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Diabetes And Delivery: A Story Of Success

Diabetes And Delivery: A Story Of Success

Pregnancy and diabetes are each difficult on their own. Put them together and you have two full time jobs. If you haven’t been following, I’ve been writing about my pregnancy with diabetes for ASweetLife (see here, here, and here), and now, after a long nine months, I can tell you not only about diabetes and pregnancy, but also about diabetes and delivery. During my final month of pregnancy, I was chronically sweating. I passed the time gulping cold water, opening windows, and using my hand as a fan. Never mind it was winter. In my 40th week, I had brunch at a restaurant and asked the waiter to turn down the heat. He smiled and told me the heat wasn’t on. That’s how I knew: The Girl was coming. A day later – two days before my due date – I was in labor. By the middle of the night, my contractions had progressed to five minutes apart. It was time to go to the hospital. But my husband Gary and I couldn’t leave yet. First, I needed to review my checklist of things I’d need for diabetes and delivery. The list had been sitting on top of my packed suitcase for two weeks. In the margin I had written: DIABETES AND DELIVERY REMINDERS CHANGE PUMP SITE BEFORE GOING TO HOSPITAL!!!!!!!! INSERT ON RIGHT HIP!!!!!!!! DOUBLE CHECK THAT YOU HAVE ALL DIABETES SUPPLIES + TAKE INSULIN FROM FRIDGE!!!!!!!! All I could see were messy capital letters and an inappropriate amount of exclamation points. I thought to myself, CRAP. I have to change my site. Now? When I had made that checklist, I’d predicted my hospital stay would likely last three days – the duration of one pump site change, which meant I could change my site right before going to the hospital, and then again when I returned home. All of this calculating was done in order to avoid having to change my site in the Continue reading >>

Success Stories: American Diabetes Association

Success Stories: American Diabetes Association

Download a print-ready PDF of this story. Eleven-year-old Andrs Alba of Elburn, Illinois has a strong interest in math and science. The Illinois Mathematical and Science Academy (IMSA) offers an all-day summer camp that fits the wishes of students like Andrs who want to learn more about science, math and technology. Andrs wanted to attend a week-long IMSA camp this summer, but hit a stumbling block because he has type 1 diabetes. Andrs, who was diagnosed with diabetes in 2010, lives a happy, normal life. He also happens to wear an insulin pump and a continuous glucose monitor (CGM). He is well-versed in his diabetes care, but due to his age, he needs assistance at times. When he experiences high or low blood glucose, his judgment can be affected. Andrs has attended other summer camps in the past. Support systems were put in place to help make sure that Andrs stayed medically safe at those camps. For example, someone would contact Andrs's mother, Adriana, during the day to update her about his blood glucose numbers and, together, they would decide if his insulin treatment needed to be adjusted. This system worked very well and the camp directors supported it. Based on his family's previous camp experience, Andrs expected to be able to attend the IMSA camp. This was particularly true since IMSA's regular camp program (run during the school year) fully accommodated students with diabetes. But after researching the summer camp, Adriana learned that a registered nurse would only be available until noon each day. When she asked about diabetes care in the afternoons, she was told by a few of the camp directors that they could not offer any options for afternoon care. They did not propose anything to ease Adriana's concerns. Adriana wondered who would be there for Andrs after Continue reading >>

Parents Talking Type 1: Milas Story

Parents Talking Type 1: Milas Story

Posted on August 13, 2013 by American Diabetes Association My name is Mila Ferrer. I am the mother of three boys and I live in Miami, Fla. Seven years ago, type 1 diabetes knocked on the door of our home. Since Friday, June 2, 2006, it has become part of our family. My relationship with it is completely personal and very close to my heart. Our youngest son, Jaime, three years old at the time, started to show typical symptoms of type 1 diabetes, which we failed to recognize. After being potty trained, Jaime started to wet the bed, the car seat and even the floor. He was constantly thirsty, was moody, had poor appetite and had lost weight. What did we think was occurring to Jaime? We thought that maybe he was going through some stage in his toddler years. It wasnt until my mother-in-law commented that something was different in Jaimehe looked thinner and had baggy eyesthat we realized that something was not right. Immediately, my husband and I looked at each other and decided to call the pediatrician. I will never forget that conversation with the pediatrician, when we explained the changes that we had observed in Jaime. She told me: Mila, I hope that I am wrong, but all those changes in Jaimes behavior are signs of diabetes mellitus type 1. She asked us to take Jaime for a blood glucose test. We took him to urgent care for the test. The result of 589 mg/dl confirmed what our pediatrician had already suspected. All those symptoms that my son had displayed were the first signs of type 1 diabetes, caused by little or no insulin production from his pancreas. As a mother, when I received Jaimes medical diagnosis, I felt the world come over me. I felt helpless, powerless, full of disbelief. I thought that the medical diagnosis was wrong, that someone would walk into the hospi Continue reading >>

Stories & Experiences

Stories & Experiences

During National Diabetes Week July 12-18, we are asking people to share your stories about diabetes. You can post on our Facebook page or email [email protected] Below are a couple of stories that we have already collected: AFL player, living with type 1 diabetes Jack Fitzpatrick is living proof that you can achieve anything you want when living with diabetes. The 24-year old forward/ruckman for the Melbourne Football Club was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in June 2012, two weeks shy of his 21st birthday. The two metre tall man dubbed ‘The Fitz’ made his AFL debut in 2011. He believes that living with type 1 diabetes is an “interesting challenge” but that the right attitude and, in his case, playing footy help to lead a normal life. "It gives you something to look forward to and you don't wallow in self-pity,” says the Demons player. He checks his blood glucose levels during every game at quarter time and half time, making sure he doesn’t develop hypoglycaemia (‘hypo’, caused by low blood glucose levels). If left untreated, hypoglycaemia can lead to serious medical problems including loss of consciousness, convulsions or seizures requiring emergency treatment. He often involves his trainers in his diabetes management and jokes that they help keeping him alive. Since changing to a low carb/high fat diet and after a period of adaption, he was able to reduce his insulin intake. He now only injects long-acting insulin at night, instead of having needles at every meal. This has given him greater flexibility in his diabetes management whilst being able to train fully at high intensity, without losing strength. Jack is well aware of being a role-model for young people living with diabetes. “I really enjoy being able to tell them about my story Continue reading >>

Another Type One Diabetes Success Story

Another Type One Diabetes Success Story

Bob Krause has been successfully managing Type 1 diabetes for85 years! If you do not think this is a tremendousachievement, then you do not recognize the struggle living with Type 1 diabetes can be. Dr. Bernstein, an icon of diabetes care , is another wonderful example of successfullymanaging Type 1diabetes. Krause had the right ideas about food, Food is fuel. Amen! Krause ate a low carb paleo meal plan, though he did not call it that. Does this look like most 90 year old diabetics you know? Answer: No. There are not many 90+ year old diabetics. Most die far too early, after decades of pain and suffering. Update: Bob Krause died in 2012 a few months short of his 91st birthday. He lived a long and full life, successfully managing his diabetes. When Bob Krause turned 90 last week, it was by virtue of an unflagging determination and a mentality of precision that kept his body humming after being diagnosed with diabetes as a boy. I see, read and hear diabetics complaining on a daily basis about the damaging affects of high blood sugars and they did not live most of their lives without the latest diabetes tools and gadgetry that we have today, like Bob did. What is the difference between people who have terrible blood sugar control and Mr. Krause? Im a stubborn old man. I refuse to give up. WOW! he hit the nail on the head in my opinion.He refused to give up and he refused to give in. Mr. Krause then goes into more specifics relating to his strategies for successfully managing diabetes. The former University of Washington mechanical engineering professor says hes succeeded because he treats his body like a car and he only eats enough food to fuel the machine. To keep your diabetes under control you only eat the food you need to before you have activities to perform, Krause Continue reading >>

Living Positively: D-mom Of 4 Children With Type 1 Diabetes

Living Positively: D-mom Of 4 Children With Type 1 Diabetes

On the surface, Elissa Renouf looks like your typical mother of five beautiful, happy, healthy, well-loved children, four boys and one girl, ages 13 to 21. Digging further, you’ll learn their family’s life is a little more complicated than others – four children with type 1 diabetes (two with celiac disease), and one child with epilepsy and suspected brain tumor. Even with the constant on going management of the health issues they’ve been handed, they’ve never lost determination to live as positive as possible. Q. Tell us what it’s like being a D-Mom to four children with diabetes, and one without? A. It’s a full time job, but having five kids in general is a full time job. Charlie was my first child diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 2002, at the age of three. My responsibility helping manage my children’s diabetes was a general progression, and every eight months, it seemed like another child had a diagnosis. I wanted a positive, stress-free life for myself and children, so had no other way but to learn to manage and accept it. Q. How do you help each of them manage their diabetes? How does it differ from the next child? A. It is important for my children to manage their diabetes self-sufficiently, so I had each of them involved in their management from day one. The more they understood how to manage their diabetes, the better control they could have so they could grow into happier, healthier adults. I taught them how to count their carbs and the glycemic index in food, and that if they wanted food, they would also need insulin. Empowering them to manage their diabetes gave them the confidence to make sound diabetes management decisions the rest of their lives. Q. With four children with diabetes, how do you keep track of their blood sugar trends and di Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes - Chandler's Story - Nhs.uk

Type 1 Diabetes - Chandler's Story - Nhs.uk

Chandler Bennett was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in October 2004. She maintains a positive attitude to life, and has learned to manageher conditionby calculating the carbohydrates in her food and taking insulin. "When I was diagnosed, my first thought was, 'Oh my God, why me?' I used to be terrified of injections, so that side of it completely scared me. "I was self-conscious at first. I didn't want to inject myself in front of everyone. I thought it was going to be embarrassing and everyone at school would think I was injecting drugs in the middle of lunch. "If I hadn't taken the medication, my blood sugars would haverisen and I would havestarted to feel dizzy. If I'd continued not taking insulin, I would havegot ill, probably thrown up and eventually Iwould havedied. "When you have type 1 diabetes, you have to calculate the carbohydrates in your meals.A piece of toasthas 20g of carbohydrates, and I have one unit of insulin for every time I eat 20g of carbohydrates. "It was a foreign idea. I hadn't ever considered food as something to be calculated. Sometimes school lunch can be a bit difficult because you don't really know what's in everything. "It was tricky and I made mistakes at first. You have to expect that. However, you get into a pattern and everything becomes second nature. "It definitely affects my sports. I have to check my blood sugars more frequently when I'm playing sport. I do quite like competitive sprinting, which is difficult because adrenaline in sport brings your blood sugars up rapidly. "A few months after I was diagnosed, I moved on to the insulin pump. It was a good change for me. It definitely gives me a lot more flexibility. It's like a bigger injection, once every three days, and it pumps in insulin throughout the day. "Sometimes I get lit Continue reading >>

Having Type 1 Diabetes Can Be A Positive Thing (kind Of..!)

Having Type 1 Diabetes Can Be A Positive Thing (kind Of..!)

Having type 1 diabetes can be a positive thing (kind of..!) Having type 1 diabetes can be a positive thing (kind of..!) Author: Sarah Jordan's story | Posted: 27 July 2015 My best attributes can be linked to having type 1. Ive been living with the condition for 16 years now. Weve had our ups and downs, me and ol diabetes, but now Ive reached 30 (gasp) I feel more at peace with it. Dont get me wrong, there are serious downsides. Theres no cure, we have to plan and take extra care, not to mention scary stuff like the looming possibilities of blindness and loss of limbs (always really cheery thoughts for day to day life, eh?) but some of my finest traits can be linked to having type 1 and for that Im lucky. Organisation. Theres nothing like testing your blood sugar eight times a day, pumping four times (goodbye injections, I dont miss you!) and constantly having sugar supplies to make you organised. Im so organised I made a career out of it for years. Organised = Event Coordinator = not too shabby for Sarah. Empathy. Living with a condition every day that people cant really see makes you realise that other people are going through things we dont know about and even if people seem ok, they might be hiding something. Ive learned to talk and really listen as Im lucky to have some people whove really listened to me. Living for now and planning for the future. Gasp. You CAN do both. Knowing that my health will seriously suffer if I dont have stable blood sugars makes me realise life is precious, so I try and do positive things that scare me, spend loads of time with my beautiful family and have fun! The future. I already have medium diabetic retinopathy (scary eye problems) and I dont want any other problems, thank you very much! Some people waste life and I know with absolute Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: Emily's Story

Type 1 Diabetes: Emily's Story

Emily Gold is a bright, spirited teen who was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 8. Shortly after her diagnosis, Emily and her family organized Emily's Eagles to participate in the JDRF Walk to Cure Diabetes and have walked every year since. From 2005 through 2010, Emilys Eagles has raised more than $21,000 to find a cure for diabetes. Emily and her family have done much more than walked and raised moneyto find a cure for diabetes. They have also produced a video posted on YouTube featuring Emily as actor and producer. Emilys mom helped edit the video and arrange for a guest appearance by Knuckles as the Diabetics cat. In the video, Emily describes her daily routine on an insulin pump. Emily is one of two children.Sheis a straight-A student who attends school in Mount Laurel, NJ. When she is not making YouTube videos, she enjoys drawing, sewing, dancing, spending time with friends, and taking care of her two cats, Knuckles and Ziggy. Emily also volunteers at the Animal Welfare Association shelter in Voorhees. As for living with type 1 diabetes , Emily notes that she tries to keep a positive attitude. She knows that taking the time to test her blood sugar, count her carbs, and make sure she's getting the proper amount of insulin is what keeps her healthy and feeling good. Diabetes hasn't stopped Emily from doing any of the things that she was able to do before she was diagnosed. She sees herself as a normal teenager. Emily's mom says: Emily has an amazing sense of humor that helps her and us going in tough times. One piece of advice that Emily would give to other kids with diabetes is to check outthe Children with Diabetes online community for good information about managing diabetes. She also recommends going to diabetes camp. Emily loves Camp Nejeda in Stillwater, Continue reading >>

Sky’s The Limit: Role Models With Type 1 Diabetes

Sky’s The Limit: Role Models With Type 1 Diabetes

A type 1 diabetes diagnosis doesn’t have to hold your child back. Just ask any one of the highly accomplished young people below: They’re living proof that whether your child’s dreams include sports, the arts, parenthood — none of them are off-limits just because of type 1. Read on to find reassurance and inspiration in these amazing young men and women. The possibilities are endless! SNOWBOARDER: Sean Busby In 2004, at age 19, pro snowboarder Sean Busby was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. He was worried about what diabetes would mean for his snowboarding — but soon came across a story online about the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) Children’s Congress that changed his perspective. “I read the stories and saw the pictures of these kids, and how some of them knew nothing other than a life with diabetes,” he told JDRF. “They were doing the birthday parties and sleepovers with insulin shots and testing their sugars on first dates. I realized living with type 1 diabetes didn’t have to be different than my old life. I would have to become more responsible, but that wasn’t a bad thing at all.” That year, Busby started an organization called “Riding On Insulin” that holds ski and snowboarding camps around the world for kids with type 1 diabetes. Later, after graduating from the University of Utah with a degree in health promotion and education, he founded Powder Lines, a backcountry mountain-guiding business with the mission of conquering remote and unexplored environments like Patagonia and Antarctica — to demonstrate to youth with type 1 that anything is possible with proper diabetes management. CEO: Phil Southerland Phil Southerland is the founder and CEO of Team Type 1 (TT1), the world’s first professional cycling team to inclu Continue reading >>

My Journey With Type 1 Diabetes

My Journey With Type 1 Diabetes

Stay positive and never tell yourself what you wont be able to achieve says Georgina who hasn't let diabetes get in the way of her life. I can still remember the day of my diagnosis. I was eight and I overheard the GP telling my Mum she thought it was diabetes and I had to be admitted to hospital. I remember thinking all the way there dia a betes that means Im going to die. Once I arrived and shuffled into a consulting room, my Mum gave me a chocolate bar because I was weak and the nurse swiftly removed it and said there would be no more of that! Thankfully after three weeks of upset stomachs, terrible food and catching every bug on the ward I was released home feeling more optimistic and glad not to feel quite so ill anymore. The early days were hard, I was very active and loved horse riding but found I was always having to stop mid play at school or mid riding lesson to rectify my crashing blood sugars, only to stuff my face and rebound high afterwards. The hardest part sometimes was just being different and not being allowed the same foods at the lunch table. I went through a stage where I would scream for five minutes before allowing anyone to prick my finger and I became obsessive about my results, feeling like a failure every time I got a high result. I was so hard on myself and then would become upset and mourn the fact I was such a victim of lifes cruel fate.The years went by and I became more determined not to let it affect my life. I did the normal regular teenage bit along with the cigarettes and alcohol at times to go with it, but never stopped doing my blood sugars or injections with it. Life wasn't kind to me as a teenager and looking back my diabetes wasnt my main concern and I started to have a few problems with things like carpal tunnel probably due to Continue reading >>

Two Stories Of Type 1 Diabetes In Kenya - T1international

Two Stories Of Type 1 Diabetes In Kenya - T1international

6 Aug 2015, 5:44 p.m. in Advocacy , Africa , Global Stories As we like to say at T1International, life with diabetes is complicated. Access to vital insulin, diabetes supplies and medical care should not be. These stories are from our friends Susan and Mbolonzi in Kenya and we think they illustrate that point well. Perhaps more importantly, it is always so inspiring to see people with type 1 diabetes facing great adversity who remain positive and take steps to make life better for others. It was in late 2002 that I started falling ill. I thought I had malaria and I went to the pharmacy and bought antimalarial drugs. I took the drugs but I didnt improve, so I decided to go to the hospital. I was told that I had amoeba and typhoid and I was given medicines but even after taking those medicines my health kept on deteriorating. I had the diabetes symptoms but I didnt know that I could be developing diabetes. In February 2003, my friend who is a dentist asked me to go to her place so that she could take me to a specialist. She took me to a diabetes and kidney specialist who diagnosed me immediately with diabetes after I told him how I was feeling. He just pricked my finger and tested my blood sugar and confirmed that indeed I had type 1 diabetes. I cried like a baby and I was 20yrs old when I was diagnosed. I was put on Humulin 70/30 thrice a day for the first 2 weeks and then twice per day after that. It was not easy at first to inject myself but at least my doctor friend guided me until I learnt how to do it. It was not easy at first to accept that I was going to live with the condition for the rest of my life, but with time I accepted it and since then I cant complain much. I thank God that when I got pregnant in July 2012, I didnt have any complications through the preg Continue reading >>

Success Story – The Paleo Diet And Type 1 Diabetes

Success Story – The Paleo Diet And Type 1 Diabetes

Dear Readers, The following post is a testimonial from a mother who’s child was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes last year, and who has seen a significant improvement in her condition after adopting the Paleo Diet. We encourage all our readers to share their success stories using the Paleo Diet with us. I have a most remarkable story! On September 10, 2009, I took my six year old daughter to the pediatrician for what I thought was a urinary tract infection. She had been very thirsty and going to the bathroom excessively. Little did I know that these were symptoms of hyperglycemia! Her BG was tested a 542 in the doctor’s office, and she spent 2 days in the hospital. During that time she was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes. Her A1c was 10.8. Her IA-2 Ab was strongly positive, with borderline positive insulin Ab, but she had negative GAD-65 and ICA. This is consistent with Type 1 Diabetes. They sent us home to begin a regimen of insulin injections; one basal in the evening, and one before each meal. We did what any parent would do which is: what the doctors told us. However, after a week or so, we realized we were counting carbohydrates in things like pop tarts. It seems absurd. We decided that all of us needed to clean up our diets. Since we worked out in a Crossfit gym, the diet that came to mind was the Paleo Diet. What happened next is amazing! My daughter’s insulin needs PLUMMETED. Over the next week we made numerous calls to the Endocrinologist to adjust her dosages downward. After about two weeks, she was completely off of insulin! That was roughly October 1st, 2009. She has continued with BG testing, endocrinologist visits, and the Paleo Diet, and as of this day (January 31, 2010) she has close to normal BG and requires no insulin. At her last Doctor visit (late Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Real Life Stories

Diabetes: Real Life Stories

Tweet This section of Diabetes.co.uk presents real stories from people with diabetes around the world. By understanding other people’s experiences, successes and failures, it is hoped that awareness about living with diabetes can be raised. The most powerful tool in fighting diabetes is information, whether this comes from medical experts or real-life tales from those who live with the disease. We interview a range of people with diabetes and present their real life stories. To feature your own story, please contact us. Diabetes Blogs Keep checking back for more real-life diabetes views and opinions. If you post about diabetes online or run a diabetes blog or web page and would like your blog or story featured, please let us know. Read the official Diabetes Blog. Read the musings of people with diabetes, real life stories and loads more on the blog. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why people with diabetes are advised to avoid sources of dietary sugar. The good news is for very many people with type 2 diabetes this is all they have to do to stay well. If you can keep your blood sugar lower by avoiding dietary sugar, likely you will never need long-term medication. Type 2 diabetes was formerly known as Continue reading >>

Caroline’s Story: Overcoming Type 1 Diabetes With Real Food

Caroline’s Story: Overcoming Type 1 Diabetes With Real Food

Today, Caroline Potter from Colorful Eats, has an amazing story of recovery for you. She’s worked with the same nutritionist that I have these last few years, and has been able to treat Type 1 diabetes with a nutrient-dense diet and natural supplements. It’s another encouraging story of how food can play a significant role in our fight against disease! Treating Diabetes with Real Food Life in your 20s seems pretty grand. You feel powerful, youthful and energized. Dreams seem within your reach and challenges seem conquerable. Then out of the blue, college bliss turns into doctors offices and waiting rooms. Countless tests of all forms, vague results and no answers as to what was wrong with me. As I came home from college that winter for Christmas break, I laid on the couch for most of my vacation. I was constantly starving, eating everything in sight but quickly loosing weight. Finally, one day while out to dinner with my family, I broke down in tears because my mouth was so dry, I could barely talk. I was experiencing dry mouth, one of the major symptoms of diabetes. Diabetes? I was 20, a seemingly healthy young girl, who grew up in a home where my mother fed us all organic food. I was the one in school with her carrot sticks and tuna salad sandwiches. I never drank soda or ate Oreos, so the thought of diabetes was never even on my radar. Barely able to walk up a flight of stairs, I checked myself into the ER to discover my blood sugar levels were in a diabetic coma range. Later the next morning, the doctor diagnosed me with type 1 diabetes. I was scared, hopeless and confused. The days that followed were difficult to say the least. I still felt sick all the time, gained over 20 pounds in 2 weeks and felt terribly alone. My legs turned black and blue from giving mys Continue reading >>

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