the insulin horomone or from insulin resistance, can affect the body’s ability to get glucose from the blood into cells to meet our energy needs People on stronger diabetes medication such as insulin, may also experience fatigue as a symptom of low blood glucose levels. Blood glucose testing can help to determine whether high or low sugar levels may be the cause of fatigue. Recognising fatigue Symptoms of fatigue include: A lack of, or no energy Difficulty in carrying out s Continue reading >>

Tired All The Time? It Could Be Your Diabetes

Tired All The Time? It Could Be Your Diabetes

If you’re coping with diabetes and feel wiped out all the time — the kind of fatigue that isn’t helped by eating or getting a little extra sleep — your doctor might tell you that your blood sugar levels are to blame. But research suggests that the fatigue associated with diabetes could have other causes. In a study published in June 2012 in The Diabetes Educator, researchers Cynthia Fritschi, PhD, RN and Laurie Quinn, PhD, RN, found that stress, depression, body mass index (BMI), and lack of physical activity can all be significant contributors to fatigue in people with diabetes. In the study, 83 women ages 40 to 65 with type 2 diabetes completed questionnaires about their health, fatigue levels, diabetes symptoms, depression, emotional distress, physical activity, and how they were managing and coping with diabetes. Some of the women wore a continuous glucose monitor for three days to assess the changes in their glucose (blood sugar) levels. The researchers found no relationship between the women’s fatigue level and their blood sugar control. Fasting blood sugar, glucose fluctuations over the study period, and results from the A1C test, which measures average blood sugar level over the previous two to three months, did not predict how tired the women reported feeling. “It appears that other factors — such as being overweight, getting little physical activity, and having higher levels of distress — could be causing their fatigue,” Fritschi says. A statement published by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) in November 2016 in its journal Diabetes Care recommends that physical activity be prescribed to all people living with diabetes in order to manage glycemic control and overall health. In particular, the ADA urges people living with diabetes to in Continue reading >>

Is A Metabolic Disorder Is Causing Afternoon Tiredness

Is A Metabolic Disorder Is Causing Afternoon Tiredness

Anyone who is overworked or not getting enough sleep at night can feel tired towards the end of the day. Add the daily stresses of family, kids, commuting, and work and it is not surprising that some days we just feel exhausted and ready for bed long before it is time. In mild cases of an afternoon slump , a good nights' sleep and eating healthier foods can usually resolve the symptoms, but not all afternoon slump symptoms are so easily addressed. For a growing percentage of those who suffer from this, extreme fatigue could be a warning sign of a serious metabolic disorder. Severe symptoms include a profound and intense desire to sleep, muscle fatigue, sweating, the shakes, headaches, changes in vision, or any combination of these symptoms. These symptoms are not signs of "normal" sluggishness but are often signs of pre-diabetes, type 2 diabetes, or insulin resistance. As more employees have become sedentary, the number of desk workers who develop "Sitting Disease" is on the rise. Sitting disease is a disorder that puts workers at an increased risk of pre-diabetes, type 2 diabetes, and for cardiovascular problems. Experts reported that even people who sit for extended periods but regularly hit the gym are at risk. Exercise in itself, though obviously critical to our bodies overall, doesn't seem to counter the damaging effects of all this time spent seated. There are many reasons people develop a sluggish feeling in the afternoon (and for some, the "afternoon" slump occurs in mid-morning). When symptoms worsen or become severe enough that they decrease your ability to complete tasks, you may want to seek advice from a physician to rule out certain health problems. Pre-diabetes is a condition in which your body begins to suffer from changes in how it metabolizes carbohyd Continue reading >>

Prediabetes Warning: Hypoglycemia Vs Diabetes

Prediabetes Warning: Hypoglycemia Vs Diabetes

A prediabetes warning can be characterized by low blood sugar symptoms like fatigue, weakness, tiredness, and more. This phenomenon, despite how common it is, is not normal, nor is it healthy. It’s the classic sign of what is known as reactive hypoglycemia and an early symptom of the prediabetes-related condition known as insulin resistance. Refined Carbs Can Cause Wild Mood Swings If you eat a meal loaded with sugar and refined carbs, you will experience wild swings in blood sugar that make you feel tired, anxious, irritable, and hungry for more quickly absorbed sugars. When you repeat this process day in and day out, eating a diet full of empty calories, refined carbohydrates (bread, pasta, rice, potatoes), sugars, and sweetened beverages (sodas, juices, sports drinks), your cells start to become resistant or numb to insulin. You end up needing more and more insulin to keep your blood sugars down. This is insulin resistance, a pre-diabetic condition that has become an epidemic. What is Reactive Hypoglycemia? Reactive hypoglycemia is characterized by low blood sugar symptoms like fatigue, weakness, tiredness, dizziness, sweating, shakiness, palpitations, anxiety, nausea, a sensation of hunger, and difficulty with concentration which occur after eating an abundance of sugar or refined carbs. These reactive hypoglycemia symptoms occur in the early stages of insulin resistance. Take a typical breakfast these days: swigging a large sweetened coffee drink and grabbing something from the Starbucks pastry case will give you a big energy surge as your sugar and insulin levels spike. What follows, however, are inevitable sugar crash symptoms as your blood sugar plummets. With this comes the low blood sugar fatigue. Insulin Levels May Be the First Sign That Something is Wrong Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Print Overview Prediabetes means that your blood sugar level is higher than normal but not yet high enough to be type 2 diabetes. Without lifestyle changes, people with prediabetes are very likely to progress to type 2 diabetes. If you have prediabetes, the long-term damage of diabetes — especially to your heart, blood vessels and kidneys — may already be starting. There's good news, however. Progression from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes isn't inevitable. Eating healthy foods, incorporating physical activity in your daily routine and maintaining a healthy weight can help bring your blood sugar level back to normal. Prediabetes affects adults and children. The same lifestyle changes that can help prevent progression to diabetes in adults might also help bring children's blood sugar levels back to normal. Symptoms Prediabetes generally has no signs or symptoms. One possible sign that you may be at risk of type 2 diabetes is darkened skin on certain parts of the body. Affected areas can include the neck, armpits, elbows, knees and knuckles. Classic signs and symptoms that suggest you've moved from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes include: Increased thirst Frequent urination Fatigue Blurred vision When to see a doctor See your doctor if you're concerned about diabetes or if you notice any type 2 diabetes signs or symptoms. Ask your doctor about blood glucose screening if you have any risk factors for prediabetes. Causes The exact cause of prediabetes is unknown. But family history and genetics appear to play an important role. Inactivity and excess fat — especially abdominal fat — also seem to be important factors. What is clear is that people with prediabetes don't process sugar (glucose) properly anymore. As a result, sugar accumulates in the bloodstream instead o Continue reading >>

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