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Popcorn For Diabetics

Can Diabetics Eat Popcorn?

Can Diabetics Eat Popcorn?

Diabetes is a chronic condition that affects the way the body metabolizes glucose. People with diabetes have to pay special attention to what they eat, since foods with carbohydrates can raise blood sugar levels. While popcorn is considered a carbohydrate, the good news is that diabetics can still enjoy this crunchy snack as part of a healthy diet. Video of the Day For the most part, a healthy diabetic diet resembles a regular diet. The main difference is that diabetics have to pay special attention to foods that affect their blood sugars, like carbohydrates. Foods that contain carbohydrates include grains, milk, sweets, fruits, juice, starchy vegetables and beans. On a diabetic diet, it's important to limit foods that are high in sugar and watch total carbohydrate intake. Additionally, eating smaller meals at consistent time intervals will help to control blood sugar levels. Popcorn is safe to eat on a diabetic diet, says the American Diabetes Association. This healthy whole-grain snack contains about 1 gram of fiber per cup and 15 grams of carbohydrates. Fiber is good for diabetics because research suggests that it helps to control blood sugar levels by slowing gastric emptying. Three cups of popcorn contains virtually no fat and sugar and only 93 calories. Popcorn also has about 1 gram of protein per cup, which is 2 percent of the daily recommended intake on a 2,000-calorie diet. Counting carbohydrates is a method diabetics use to manage their blood sugar levels. This technique is also called carb counting. By becoming aware of the level of carbohydrates eaten at each meal, people with diabetes can better manage their blood glucose levels. According to the American Diabetes Association, it's a good idea to start by having 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates at each meal. Continue reading >>

» Is Popcorn A Healthy Snack? It Can Be!

» Is Popcorn A Healthy Snack? It Can Be!

Eric Uthus Popcorn is relatively high in fiber - a cup of air-popped popcorn contains just over a gram of fiber. It also contains 1 gram of protein and 6 grams of carbohydrate. It contains no cholesterol, it is virtually fat-free (only 0.1 g per cup) and contains only 100 to 150 calories in a serving of 5 popped cups. You can find a nutrient profile for various popcorn snacks at: then click "Start Your Search Here" and enter "snacks, popcorn". Popcorn also has a relatively good glycemic index (GI). The GI, which describes how much blood sugar increases after eating foods that contain carbohydrates, is based on a scale from 1 to 100. The higher the value the more your blood sugar will rise. Foods with a high GI are rapidly digested and absorbed; they produce marked fluctuations in blood sugar levels. Low-GI foods, are slowly digested and absorbed; they produce gradual rises in blood sugar and insulin levels. Low GI diets have proven health benefits. They improve both glucose and lipid levels in people with type 1, as well as type 2, diabetes. Because they are slowly absorbed, they help in weight control because they help control appetite and delay hunger. Air-popped popcorn has a GI of 55 - at the upper end of low-GI foods. Compare that to an apple with a GI value of 30-40 and 13-16 grams of carbohydrate, or to two slices of white bread with a GI of 88 and 12-14 grams carbohydrates. As popcorn is 100 percent unprocessed grain, it is a whole-grain food. One serving can provide about 70 percent of the recommended daily intake of whole grain. Popcorn also contains a number of vitamins: folate, niacin, riboflavin, thiamin, pantothenic acid, and vitamins B6, A, E and K. A serving of popcorn contains about 8 percent of the daily value of iron, with lesser amounts of calcium, c Continue reading >>

7 Diabetes-friendly Snacks

7 Diabetes-friendly Snacks

Part 1 of 10 Snacks are a great way to keep your blood glucose levels stable, but sometimes it may seem that choosing what to snack on is easier said than done. Making smart food choices starts with understanding the fundamentals. For most people with diabetes, that means understanding the effects of carbohydrates on blood glucose levels. Carbohydrates break down into sugar, and when you eat large amounts of certain types of carbohydrates, blood glucose levels can spike. Part 2 of 10 The glycemic index (GI) measures how much a food containing carbohydrates raises your blood glucose level compared to the consumption of pure glucose. Pure glucose has a score of 100. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) identifies low-GI foods as those with a ranking of 55 or less. Low-GI foods include: 100 percent stone-ground whole wheat oatmeal legumes non-starchy vegetables Medium-GI foods have ratings between 56 and 69. Some examples are: whole wheat rye pita bread Eating mixed snacks can also help, since foods digest more slowly when they’re eaten together. Adding protein or healthy fats to a snack with carbohydrate can help increase fullness and decrease the risk of blood sugar spikes. Part 3 of 10 Counting the number of carbohydrates in your snacks and choosing foods using the glycemic index are both great ways to make smart snacking decisions. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics says that a diabetes-friendly snack should contain 15–30 grams of carbohydrates. We’ve come up with a few healthy snack ideas that are great on-the-go and can help make managing your blood glucose level simple! Part 4 of 10 Store-bought trail mix can be boring, bland, and not so healthy — not to mention expensive. Save money (and your taste buds) by making your own! Ingredients*: 1 cup roaste Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Popcorn?

Can Diabetics Eat Popcorn?

Popcorn is one of life's little snacking pleasures -- after all, who could imagine going to see a flick without stopping by the snack counter for a small bucket? While people with diabetes should try to avoid the highly salted and buttery versions, popcorn can still be safely incorporated into the diabetic diet. Popcorn has high fiber and a low glycemic load compared to many other snack foods, so as long as it is consumed in moderation it makes a healthy addition to the diabetic diet. Nutritional Content of Popcorn Like any whole grain source of carbohydrate, air-popped and unprocessed popcorn is an excellent source of nutrients for individuals with diabetes. Most "light" popcorns contain 80 to 100 calories and 3 grams of fiber per serving. Because it is made from corn, which is a whole grain, popcorn does not impact blood sugar levels as dramatically as other sugary snack foods. In fact, one serving of popcorn has a glycemic load that is 2 to 4 times lower than other snack foods, such as raisins, graham crackers, or potato chips. The Diabetic Portion Size of Popcorn According to the American Diabetes Association, one diabetic portion size of popcorn equals 3 cups of popped popcorn, or approximately 15 grams of carbohydrates. Because individuals with diabetes can consume between 15 and 30 grams of carbohydrate for snacks, no more than two servings or 6 cups of popcorn should be consumed at one time. Most individual, 1 ounce bags of microwave popcorn bags contain approximately 21 grams of carbohydrate, making these portions perfect for individuals with diabetes. Choosing the Right Popcorn Individuals with diabetes must be mindful of the type of popcorn they consume because many versions have added fats, sugars and salts. When selecting popcorn at the grocery store, indiv Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Popcorn: Can Diabetics Eat Popcorn?

Diabetes And Popcorn: Can Diabetics Eat Popcorn?

Popcorns are one of the most popular snacks across the globe. However, one of the frequently asked questions by those who suffer from diabetes is “Is Popcorn Healthy for Diabetes?” Well, diabetes is a complicated condition and several precautions need to be maintained by those suffering from it. If certain precautions and recommendations are followed, popcorn can be considered a healthy snack option for diabetes. However, an expert advice is always recommended on “can a diabetic eat popcorn or not”?. In this article, we shall explore the relationship between diabetes and popcorn and whether consuming popcorn is healthy for those suffering from diabetes. Health Facts Related to Popcorn Before we get into the details of the relationship between popcorn and diabetes, let us see a few facts related to our favorite snack: Popcorns are a rich source of various minerals and vitamins namely Vitamin A, B6, E, thiamin, niacin, riboflavin, amongst a host of other minerals. It is a rich source of whole-grain which our body requires. As otherwise believed, popcorn can be a very healthy snack and fresh popcorns do not contain too many calories. If you take 5 cups of this delicious and easy to make snack, you are in taking only 100-150 calories. It is a rich source of both fiber as well as protein. The snack is a rich source of minerals such as potassium, magnesium, copper, as well as zinc. It is a rich source of antioxidants due to the presence of polyphenols. Finally, popcorns do not contain too much of carbohydrates. They only contain about 6 grams of the carbs. Health Benefits of Popcorn for Diabetes Patients Extremely nutritious popcorns are a very healthy snacking option. Let us look into some of the health benefits which popcorns have to offer to those suffering from di Continue reading >>

10 Easy Snacks For Diabetes

10 Easy Snacks For Diabetes

Thinkstock Stay Fueled With These Diabetes Snacks Snacks aren't just an excuse to munch on something mid-day — they are an important part of a type 2 diabetes diet to help manage weight and control blood sugar. "Eating frequently throughout the day allows you to better regulate your appetite and avoid excess hunger, which can lead to overeating and elevated blood sugar levels," says Erin Palinski-Wade, RD, CDE, and author of The 2-Day Diabetes Diet. Palinski-Wade has three recommendations for good diabetes snacks: Stick to between 15 and 45 grams of carbohydrates per diabetes snack, choose 100 percent whole grains, and eat whole fruits instead of fruit juice. Also be sure you eat every 4 to 6 hours, suggests Jessica Crandall, RD, CDE, a national spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. "If it's going to be a longer time before you eat a meal or if you feel your blood sugar dropping, eat a snack," she says. Continue reading >>

10 Best Type 2 Diabetes Snacks

10 Best Type 2 Diabetes Snacks

Healthy Combinations Ready in Minutes When you have type 2 diabetes, a smart strategy for controlling your blood sugar levels is to think of snacks as miniature versions of meals and plan your carbs accordingly. Snacks with a good mix of protein, fat, and fiber will help keep hunger at bay and your blood sugar on an even keel throughout the day. "Since a meal should include 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates, a snack should have around 15 to 20 grams," says Katherine Basbaum, MS, RD, a clinical dietitian in the Cardiology and Cardiac Rehabilitation departments at University of Virginia Health System in Charlottesville. By the same token, she says, fill your snack plate the same way you would for a regular meal. That means half should be non-starchy vegetables, one-quarter should be lean protein, and one-quarter a starchy carb. Here are 10 terrific options for healthy diabetes snacks. Continue reading >>

Can People With Diabetes Eat Popcorn?

Can People With Diabetes Eat Popcorn?

Popcorn can be a healthful snack for most people, depending on how it is prepared. With its fairly low calorie and high-fiber content, air popped popcorn is often a go-to snack for dieters. However, people with diabetes have more to worry about than their waistlines when snacking on popcorn. People with diabetes can eat popcorn but need to choose carefully the type of popcorn, how it is cooked, and how much they eat, due to popcorn's high carb content. Nutritional information Air-popped popcorn offers very few calories per cup. In addition, a cup of air-popped popcorn contains a little over 1 gram (g) in fiber. It also contains about 1 g of protein and about 6 g of carbohydrate. Additionally, popcorn contains zero cholesterol and is almost fat-free, far less than 0.5 g per cup. The total calories in a 5-cup serving are between 100-150. Popcorn qualifies as a whole-grain food. One serving can provide about 70 percent of the recommended daily intake of whole grain. Popcorn is full of vitamins and minerals. A single serving of popcorn contains a number of vitamins and minerals, including: vitamin A vitamin E vitamin B6 pantothenic acid thiamin niacin riboflavin A serving of popcorn also contains iron and trace amounts of manganese, calcium, phosphorus, copper, magnesium, potassium, and zinc. The popcorn's hull or shell is the source of much of its nutritional value. The shell contains beta-carotene, lutein, and zeaxanthin, which are important for maintaining eye health. The shell also contains polyphenols with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, which may protect against cancer and cardiovascular disease. Researchers have stated that popcorn contains up to 300 milligrams of polyphenols per serving. This high amount of polyphenols is more than 60 percent of the am Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Popcorn

Can Diabetics Eat Popcorn

Popcorn can be a healthy snack depending upon how it’s prepared, and it is also one of little snacking pleasures of life. After all, who can imagine gonna see a flick with no stopping by shop for a small bucket? A lot of people love to eat popcorn at the movies. However people with diabetes have to try to avoid these highly buttery and salted versions. Don’t worry, popcorn can easily still be properly incorporated into your diabetic diet. It is a good snack for a diabetic, however the preparation and the type of corn impact its value. Popcorn is considered a important source of the whole-grain fiber in its unprocessed form, making it perfect for people concerned about diabetes and blood sugar. It is so fluffy and light. In addition, it comes with a quite low glycemic load compared to other traditional snack foods, hence as long as you consume popcorn in moderation, it can be a health addition to your eating plan. According to the ADA, the portion size of popcorn for a diabetic equals about 15 grams of carbs, or three cups of popped popcorn. As a diabetic could consume between 15 to 30 grams of carbs for snacks, no more than six cups of popcorn should be ate at once. One ounce bags of the microwave popcorn have about 21g of carb, making the portions idea for one diabetic. Also read: How I Finally Cured My Diabetes Nutritional Content of Popcorn By comparison, foods that are high in fiber usually reflect a whole grain source of carb, which is a more complex form that is more slowly absorbed and digested. Like any other whole grain source of carbs, unprocessed and air-popped popcorn is a good source of nutrients for people with diabetes. In fact, a lot of “light” popcorns have 80 to 100 calories as well as 3 grams of fiber a serving. Popcorn doesn’t affect blood Continue reading >>

Diabetes? Pick Popcorn Over Potato Chips

Diabetes? Pick Popcorn Over Potato Chips

Move over, potato chips. Who doesn’t love a bowl of hot, crunchy popcorn? It’s one of my favorite snacks for several reasons: It’s a healthy whole grain. It’s fairly low in calories. It’s easy and quick to make. You can season it many different ways. Chips Versus Popcorn When you compare the nutritional values of popcorn to potato chips, popcorn comes out way ahead. A little 1-ounce bag of potato chips has 150 calories, 15 grams of carbs, 10 grams of fat, and 150 grams of sodium. One cup of air-popped popcorn has just 31 calories, 6 grams of carbohydrates, less than 1 gram of fat, and 0 grams of sodium. Even when popped in oil, a cup of popcorn has only 55 calories. So dig in to three cups of popcorn. It’s a nutritious, satisfying snack with fewer than 100 calories. Make It Healthy Forget the bags of already-popped corn in the supermarket snack aisle. They often have extra fat and sodium. Some “light” microwavable popcorn products are fine, but it’s easy and cheaper to pop your own: Use the microwave oven. Place two tablespoons of popcorn in a brown paper bag. Fold the bag shut twice. Microwave for 2 to 3 minutes until the popping stops. Use the stove top. Heat two teaspoons canola oil in a heavy-bottomed pan on medium-high heat. When the oil is hot, add two tablespoons of kernels. Cover the pot and shake gently for 2 to 3 minutes until the popping has slowed. Use a hot air popcorn popper. Just follow the machine’s instructions. You won’t need to use any oil to pop the corn. Season It Your Way Instead of melted butter, drizzle the popped corn with olive oil (my favorite healthy oil). A little oil helps seasonings stick to the popcorn. If you’re watching calories, skip the oil, or use an oil mister so a little goes a long way. Try these zesty seas Continue reading >>

5 Healthy Snacks For People With (or Without!) Diabetes

5 Healthy Snacks For People With (or Without!) Diabetes

Yes, you can snack if you have diabetes When your stomach starts to rumble, you need a snack that can curb your hunger without blowing your blood sugar. Just like meals, snacks should be a combination of fat, protein, and carbohydrates. Aim for one that consists of 15 to 30 grams of carbohydrates and 100 to 200 calories (depending on your meal plan and medication). Here are five that typically get a seal of approval from diabetes educators and nutritionists. Whole-grain crackers, grapes, and cottage cheese Nutrient-rich whole grains like cracked wheat, whole wheat, rye, and quinoa can lower blood sugar and cholesterol. The cottage cheese adds protein to stabilize blood sugar, curb hunger pangs, and provide calcium for strong bones. Buy your favorite whole-grain crackers, and make sure that the first ingredient is whole-wheat flour or another whole grain, such as rye. (Even if the ingredient list says "wheat flour," it is not a whole-grain food unless it specifies "whole-wheat flour.") Arrange on a small plate 2 crackers, 1/4 cup nonfat cottage cheese, and 1/4 cup grapes. Serving size: 2 crackers, 1/4 cup cottage cheese, and 1/4 cup grapes. Nutritional information—Calories: 138, Total Carbohydrate: 21.2 g (7%), Dietary Fiber: 1.5 g (6%), Sugars 11.9 g Homemade popcorn Popcorn is high in fiber, and when made from scratch is an all-natural food without additives and artificial flavorings. Pour 1 tablespoon of mild-flavored oil such as canola into a heavy-bottomed medium-large pot. Cover the bottom of the pot with 1/2 cup of popcorn kernels spread in a thin layer. (If the kernels are too crowded, not all of them will pop.) Cover the pot and heat on medium, shaking the pot every minute or so until all of the kernels have popped. Take care not to cook too long, which could Continue reading >>

15 Best Snack Foods For Diabetics

15 Best Snack Foods For Diabetics

Figuring out the right snack foods in between meals is hard enough for most people, but what if you're one of the 18.8 million people in the United States who have been diagnosed with diabetes? The options may seem even more limited. That's why we've put together a list of 15 diabetic-friendly snacking options based on advice from a few experts. Lori Kenyon, certified nutritional consultant, says that raw almonds and cashews are high in protein and fiber, making them a very satisfying treat. One 1-ounce serving, or 24 to 28 medium-sized nuts, has around 170 calories, 5.5 to 8 grams of carbohydrates, and almost no transfat. Kenyon also recommends jicama to her clients. Jicama is a root vegetable that is super tasty raw or cooked. After peeling, you can slice it into sticks and then refrigerate until cold. Either dash the slices with diced red pepper or hot spices for a kick, dip into salsa or your favorite hummus , or grill or bake it with a little olive oil to make a diabetic-friendly french fry. Eat your fill, since each ounce of jicama has only 11 calories, 2 grams of carbohydrates, and 1 gram of sodium. Edamame are also a favorite of Kenyon's. She says one 1-ounce serving of this tasty snack has only 34 calories, 1 gram of fat, 3 grams of carbohydrates, 2 milligrams of sodium, and 3 grams of protein. You can boil and eat them alone or toss some into a blender or food processor with a little olive oil and seasonings to make a tasty dip or spread to pair with raw veggies. Kenyon says that similar to jicama, zucchini and yellow squash can be sliced like french fries, chilled, and then dipped in salsa or hummus for a tasty treat that satisfies cravings. One cup of yellow squash has 18 calories, 0.2 grams of fat, 3.8 grams of carbohydrates, 2 milligrams of sodium, and 1. Continue reading >>

Popcorn?

Popcorn?

I thought popcorn was safe to eat as a snack. I just found a "Glycemic index" on the American Diabetes Association website that said popcorn has a high glycemic index and can cause a sugar spike. Is this true? D.D. Family Getting much harder to control It sure is for me, check with your meter readings. Things made from corn or grains spike me to the moon. I thought popcorn was safe to eat as a snack. I just found a "Glycemic index" on the American Diabetes Association website that said popcorn has a high glycemic index and can cause a sugar spike. Is this true? YES! FWIW, I won't eat it, even at the movies! Way too many carbs. For some, it is the portion size. I have found I can have one cup of popped corn (with butter), if I go over that amount, it isn't pretty. Haven't done it in a while because it is hard to stick with the portion size and I don't respond well to corn or wheat. Get some pork rinds and use a sugar free salsa dip or ranch made with sour cream (full fat) No carbs in pork rinds unless you get the barbecue and then they add sugar or maltodextrin. Rather than go by glycemic index, use the carb count and your meter to tell you what works. Popcorn is pretty much in the middle of the Glycemic index likely because the starch in corn converts easily to glucose. I think that the ADA recognizes that, but also says that a small portion made without add-ins can be a nutritious and filling snack.. I'm not a big popcorn fan but I do make some on occasion and keep out a ~2cup serving for myself and Pam gets the rest. Since it's usually a snack and not part of a meal I don't see any big spike or rise in my bg from this. Also, it's best to buy the plain popping corn and put your own butter on it. The packaged popcorn mix can have all sorts of additives. HbA1c 1st Novem Continue reading >>

6 Facts About Popcorn And Diabetes (#good Or Bad ?)

6 Facts About Popcorn And Diabetes (#good Or Bad ?)

Researches report that popcorn is rich of fitonutrient. It also contains polyphenol twice more than a portion of fruit. If we eat popcorn only during cinema time, it means we miss one of the healthiest seeds. We can eat 3 cups of popcorn for gaining 99 calorie and 4 gram fiber. Sponsors Link 6 Connections between Popcorn and Diabetes Patients: 1. Whole Grain. Inside of these whole seeds, there are parts called germ, bran and endosperm. The germ contains healthy oil, vitamin E, protein, a lot of vitamin B, and mineral. Meanwhile, the bran contains a lot of fiber, vitamin B, mineral, protein, and antioxidant. And in endosperm we can find flour content that is rich of protein and fiber. As popcorn is made of corn seeds. People who eat popcorn automatically consume 250% more whole seeds than people who do not eat popcorn. 2. Rich of Fiber. In popcorn contains 4 gram of diet fiber. These 4 gram of diet fiber can be gained in 4 cups of popcorn. Most popcorn is consumed more than 4 cups so that it can meet the 25 gram fiber intake in women and 38 gram fiber intake in men. The regular intake of fiber can decrease the risk of cardiovascular or heart disease. It also levels down the cholesterol in our blood and decrease the risk of suffering diabetes type 2 because it flows our blood flow well. 3. Polyphenols. There is high antioxidant found in popcorn. It is indeed higher than expected. The antioxidant in popcorn is in the form of polyphenols. It is in the corn skin that is not peeled when popcorn is cooked. Peeling skin corn when it is cooked becomes popcorn will reduce the benefit of polyphenols. The sufficient intake of polyphenols is beneficial to prevent our body from heart disease, cancer, and diabetes. Polyphenols is powerful to prevent us from free radicals and reduce th Continue reading >>

Late-night Eating: Ok If You Have Diabetes?

Late-night Eating: Ok If You Have Diabetes?

Are late-night snacks a no-no for people who have diabetes? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. If you have diabetes, late-night snacks aren't necessarily off-limits — but it's important to make wise choices. Late-night snacks add extra calories, which can lead to weight gain. And if you snack after your evening meal — especially if the foods contain carbohydrates — you may wake up the next morning with a high blood sugar level. If you're hungry after dinner, choose a "free" food, such as: One sugar-free frozen cream pop Five baby carrots One cup of light popcorn A small handful of goldfish-style crackers A can of diet soda Or swap the snack for a piece of gum or small hard candy. These "free" foods have few, if any, carbohydrates and calories, so they won't contribute to weight gain or increased blood sugar. If you take insulin or other diabetes medications and feel that you must snack before bedtime to prevent low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) during the night, talk to your doctor. He or she may recommend adjusting the dose of your medications to prevent the need for a late-night snack. Continue reading >>

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