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Potato Side Dishes For Diabetics

20 Tasty Diabetic-friendly Recipes

20 Tasty Diabetic-friendly Recipes

Indulge in these diabetic-friendly dishes Not all low-carb, low-sugar meals have to be tasteless. Check out this collection of recipes to find a dish perfect for every course. Applesauce Pancakes Trading butter for applesauce is a healthy way to cut out excess fat and still enjoy the sweetness of pancakes. Try this recipe: Applesauce Pancakes Continue reading >>

Our Best Potato Recipes

Our Best Potato Recipes

Enjoyed alone or accompanied by meat, veggies, or cheese, potatoes make a perfect side dish, satisfying soup, savory casserole, and even a sweet dessert. Enjoyed alone or accompanied by meat, veggies, or cheese, potatoes make a perfect side dish, satisfying soup, savory casserole, and even a sweet dessert. Enjoyed alone or accompanied by meat, veggies, or cheese, potatoes make a perfect side dish, satisfying soup, savory casserole, and even a sweet dessert. Enjoyed alone or accompanied by meat, veggies, or cheese, potatoes make a perfect side dish, satisfying soup, savory casserole, and even a sweet dessert. Continue reading >>

3 Simple Tips On How To Make A Healthier Potato Salad

3 Simple Tips On How To Make A Healthier Potato Salad

Potatoes are a real comfort food and what better way to enjoy them in the summertime but in a rich, creamy potato salad? There’s just something about a cool dish of potato salad that makes a summer meal a true delight. At the same time, though, I used to shy away from eating potato salad. I used to think something this tasty couldn’t be good for me. After all, it’s potatoes and mayonnaise. We all know what potatoes do to our waistline, right? And commercially prepared mayo is processed with all kinds of ingredients that we really don’t want to eat. Fear not! This summer, potato salad can make a return to our picnic tables. In today’s post, I’m excited to share 3 tips for making a healthier potato salad. First, if we’re healthy and active, we shouldn’t fear potatoes. They’re actually a very healthy choice. Though they’re not packed with micronutrients like kale, they do have some important nutrients. These include vitamins A & C, iron, calcium, fiber, and protein. The white potato nutrient composition is very close to their cousin the sweet potato. If potato salad is prepared properly, it can give your gut microbiota a big boost. Of course, if you’re concerned with your weight or have a metabolic disorder like diabetes, you may want to limit your carb intake. However, potato salad can be made in a certain way where the potato’s glycemic index, (GI) which measures how a carbohydrate-containing food raises blood glucose, can actually be significantly reduced. That should come as good news to all diabetics and pre-diabetics. Here are the 3 simple tips: Tip #1. Use Organic Red Potatoes There are so many different types of potatoes, but not all of them are created equal. The best potatoes to use for potato salad are red potatoes. Red potatoes are lower Continue reading >>

Easy Cauliflower Mashed “potatoes” Recipe

Easy Cauliflower Mashed “potatoes” Recipe

Ingredients Print Recipe 1 head cauliflower 1 clove garlic optional 1/8 cup skim milk You can also use plain yogurt or butter 1 pinch salt & pepper to taste 1 sprinkle paprika Servings: cups Units:MetricUS Imperial Votes: 23 Rating: 3.17 You: Rate this recipe! Carbs Per Serving:16g Prep Time:10minutes Cook Time:8minutes Passive Time:0minutes Course Side Dish, Vegetables Cuisine Chicken, Pork, Thanksgiving, Vegetarian Pre-heat your oven to 400 degrees. Steam or boil cauliflower (optionally with a clove of garlic) until tender. Cut the cauliflower into pieces and place in a blender with the milk, yogurt or butter. Season with salt and pepper and whip until smooth. To save time, you can use a hand-powered immersion blender. Pour cauliflower into small baking dish, sprinkle with paprika and bake in a 400 degree oven until bubbly. The recipe is enough to serve two to four people depending upon the size of the cauliflower. It can easily be doubled. Community members have shared a variety of variations you can use. Share yours in the comments: "I made this tonight with dinner. It was better than I expected. I think these actually might taste better than real mashed potatoes. I added fresh parmesan cheese and two spoonfuls of horseradish and blended it in the food processor. I sprinkled more parmesan on top along with some crushed, dried garlic before baking." - Melissa "I love it mashed & would like to share a tip that makes the texture thicker, which I like better. After steaming (or boiling) I place the cauliflower in a colander and gently press it with a masher to remove all the water. Next - return it to the kettle and mash it, then add whatever you prefer. I use S&P, then dot it with butter & put the lid back on - just like mashed potato's. Absolute favorite is to thicken Continue reading >>

Twice Baked Sweet Potatoes {no Sugar Added}

Twice Baked Sweet Potatoes {no Sugar Added}

Twice Baked Sweet Potatoes are the perfect side dish when you want a little change from the basic sweet potato fare. Baked to perfection and then combined with a few simple ingredients you most likely have on hand make for an irresistibly decadent creamy sweet potato! Top with chopped pecans if desired and you will be in love! No need for the sugary sweet potato dishes that most often are presented at the Thanksgiving table. These will leave you fully satisfied and happy. Sweet potatoes are easy to love and there’s really not just one way I don’t enjoy eating them. Baked, roasted, pureed, and now twice baked have become a regular way to enjoy them in our house. Even my children loved this recipe. My little man has a nut allergy so can’t have it with the pecans but even standing alone without them, it’s a pretty dish to present during the upcoming holiday feasting. Here are some other sweet potato recipes you might enjoy: Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Potatoes And Other Carbohydrate Side Dishes Consumed With Meat On Food Intake, Glycemia And Satiety Response In Children

The Effects Of Potatoes And Other Carbohydrate Side Dishes Consumed With Meat On Food Intake, Glycemia And Satiety Response In Children

Original Article | Open The effects of potatoes and other carbohydrate side dishes consumed with meat on food intake, glycemia and satiety response in children Nutrition & Diabetes volume 6, page e195 (2016) The effect of carbohydrate (CHO) foods on blood glucose (BG) is ranked by their glycemic index (GI). Boiled and mashed potatoes (BMPs) are ranked as high GI foods, whereas pasta and rice have moderate GI rankings. The objective of this study was to compare ad libitum consumption of common CHO dishes consumed with meat on meal-time food intake and post-meal satiety, BG, insulin and gut hormones in 11- to 13-year-old normal weight children. Two randomized crossover studies were conducted. At weekly intervals, children (experiment 1: 12 males (M), 8 females (F); experiment 2: 6M, 6 F) received in random order 1 of 5 CHO side dishes of rice, pasta, BMP, fried French fries (FFF) or baked French fries (BFF) eaten freely together with a fixed amount of lean beef (100 g). In experiment-1, food intake over 30 min and subjective appetite were measured for 120 min. In experiment-2, the same outcomes were measured along with BG, plasma insulin and gut hormones. The results for boys and girls were pooled as sex was not a factor. In both experiments, children consumed 3040% less calories at meals with BMP (P<0.0001) compared with all other treatments, which were similar. BMP increased satiety, expressed as a change in appetite per kilocalorie, more than all other treatments (P<0.0001). FFF resulted in the lowest (P<0.0001) glucose and insulin at meal end and post-meal and peptide YY (PYY) post-meal. Blood measures were similar among all other treatments. The physiological functions of CHO foods consumed ad libitum at meal time on food intake, appetite, BG, insulin and gut hormon Continue reading >>

Healthy Potato Recipes: 10 Potato Side Dishes You've Gotta Try

Healthy Potato Recipes: 10 Potato Side Dishes You've Gotta Try

No matter what time of year it is, we know you need ideas for what to make on the side. Our latest recipe collection, Healthy Potato Recipes - 10 Potato Side Dishes You've Gotta Try, covers the gamut from mashed potatoes to sweet potatoes and more. Bring 'em along for the holidays or make 'em anytime during the week! All of our diabetic potato side dishes follow our "quick 'n' easy" formula, so you know they'll be a cinch. The wonderful mix of spices makes our Herb-Roasted Potatoes a surefire hit to go along with pretty much any main dish you've cooked up for the family tonight! But remember, if you are following a diabetes diet, keep your main dish light to offset the carbs from the potatoes. Homestyle Smashed Potatoes French fries -- one of those savory foods we can't get enough of! Well, when you "indulge" in our Italian Baked French Fries, you won't feel guilty about eating them! That's what makes this one of our favorite healthy potato recipes of all time! It doesn't have to be a holiday in order for you to put together this scrumptious Maple-Nut Sweet Potato Casserole, but it sure would be an easy Thanksgiving recipe! Whenever you decide to serve it, we think this side will be a crowd-pleasing favorite! This light and novel twist on traditional potato pancakes will wow you! Our Mashed Potato Pancakes use some shortcuts, but the tasty result is all that matters.That's why this is a potato side dish recipe for the ages. Potato Casserole Potatoes Au Gratin is a classic dish, and one you may remember eating at Granny's house. That's probably why it's one of our most requested Christmas side dish recipes. Those creamy, classic flavors are just unbeatable, and now they are fit for your diabetes diet, too! Spicy Baked Sweet Potato Fries Our Dreamy Sweet Potato Bake is ce Continue reading >>

Side Dishes For Children With Diabetes | Children's Hospital

Side Dishes For Children With Diabetes | Children's Hospital

3 Tbsp. orange juice concentrate, undiluted Cook carrots in 3/4 cup water with margarine 1015 minutes or until tender. Drain cooking water into a measuring cup. Add the juice concentrate and more water to make a total of 1-1/4 cups liquid. Add corn starch and blend well. Pour liquid over carrots in saucepan and cook over low heat stirring frequently until sauce thickens. Season with salt, pepper and cinnamon to taste. Makes 8 1/2 cup servings. 1 serving = 1 vegetable exchange or 5 grams of carbohydrate Drain mushrooms and reserve liquid. Place mushrooms in glass jar. Mix all other ingredients and pour over mushrooms. Add enough of the original liquid from the mushrooms to cover them. Shake jar to mix well and refrigerate. Allow mushrooms to marinate 24 hours before serving. Drain and discard liquid from mushrooms. Place a toothpick into each mushroom and arrange on a plate to serve. Makes 4 1/4 cup servings. 1 serving = 1 vegetable or 5 grams of carbohydrate Heat oil on medium in a large skillet. Saute garlic 3 minutes until soft, but not brown. Add vegetables, except tomatoes, and stir-fry 5 minutes until golden brown. Add broth and simmer for about 5 minutes until tender. Add tomatoes and simmer 1 minute. Add chives to taste. Make a horizontal slice in top of each baked potato and spoon vegetable mixture into potato. Add 1/4 cup shredded cheddar cheese to top. Makes 4 servings. 1 serving = 3 starch + 2 vegetable + 1 meat + 2 fat exchanges or 57 grams of carbohydrate Melt the 3 tablespoons of margarine in a large frying pan. Add 1 Tbsp. lemon juice, nuts and bread crumbs. Cook until bread crumbs and nuts are toasted. Bring 1 inch of water to boil in large saucepan. Add salt and broccoli. Cover and simmer 12 minutes or until broccoli is semi-tender. Drain. Mix together Continue reading >>

Mashed Potatoes On A Diabetic Diet

Mashed Potatoes On A Diabetic Diet

According to the North Carolina Potato Association, the average adult consumes about one potato each day, and potatoes are the second most consumed food in America after dairy products. A side of mashed potatoes with a meal may be an American staple, but if you have diabetes, you may be concerned about the carbohydrate content of this popular side dish. You can include mashed potatoes as part of your diabetic diet, and preparation and serving size will help you keep your blood sugar under control. Video of the Day Carbohydrates and Mashed Potatoes Diabetes occurs when your body cannot effectively control your blood sugar levels. Carbohydrates affect blood sugar, so the American Diabetes Association's meal plan recommends that people with diabetes limit their carbohydrate intake to 45 percent of their total calories, or 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates per meal. Fruit, vegetables, grains, breads and added sugar all contribute to the carbohydrate total of your meal. One cup of mashed potatoes prepared with whole milk provides 174 calories and 37 grams of carbohydrates, between 62 and 82 percent of the total carbohydrates recommended for an entire meal. Mashed potatoes also rate high on the glycemic index, a tool that measures a food's impact on blood sugar levels. Unprocessed, high-fiber foods, such as whole grains and most fruits and vegetables, tend to be low-glycemic foods because fiber slows the rate of blood sugar increase. Processing and cooking often increases the glycemic index of foods. High-glycemic foods have a rating of 70 or above. The University of Sydney’s glycemic index database reports that mashed potatoes have a glycemic index of 83. Instant mashed potatoes have a glycemic index of 87, according to Harvard Health Publications. If you follow the glycemic Continue reading >>

Diabetes Meal Plan Recipes

Diabetes Meal Plan Recipes

It's not always easy to follow your diabetes meal plan day after day, but these delicious recipes may help. Appetizer recipes Beverage recipes Bread recipes Breakfast recipes Dessert recipes Main dish recipes Salad recipes Sandwich recipes Sauce and dressing recipes Side dish recipes Soup recipes Vegetable recipes Continue reading >>

Praline Sweet Potato Casserole- Diabetic

Praline Sweet Potato Casserole- Diabetic

Report Inappropriate Recipe Introduction A low calorie recipe I found in the Reader's Digest that I adapted to make even healthier- less than 110 calories per serving!!! Ingredients 1 cup yams, cooked and mashed 6 Splenda packets 1 egg white 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract Topping: 2 tsp. packed brown sugar 2 Splenda packets 1 tbp. chopped pecans 1/2 tbp. all-purpose flour 1/2 tbp. whole wheat flour 1/2 tbp. unsweetened applesauce Butter-flavored cooking spray Directions *Makes 3 servings* 1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Lightly grease (or spray with cooking spray) a baking dish. 2. Combine the sweet potatoes, Splenda, egg white, and vanilla in a blender and process until smooth. Spoon into the baking dish. 3. Stir together the brown sugar, Splenda, pecans, flours, and applesauce in a medium bowl. Lightly sprinkle over the sweet potato mixture. Spray the top with butter-flavored spray and bake until lightly browned, about 30 minutes. Number of Servings: 3 Recipe submitted by SparkPeople user EAGLES17. Continue reading >>

7 New Ways To Make Sweet Potatoes Part Of Your Diabetes Diet

7 New Ways To Make Sweet Potatoes Part Of Your Diabetes Diet

Sweet potatoes are one of the most popular foods for diabetes on EverdayHealth.com, and with good reason. The root vegetable is higher in fiber than its regular-potato cousin. Fiber cannot be digested by the human body, so it provides bulk without adding calories and helps keep you fuller for longer. “Sweet potatoes have many health benefits,” notes Sylvia White, RD, CDE, a dietitian in private practice in Memphis, Tennessee. “They are anti-inflammatory and have antioxidants that help prevent diseases. This includes heart disease, the number one cause of death in people with diabetes.” Sweet potatoes are also an excellent source of vitamin A. “This vitamin may help improve the function of our pancreatic beta cells,” says Lori Zanini, RD, CDE, the creator of the online training program For the Love of Diabetes, based in Manhattan Beach, California. This is significant because beta cells produce, store, and release insulin, according to the British diabetes association Diabetes.co.uk. When it comes to preparing sweet potatoes, you may want to opt for boiled when you can, suggests a small study published in September 2011 in the Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism. In the study, volunteers ate sweet potatoes that were roasted, baked, fried, or boiled. Boiled sweet potatoes have the lowest glycemic index value, meaning they won’t quickly spike your blood sugar. Baked and roasted sweet potatoes have the highest glycemic index values. 7 Tips and Tricks for Preparing Sweet Potatoes if You Have Diabetes If you have diabetes, you can eat sweet potatoes daily — as long as you factor in the vegetable’s carbohydrate count in your meal planning. “Sweet potatoes are a source of carbohydrates, which raise blood sugars,” says White. “People with diabetes can eat Continue reading >>

Chicken Divan (diabetes-friendly Version)

Chicken Divan (diabetes-friendly Version)

Courses Main Dish Recipes Chicken Main Dish Recipes Chef .. As any cook’ll tell ya, cooking is about a whole lot more than food. It’s an experience. It’s a celebration of friends and family. It’s about showing and sharing love. That’s why Paula deen and her boys — Bobby and Jamie — and have created a diabetic meal from one of her favorite recipes that she's been making for years. Enjoy! more Ingredients Directions Preheat the oven to 350°F. Spray a 2-quart casserole or 13 x 9-inch baking dish with nonstick spray. Remove the outer wrappers from the boxes of broccoli. Open one end of each box. Microwave on full power for 2 minutes until thawed. Drain and put into the prepared baking dish. Top with the chicken. Meanwhile, heat the oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add the mushrooms and cook, stirring frequently, until they release their juices and thoroughly brown, about 10 minutes. Add the garlic and thyme during the last minute of cooking time. Add to the baking dish with the chicken and broccoli. In a medium bowl, whisk together the soup, broth, mayonnaise, yogurt, 2/3 cup of the Parmesan cheese, curry powder, and pepper. Pour over the broccoli-chicken mixture and mix well with a spatula. Grate the bread over the large holes of a box grater to make coarse soft crumbs. Combine the bread crumbs, melted butter, and remaining 2 tablespoons of Parmesan cheese in a small bowl until blended; sprinkle evenly over the top of the casserole. Bake uncovered until the filling is bubbly around the edges and the topping is lightly browned, 30 to 40 minutes. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Side Dishes

Diabetic Side Dishes

Low-Sugar and Low-Fat Alternatives Because there is not just one type of diabetes, there is no one diet that works for everyone. Our collection of side dish recipes offer low-sugar and low-fat alternatives to otherwise unsuitable dishes for those looking to maintain blood sugar levels and a healthy lifestyle. First up is our Balsamic-Glazed Green Beans and Pearl Onions. Dress up green beans with pearl onions and balsamic vinegar to give this worthy-of-a-special-occasion side dish a nice flavor. View Recipe: Balsamic-Glazed Green Beans and Pearl Onions Asparagus Ribbons with Lemon and Goat Cheese Creamy goat cheese crowns a refreshingly bracing salad. Because the asparagus is shaved, it does not have to be cooked. Thick asparagus spears work best when it comes to making ribbons like these. View Recipe: Asparagus Ribbons with Lemon and Goat Cheese Continue reading >>

Double-stuffed Potatoes Recipe

Double-stuffed Potatoes Recipe

Double-Stuffed Potatoes Recipe photo by Taste of Home Read Reviews Be the first to add a review This creamy dish comes alive with the addition of sweet potatoes, brown sugar and cinnamon. Fresh pears lend an unexpected, yet fitting, special touch. Taste of Home Test Kitchen - Greendale, Wisconsin Scrub and pierce the baking and sweet potatoes. Bake at 400 for 50-55 minutes or until tender. Meanwhile, place pears in a large saucepan and cover with water. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and cook for 15-20 minutes or until tender. Drain and set aside. Cool potatoes slightly; cut each in half lengthwise. Scoop out the pulp, leaving thin shells. In a large bowl, mash pulp with butter. Stir in the milk, egg, salt, pepper, cinnamon and reserved pears. Spoon mixture into potato shells. Sprinkle with brown sugar. Place on a baking sheet. Bake, uncovered, at 400 for 20-25 minutes or until a thermometer reads 160. Yield: 14 servings. Originally published as Double-Stuffed Potatoes in Healthy CookingDecember/January 2009, p38 1 each: 182 calories, 5g fat (3g saturated fat), 26mg cholesterol, 218mg sodium, 34g carbohydrate (16g sugars, 3g fiber), 3g protein. Diabetic Exchanges: 2 starch, 1 fat. Scrub and pierce the baking and sweet potatoes. Bake at 400 for 50-55 minutes or until tender. Meanwhile, place pears in a large saucepan and cover with water. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and cook for 15-20 minutes or until tender. Drain and set aside. Cool potatoes slightly; cut each in half lengthwise. Scoop out the pulp, leaving thin shells. In a large bowl, mash pulp with butter. Stir in the milk, egg, salt, pepper, cinnamon and reserved pears. Spoon mixture into potato shells. Sprinkle with brown sugar. Place on a baking sheet. Bake, uncovered, at 400 for 20-25 minutes or un Continue reading >>

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