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Pre Diabetes And Bodybuilding

Recommended Weight Lifting Supplements For Diabetics

Recommended Weight Lifting Supplements For Diabetics

Diabetes is a medical condition in which you experience abnormally high blood glucose levels because your body has trouble producing or using insulin. The American Diabetes Association explains that you should limit saturated fat intake and keep sugar intake low, as that can rapidly increase your blood sugar levels. Because many weight lifting supplements contain both of these nutrients, you need to choose supplements carefully and consult a doctor before using any. Many protein bars are high in saturated fat and sugar to overcome the taste of healthy ingredients. However, there are some low-fat, low-sugar protein bars available that may not significantly impact your blood glucose levels. Protein bars such as Doctor's CarbRite Diet bars and Allmax Isofemme bars, which have 6 g or less of fat and 1 g or less of sugar per bar, may support weight lifting because they are high in protein. Both bars use sugar alcohols, which provide fewer calories than sugar and don't cause quick increases in your blood sugar levels. Weight gainers are high-calorie, high-protein supplements that come in powdered form. Unfortunately, many of these weight gainers use sugar and fat to increase the calorie content. Try to find weight gainers that provide fiber and have low sugar and low fat content, such as Cytosport Cytogainer. This supplement contains only 7 g of sugar, 6 g of fat and 4 g of fiber in each 570-calorie serving. Protein powders tend to contain between 100 and 200 calories per serving, and offer primarily protein and much fewer grams of fat and carbohydrates than weight gainers. However, these powder still may contain added sugars and saturated fat. For this reason, you may want to choose a whey protein isolate, a type of protein powder with very little fat and at least 90 percent Continue reading >>

Bodybuilding And Diabetes: Are You Making The Connection?

Bodybuilding And Diabetes: Are You Making The Connection?

Bodybuilding And Diabetes: Are You Making The Connection? Not only will bodybuilding help to prevent the onset of adult diabetes, which is one of the most prevalent diseases today, but it will also really play an important role. Here is why bodybuilding is a must... When weight lifting the muscle tissues are primed to suck up excess glucose in the blood. IIntense exercise cannot be performed unless carbohydrates are taken in at some point. You may need to monitor how many carbohydrates you eat pre- or post-workout. You read information about bodybuilding, and then you read information about diabetes . But very rarely do you read information about the two together. One thing many people miss is the connection between bodybuilding and diabetes. While if you have diabetes, getting involved in bodybuilding is not automatically going to cure you - but the benefits of a regular strength training program as far as diabetes is concerned are tremendous. Not only will bodybuilding help to prevent the onset of adult diabetes, which is one of the most prevalent diseases today, but it will also really play an important role in controlling it in those who are already affected. Here is why bodybuilding is a must if this disease is something you are concerned with. Bodybuilding Will Help To Prevent The Onset Of Adult Diabetes, Which Is One Of The Most Prevalent Diseases Today. One of the first reasons why weightlifting is helpful when trying to manage diabetes is because of the fact it helps to decrease the total body weight through the reduction of body fat tissue. Unlike cardio training which has a higher tendency to reduce both fat and muscle mass, weight training really helps with the promotion of lean body mass while dieting, thus helps prevent this muscle mass loss. Since having Continue reading >>

Fight Diabetes Using Bodybuilding

Fight Diabetes Using Bodybuilding

Many people with the terrible illness of diabetes do not realize how much they can benefit from following a bodybuilding lifestyle. In this article, I'll point out what the top benefits are for following a healthy bodybuilding lifestyle if you suffer from diabetes. What is Diabetes? Diabetes comes in two forms: Type 1 Diabetes: With this type, people need to take insulin injections so this is often called "insulin dependent diabetes". Insulin is the hormone responsible for delivering the nutrients (carbs, proteins, and fats) into the muscle cells and is essential for energy production from the glucose (carbs) that come from food. The pancreas is the organ responsible for this hormone's production. Unfortunately, Type 1 diabetes cannot be prevented as it is a result of an autoimmune reaction that causes the cells in the pancreas to stop working. Typically, this happens on the early ages between 8-12 (though cases have been reported where it happens much later). Type 2 Diabetes: This type requires no need for insulin shots as it is caused by the cells' reduced capability to let insulin in and do its job. This condition is called insulin insensitivity or low insulin sensitivity. When the cells reject the hormone insulin, then not only does the person get lousy energy production but also starts to get fat due to the fact that since the nutrients cannot be delivered to the appropriate tissues, then they just get stored. In addition, once the body notices that the cells are not having adequate insulin uptake, then it starts to increase its insulin production in an attempt to compensate. This only worsens the problem as cells become even more resistant and body fat continues to increase from anything that the person eats. Fight Diabetes Using Bodybuilding A healthy bodybuildin Continue reading >>

The Ultimate Muscle Building Diet Plan For Men With Diabetes | Calories, Macros, Nutrient Timing, And Supplements

The Ultimate Muscle Building Diet Plan For Men With Diabetes | Calories, Macros, Nutrient Timing, And Supplements

Everyone who goes to the gym with the goal of getting stronger and leaner is technically bodybuilding whether you like it or not. Competitive bodybuilding is fat loss taken that little bit further. The best diabetes bodybuilding diet plan is the one you can stick to the longest. Bodybuilding involves set periods of eating a calorie surplus and deficit. Bodybuilding is more challenging for people with diabetes. There are many important nutrition considerations. 99% of people looking to lose weight or gain muscle mass prioritse the wrong things when it comes to diet. If you don’t assess your diet you won’t reach your true potential. You need fewer supplements than you think. Both whey and creatine are valid options for people with diabetes. What you’re in for? 3,500 Words Reading Time ~ 20 minutes If you live with diabetes and love bodybuilding, this article is for you. I’m all for building muscle and shredding fat as fast as possible. However, to achieve this, your diet MUST be set up correctly. There is a fine line between… Eating too much Vs. Eating too little. Taking too much insulin Vs. Taking too little. Training too much Vs. Training too little. Overlook one detail and you run the risk of burning out, losing muscle, gaining body fat and looking the same (or worse) from year to year Sound familiar? Bodybuilding with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, is more challenging than you think. That’s why so many people living with diabetes fail to look and perform their best in the gym. It’s taken me ten years of academic learning, 1000s of blood glucose tests, 1000s of hours in the gym and over 700 clients later to develop, The Ultimate Bodybuilding Cutting and Mass Building Diet Plan for people living with diabetes. BEFORE WE BEGIN: WHAT IS BODYBUILDING? When you h Continue reading >>

5 Signs You Might Have Prediabetes

5 Signs You Might Have Prediabetes

You checked for diabetes and you are came out clean. Celebrate. But what if you have prediabetes? Yes, prediabetes is a diagnosis made when your blood glucose is higher than it should be, but not high enough to be called diabetes. A huge number of people in India as well as across the globe are known to be the victims of prediabetes, but the problem is that most of us dont get to know it. Prediabetes often has no symptoms at all. Yet, there are a few signs that could help you figure out whether you are a prey to the disease or not. Read on! Being In A High-Risk Group For Type 2 Diabetes If you have a family history of diabetes or if you have a sedentary lifestyle (which most of us have), then youre at a higher risk for prediabetes. Other factors include being older than 45 or belonging to Asian, African or Hispanic background. Obesity is a huge trigger for prediabetes. If your body mass index (BMI) is over 25, it can definitely point to high blood sugar. High blood pressure, high cholesterol, heart disease or polycystic ovarian syndromes are also caused due to obesity or being overweight. This is the scary part of prediabetesthe vast majority of people with prediabetes will have no symptoms whatsoever. But people with elevated blood sugar levels will surely notice an unexplained fatigue, increased thirst or a more frequent need to pee. A common symptom for people with prediabetes is a skin disorder called acanthosis nigricans. In areas of your body where the skin creases or folds, strange, dark and thick patches can be seen. Acanthosis nigricans often appears on the neck, inside the elbows, behind the knees and on the knuckles. Are you a self-proclaimed insomniac? Chances are, you might be prediabetic too! Studies show that people who sleep for less than six hours a ni Continue reading >>

Meal Plan For A Diabetic Bodybuilder

Meal Plan For A Diabetic Bodybuilder

Diabetes, or as it's fully called Diabetes Mellitus, is in fact two completely different diseases type 1 and type 2. From a nutritional point of view each should be treated differently, and meal plans for each can be viewed though the relevant links here where you can also read more about the conditions. The plan below is aimed at a type 1 diabetic, i.e. who replies on injections of insulin to control their blood sugar levels, and who is looking to increase their muscle size and strength. The individual will more likely be on an insulin regimen which allows for some flexibility by having one injection of long acting insulin per day and an appropriate dose of super-fast acting insulin prior to a meal. Regular meals and snacks are encouraged, especially in respect of slow-released low glycaemic carbohydrate foods as the basis of each meal and snack. If you do not control your own insulin regimen, then speak to your doctor or diabetes specialist nurse. See our Glycaemic Index Tables for GI values of foods. Many diabetics feel they cannot make notable muscle and strength gains due to their condition, but there is no reason at all why a diabetic cannot make just as good gains as a non diabetic. There is nothing revolutionary and special about a diet for type 1 diabetics; it's simply based on the healthy eating guidelines which everyone should be following, so simply incorporate concepts applicable to muscle growth, and the results will be fruitful. So called 'diabetic products' such as special chocolates, cakes, biscuits, etc are not recommended. Eating a range of low fat, low sugar, high fibre 'ordinary' foods is far better. Many of these 'diabetic products' are no lower in fat or calories and are normally more expensive. Some contain the sweetener sorbitol which can cause Continue reading >>

Bodybuilding With Diabetes

Bodybuilding With Diabetes

Bodybuilding with Diabetes – An Overview We’re often told how exercising and lifting weights is beneficial for our health. After all, as great as getting bigger guns, being lean and ripped, and lifting heavy iron is, we need to look at the overall picture too – health and happiness. What good is a six-pack if you don’t live long enough to enjoy it? While being fit, strong and active generally does greatly reduce your chances of picking up illnesses and disease, one that might not be avoidable is diabetes. There are two types of diabetes – type I and type II. Type II (2) diabetes is usually avoidable, as it’s related to a host of lifestyle factors, such as being overweight, having a poor diet, and being inactive. If you’re type II, it means that there’s an issue with the insulin receptors in your body. Because of years of working in overdrive, they can’t deal with blood glucose properly, and so blood sugar levels stay high and your body continues to release insulin, when in theory, it shouldn’t need to. If you’re in the “pre-diabetic” stage it means that you’re at a much higher risk of developing full-blown type II diabetes, and this should be a wake up call that you need to change your ways. Fingers crossed you catch this soon enough. Type I diabetes is a little different though. This is an autoimmune disease that can’t be prevented. Your pancreas can’t produce insulin (so can’t deal with carbs) and therefore type I diabetics need to inject insulin to prevent blood sugar levels skyrocketing. In today’s article, we’ll address both types of diabetes, and talk through some nutritional strategies to help you make gains, even if you are diabetic. Get Moving Before we even touch on advanced and specialised nutrition tactics, it’s crucia Continue reading >>

Pre Diabetic - Vegan Bodybuilding & Fitness

Pre Diabetic - Vegan Bodybuilding & Fitness

#1 Post by kjs Wed Apr 11, 2007 6:42 pm Just wondering if anyone has been in a similar situation with a less than stellar glucose level reading and how they handled it or any recommendations. I tested my glucose level a few times in the past weeks and it is around 105 which is mapped as pre-diabetic. Currently 165, 6'0', with a fair amount of flab and not much muscle mass. Beginning of 2006 I was 190. (I ate extremely poorly until the past 6 months. Been vegan only the last 9 months, vegetarian before that) Until the readings, I had been trying to add muscle and gaining weight. I thought I would try to gain some muscle and then try to trim down, repeating the cycle every 3 months. But I am rethinking things and will probably try to lose more weight until I can get rid of more excess fat. From what I understand, having extra fat is a big factor in raising glucose levels. Hopefully this will help improve my numbers and then I can try to start add muscle later. Luckily being vegan is the biggest step in the plan. I eat 5 fruits a day, 4 servings of vegetables a day, and 3-4 oz of nuts a day. I've also been eating about 6 pieces of whole wheat bread daily as well. I don't know if that has been a factor in the levels even though it is "whole wheat flour" in the ingredients and each slice has 5g of fiber. I have been reading Eat to Live, but it is hard for me to eat that many vegetables. I am waiting for Dr Neal Barnard's, Reversing Diabetes as I think I can relate better with his guidelines. #4 Post by veganmomma Wed Apr 11, 2007 9:03 pm Is that 105 a fasting reading? I was diagnosis with diabetes II in January 2005. My blood work read 156 fasting, my A1C was 8.5%. 6 months later my A1C was 5.4%, 3 months later 5.1%. My last A1C results were 5.1% in June of 2006. My weight Continue reading >>

Is It Ok To Purposely Gain Weight If I'm Pre-diabetic?

Is It Ok To Purposely Gain Weight If I'm Pre-diabetic?

Is it ok to purposely gain weight if I'm pre-diabetic? Is it ok to purposely gain weight if I'm pre-diabetic? I'm trying to bulk up with intense strength training to put on some size and muscle I'm currently 5'6" 135lbs but trying to add about 10lbs. My daily and a1c levels are elevated and I also have family history of diabetes. D.D. Family diabetic since 1997, on insulin 2000 My last lab work fasting 2 months ago was 107mg/DL Glucose, 5.8% HA1c, and 109 mg/DL LDL Cholesterol. D.D. Family diabetic since 1997, on insulin 2000 That is not too bad. Gaining weight may make sugar control a bit worst on the short run but the added muscle mass would be an asset on the long run so go for it. That is not too bad. Gaining weight may make sugar control a bit worst on the short run but the added muscle mass would be an asset on the long run so go for it. Thanks. Would it be possible for someone to go from pre-diabetic to normal with exercise and diet? D.D. Family diabetic since 1997, on insulin 2000 Thanks. Would it be possible for someone to go from pre-diabetic to normal with exercise and diet? That is a $10,000,000 question. My wife last 3 yearly A1c were 6.0%,6.0% and 6.0% on a low carb diet. If she ate sad I am quite sure the BG would skyrockey. she has little muscle mass and at 65 years is loosing more and more of it. so normality for her is not in the cards. But someone younger with large muscle mass to buffer sugar god only knows, so possibly if you liver is well behave If you are currently sedentary and add exercise it may increase insulin sensitivity,which is good. I did exercise a ton before diabetes and I still progressed to a full blown Diabetic. If you need to gain weight, add some protein after each muscle workout. 115 pounds, Breast Cancer dx'd 6/16, 6 months of c Continue reading >>

Why You Should Lift Weights To Stop Prediabetes

Why You Should Lift Weights To Stop Prediabetes

Are you prediabetic or do you know someone with prediabetes or excess “stomach fat?” You should know that not only aerobic exercise, what many people call “cardio,” but also some good old-fashioned weightlifting is like medicine for stopping prediabetes and warding off full-blown type 2 diabetes and its nasty side effects. First off, before using exercise as medicine, you should get a medical clearance from your doctor, and start slowly. Slow and steady wins the race; quick and fast just won’t last. As a foot and ankle specialist, I see patients with diabetes and pre-diabetes every day. Many of my patients know that walking is helpful for diabetes as well as cardiovascular health, weight control, and blood sugar levels, however most people only think about weightlifting as a way of “having big muscles.” I hope YOU do not think this way. If you do, you need to STOP it, if you want to achieve a metabolism that will stop prediabetes. Just like drugs taken for diabetes, medical research has shown that exercise in general has many benefits for pre-diabetics and diabetics alike including: • Lower glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels. Hemoglobin is what carries oxygen through your bloodstream. An HbA1c level is a measurement that reflects how much of your hemoglobin has glucose sugar attached to it. This is one of the tests that can give you an early warning that you may have pre-diabetes. If your HbA1c is 5.7% or greater, you need to be concerned about your blood sugar level and pre-diabetes. People with elevated blood sugar levels get more sugar stuck on their hemoglobin. Having sugar stuck to your hemoglobin, and other proteins in your body, is not a good thing. It literally “gums up” your system. • Improved insulin sensitivity. One of the main probl Continue reading >>

Pre-diabetic - Help !

Pre-diabetic - Help !

I'm hoping there is some wisdom here in the 035 folks who may have dealt with or are dealing with being pre-diabetic. My Dr. told me my blood sugar reading was 108 today. He said normal is 100 or less, so we should keep an eye on my reading in the future. That was about it. Doing a little research on my own today, I read that anything over 100 is considered pre-diabetic. Unfortunately, he didn't even mention that to me. I am otherwise quite healthy - good weight, relatively low bodyfat (15-17% range I believe), I lift weights 3x a week for an hour at least. There seems to be so much conflicting information out there about what to do to reduce my blood sugar reading/score. Common advice is 'lose some weight' and "exercise', and "eat less". Well, I'm not fat, I exercise 3x a week, and am trying to GAIN weight in muscle mass. Information about Glycemic Index ratings for foods also seems to be dubious...some sources say it's key to eat low G.I. foods, some sources say G.I. of a food source isn't the same as the Insulin Response to said food source. It's all terribly confusing. Short of laying out bucks to find a great nutritionist (and again, everyone out there seems to have different opinions), what is are some starter/first step approaches I should take to lower my blood sugar rating? Is there anyone who has/had a similar problem, and has some suggestions on what has definitively worked for them to lower their score? I've always been very healthy and had good test results across the board from the Dr., so this blip on the radar has me a bit freaked out I must admit. Is this just the guy who says "sugar is poison" ? I'm hoping there is some wisdom here in the 035 folks who may have dealt with or are dealing with being pre-diabetic. My Dr. told me my blood sugar reading wa Continue reading >>

Bodybuilding With Diabetes

Bodybuilding With Diabetes

When I tell people I'm diabetic, they look at me like I'm joking. They find it hard to believe that here is this muscled up guy, with relatively low body fat, who is a diabetic. Often times when we think of a diabetic we think of someone who has made poor food choices their whole life, is overweight, and often lazy. Well things aren't always as they appear. I was diagnosed with diabetes over a year ago, and was borderline diabetic the year prior. I have asked myself over and over again what could have caused this. Was it steroid use over the years? Was it massive food consumption and carbs? Was it just in my cards since I have a family history of auto immune disorders (my mother has chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia)? The thing is I'll never know. My best guess is a perfect storm of limited sleep, excessive dieting which caused my liver to dump glucose into my body instead of food, and elevated cortisol levels for far too long. You see, I never really stopped dieting after this show I competed in back in 2009. I stayed very lean year round, and ate like I was contest prepping all the time. But that's neither here nor there, it is what it is now. Just before I was diagnosed with diabetes I noticed how thirsty I was all the time. It was worse at night, I just could not drink enough water to satisfy myself. I could literally drink 5-6 20 ounce bottles of water within an hour, and still felt thirsty. I also noticed how tired I was. I would wake up, go to the gym, and an hour later I felt like going back to sleep again. Then when it really was time to go to sleep at night, I could not fall asleep for shit!! I tossed and turned, woke up every couple hours, and day in and day out this was how it was for a couple months. I also noticed how irritable I was after eating a Continue reading >>

Prediabetes | The Final Frontier In Bodybuilding , Fat Loss, Health & Fitness

Prediabetes | The Final Frontier In Bodybuilding , Fat Loss, Health & Fitness

Prediabetes is a condition in which blood glucose level is higher than normal but does not reach the level for diabetes diagnosis.[ 1 , 2 ] Studies have shown that people with prediabetes tend to develop type 2 diabetes within 10 years, and are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease.[ 1 ] Among US adults over 18 years, the prevalence of prediabetes has increased from 29.2% in 1999 to 36.2% in 2010.[ 3 ] Considering the entire US population in 2010 (approx. 309 million, data from US Cencus), this corresponds to 112 million US adults, or over one third of the US population. Data from non-diabetic men have revealed an inverse association between insulin resistance and testosterone levels; i.e. a higher degree of insulin resistance is associated with lower testosterone levels.[ 4-6 ] This raises the question whether prediabetes, which is a state of increased insulin resistance, is also associated with low testosterone. However, few studies have investigated testosterone levels in men with prediabetes, and the risk of testosterone deficiency in men with prediabetes has not been reported. Because the prevalence of prediabetes is affecting such a large number of Americans, and is on the rise, it is important to investigate how this condition might affect testosterone levels. Knowing that can helpdetect men who are likely to have testosterone deficiency and might be at risk for health complication caused by low-T. Continue reading >>

Bodybuilding With Diabetes

Bodybuilding With Diabetes

Living with diabetes and trying to build a great body can be a challenge. From the muscle wasting effects of high blood glucose right through to consumption of unwanted calories to treat low blood glucose, training to build a stronger better looking diabetic body can be a frustrating task. The purpose of this article is to highlight some of the major problems people with diabetes face when it comes to training for a better body. The naïve personal trainer will also gain a better insight into what diabetes is and how exercise can prove both beneficial and detrimental to diabetic health. A GROWING PROBLEM At present, over 82 million people are living with Diabetes in the world, of which 46% are undiagnosed. What’s worse is the majority of these conditions are Type 2, the preventable form of Diabetes. Diabetes is a huge problem and the costs to society, and the economy is high and escalating. The International Diabetes Federation reported that Diabetes caused 5.1 million deaths in 2013, that’s one death from diabetes every six seconds! The cost to the economy doesn’t get much better with $548 billion dollars spent in 2013. By 2040, it’s estimated that: One adult in 10 will have diabetes 642 million people globally Diabetes-related health expenditure will exceed $802 billion Urgent Need For Focus Given the sheer threat to society government policy must focus on: Reducing the obesity Crisis (Type 2 Prevention) Cost effective Type 2 Treatment Cost effective Type 1 Management Cost effective Gestational Diabetes treatment Unless we do this, we are likely to see more people having to endure complications and an accompanying rise in diabetes spending that our government health services will simply not be able to afford. DEFINING DIABETES Diabetes mellitus is a group of m Continue reading >>

Building Muscle With Diabetes

Building Muscle With Diabetes

Tweet Having diabetes won't stop you from building muscle. However, it's wise to follow a few precautions when it comes to gaining muscle. There are many different types of exercise and one of the most popular is strength or power training, which is very effective for building strong bones and muscles. Strong muscles collect oxygen and nutrients from the blood much more efficiently than weak ones, meaning that any physical activity you do will require less cardiac work and put less strain on your heart. As well as being good for the heart, they also improve weight control and help the body remain sensitive to the hormone insulin, which is vital for keeping blood sugar levels in check and preventing or controlling type 2 diabetes. Here are some tips on how you can build strong, lean muscle, without affecting your diabetes: Load up on protein Protein intake is vital for building muscle. However, your body constantly drains its protein reserves for other uses such as producing hormones, resulting in less protein available for muscle building. To counteract this, you need to build and store new proteins faster than your body breaks down old proteins. You should look to consume about 1 gram of protein per pound of body weight, which is roughly the maximum amount your body can use in a day. Good sources of protein include: Chicken Tuna Eggs, milk and cottage cheese Protein shakes (see below for more about shakes) Remember, the more protein your body stores (protein synthesis), the larger your muscles grow. Have a protein shake before your workout Protein shakes are very effective for improving strength. While many trainers have a post-workout shake, research has shown that drinking a shake containing at least 6 grams of amino acids - the muscle-building blocks of protein - an Continue reading >>

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