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Pre Diabetes And Weight Gain

Environmental Toxins Linked To Weight Gain And Prediabetes

Environmental Toxins Linked To Weight Gain And Prediabetes

**This post has been contributed by, Dr. Sarah Cimperman. Dr. Cimperman is a naturopathic doctor in private practice in New York City. She is the author of the new book, The Prediabetes Detox: A Whole-Body Program to Balance Your Blood Sugar, Increase Energy, and Reduce Sugar Cravings. For more information about prediabetes and detoxification, visit The Prediabetes Detox. For more information about Dr. Cimperman, visit Dr. Sarah Cimperman. In recent years, rates of obesity and prediabetes have skyrocketed. Prediabetes affects one in three people in the United States, and so does obesity. It’s not a surprise that these diseases have similar statistics because blood sugar imbalances are the most common cause of weight gain. People with prediabetes are usually overweight, and overweight individuals often have prediabetes, whether they know it or not. Prediabetes is a condition characterized by high levels of blood sugar and the hormone insulin, which triggers the body to store fat. Because there are often no symptoms, many people don’t even know they have prediabetes. There’s no question that poor diet and lack of exercise contribute to weight gain and prediabetes, but there’s another piece to the puzzle: the environment. Research studies have linked toxic chemicals in the environment to weight gain and prediabetes. Most of the time, we can’t see or smell or taste environmental toxins, but they’re very real and we come into contact with them every day. Chemicals in the environmental that promote weight gain and prediabetes include pesticides, bisphenol A (BPA), phthalates, and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). Pesticides have been shown to cause insulin resistance in animals and weight gain in children. Five billion pounds of pesticides are applied annually to cro Continue reading >>

Top 5 Signs You May Have Prediabetes

Top 5 Signs You May Have Prediabetes

Prediabetes is a diagnosis of risk for diabetes, which is a metabolism disorder in which the body cannot regulate insulin. This results in unhealthy levels of glucose in the blood. If a person has prediabetes, their blood glucose levels are high, but not considered high enough to merit a diabetes diagnosis. A prediabetes diagnosis should be taken seriously, as it is advanced warning of a preventable serious disease. Unless diet and lifestyle changes are made, prediabetes can develop into type 2 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association reports that some people may not show any signs of prediabetes other than a higher than normal blood glucose level. However, these five signs have been associated with a prediabetes diagnoses and may merit the advice of a physician: Urgent: Discover Your Risk for Heart Disease, Take the Test Now! 1. Increased thirst and urination: When insulin levels are not being regulated, the kidneys have to work overtime to remove glucose from the bloodstream. This causes increased urination, which then causes dehydration and excessive thirst. 2. Weight gain: A common sign of prediabetes is unexplained weight gain even when eating habits have remained the same. In addition, increased exercise may have no effect on weight loss. Insulin is the hormone that is released by the pancreas to regulate blood sugar, which is converted into energy. If the body has become insulin resistant, blood sugar cannot be used as energy and is converted to fat by the liver instead. 3. Unexplained fatigue: Fatigue that is not due to a lack of sleep, poor nutrition, excessive stress, or other illnesses may be a sign of prediabetes. According to Natural Health Advisory, "The experience of fatigue and other low blood sugar symptoms 2-4 hours after a high-carb meal may be a w Continue reading >>

Medicare To Pay $450 To Help Seniors Lose Weight, Avoid Diabetes

Medicare To Pay $450 To Help Seniors Lose Weight, Avoid Diabetes

Oscar and Teri Lara of Rancho Bernardo were diagnosed with prediabetes a few months ago, a condition 86 million Americans share. That means the retired couple live with a greater chance they’ll develop diabetes, which can lead to heart, nerve, kidney and eye disease, and an early death. Some 86 million Americans live with prediabetes, which can progress to diabetes, a costly and debilitating disease. A new program can help people lose weight, a proven way to reduce the risk of getting the disease. The Laras are lucky. Nine in 10 Americans don’t know they have prediabetes, but the Laras were caught early. They have an opportunity to alter their diets, reduce their sugar intake and lose weight, and likely postpone or prevent that trajectory. On advice from their doctors, they enrolled in a special lifestyle class, part of the Scripps Diabetes Prevention Program, much like the curriculum that will be offered to Medicare beneficiaries across the country, free of charge, starting Jan. 1. “This class changed my thinking about what I eat, how much I eat, how to stay focused, and how to maintain a healthy regimen of proper nutrients to put into my body,” Oscar Lara said. Instead of chomping down on bread and burritos, it’s broccoli, brussel sprouts and salads. $450 for a few pounds of flesh Providers who run Medicare’s year-long programs will receive up to $425 per participant if attendees take all the classes and lose 5 percent of their body weight during the year; $450 if they lose 9 percent. If attendees miss classes, drop out, or fail to lose that much — or gain it back — the programs will be paid incrementally less. In 2012, the direct medical costs for 29 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the U.S. was an estimated $176 billion, including hospital, Continue reading >>

Why Can’t I Lose Weight?

Why Can’t I Lose Weight?

Finding Your Trouble Spots You’re trying hard to lose weight. You’ve changed your eating habits, and you’ve been doing more physical activity than you used to. But a few weeks — or even a few months — have gone by, and the scale isn’t budging. “Why?!” you ask in frustration. “What am I doing wrong?!” Body weight is regulated mainly by the number of calories consumed and the number of calories burned off. But there are a number of other things that influence weight, and some of them can make it difficult to lose weight. This article explores what some of these are and how to overcome them. As you make the effort to lose weight, be sure you are aiming for a realistic body weight for you. A starting point for determining this is body-mass index (BMI), a measure of body fat based on height and weight. You can calculate your BMI easily with an online tool such as the one at www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/assessing/bmi. (Note that there’s a separate BMI calculator for children and teens.) Generally, a BMI between 18.5 and 24.9 is considered normal, between 25 and 29.9 is considered overweight, and 30 and higher is considered obese. However, BMI tends to overestimate body fat in athletes and other muscular people and to underestimate it in older people who have lost muscle mass. There is also some evidence that the negative health effects of overweight start at a lower BMI for Asian people. Keep in mind, too, that people come in different shapes and sizes. You don’t necessarily have to be “thin” to be healthy, but losing some excess fat can improve your health in a number of ways. Talk to your health-care team about your weight-loss goals and about what a healthy weight is for you. Frequent hypoglycemia Frequent episodes of hypoglycemia, or low blood glu Continue reading >>

Pre-diabetes

Pre-diabetes

What Is It? In pre-diabetes, blood sugar levels are slightly higher than normal, but still not as high as in diabetes. If diabetes is "runaway blood sugar" think of pre-diabetes as blood sugar that is "halfway out the door." People almost always develop pre-diabetes before they get type 2 diabetes. The rise in blood sugar levels that is seen in pre-diabetes starts when the body begins to develop a problem called "insulin resistance." Insulin is an important hormone that helps you to process glucose (blood sugar). If usual amounts of insulin can't trigger the body to move glucose out of the bloodstream and into your cells, then you have insulin resistance. Once insulin resistance begins, it can worsen over time. When you have pre-diabetes, you make extra insulin to keep your sugar levels near to normal. Insulin resistance can worsen as you age, and it worsens with weight gain. If your insulin resistance progresses, eventually you can't compensate well enough by making extra insulin. When this occurs, your sugar levels will increase, and you will have diabetes. Depending on what a blood sugar test finds, pre-diabetes can be more specifically called "impaired glucose (sugar) tolerance" or "impaired fasting glucose." Impaired fasting glucose means that blood sugar increase after you haven't eaten for a while – for example, in the morning, before breakfast. Impaired glucose tolerance means that blood sugar levels reach a surprisingly high level after you eat sugar. To diagnose impaired glucose tolerance, doctors usually use what is called a "glucose tolerance test." For this test you drink a sugary solution, and then you have blood drawn after a short time. Having pre-diabetes does not automatically mean you will get diabetes, but it does put you at an increased risk. Pre- Continue reading >>

Pre Diabetes Symptoms

Pre Diabetes Symptoms

Here's a fact: Most people diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes had pre diabetes symptoms that if known, could have alerted them to make diet and lifestyle changes before their diagnosis. Most physicians only pay attention to fasting blood sugar when watching for diabetes. For instance, if a patient's blood sugar is between 110-125, mg/dL, it indicates prediabetes. But blood sugar results can test in normal ranges even as diabetes is developing. If people with a type 2 diabetes diagnosis knew ALL of the pre diabetic symptoms for which to watch, it could help them avoid being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is defined medically as the state in which fasting blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be classified as type 2 diabetes. Blood sugars in the prediabetic range (between 100 - 126 mg/dl) indicate insulin resistance is developing, and a metabolic syndrome diagnosis is more likely in the future. Insulin resistance (IR) is a condition in which chronically elevated blood sugar and insulin levels have resulted in an inability of body cells to respond to them normally. IR is the driving factor as insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, prediabetes and diabetes are all linked together on a continuum. Pre Diabetes Symptoms: It's Not Just About Blood Sugar Medical information about pre diabetes comes from medical associations such as the American Diabetes Association. The ADA guidelines say that prediabetes is a function of a fasting blood sugar is between 100-125 mg/dl. However, I am convinced that signs of prediabetes can be spotted even when blood tests indicated blood sugars below 100 mg/dl. I saw this in my own life. Eight years ago, I had many of the pre diabetic symptoms listed below, but my fasting blood sugar was still classified as "n Continue reading >>

Hasimoto’s Hypothyroidism, Pre-diabetes, Weight Gain

Hasimoto’s Hypothyroidism, Pre-diabetes, Weight Gain

As a health care professional, I tried effortlessly to find someone that would address my health concerns. Nothing that Western medicine offered was effective. I knew that a pill was not the answer. After many years and thousands of dollars not covered by my insurance I stumbled upon a book “Why Do I Still Have Thyroid Symptoms? When My Lab Tests Are Normal” in 2010 by Dr. Datis Kharrazian. My passion is wellness research and I thought I could figure out my body and what it needed, evidenced by multiple supplements, multiple consults, and countless hours spent researching remedies, modalities, which might offer an answer to my health issues. I felt like I was loosing my mind and becoming a hypochondriac. I had reached the end of my rope with my weight at an all-time high of 185 lbs on my 4’10 frame along with the list of symptoms that accompany adrenal exhaustion, pre-diabetes, hypertension, high blood lipids, shortness of breath, and too tired to exercise. I felt like a balloon ready to pop. After reading The Thyroid Book, I asked my family doctor about the possibility of autoimmune problems but she did not know how to address the issue. She recommended I see a dietician to learn how to eat properly. I became enraged and never went back to her. I had to find someone that understood my dilemma so I emailed Dr. Datis Kharrazian asking for someone in my area that was knowledgeable with Hashimoto’s, an autoimmune thyroid disease. He sent me a list of possible practitioners. Dr. Mark Flannery agreed to manage my care by phone consult and email from California. (I live in Ohio) How do you thank someone who literally saved my life? His knowledge of intricate physiology is outstanding along with how to bring the body back into balance. At first, I was very skeptical an Continue reading >>

Impact Of Weight Gain On The Evolution And Regression Of Prediabetes: A Quantitative Analysis

Impact Of Weight Gain On The Evolution And Regression Of Prediabetes: A Quantitative Analysis

The quantitative impact of weight gain on prediabetic glucose dysregulation remains unknown; only one study quantitated the impact of weight loss. We quantified the impact of weight gain on the evolution and regression of prediabetes (PDM). In 4234 subjects without diabetes, using logistic regression analysis with a 4.8-year follow-up period, we analyzed the relationship between (1) δBMI (BMIfollow-up−basal) and the progression from normal glucose regulation (NGR) to PDM or diabetes, and (2) δBMI and the regression from PDM to NGR. Mean (±s.d.) δBMI was 0.17 (±1.3) kg/m2 in subjects with NGR and δBMI was positively and independently related to progression (adjusted odds ratio (ORadj) (95% CI), 1.24 (1.15–1.34), P<0.01). Mean (±s.d.) δBMI was −0.03 (±1.25) kg/m2 in those with PDM and δBMI was negatively related to the regression (ORadj, 0.72 (0.65–0.80), P<0.01). The relation of δBMI to the progression was significant in men (ORadj, 1.42 (1.28–1.59), P<0.01) but not in women (ORadj, 1.05 (0.94–1.19), P=0.36). Also, the negative impact of δBMI on the regression was significant only in men (men, ORadj, 0.65 (0.57–0.75), P<0.01; women, ORadj, 0.94 (0.77–1.14), P=0.51). In Japanese adults, an increase in the BMI by even 1 kg/m2 was related to 24% increase in the risk of development of PDM or diabetes in NGR subjects and was related to 28% reduction in the regression from PDM to NGR. In women, we did not note any significant impact of weight gain on the evolution or regression of PDM. Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance: The Real Reason Why You Aren’t Losing Weight

Insulin Resistance: The Real Reason Why You Aren’t Losing Weight

Many people have weight loss as one of their key resolutions. Sadly, 35 percent of people also give up on that goal before the month even ends. It’s not necessarily lack of time or willpower that causes you to struggle with weight loss year after year. The real reason that you may have struggled to lose weight is insulin resistance, or a condition I call metabolism dysfunction. So you may be thinking, “Why is it so hard for me to lose weight?” I’m doing “everything right,” and yet still weight loss is difficult. Perhaps (like many of my patients) you’re already following a strict diet and working out several times a week, but to no avail. The weight still won’t come off — or, worse, you are gaining weight for seemingly no reason at all! You have become resigned to being overweight. Weight problems aren’t a permanent and immovable fixture for the rest of your life. If you’re finding that weight is easy to gain and hard to lose, it’s not your fault! Weight problems aren’t just about overeating or under exercising — they’re about metabolic changes (The MD Factor Diet, 2015) that are collectively known as insulin resistance. Lab tests conducted in my practice have confirmed that over 89 percent of my patients have this real and often undiagnosed issue. So the good news is that the right combination of diet, exercise, and will to succeed you can reverse your MD factor and finally find success in losing weight and keeping it off for good. In a nutshell, insulin resistance is the inability of your body to properly convert the food that you eat into energy to fuel your cells. People with the MD Factor have difficulty regulating their blood sugar, which is often due to insulin resistance or even diabetes. In both instances, their bodies are unable t Continue reading >>

The Causes Of Insulin Resistance In Type 1 Diabetes, Type 2 Diabetes And Prediabetes (video)

The Causes Of Insulin Resistance In Type 1 Diabetes, Type 2 Diabetes And Prediabetes (video)

Most people believe that people with type 1 diabetes are not insulin resistant simply because they are not overweight. This could not be farther from the truth. While insulin resistance affects many overweight individuals, many people with type 1 diabetes remain skinny their entire lives despite a large degree of insulin resistance (1–3). Over the past decade, I have helped many people with type 1 diabetes measure, track and reverse insulin resistance. In practice, 100% of all my clients with type 1 diabetes suffer from insulin resistance despite the assumption that they were insulin sensitive. By measuring their baseline insulin resistance, we were able to identify an impaired ability to utilize glucose as a fuel, and through dedicated diet modification and frequent exercise, some of my clients have reduced their insulin usage by as much as 60%. If you have type 1 diabetes, do not be fooled into thinking that you are insulin sensitive simply because you are skinny. Insulin resistance is a hidden condition, and affects both normal weight and overweight individuals (1–3). What Causes Insulin Resistance? Insulin resistance underlies all forms of diabetes, and is a condition which primarily affects your muscles, liver and adipose tissue. Many people think that diabetes is caused by an excess intake of sugar and candy starting from a young age. While eating artificial sweeteners and drinking soda can certainly increase your risk for the development of insulin resistance and diabetes, in most cases diabetes is caused by excessive FAT intake. The most important thing you can do as a person with diabetes is understand the following: Diabetes is caused by a fat metabolism disorder, which results in a glucose metabolism disorder. At the heart of all forms of diabetes is insu Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar, Weight Gain And (pre-)diabetes

Blood Sugar, Weight Gain And (pre-)diabetes

Do you know how your body regulates fat storage and weight? Did your doctor ever tell you how your body works so you could understand how you gain weight and/or why you have some health issues like diabetes? Yet, how could we possibly know what’s good or bad for us if we don’t know in the first place how our bodies work? I have talked in previous emails this summer about coffee, portion control, menstrual hormones, underactive thyroid, busy woman syndrome, the nervous system, and emotional eating. All these can create situations where we gain weight. But there is also a very important hormone that plays a role in how we store or burn fat, and how we gain and lose weight. This hormone is Insulin. Here’s how it works. Most adults have about 1 gallon (5 liters) of blood in their bodies, and in that gallon, there is only 1 teaspoon of sugar! Our body only needs 1 single teaspoon of sugar (at most) at all times. If our blood sugar level were to rise to 3 teaspoons of sugar, we would quickly go into a hyperglycemic coma and die. So, our body works very hard to prevent this from happening by producing the hormone insulin. Insulin keeps your blood sugar at the appropriate level. Any meal, snack or drink high in grain and sugar carbohydrates typically generates a rapid rise in blood glucose. In order to compensate for this the pancreas secretes insulin into the bloodstream, which lowers our blood sugar to keep us from dying. What happens when you eat foods that contain sugar? Here is the sugar content of some very common sugary foods and drinks: If you eat 1 medium muffin with 1 cup commercial orange juice, your body has to get rid of the equivalent of 10 teaspoons of sugar in your blood! Insulin is released and does a good job of getting all this sugar out of your bloodst Continue reading >>

Understanding Prediabetes And Excess Weight

Understanding Prediabetes And Excess Weight

Brochure To view a PDF version of this brochure, click here. To view a digital version of this brochure, click here. This brochure is designed to help individuals affected by excess weight understand the high risk of developing prediabetes. Many people are not aware they have prediabetes until symptoms of type 2 diabetes begin to show. Through this educational brochure, we hope to provide a better understanding of prediabetes and how it relates to excess weight by addressing the following: Evaluating excess weight Defining prediabetes Risk factors for prediabetes Testing for prediabetes Reducing risk of developing type 2 diabetes How does excess weight affect a person’s health? Excess weight, obesity or severe obesity can affect a person’s health in many ways. Obesity is a disease in which excess body fat has accumulated to the extent that it may have an adverse effect on a person’s health. Obesity also increases a person’s risk of developing hypertension, type 2 diabetes, certain types of cancer, osteoarthritis, stroke and dyslipidemia. Setting realistic goals about nutrition, physical activity and weight-loss to support lifestyle changes can delay or prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes. Since excess weight can affect a person’s health in many ways, it is therefore important to be able to evaluate how much excess weight a person has. There are many methods of measurement that can be used; however, the most often used method is calculating the body mass index (BMI). BMI is a number calculated by dividing a person’s weight in kilograms by his or her height in meters squared. There are four weight status categories (underweight, normal weight, overweight and obesity). To calculate your BMI and determine your weight status category, click here. What is prediab Continue reading >>

My Diabetes Is Controlled — But Why Am I Gaining Weight?

My Diabetes Is Controlled — But Why Am I Gaining Weight?

Exercise, eat right, and stay at a healthy weight. These goals are at the core of every type 2 diabetes treatment plan. And, for some people, that’s enough. When it’s not, insulin therapy is one treatment option that can help patients, but one possible side effect is weight gain. This can become a cycle for patients who need to control both diabetes and their weight. It’s frustrating when you feel the treatment is part of the problem. With diabetes, however, you have to get the blood sugar under control first. Insulin is used because it works. The cost of insulin can vary, but lower-cost insulin is associated with more weight gain. RELATED: Take Control of Your Diabetes How to break the cycle In a way, weight gain is a sign that the insulin is working — your body is more effectively utilizing sugar, fat and protein. Your body also has the ability to store them, which means if you don’t adjust your food intake, more of those calories turn to fat. Also, insulin is not necessarily the only factor. When you’re managing your diabetes, your body has a better chance to rehydrate, which also can cause weight gain. Of course, dehydration is a greater risk if you have diabetes, with frequent urination and thirst as two common signs of the condition. Drugs you take for other conditions also sometimes cause weight gain. So, what are your options if weight gain and insulin are an issue? Try these three tips: 1. Up the ante on diet and exercise The simplest answer is to adjust your diet and exercise. Talk to your doctor and to a nutrition specialist about a food plan that takes the insulin effects into account. Work a bit more activity or exercise into each day. Don’t self-adjust the dosage or timing of your insulin in order to accommodate eating more calories. You can Continue reading >>

Impact Of Weight Gain On The Evolution And Regression Of Prediabetes: A Quantitative Analysis.

Impact Of Weight Gain On The Evolution And Regression Of Prediabetes: A Quantitative Analysis.

Abstract BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: The quantitative impact of weight gain on prediabetic glucose dysregulation remains unknown; only one study quantitated the impact of weight loss. We quantified the impact of weight gain on the evolution and regression of prediabetes (PDM). SUBJECTS/METHODS: In 4234 subjects without diabetes, using logistic regression analysis with a 4.8-year follow-up period, we analyzed the relationship between (1) δBMI (BMIfollow-up-basal) and the progression from normal glucose regulation (NGR) to PDM or diabetes, and (2) δBMI and the regression from PDM to NGR. RESULTS: Mean (±s.d.) δBMI was 0.17 (±1.3) kg/m2 in subjects with NGR and δBMI was positively and independently related to progression (adjusted odds ratio (ORadj) (95% CI), 1.24 (1.15-1.34), P<0.01). Mean (±s.d.) δBMI was -0.03 (±1.25) kg/m2 in those with PDM and δBMI was negatively related to the regression (ORadj, 0.72 (0.65-0.80), P<0.01). The relation of δBMI to the progression was significant in men (ORadj, 1.42 (1.28-1.59), P<0.01) but not in women (ORadj, 1.05 (0.94-1.19), P=0.36). Also, the negative impact of δBMI on the regression was significant only in men (men, ORadj, 0.65 (0.57-0.75), P<0.01; women, ORadj, 0.94 (0.77-1.14), P=0.51). CONCLUSIONS: In Japanese adults, an increase in the BMI by even 1 kg/m2 was related to 24% increase in the risk of development of PDM or diabetes in NGR subjects and was related to 28% reduction in the regression from PDM to NGR. In women, we did not note any significant impact of weight gain on the evolution or regression of PDM. Continue reading >>

Gaining Weight On Medication

Gaining Weight On Medication

Tweet A number of widely prescribed diabetes medications have been linked with increased weight gain. It can be hugely frustrating when medicines which we take to improve our blood glucose levels and diabetes control make it harder for us to manage our weight. However, it's important to remember that even if your diabetes medication is contributing to increases in weight, it’s not an inescapable trap and there are actions you can take, with your doctor’s help, to combat and reverse weight gain. Insulin Insulin allows glucose to move from out of the bloodstream and into the cells of the body, thereby helping to lower levels of blood glucose. However, insulin is also known as a fat storage hormone. Excess glucose in the blood, if not being used as energy by the muscles, is stored as fat and insulin is the hormone that allows this to happen. A problem that can happen for many people who take insulin is that the benchmark of how much needs to be eaten is set by the insulin dose. So, invariably, taking insulin is going to require you, at some point, to eat more than you would otherwise to prevent blood glucose levels going too low. The key to minimising this problem is to ensure you are not taking too much insulin. There is a balance to strike, of course, as taking too little insulin for what you’ eat will result in too high blood sugar levels. If you are putting on weight on insulin, it will help to speak to your doctor about gradually reducing both your insulin and your dietary intake, particularly with regard to carbohydrate. Hypos, hunger and weight gain Insulin has additional problems for weight management. If insulin causes blood glucose levels to go too low (hypoglycemia), it can leave with you a strong feeling of hunger. The best response to strong hunger or in Continue reading >>

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