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Popped Blister On Diabetic Foot

Foot Ulcers & Wounds | J. Richard Werkman Chiropodist

Foot Ulcers & Wounds | J. Richard Werkman Chiropodist

A break in the skin that is often accompanied by formation of pus and necrosis of surrounding tissue, usually resulting from inflammation or ischemia. The term ulcer is generally used to refer to breaks in the normal integrity of the skin. An ulcer may form due to decreased circulation or sensation within the feet. Management consists of wound evaluation, debridement, application of topical antibiotics, appropriate dressings, footwear advice, and padding or insoles/orthotics. People living with diabetes are especially prone to developing ulcers.It is vital to treat foot injuries right away. Do you have any questions or suspect you may have an ulcer? Dont let your foot condition worsen. Please give our office a call and have it assessed by a professional. Heres why: Ulcers are skin wounds that are slow to heal and are classified in four stages, according to which layers of skin are broken through. Stage 1 ulcers are characterized by a reddening over bony areas. The redness on the skin does not go away when pressure is relieved. Stage 2 ulcers are characterized by blisters, peeling or cracked skin. There is a partial thickness skin loss involving the top two layers of the skin. Stage 3 ulcers are characterized by broken skin and sometimes bloody drainage. There is a full thickness skin loss involving subcutaneous tissue (the tissue between the skin & the muscle). Stage 4 ulcers are characterized by breaks in the skin involving skin, muscle, tendon and bone and are often associated with a bone infection called osteomyelitis. There are many different diagnostic tests that can be done in the course of treating an ulcer. If the ulcer appears to be infected (i.e., there is redness, and drainage) then a culture of the wound should be done. The reason for the culture is to iden Continue reading >>

Blisters & Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Blisters & Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Living With Diabetes Starts With Proper Management Blisters & Diabetes: What You Need to Know As atype 1diabetic for the past 8 years, Im always trying to stay on top of the latest news and trends when it comes to diabetes complications. Did you know that every 30 seconds, somewhere in the world, someone loses a lower limb as a result of diabetes. Thats because diabetes and wounds are a dangerous combination. If you have diabetes, theres no such thing as a minorwoundto the foot even small blisters or foot sores can turn into anulcerthat, if not properly treated, can lead to amputation. The rate of amputation for people with diabetes is 10 times higher than for those who dont have the disease. There is no single known cause for diabetic blisters. Many of those who have diabetic blisters may also tend to suffer fromneuropathyandnephropathy. Some researchers think that a decreased ability to sustain an injury may play a role. Also in people with heart failure, the swelling that can result from that condition may be enough to cause the blisters.Many people who develop the diabetic blisters have had diabetes for many years or have several complications from the disease. Symptoms of diabetic blisters include intenseitchingandburningsensation of the skin. When the mucous membranes of the mouth are affected, it can cause pain, burning, peeling away of affected inner lining tissues, and sensitivity to acidic foods. Eating can be difficult, and involvement in the deeper areas of the throat can cause coughing. Involvement of the inner nose can cause nosebleeds. The disease typically worsens (exacerbates) and improves (remits) over time. It is crucial that you report any slow-healing blisters to your doctor because if infection occurs it can threaten the well-being of your entire Continue reading >>

When A Blister Becomes An Ulcer: The Perils Of Insufficient Testing

When A Blister Becomes An Ulcer: The Perils Of Insufficient Testing

Issue Number: Volume 16 - Issue 5 - May 2003 There is a great deal of satisfaction when our diabetic foot care team gets referrals for patients who were previously seen by doctors from surrounding regions and other nations. However, there is also a great deal of difficulty with poorly or improperly managed cases. In this diagnostic dilemma, I’d like to focus on one patient who was sent to us after one year of care by several doctors. The patient in question is a 70-year-old male, who was previously seen by two podiatrists and an orthopedist. His initial complaint was a small blister plantar to the first metatarsal head of his left foot. He had just returned from a business trip in which he had done excessive amounts of walking. Near the end of the trip, he noticed the blister and followed up with his local podiatrist two days later. The blister had ruptured when he saw the podiatrist and evolved into a small eschar with dry blood covering the site. The patient has had diabetes for 20 years that he has controlled with oral medication. He also has peripheral neuropathy of the feet to the ankle. Pulses were not palpable but the foot was warm to touch and the capillary fill time was five seconds. His foot type was a high arch foot with a plantarflexed first ray and a mild equinus deformity. His doctor debrided the local wound and noticed minimal bleeding. He started wet to dry dressing changes and told the patient to wear only tennis shoes for the next week. At one week follow-up, the patient’s foot was warm and swollen, and the blister had become an ulcer. There was edema locally at the first metatarsal head region, yet there was no drainage. The patient was complaining of mild pain and difficulty sleeping. The doctor debrided the wound of necrotic borders and started Continue reading >>

Everything You Should Know About Diabetic Blisters

Everything You Should Know About Diabetic Blisters

If you have diabetes and experience the spontaneous eruption of blisters on your skin, they may well be diabetic blisters. These are also called bullosis diabeticorum or diabetic bullae. Although the blisters may be alarming when you first spot them, they’re painless and normally heal on their own without leaving scars. A number of skin conditions are associated with diabetes. Diabetic blisters are fairly rare. An article in the International Journal of Diabetes in Developing Countries notes that in the United States, the disorder occurs in only 0.5 percent of people with diabetes. Diabetic blisters are twice as likely to be found in men than in women. Diabetic blisters most often appear on your legs, feet, and toes. Less frequently, they show up on hands, fingers, and arms. Diabetic blisters can be as large as 6 inches, though they’re normally smaller. They’re often described as looking like blisters that occur when you get a burn, only without the pain. Diabetic blisters seldom appear as a single lesion. Rather, they are bilateral or occur in clusters. The skin surrounding the blisters isn’t normally red or swollen. If it is, see your doctor promptly. Diabetic blisters contain a clear, sterile fluid, and they’re usually itchy. Read about the eight best remedies for itching. Given the risk of infection and ulceration when you have diabetes, you may want to see a dermatologist to rule out more serious skin conditions. Diabetic blisters usually heal in two to five weeks without intervention, according to an article in Clinical Diabetes. The fluid in the blisters is sterile. To prevent infection, you shouldn’t puncture the blisters yourself, though if the lesion is large, your doctor may want to drain the fluid. This will keep the skin intact as a covering for Continue reading >>

Blisters: First Aid

Blisters: First Aid

If a blister isn't too painful, try to keep it intact. Unbroken skin over a blister may provide a natural barrier to bacteria and decreases the risk of infection. Cover it with an adhesive bandage. If you're allergic to the adhesive used in some tape, use paper tape. Seek medical care if the blister is painful or prevents you from walking or using one of your hands. Consider taking the following self-care measures if medical help is not available. How to drain a blister To relieve blister-related pain, drain the fluid while leaving the overlying skin intact. Here's how: Wash your hands and the blister with soap and warm water. Swab the blister with iodine. Sterilize a clean, sharp needle by wiping it with rubbing alcohol. Use the needle to puncture the blister. Aim for several spots near the blister's edge. Let the fluid drain, but leave the overlying skin in place. Apply an ointment (Vaseline, Plastibase, other) to the blister and cover it with a nonstick gauze bandage. If a rash appears, stop using the ointment. Change the dressing every day. Apply more ointment and a bandage. Blister prevention To prevent friction blisters on your feet, wear shoes that fit well. It also helps to use moisture-wicking socks. Try the various socks, shoes and insoles that are designed specifically to help reduce blistering. You might also try attaching moleskin to the inside of your shoe where it might rub or dusting the inside of your socks with talcum powder. Gloves help prevent blisters on your hands. Continue reading >>

Blisters-home Treatment

Blisters-home Treatment

Most blisters heal on their own. Home treatment may help decrease pain, prevent infection, and help heal large or broken blisters . A small, unbroken blister about the size of a pea, even a blood blister, will usually heal on its own. Use a loose bandage to protect it. Avoid the activity that caused the blister. If a small blister is on a weight -bearing area like the bottom of the foot, protect it with a doughnut-shaped moleskin pad It's best not to drain a blister at home. But when blisters are painful, some people do drain them. If you do decide to drain your blister, be sure to follow these steps: Press the fluid in the blister toward the hole so it can drain out. You have a condition such as diabetes , HIV , cancer , or heart disease , because of the risk of infection. You think your blister is from a contagious disease , such as chickenpox, because the virus can be spread to another person. If a blister has torn open, or after you have drained a blister: Gently wash the area with clean water. Don't use hydrogen peroxide or alcohol, which can slow healing. Don't remove the flap of skin over a blister unless it's very dirty or torn or there is pus under it. Gently smooth the flap over the tender skin. You may cover the blister with a thin layer of petroleum jelly, such as Vaseline, and a nonstick bandage. Apply more petroleum jelly and replace the bandage as needed. Watch for a skin infection while your blister is healing. Signs of infection include: Increased pain, swelling, redness, or warmth around the blister. Red streaks extending away from the blister. Home remedies may relieve itching from blisters . One way to help decrease itching is to keep the itchy area cool and wet. Apply a cloth that has been soaked in ice water, or get in a cool tub or shower. Medici Continue reading >>

Caring For Your Feet With Diabetes

Caring For Your Feet With Diabetes

When you have diabetes, taking good care of your feet is very important. Poor foot care can lead to serious problems, including possibly having to remove -- or amputate -- the foot or leg. As a person with diabetes, you are more vulnerable to foot problems, because the disease can damage your nerves and reduce blood flow to your feet. The American Diabetes Association has estimated that one in five people with diabetes who seek hospital care do so for foot problems. By taking proper care of your feet, most serious problems can be prevented. It's important that your doctor check your feet at least once a year for any problems. Here are some diabetes foot care tips to follow. Use mild soaps. Use warm water. Pat your skin dry; do not rub. Thoroughly dry your feet, especially between the toes. After washing, use lotion on your feet to prevent cracking. Do not put lotion between your toes. Check the tops and bottoms of your feet. Have someone else look at your feet if you cannot see them. Check for dry, cracked skin. Look for blisters, cuts, scratches, or other sores. Check for redness, increased warmth, or tenderness when touching any area of your feet. Check for ingrown toenails, corns, and calluses. If you get a blister or sore from your shoes, do not "pop" it. Apply a bandage and wear a different pair of shoes. Cut toenails after bathing, when they are soft. Cut toenails straight across and smooth with an emery board. Avoid cutting into the corners of toes. You may want a podiatrist (foot doctor) to cut your toenails. Walk and exercise in comfortable shoes. Do not exercise when you have open sores on your feet. Use this simple test to see if your shoes fit correctly: Stand on a piece of paper. (Make sure you are standing and not sitting, because your foot changes shape w Continue reading >>

Foot Blisters

Foot Blisters

A blister is a pocket of fluid which forms a bubble in the upper layers of the skin. Blisters on the feet are normally caused by a mixture of friction and pressure. They can be very painful. The word "blister" comes from the Old French "blostre" which meant a nodule caused by leprosy. In this article What is a blister? A blister is a fluid pocket in the skin which develops when the upper skin layers separate and the space between them fills with serum. Serum is the liquid part of the blood - it contains protective substances like antibodies. The appearance is of a bubble on the skin. Sometimes a small blood vessel will bleed into the bubble, in which case rather than being clear it will be red. Occasionally the contents of a blister will become infected and the contents will become cloudy as the blister may then contain pus. Most blister formation is a self-defence strategy by the body. The purpose is to protect the skin beneath from further injury and encourage fast healing. The associated pain also has a protective effect. Blisters are caused by pressure and friction and we are therefore less likely to continue the activity that causes them if they become increasingly painful. What causes foot blisters? Blisters are most common on the feet and ankles, as these are the areas most subject to heat and pressure in most people. Generally blisters may be caused by: Friction - the most common cause in the feet. Direct damage to the skin by corrosive substances or heat. Some infectious diseases (for example, chickenpox). Some inherited diseases (for example, pompholyx). This article focuses on foot blisters caused by friction. Areas of the foot will suffer repeated friction if you: Have poorly fitting or rigid shoes which rub as you walk. Wear high heels (which force pressure Continue reading >>

Blisters On Foot - Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Blisters On Foot - Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I have been working really hard at getting my weight down and getting in shape. I walk 30 minutes each day at lunch, ride my stationary bike before going to work and climb the stairs at work. I have lost 10Lbs in 2 weeks:D Yesterday I wore thin socks and got blisters on my foot from walking. I am not sure how to treat blisters now that I am diabetic. Can I go ahead and walk (I'm wearing thick socks so it does not hurt much)? Or should I pop them and put tribiotic on them? Any suggestions? I would not pop the blisters. I also would not wear thick socks. They just cause more rubbing on the blisters. Get some "second skin" or "blister bandages". They sell them at the store. I have popped blisters in the past and used antibiotic on it and got yelled at by my doctor. I think blister bandages are the best bet with thin white socks with no seams. I would have to agree with notme and not pop the blisters. The liquid in there is there to provide a natural cushion while they heal. When I was a Girl Guide leader for 12 years we would recommend and use moleskin, you can buy it around the foot section in the pharmacy and cut it to the right size. (or some of them come in little pre cut shapes). We did an awful lot of hiking in some precarious situations then and would end up with blisters on the sides of our feet from balancing on the rocks/bluffs. Sheesh, maybe I should re join and get some good exercise in! PS, I just found some thin white cotton socks in Walmart called Alldaydry from Haynes which allows your feet to breath while wearing them. 6 pairs for around $7 here in Canada so likely less expensiv Continue reading >>

Proper Care For Foot Blisters

Proper Care For Foot Blisters

Regular foot checks will help minimize your risk of foot ulcers. While foot blisters are simply a nuisance for some, they can lead to serious complications for people with diabetes. Due to decreased circulation and feeling in many diabetic patient’s extremities, it’s possible for a blister to become a diabetic ulcer. With the proper treatment, your chances of developing an ulcer can be minimized. What causes blisters? Simply put, friction causes blisters, but not necessarily by the shoe rubbing on the outside layer of skin. The skin on your foot moving relative to the underlying bone is called shear. When shear happens excessively in one place, the tissue tears and fluid fills the injury site. So, you got a blister Clean it thoroughly with warm water and soap, and sanitize it with rubbing alcohol or hydrogen peroxide. Do this at night when you’ll be off your feet to allow for proper air circulation. Put antibiotic ointment on the area and cover it with a bandage or dressing, especially if you’re putting shoes back on. If you aren’t putting shoes back on, take the pressure off of your feet. This will prevent your feet from swelling. Wait as long as you can to put shoes back on, reducing the friction on the blister, ensuring that the roof doesn’t tear off of it. Many people wonder if they should pop a blister. While it isn’t necessary, it’s usually safe to pop a small, clear blister. This can be done with a sterilized needle or pin. Do not pop it if your blister is large. This will cause a large opening in the skin, potentially allowing bacteria to enter the wound. It could become a diabetic foot ulcer it it’s not handled properly. If it’s large enough that it’s hard to walk, you should see a doctor. As with all wounds, severe redness and pus are sig Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Wounds: Caring For Sores

Diabetes And Wounds: Caring For Sores

When you have diabetes, it's vital to treat foot injuries right away. Even minor wounds can turn into serious foot ulcers, which can cost you a foot -- or an entire leg -- if you don’t care for them quickly and thoroughly. These easy steps can prevent problems down the road. Common Causes What you put on your feet matters. "You can get a foot ulcer from something as simple as walking in new or tight-fitting shoes or getting a small pebble stuck in the shoe,” says Raul Guzman, MD, a vascular surgeon at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. If you have diabetes, you may get a kind of nerve damage that stops the feeling in your feet. Doctors call this neuropathy. If you can’t feel your feet, you may not know you’re hurt, and a small cut or sore can turn into something bigger. Or you might have poor blood flow to your feet, which makes it hard for even minor cuts to heal. Your doctor can tell you whether you have nerve damage or blood-flow problems. Guzman says he can do a test that shows how blood moves through your body. If the results are normal, you can have standard wound-care treatments. “If the results of this blood-flow test are abnormal, that means you have poor circulation that needs to be repaired,” he says. Surgery can help. “We can use a balloon and stent,” Guzman says, “or we can do a bypass procedure, where we connect the artery above the blockage to one of the arteries in the calf or foot.” Wound Treatment Options If you do injure your foot, don't try to take care of it at home. Go to a wound-care center or your doctor, even for blisters, calluses, and scratches. “Put on some antibiotic ointment and see a wound center or your doctor, at the latest, the next day,” says Harold Brem, MD, chief of the wound healing and regenerative medici Continue reading >>

The Dos And Don’ts Of Treating Blood Blisters On Your Feet

The Dos And Don’ts Of Treating Blood Blisters On Your Feet

Whether you walk, hike, run, or dance, your feet can take a lot of abuse. But when you’re particularly active, you can easily injure or otherwise damage your feet, especially if you have ill-fitting socks and shoes. With enough friction, a blister can form on your toes or the sole of your foot. In some cases, a simple blister can turn into a blood blister. But while you may be used to the sight of a common blister, you may be unsure of what to do with a blood blister. To help you better care for your blood blister, we’ll address several dos and don’ts for treating this minor injury. We’ll also talk about what a blood blister is and what causes it. What Is a Blood Blister? A blood blister is essentially a blister where the blood vessels beneath the blister have been damaged. As a result, the blood leaks into the blister. Most often, blood blisters form in bony areas, but they can develop in softer areas as well. What Causes a Blood Blister? Blood blisters can form in areas under excess pressure and friction. For instance, if you go running for an extended period of time and the bony parts of your feet constantly rub against the inside of your shoes, you might develop a blood blister on your toes or the side of your foot. You can also get a blood blister when your skin has been severely pinched. The pressure can easily damage the blood vessels without actually breaking the skin. How Do You Treat a Blood Blister? Blood blisters can be painful, and you may feel tempted to lance the blister as soon as possible. But there are wrong and right ways to treat your blood blister. For a full, quick recovery, you want to take the proper steps. Below, we’ll discuss some of the most common dos and don’ts for treating your blood blister. DO Elevate and Ice Your Blister Once Continue reading >>

Diabetic Blisters

Diabetic Blisters

Share: Diabetic blisters are also called bullosis diabeticorum or diabetic bullae. They can sometimes develop in people with diabetes, although the condition is relatively rare. Only about one-half of one percent of those with diabetes is ever diagnosed with diabetic blisters. The blisters often appear on the legs and arms and seem to appear for no reason. In most cases, when they disappear, they do not leave scars. What Causes Diabetic Blisters? There is no single known cause for diabetic blisters. Many of those who have diabetic blisters may also have neuropathy and nephropathy. Some researchers think that a decreased ability to sustain an injury may play a role. And in people with heart failure, the swelling that can result from that condition may be enough to cause the blisters. Many people who develop the diabetic blisters have had diabetes for many years or have several complications from the disease. What Are the Symptoms of Diabetic Blisters? Most commonly, the blisters appear on the legs and feet. Rarely, you may also notice them on your fingers or the backs of your hands. You might go to bed one night with no blisters, wake up, and notice them. The blisters tend to be large and irregularly shaped. Sometimes, they look like a burn. There are commonly clear and contain sterile liquid. You might feel a burning sensation or a twinge of discomfort, but many people do not feel anything - other than a bit of surprise at seeing the blisters where there were none before. How Are Diabetic Blisters Treated? In many cases, the blisters heal by themselves, within two to four weeks, and no treatment is needed other than keeping them clean. On occasion, though, the blisters may burst. If this happens, your doctor may prescribe an antibiotic ointment or something to help dry Continue reading >>

3 Steps To Treating A Blister

3 Steps To Treating A Blister

A small blister from a new pair of shoes might seem harmless at first, but that tiny mark can lead to some big problems if you're not careful. If the blister breaks, germs can get into your foot. These germs can cause not only an infection on the skin, but also in the bone. Bone infections are very difficult to treat, and when they worsen, you could end up with an amputation. Here are three steps to prevent a blister from turning into a serious problem: Wash your feet carefully in gentle soap and water and dry them thoroughly. Then put a small amount of antibiotic ointment on a dressing and cover the wound. Next, although a blister may seem like a small concern, place a call to someone on your medical team. You'll probably get a foot exam and possibly an antibiotic to prevent infection. Last, stop wearing the shoes that caused the blister, even if you think you're on your way to "breaking them in." A comfortable pair of shoes is one of the best investments you can make. And remember, they must properly fit your feet at the store. This kind of careful attention can prevent future problems. Continue reading >>

Should You Pop A Blister On Your Foot?

Should You Pop A Blister On Your Foot?

This is the most common question I get about blisters! I'm a big fan of popping a foot blister, but only in certain circumstances. Pop. Burst. Puncture. Drain. Lance. It’s the same question. Should I open it up and get the fluid out? Do a quick scan of the internet and you’ll find about 50% against and 50% for popping. And some recognise there's a place for both interventions. What's missing is the practical information you need to decide whether your blister needs to be lanced or left alone. Here's the question you should be asking yourself: Deciding how to treat a foot blister - to pop or not to pop! ©iancorless.com - all rights reserved Because it depends entirely on your blister (size, location, your foot) and your situation (for example, are you about to leave home to run a marathon, half way through the race or have you just finished?). I’ll demonstrate the point further. But first, it helps to properly understand the risks associated with popping a blister. What are the risks of popping blisters on the feet? Dealing with the pain of a foot blister, the inconvenience of blister treatment and the downtime in waiting for it to resolve is bad enough. But an infection is a whole different story. It makes your blister more sore, requires more of your attention and things can go nasty quickly. So you need medical help close at hand. And let's face it, while they're tucked away in your shoes, feet spend a lot of time in a dirty, dark, warm, moist environment that lends itself to bacterial infection. And when not in shoes, out feet are what connects us to the ground - a source of limitless germs. So foot blisters are particularly prone to infection. Signs your blister is infected Pus Increasing pain, swelling, redness and warmth An infected blister requires at leas Continue reading >>

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