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Plant Based Diet Diabetes Study

New Study Shows Vegan Diet Improves Diabetes Markers In Overweight Adults

New Study Shows Vegan Diet Improves Diabetes Markers In Overweight Adults

New study shows vegan diet improves diabetes markers in overweight adults February 12, 2018, Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine A plant-based diet improves beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity in overweight adults with no history of diabetes, according to a new study published in Nutrients by researchers from the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine. Measuring the function of beta cells, which store and release insulin, can help assess future type 2 diabetes risk. The study randomly assigned participantswho were overweight and had no history of diabetesto an intervention or control group in a 1:1 ratio. For 16 weeks, participants in the intervention group followed a low-fat vegan diet based on fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and legumes with no calorie limit. The control group made no diet changes. Neither group changed exercise or medication routines. Based on mathematical modeling, the researchers determined that those on a plant-based diet increased meal-stimulated insulin secretion and beta-cell glucose sensitivity, compared to those in the control group . The plant-based diet group also experienced a decrease in blood sugar levels both while fasting and during meal tests. "The study has important implications for diabetes prevention," says lead study author Hana Kahleova, M.D., Ph.D. "Type 2 diabetes affects approximately 30 million Americans, with 84 million more suffering from prediabetes." Physicians Committee researchers posit that because the intervention group experienced weight loss, including loss of body fat, their fasting insulin resistance decreased (i.e. improved), and their beta-cell function improved as a result. "If nothing changes, our next generationthe first expected to live shorter lives than their parentsis in troubl Continue reading >>

Diabetic? 5 Reasons To Eat A Plant-based Diet

Diabetic? 5 Reasons To Eat A Plant-based Diet

Save Here in the United States, 9.3 percent of the population (over 29 million!) has diabetes. Every year, 1.4 million Americans becomes a newly diagnosed diabetic. If you don’t have diabetes, you probably know someone who does. It’s a growing epidemic and can lead to complications such as hypertension, heart disease, stroke, loss of feet and limbs, blindness and kidney disease. Luckily, word is starting to spread about the benefits of eating plants to combat this chronic disease. Many a doctor has said, if a plant-based diet came in pill form, it would be the miracle cure and everyone would want one. Lose weight, improve blood sugar control, decrease risk of cancer and heart disease, clear up your skin and recover from exercise faster with absolutely no negative side effects? Sounds perfect. There’s tons of research to support the benefits of eating a plant-based diet. This study found that diabetics who replaced at least 35 percent of their total protein intake with plant protein (like soy, legumes and nuts) improved their blood sugar control. Imagine what would happen if they had replaced 50 percent of their meat consumption with plants — or even all of it! These results are in line with other studies, such as the Adventist Health Study, in which vegetarian/vegan diets are associated with a lower risk for diabetes, as well as all-cause mortality. In a study of 92,000 women and 40,000 men, replacing just one serving of animal protein for plant protein was associated with a 10 to 21 percent reduced risk for type 2 diabetes. On the flip side, evidence shows that diets high in animal protein (especially red meat) are associated with an increased occurrence of the chronic disease. Why, specifically, are plant-derived foods a better choice? 1. Fat in animal protein Continue reading >>

Disarming Diabetes With A Plant-based Diet

Disarming Diabetes With A Plant-based Diet

Diabetes is a major public health problem of epidemic proportions. Eleven percent of the U.S. adult population has diabetes (up from 8 percent in 2007), and nearly one-third of those 65 and older have the disease. Uncontrolled, diabetes can lead to complications from head to toe, including stroke, loss of vision, heart disease, kidney failure, and various problems due to nerve damage and circulatory problems, such as erectile dysfunction or lower-extremity amputation.–Physicians Committee What if someone told you that, not only could you manage and slow the progression of type 2 diabetes, but possibly even reverse it. Would you believe them? It may sound too good to be true, but research studies are showing that a plant-based diet can do just that. A 2006 study, conducted by the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine with the George Washington University and the University of Toronto, looked at the health benefits of a low-fat, unrefined, plant-based diet (excluding all animal products) in people with type 2 diabetes. Portions of vegetables, grains, fruits, and legumes were unlimited. The plant-based diet group was compared with a group following a portion-controlled, higher-fat diet based on American Diabetes Association (ADA) guidelines. The results of this 22-week study were astounding: Forty-three percent of the plant-based group and 26 percent of the ADA group reduced their diabetes medications. Among those whose medications remained constant, the plant-based group lowered hemoglobin A1C, an index of long-term blood glucose control, by 1.2 points, three times the change in the ADA group. The plant-based group lost an average of about 13 pounds, compared with about 9 pounds in the ADA group. Among those participants who didn’t change their lipid-lowering Continue reading >>

Plant-based Diet Improves Diabetes Markers In Overweight Adults: Study

Plant-based Diet Improves Diabetes Markers In Overweight Adults: Study

Plant-based diet improves diabetes markers in overweight adults: study Related tags: Insulin resistance , Obesity , Diabetes A vegan diet improves insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function in overweight adults with no previous history of diabetes, reveals a new study in Nutrients. Participants who followed the plant-based diet for the 16-week intervention period saw increases in meal-stimulated insulin secretion and pancreatic beta-cell glucose sensitivity, found the research team led by the from the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine. Compared with controls, the plant-based diet group also had lower fasting insulin resistance and decreased fasting and postprandial blood glucose levels. The intervention group followed a low-fat vegan diet based on fruits, vegetables, whole grains and legumes with unlimited calorie intake. The macronutrient composition of the diet was around 75% energy from carbohydrates, 15% from protein and 10% from fat. The control group continued to consume their regular diet. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that beta-cell function and fasting insulin sensitivity can be modified by a 16-week dietary intervention. Our study suggests the potential of a low-fat plant-based diet in diabetes prevention, addressing both core pathophysiologic mechanismsinsulin resistance and diminished beta-cell functionat the same time, wrote lead author Dr. Hana Kahleova. The study findings are important in the context of the obesity epidemic facing many Western countries. "The study has important implications for diabetes prevention," commented Kahleova."Type 2 diabetes affects approximately 30 million Americans, with 84 million more suffering from prediabetes. "If nothing changes, our next generation--the first expected to live shorter lives than their Continue reading >>

The Broad Study: A Randomised Controlled Trial Using A Whole Food Plant-based Diet In The Community For Obesity, Ischaemic Heart Disease Or Diabetes

The Broad Study: A Randomised Controlled Trial Using A Whole Food Plant-based Diet In The Community For Obesity, Ischaemic Heart Disease Or Diabetes

There is little randomised evidence using a whole food plant-based (WFPB) diet as intervention for elevated body mass index (BMI) or dyslipidaemia. We investigated the effectiveness of a community-based dietary programme. Primary end points: BMI and cholesterol at 6 months (subsequently extended). Ages 35–70, from one general practice in Gisborne, New Zealand. Diagnosed with obesity or overweight and at least one of type 2 diabetes, ischaemic heart disease, hypertension or hypercholesterolaemia. Of 65 subjects randomised (control n=32, intervention n=33), 49 (75.4%) completed the study to 6 months. Twenty-three (70%) intervention participants were followed up at 12 months. All participants received normal care. Intervention participants attended facilitated meetings twice-weekly for 12 weeks, and followed a non-energy-restricted WFPB diet with vitamin B12 supplementation. At 6 months, mean BMI reduction was greater with the WFPB diet compared with normal care (4.4 vs 0.4, difference: 3.9 kg m−2 (95% confidence interval (CI)±1), P<0.0001). Mean cholesterol reduction was greater with the WFPB diet, but the difference was not significant compared with normal care (0.71 vs 0.26, difference: 0.45 mmol l−1 (95% CI±0.54), P=0.1), unless dropouts were excluded (difference: 0.56 mmol l−1 (95% CI±0.54), P=0.05). Twelve-month mean reductions for the WFPB diet group were 4.2 (±0.8) kg m−2 BMI points and 0.55 (±0.54, P=0.05) mmol l−1 total cholesterol. No serious harms were reported. This programme led to significant improvements in BMI, cholesterol and other risk factors. To the best of our knowledge, this research has achieved greater weight loss at 6 and 12 months than any other trial that does not limit energy intake or mandate regular exercise. Globally, the ob Continue reading >>

Plant-based Diets & Diabetes

Plant-based Diets & Diabetes

Weve known for a half century that plant-based diets are associated with lower diabetes risk, but how low does one have to optimally go on animal product and junk food consumption? Decades ago we started to get the first inklings that a plant-based diet may be protective against diabetes. Studies going back half a century found that those eating meat one or more days a week had significantly higher rates of diabetes, and the more frequently meat was eaten, the more frequent the disease. And this is after controlling for weight. Even at the same weight, those eating plant-based had but a fraction of the diabetes rates, and if anything, vegetarians should have had more diabetes just because they appear to live so much longer so had more time to develop these kinds of chronic diseasesbut noapparently lower rates of death and disease. Fast forward 50 years to the Adventist-2 study, looking at 89,000 people and we see a stepwise drop in the rates of diabetes as one eats more and more plant-based, down to a 78% lower prevalence among those eating strictly plant-based. Protection building incrementally as one moved from eating meat, to eating less meat, to just fish, to no meat, and then to no eggs and dairy either. We see the same thing with another leading killer, high blood pressure. The greater the proportion of plant foods, the lower the rates of hypertension. The same with excess body fat. The only dietary group not on average overweight were those eating diets composed exclusively of plant foods, but again this same incremental drop with fewer and fewer animal products. This suggests that its not black and white, not all or nothing; any steps one can make towards eating healthier may accrue significant benefits. Followed over time, vegetarian diets were associated with Continue reading >>

A Plant-based Diet For Type 2 Diabetes

A Plant-based Diet For Type 2 Diabetes

The main goal of diabetes treatment is to protect the blood vessels. When the delicate blood vessels of the heart, eyes, kidneys, and feet are attacked, the complications can be devastating, even fatal. Foods are our first line of defense, and a plant-based diet is your arteries best friend. It has no animal fat and no cholesterolat all. And as part of a healthful lifestyle, it has been shown to reopen narrowed arteries. In 2003, our research team was funded by the National Institutes of Health to put a plant-based diet to the test. The year-and-a-half study used a three-pronged regimen: it was veganthat is free of animal products. It was low in fat, and was low-Glycemic-Index. It was already clear that a low-fat vegan diet is highly effective for improving body weight, cholesterol, and blood pressure. The new study showed that, compared with a more conventional regimen focused on limiting calories and carbohydrates, the plant-based diet was much more effective in improving blood sugar control. In participants whose medication regimens remained constant, the drop in A1C was 0.4 points for the conventional diet and 1.2 points for a plant-based diet.1 Since then, many people have used this approach, finding that it is really quite easybecause there is no calorie-counting, no skimpy portions, and not even carb-counting, except when needed for calibrating insulin doses. Low-carb diets are based on the simplistic idea that carbs release glucose into the blood. True enough, but our bodies run on glucose. It is our basic fuel. So the real issue is, what is preventing glucose from getting from the bloodstream into the cells where it belongs? The answer, of course, is insulin resistance. At Yale University, researchers have investigated the causes of insulin resistance. With MR Continue reading >>

Study Finds Plant-based Diet Can Drastically Improve Diabetes Markers

Study Finds Plant-based Diet Can Drastically Improve Diabetes Markers

Study Finds Plant-Based Diet Can Drastically Improve Diabetes Markers Yet another testament to the power of a plant-based diet ! A recent study published in Nutrientsby a Physicians for Responsible Medicine (PCRM) research team, showed that a plant-based diet improves insulin sensitivityand beta-cell function in overweight adults. The participants, who had no previous history of diabetes, followed a plant-based diet for 16 weeks. When compared with the control group, the plant-based group had increased stimulatedinsulinsecretion, lowered body weight, and beta-cell glucose sensitivity. We have demonstrated that beta-cell function and fasting insulin sensitivity can be modified by a 16-week dietary prevention, said the lead author of the study, Dr. Hana Kahleova. The results of the study are important considering how Western diets are laden with heavy animal products (the average American eats about double the amount of protein they need). Not only is a switch to a plant-based diet better for your health, the animals , and the environment , plant-based diets could save BILLIONS in healthcare costs. A recent study published in the Journal of Nutrition posits that the U.K. could cut its healthcare and societal costs 5.87 billion Euros ($7.30 billion) simply if 10 percent of the population opted for plant-based options. The researchers also concluded that plant-based diets reduce the risk of diabetes , cardiovascular disease , stroke , and certain cancers . In yet another recent study published in the journal Frontiers in Nutrition , researchers showed strong evidence that a mostly plant-based diet has a LESSER environmental impact, as opposed to one high in animal products. Knowing the vast benefits of a plant-based diet, both on a personal level and in society, many count Continue reading >>

A Plant-based Diet For The Prevention And Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes

A Plant-based Diet For The Prevention And Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes

Go to: Abstract The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is rising worldwide, especially in older adults. Diet and lifestyle, particularly plant-based diets, are effective tools for type 2 diabetes prevention and management. Plant-based diets are eating patterns that emphasize legumes, whole grains, vegetables, fruits, nuts, and seeds and discourage most or all animal products. Cohort studies strongly support the role of plant-based diets, and food and nutrient components of plant-based diets, in reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes. Evidence from observational and interventional studies demonstrates the benefits of plant-based diets in treating type 2 diabetes and reducing key diabetes-related macrovascular and microvascular complications. Optimal macronutrient ratios for preventing and treating type 2 diabetes are controversial; the focus should instead be on eating patterns and actual foods. However, the evidence does suggest that the type and source of carbohydrate (unrefined versus refined), fats (monounsaturated and polyunsaturated versus saturated and trans), and protein (plant versus animal) play a major role in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes. Multiple potential mechanisms underlie the benefits of a plant-based diet in ameliorating insulin resistance, including promotion of a healthy body weight, increases in fiber and phytonutrients, food-microbiome interactions, and decreases in saturated fat, advanced glycation endproducts, nitrosamines, and heme iron. Keywords: Diabetes mellitus, Insulin resistance, Vegan, Vegetarian Go to: 1. Introduction Type 2 diabetes is a global epidemic, with approximately 422 million cases worldwide and a rapidly rising prevalence in middle- and low-income countries.[1] In the United States in 2011–2012, 12%–14% of adul Continue reading >>

Should You Go Vegetarian? The Benefits Of A Plant-based Diet For People With Diabetes

Should You Go Vegetarian? The Benefits Of A Plant-based Diet For People With Diabetes

What if you were told you could lose weight, lower your blood glucose and blood pressure, prevent heart disease, and slow the progression of type 2 diabetes—or prevent it if you don’t yet have it? It sounds too good to be true, but more and more research indicates that a plant-based eating plan may help people with diabetes. What the Studies Show In a 72-week study published by Neal Barnard, M.D., president of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, people with type 2 diabetes followed either a low-fat vegan diet or a moderate-carbohydrate plan. Both groups lost weight and improved their cholesterol. When people who didn’t complete the study or had medication changes were omitted from the study analysis, there was a significantly greater decrease in A1C and LDL (bad) cholesterol in the vegans. A study of nearly 100,000 members of the Seventh-day Adventist church, which promotes a vegetarian diet, showed that the vegetarians had a lower rate of type 2 than nonvegetarians. “The closer people follow a vegan diet, the more they stay at a healthy weight and prevent type 2,” says Michael J. Orlich, M.D., assistant professor of preventive medicine at Loma Linda University in California. Orlich was involved with the study. Not eating red and processed meats may help prevent type 2 even without factoring in body weight. Two long-term, ongoing studies by the Harvard School of Public Health tracking nearly 150,000 health care providers showed that people who ate an additional half serving of red meat daily for four years had a 50 percent higher risk of developing type 2. Cutting back on red-meat intake by more than a half serving a day reduced this risk by 15 percent. “Study after study has tightly linked eating a plant-based diet with decreasing a number of Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Cause, Prevention, Treatment And Reversal With A Plant Based Diet

Diabetes - Cause, Prevention, Treatment And Reversal With A Plant Based Diet

Summary This is a long article, so here's the summary: In the next 25 years 1 in every 3 Americans will have developed type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is a serious progressive disease. Type 2 diabetes is largely a lifestyle-related disease and is preventable. Caused by diets high in saturated fat, not high in carbohydrates. Animal products and processed foods contain the vast majority of saturated fat in our diets. The excess fat inhibits insulin's effect so blood sugar levels remain dangerously high. By following a low-fat plant-based diet your risk of developing diabetes is very, very low. People with diabetes are at high risk for heart disease and stroke. Removing animal products from your diet helps lower your risk of having a heart attack or stroke. A low-fat plant-based diet has been proven to treat and reverse diabetes. Heart disease risk is also lowered by following a low-fat plant-based diet. A plant-based diet has been shown to work better than American Diabetes Association's guidelines in treating diabetes. Patients switching to a vegan diet didn't find it any harder to stick to than the ADA's recommended guidelines. Diabetes will affect 1 in every 3 of us Introduction Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition with the exact cause is currently unknown. It is partly inherited with multiple genes influencing the overall risk. Type 1 diabetes means the body doesn't produce insulin on it's own so insulin injections are required. There is currently no known way to prevent type 1 diabetes, but this form of diabetes only accounts for 5–10% of all cases of diabetes.[1] However type 2 diabetes is far more common. This form of diabetes accounts for 90-95% of all diabetes cases, and is characterised by insulin resistance. Type 2 diabetes is a lifestyle related disea Continue reading >>

Plant-based Diet Studies - Read All Research And Evidence | Plantpure - Plantpure Nation

Plant-based Diet Studies - Read All Research And Evidence | Plantpure - Plantpure Nation

Fact: In the U.S., 29.1 million people have diabetes (about 10% of the population). If current trends continue, one in three adults could have diabetes by 2050. James Anderson, M.D. studied a group of Type 1 & 2 diabetic patients following a mostly plant-based diet, all of whom had been taking insulin prior to their dietary change. Here are the results after three weeks: Type 1 diabetic patients reduced their medication on average by 40% 24 of the 25 Type 2 diabetic patients were able to discontinue their insulin A recent study from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health surveyed 200,000 health professionals for more than 20 years and found that those following a healthy plant-based diet had a 34% lower risk of developing diabetes. Fact: Approximately 39% percent of men and women will be diagnosed with cancer of any type at some point during their lifetime. A large prospective study found that the occurrence of all cancers were lower for those eating a plant-based diet as compared to those eating the Standard American Diet. A study that looked at men and women between the ages of 50 to 65 found that those eating higher protein diets had a 75% increase in overall mortality and four fold increased risk of dying from cancer. The American Cancer Society (February 13, 2015) published their recommendations that cancer survivors should follow plant-based diets that are high in fruits, vegetables and unrefined grains. Continue reading >>

Vegan Diet Rapidly Improves Type 2 Diabetes Markers In Adults

Vegan Diet Rapidly Improves Type 2 Diabetes Markers In Adults

Vegan Diet Rapidly Improves Type 2 Diabetes Markers in Adults In overweight adults with no history of diabetes, a low-fat, plant-based vegan diet can reduce visceral fat and significantly improve both pancreatic beta-cell function and insulin resistance, potentially decreasing the risk of type 2 diabetes, according to researchers. The 16-week randomized controlled trial in 73 adults showed that participants who ate a diet of vegetables, grains, legumes, and fruits significantly improved their overall metabolic condition, say Hana Kahleova, MD, PhD, of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine in Washington, DC, and colleagues. "Our study suggests the potential of a low-fat plant-based diet in diabetes prevention, addressing both core pathophysiologic mechanisms insulin resistance and diminished beta-cell function at the same time," they write in their article, published online February 9 in Nutrients. In a statement by the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, Kahleova said the study "has important implications for diabetes prevention." An estimated 30 million Americans have type 2 diabetes and it is projected that a third of the population will develop diabetes, she pointed out. "Fortunately, this study adds to the growing evidence that food really is medicine and that eating a healthful plant-based diet can go a long way in preventing diabetes." Previous studies have shown that the prevalence of diabetes is 46% to 74% lower in people who eat a plant-based diet compared with meat lovers in the general population, according to background information in the article. A vegan diet has also been shown to improve glycemic control in type 2 diabetes better than calorie-restricted, low-carbohydrate diets, the researchers note. Insulin resistance leading to im Continue reading >>

Plant-based Diets For Diabetes

Plant-based Diets For Diabetes

The three diabetes videos I mentioned are: For those seeking a deeper understanding of what diabetes really is and what causes it, check out How Not to Die from Diabetes, and this series of videos: Thankfully, not only can diabetes be reversed, but so can some of its complications. See Can Diabetic Retinopathy Be Reversed? and, for diabetic neuropathy, my live annual review From Table to Able: Combating Disabling Diseases with Food. Of course, preventing it is better: There are some foods that may increase the risk: And others that may help: If you haven’t yet, you can subscribe to my videos for free by clicking here. Continue reading >>

A Prescription For A Plant-based Diet Can Help Reverse Diabetes

A Prescription For A Plant-based Diet Can Help Reverse Diabetes

Mark Hatfield via Getty Images Chances are good that you have diabetes or know someone who does. Even if you don’t, you’re paying for the care of millions of people with diabetes through your taxes. It’s a disease that affects people of all backgrounds, income levels, and, increasingly, ages, and it costs our country nearly a quarter trillion dollars every year — that’s well over the total yearly revenue of electronics giant Apple. New statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that 29 million Americans have diabetes and another 86 million have prediabetes. Hardest hit are Native Americans, followed by African Americans and Latinos. They are at far greater risk for heart attacks, blindness, amputations, kidney failure, painful nerve symptoms, and loss of a decade of life compared with those who do not have the disease. But a recent report has found that one simple prescription could help reverse diabetes, improve blood sugar, and lower weight, blood pressure, and cholesterol. It could allow the 115 million Americans with diabetes or prediabetes to dramatically reduce their medications or get off them entirely. And all this is possible, the analysis found, not with a new magic pill, but with tried-and-true, simple changes to diet. A team of researchers from the United States and Japan, including the Physicians Committee’s Susan Levin, MS, RD and myself, published a new meta-analysis showing that a plant-based diet significantly improves diabetes management. Combining the results of six prior studies, we found that a plant-based diet boosts blood sugar control considerably. Among the studies analyzed was our 2006 NIH-funded trial, which found that plant-based diets could improve a key indicator of blood sugar control called hemoglobin Continue reading >>

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