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Pizza Diabetics

Best Low Carb Pizza For Diabetics Ever 4

Best Low Carb Pizza For Diabetics Ever 4

All hail FAT HEAD pizza crust, the best low carb, pizza for diabetics EVER!!! The crust’s recipe comes from Tom Naughton’s Fat Head site, Tom’s a super cool dude and some say he’s EVEN funnier than me… it’s true. :) Mouthwatering Pizza Pictures! Best Low Carb Pizza Recipe Low Carb Pizza Topping Preparation When you first start your ‘low carb paleo’ journey, eating a variety of foods is important for some. Once I discovered these recipes Low Carb Pizza Crust, Low Carb Faux Spaghetti and Low Carb Paleo Chili, I knew that I could survive and thrive on a ‘low carb paleo’ meal plan. Today I rarely eat replacement foods like this pizza, I have gravitated to simpler foods typically eating fatty meats and leafy green veggies for most of my meals. The low carb pizza crust in this post truly is THE best pizza crust I’ve ever tasted, bar none. Even better, its a great low carb pizza for diabetics … too! :) Diabetes Friendly Pizza Crust Here is the recipe post on Fat Head Crust Ingredients: 1 1/2 cups shredded mozzarella ¾ cup almond flour 2 tbs cream cheese 1 egg Garlic salt Parchment paper and cookie sheet. Instructions: put mozzarella & cream cheese in a medium size microwaveable bowl Microwave for 1 min, stir and then another 30 sec, stir (very hot!) Wet hands and spread “dough” thin on parchment paper. It should spread evenly with dough-like consistency (if “stringy” then your cheese has hardened too much— just put it back in the microwave for maybe another 20 seconds) Dock (poke rows of holes) with a fork to avoid bubbling Sprinkle with garlic salt Put in 425 degree oven After about 8 minutes, check it and poke holes where any large bubbles may be. Continue cooking for a total 12-14 min, or until slightly brown on top. Note: If you like your Continue reading >>

Easy Homemade Diabetic Pizza Recipe

Easy Homemade Diabetic Pizza Recipe

Ingredients Nonstick cooking spray 1/4 cup onion, diced 1/4 cup green pepper, diced 1/2 cup sliced mushrooms 1 teaspoon olive oil 8-ounce thin and crispy pizza crust 1/2 cup prepared pizza sauce 2 ounces sliced Canadian bacon or lean ham, cut into half-inch pieces 1 cup shredded part-skim mozzarella cheese Directions Preheat oven to 425°F. Spray a large skillet with nonstick cooking spray. Add onion, green pepper, and mushrooms and sauté over medium heat until soft, about two to three minutes. Remove from heat. Brush the olive oil over the top of the pizza crust. Spread the pizza sauce over the crust up to half an inch from the edge. Evenly sprinkle the sautéed vegetables, Canadian bacon, and mozzarella over the crust. Place pizza crust on oven rack or cookie sheet in the middle position of the oven. Bake for 7–10 minutes. Remove from the oven and let sit for 3–5 minutes at room temperature, then cut into eight slices. Note: Nutrient analysis for the pizza is an approximation and will vary with the brand of pizza crust and types of ingredients used. Yield: 8 slices. Serving size: 2 slices. Nutrition Facts Per Serving: Calories: 330 calories, Carbohydrates: 34 g, Protein: 16 g, Fat: 14 g, Cholesterol: 20 mg, Sodium: 650 mg, Fiber: 2 g Exchanges per serving: 2 starch, 1 medium-fat meat, 2 fat. Carbohydrate choices: 2. This recipe was developed by Sandy Bjerkness, a registered dietitian working in research at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Continue reading >>

Can A Diabetic Eat Pizza & Chinese Food?

Can A Diabetic Eat Pizza & Chinese Food?

A person with diabetes can eat anything, so you can certainly include pizza and Chinese food on your menu. This doesn’t mean you can eat either type of fare with abandon or without consideration of other foods on your menu for the day. Careful planning and balanced nutrition play vital roles in managing symptoms of diabetes. Video of the Day A balanced diet for a person with diabetes includes essentially the same foods you’d find on a nutritionally sound diet for anyone – a combination of complex carbohydrates, lean protein, fruits, vegetables and dairy. A healthy diet also includes healthy fats such as those found in olive oil, oily fish, almonds and walnuts. A good balance includes obtaining 40 to 60 percent of your daily carbohydrates from carbohydrates, 20 to 35 percent from protein and 20 to 35 percent from fat. To help manage diabetes, you should limit refined carbohydrates and mix your consumption of both refined and complex carbohydrates with other foods. Pizza crust usually includes a crust made from white flour, a refined carbohydrate. To avoid causing sudden spikes in your blood sugar levels, limit the amount of pizza you eat at any one time. Order thin crust pizza and opt for whole wheat pizza crust when available. Your choice of toppings also proves important in managing diabetes. Cheese, a good source of calcium, contains some sugar. Order a pizza with light cheese. You also need to manage your weight and cholesterol to control symptoms of diabetes. If you want a meat topping, chicken makes a better choice than pepperoni. And if you add a lot of vegetables – tomatoes, broccoli, mushrooms, green peppers, spinach – these complex carbohydrates will help balance out the refined carbohydrates in the pizza crust. The Glycemic Index, a system that rates Continue reading >>

Pizza And Diabetes: How To Eat Pizza Without Sabotaging Your Blood Sugars

Pizza And Diabetes: How To Eat Pizza Without Sabotaging Your Blood Sugars

Pizza and Diabetes: How to Eat Pizza Without Sabotaging Your Blood Sugars Pizza and Diabetes: How to Eat Pizza Without Sabotaging Your Blood Sugars A Type 1 writer gives guidelines on how to dose insulin so you can occasionally indulge in high-carb/high-fat foods without making your blood sugars soar. Diabetes doesn't have to end your love affair with pizza. If you're going to occasionally indulge, do some experimenting and take good notes to figure out the right way to dose your insulin.Photo by Cel Lisboa on Unsplash Just because you live with type 1 diabetes doesnt mean you cant enjoy a few slices of pizza, or lasagna, or Chinese food, or even...a cupcake with buttercream frosting! (Note: If youre a hardcore low-carber and you can willfully resist cake and pizza every day of the week, all year long, this article simply isnt for you!) Personally, I make sure that most of my diet (80 to 90%) consists of real food, and is generally very low-carb, too. And then that leaves room for the occasional gluten-free carb-loaded dessert (I love baking!) or one of my favorite gluten-free pizzas (white pizza with lots of cheese and red onions...please!). But managing your blood sugar around those luxury items that are both loaded with carbs and loaded with fat means your usual insulin dosing protocol isnt going to work. This applies to foods including: Lasagna (most cheese & pasta Italian dishes, actually) Cakes & Cupcakes with buttercream frosting Surprisingly, there are foods that you would think should be on this list that Ive found simply dont qualify because they do digest at a more normal rate, like cheesecake! So you really need to take good notes when indulging to figure out what other foods should be on this list for you. Mostly, I think youll find that the 5 listed above Continue reading >>

Eating Out When You Have Diabetes

Eating Out When You Have Diabetes

en espaolComer fuera de casa cuando tienes diabetes Whether it's the local pizza joint after a game, the food court at the mall, or barbecued ribs on your best friend's back porch, eating out is probably a part of your social scene. You don't want to miss the fun just because you have to watch what you eat, and the good news is that you don't have to. You can pretty much eat the same foods as your friends and family you just have to keep track of what you eat and enjoy certain foods in moderation. If you're choosing where to eat, think about the places that offer you the most options even fast-food places have healthy choices on their menus. Whenever possible, look for nutritional facts on the meal you plan to order like calorie, carbohydrate, and fat content. This information is available in many chain restaurants (you may need to ask for it) or online. Don't worry you're not limited to places that serve only soy burgers and carrot sticks. If you can order a meal that includes a good balance of proteins, fats, and carbohydrates, you're doing OK. But if you find that certain restaurants don't offer many vegetable choices or that they only serve fried food that's covered in cheese, you might want to pick a place that offers more options. You might find that there are more healthy breakfast choices like yogurt, fresh fruit, and scrambled eggs for you at the diner than at the coffeehouse, so convincing your friends to chow down on diner food is one option. But if your friends prefer the coffeehouse, one alternative is to buy something to drink and bring a snack in your backpack or purse that's easy to eat discreetly, like pretzels or raisins. Some people may be embarrassed or worried that the manager might give them a hard time, though. If you think you might be in a situ Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Pizza

Can Diabetics Eat Pizza

A diabetic can eat anything but it doesn’t mean you can eat them with abandon. So for the question: Is pizza incompatible with diabetes? The answer is absolutely not. Balanced nutrition and careful planning play vital role in managing your diabetes. The real question is that how do we manage to perfectly incorporate pizza into our diet without suffering from marked hyperglycemia. Pizza Pizza can be lots of things you need to know. On the one hand, you should know it can be a cheese-filled, thick dough topped with the thick layer of the gooey cheese as well as loads of salty, fatty meats such as sausage and pepperoni. On the other hand, pizza can be the thin whole wheat crusts topped with a sprinkle of reduced fatty cheese, tomatoes along with loaded with veggies. Obviously, the type of pizza is more important to diabetics. Additionally, how often to consume and how much to consume come into play. Eating half of a big pizza or more will be very high in calories, fat and carbohydrates – and is not recommended. But, consuming a slice can more conveniently fit into your healthy eating plan. You still need to consider how often to consume pizza. Don’t eat too much a week. Pizza crust typically contains the crust made from a refined carbohydrate, white flour. To avoid causing rapid spikes in our blood sugar levels, so limit the amount of pizza we consume at any one time. Opt for the whole wheat pizza crust and thin crust pizza. Your choice of toppings always proves significant in managing your diabetes. Cheese includes some sugar, also a great source of calcium. Opt for a pizza along with light cheese, also manage your cholesterol and weight to control your diabetes. Opt for chicken as a meat topping rather than pepperoni. Some complex carbohydrates like spinach, green Continue reading >>

Low Carb Diabetic Pizza Crust

Low Carb Diabetic Pizza Crust

Who loves pizza? We do too. But did you know that regular pizza crust is super high in carbs? We're talking around 36 g total carbs and 33.5 g net carbs per slice for a 14″ pizza crust. I don't know about you but I like more than one slice of pizza! What that means is if you eat a slice of regular pizza you're going to see your blood sugar soaring and you won't be a happy chappy! Of course, we have a solution for you. In fact we've got several options. Over the coming days we're going to be sharing some low carb diabetic friendly pizza options for you to try (and thoroughly enjoy). This low carb pizza crust Our gourmet pizza recipe (pictured above – YUM!) Big breakfast pizza – yes, who said you can't have pizza for breakfast Baked zucchini pizza boats – these are so awesome Seriously, you are going to LOVE these because they are so tasty and yummy. Want to receive all these delicious recipes in your inbox? CLICK HERE to subscribe to our weekly newsletterand we'll send them to you. Well let's get on with it then… This diabetic pizza crust is made with diabetic friendly flour – almond flour, which greatly reduces the carb count. In fact, our version is just 6 g net carbs for half a large pizza. Oh yes, you can feel more than satisfied with this delicious crust. As you can see from the pictures below, it is quite a large pizza – around 4 generous slices per person. It's quite a thin base but it does not go soggy or fall apart either. Here's the recipe: Nutrition FactsLow Carb Diabetic Pizza Crust Amount Per Serving Calories 480 Calories from Fat 378 % Daily Value* Total Fat 42g 65% Saturated Fat 8g 40% Polyunsaturated Fat 18g Monounsaturated Fat 15g Cholesterol 109mg 36% Sodium 452mg 19% Potassium 20mg 1% Total Carbohydrates 12g 4% Dietary Fiber 6g 24% Sugars Continue reading >>

The Great Pizza And Diabetes Experiment

The Great Pizza And Diabetes Experiment

I hate pizza. Sure, it has that great smell. Yeah, it has an amazing look, as steam rises up over a landscape of melted cheeses dotted with toasted veggies and crisp meats. Oh, and the taste is wonderful, a molten fusion of flavors that rocks the taste buds. But I still hate pizza. Because no matter what I do, it effs up my blood sugar. Big time. And I’m not alone. The problem is that every pizza is two glucose highs waiting to happen. There are fast sugars in the crust and in the sauce, and there are slow carbs in the cheeses and meats. And pizza’s challenges for the pancreatically-challenged are everywhere. Pan, hand-tossed, or thin crust? What toppings? How generous or stingy is the cook? Does one brand have more sugar in their sauce than another? And what about the slices? A “slice” of pizza has a published carb count in many cases, but rarely are pizzas cut uniformly. It’s a nightmare. In wondering how on earth we're supposed to deal with all of this, my solution has been to avoid pizza altogether. So you can imagine how I felt when the 'Mine team asked me to take on pizza as the next in our line of "great food experiments" that have included ketchup, coffee, and craft beer so far. Given that March is National Nutrition Month, it seemed like a perfect time for the so-called Great Diabetes and Pizza Experiment. Know Thy Enemy I started by studying the enemy. And there’s a lot of information out there, despite the fact that pizza sales are actually on the decline with only $38,504,164,116 in sales last year. For those of you who can’t count your commas, that's $38 billion! There are more than a dozen brands of pizza out there and they have a pretty big carb range. Or so it would appear at first glance. But something interesting is lurking in the math. A Continue reading >>

Five Diabetes Myths, Busted

Five Diabetes Myths, Busted

David Kendall, M.D., is the chief scientific and medical officer of the The American Diabetes Association. The group’s 71st Scientific Sessions begin Friday in San Diego, California, with presentations of the latest research, treatment recommendations and advances toward a cure for diabetes. Each year diabetes accounts for more deaths than breast cancer and AIDS combined. While diabetes (both type 1 and type 2) is ever more manageable because of advances in medication, a better understanding of blood glucose monitoring and new technologies for delivering insulin, uncontrolled or undiagnosed diabetes still remains the leading cause of blindness in adults, kidney failure and amputation. There are many myths about diabetes - myths that can do much harm. Many believe that diabetes is “just a touch of sugar,” or only something we develop in later life. Although diabetes is manageable, the diabetes epidemic continues to grow; every 17 seconds someone is diagnosed with diabetes and at the current rate, one in three people in the U.S. will have diabetes by the year 2050. Knowing the facts (and your own risk) can help all of us fight the misconceptions associated with this awful disease and ultimately stop diabetes. So take a minute to learn the facts about diabetes. The more we know, the better equipped we are to detect, prevent and treat diabetes and its deadly complications. 1) Myth: Diabetes is really no big deal. Fact: As I’ve already noted, diabetes causes more deaths a year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. The risk of heart problems is more than twice as high in people with diabetes and two out of three people with diabetes die from heart disease or stroke. Uncontrolled diabetes also leads to a host of other complications. 2) Myth: Eating too much sugar cause Continue reading >>

Pizza And Blood Sugar Control: (not Quite) Easy As Pie

Pizza And Blood Sugar Control: (not Quite) Easy As Pie

by gary scheiner, MS, CDE Since the beginning of time, when cave people discovered the joys of combining cheese, sauce, and crust, people with diabetes have been perplexed on how to manage blood sugar levels when eating pizza. Things became even more complicated during the "toppings revolution" of the Renaissance, when folks started putting everything from salted fish to pineapple on their favorite pies. Today, even with an assortment of new tools and techniques for managing blood sugar, the "pizza effect" continues to elude the masses. Many find it nearly impossible to figure out the carbs-per-slice, whether it be thin-crust, hand-tossed, or deep-dish. For some, indulging in a few slices results in an inexplicable blood sugar drop after eating, followed by a momentous sugar surge. For others, the blood sugar doesn't start to head skyward until many hours later, perhaps overnight. For those who enjoy a slice (or two, or six...), here are three ideas that might help you find that delicate balance between the pizza you love and the healthy blood sugar you covet. 1. counting pizza carbs To count the carbs in pizza, you'll need a hand. Your hand, to be exact. You can estimate the number of carbs in pizza pretty well by using your hand as a measuring tool. A traditional, hand-tossed pizza that is the size of the average adult's hand contains approximately 30g of carb. And don't forget to include the corners! A traditional, hand-tossed pizza that is the size of the average adult's hand contains approximately 30g of carb. And don't forget to include the corners! In this example, the slice of pizza is slightly larger than an adult woman's hand, so we'll call it 35g. An adult's hand-size slice of thin-crust? Go with 20g. Deep-dish, pan or Sicilian? Call it 45g. To see if your ha Continue reading >>

Foods’ Strange Tricks

Foods’ Strange Tricks

You sit down to eat. How will your meal affect your blood glucose? If you’re on insulin, how much should you take? Turns out that counting carbohydrate will not always give you the answer. Food can affect you in strange ways. Do you know about the pizza effect? In a blog on glycemic index, I mentioned how plain pizza had a much higher glycemic index than a deluxe pizza with all the toppings. Plain dough and sauce raises your blood glucose way faster. What I didn’t mention was that all that carbohydrate in the deluxe pizza will get into your bloodstream eventually. You just don’t know when, unless you check your blood glucose every hour for four hours or even more. That’s because the fats and protein in the toppings slow down the absorption of carbohydrate. As a result, your blood glucose might spike two to five hours after the meal. Other meals that combine lots of carbohydrate with fats and/or proteins could have the same effect. Jan Chait posted here five years ago about a big spaghetti fest she had with her husband. The pasta was covered with a fatty sauce, with a side of garlic bread and lots of butter. Because of the fats (the pizza effect,) her blood glucose levels were up for two days, instead of just spiking high for an hour or two. One commenter posted on HealingWell.com that he injected enough insulin to cover the carbohydrate in a big Chinese meal, including lots of fried food. Two hours after eating, his glucose was 171, the same as it had been before the meal. But three hours later his sugar was over 500! It took him days to get back in control. Sometimes the pizza effect is helpful, like at bedtime. A bedtime snack that includes a small amount of fat and protein can help keep overnight levels from going too low. That way you don’t get a rebound e Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pizza: Can Diabetics Eat Pizza?

Diabetes And Pizza: Can Diabetics Eat Pizza?

When a person suffers from diabetes, he or she is always worried of everything that he or she eats. The disease is complicated and even a slight mistake as far as diet is concerned could be disastrous and damaging on the health. One such concern is about the inclusion of pizza in the diabetes meal plan. In this article, we shall deep dive and see if a person suffering from diabetes can have pizza it will be good or bad. So, join in for the article “Diabetes and Pizza: Can Diabetics Eat Pizza?” Risks Associated with Eating Pizza for Diabetics Let us look into the risks which eating of pizza can have in a person who suffers from diabetes: The crust of the pizza we love is made up of white flour. This white flour is rich in refined carbohydrates, something which is not considered healthy for diabetes patients. The crust of the pizza can give rise to the blood sugar levels of the body. Besides, the pizza we get in restaurants and fast food joints usually contain a lot of cheese. Cheese, can come in the way of healthy weight management and hence, pizza should be avoided. Besides, cheese is also known to contain too much of sugar, again not a healthy option for the diabetics. Pizza also tends to have very unhealthy toppings comprising meat, sausages, pepperoni, too much of salt, etc. which is really something that people suffering from diabetes should ideally avoid. Thus, pizza is not a very healthy option for the diabetics. However, it also depends on what type of pizza you are eating. If you can manage a pizza with a thin dough, light cheese, and healthy toppings, the fast food can be incorporated into your diet. The following paragraph explains some of the guidelines that you should keep in mind while you think of including pizza in your meal plan: Tips to Keep in Mind Continue reading >>

That Pizza May Be Worse For You If You Have Diabetes

That Pizza May Be Worse For You If You Have Diabetes

DIABETES: Fast food contains a lot of sugar and fat. But even worse, it causes blood sugar and fat levels (glucose and triglycerides) to skyrocket. Previous studies have shown that vascular function is impaired in the period right after you eat unhealthy foods, but there have been fewer studies of how the heart reacts. Now a study by NTNU’s Cardiac Exercise Research Group suggests that a single meal of fast food stresses the heart, and that the negative effect is greater for patients with type 2 diabetes than in healthy individuals. “Both the healthy and diabetic participants experienced changes in their diastolic heart function within half an hour after they had eaten. The heart needed to work harder to fill with blood in the relaxed diastole phase. While this effect was reversed after four hours in healthy participants, the effect lasted the longer for diabetics,” says the study’s first author Siri Marte Hollekim-Strand. Study method Ten individuals with type 2 diabetes and ten healthy individuals participated in the study. They were all the same age and had similar BMIs. A single meal of fast food stresses the heart, and the negative effect may be greater in patients with type 2 diabetes. Photo: Thinkstock All 20 participants ate a whole Dr. Oetker mozzarella pizza on three different occasions: 16-18 hours after they had completed either a workout with intensive 4 × 4 intervals, or a workout of moderate intensity or no training. The researchers measured participants’ heart function with ultrasound both before the workouts and before the meal, and then again 30 minutes, two hours and four hours after the meal. “The heart rate also increased after ingesting fast food, but here no significant differences between groups resulted. The pre-exercise workout (or Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Pizza If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Eat Pizza If I Have Diabetes?

Question: Is pizza incompatible with diabetes? Answer: Absolutely not The real question is how do I manage to incorporate pizza into my diet without experiencing marked hyperglycemia? Answer: Experiment! The “pizza” food group is often a staple in the lives of many children and adolescents. Some of my colleagues have even referred to it as evil! However, I prefer to refer to pizza management as a challenge and thus try to include it in meal planning in moderation. Pizza is a complex assortment of fat, protein, and carbohydrates (carbs). As such, despite coverage with either fast or rapid acting insulin, blood sugars are often elevated several hours after pizza parties. The goal is to perform “damage control” in order to avoid having high blood sugars all day or night. Suggestions for Pizza Strategies 1. All pizzas are not equal! It is important to realize that different brands have differing combinations of fat, protein and carbohydrates. Indeed, apps that can be downloaded to computers and mobile devices such as the Calorie King can provide carbohydrate counts for all the different brands of pizza (e.g. Domino’s, Pizza Hut). Use this information to help you estimate as best as possible the number of carbs per slice, etc. There’s a lot of debate surrounding the pros and cons of using artificial sweeteners especially when living with diabetes. Here are some highlights of recent research. 2. There are many algorithms for estimating carbs based on thickness of the pizza crust. Ask your diabetes team for their favorite. 3. Match your insulin regimen to accommodate the pizza. For those patients on conventional split mixed insulin with NPH/Regular or rapid acting (humalog, novolog or apidra) 2 or 3 injections/ day, time your slice(s) with a meal such that the rapi Continue reading >>

How To Order Fast Food When You Have Diabetes

How To Order Fast Food When You Have Diabetes

Although anyone may develop type 2 diabetes, this kind of diabetes is often caused by poor lifestyle choices, such as being overweight and not being physically active. Controlling your diet by avoiding typical fast-food choices can play a large role in helping control your blood sugar levels — a must when managing type 2 diabetes. Taking this important step may even reduce the amount of medication you need to take each day. But there are many reasons that you might need to rely on fast-food restaurants. For instance, you may work late hours or be pressed for time, and fast food might be the most convenient, or even the only, option available to you. There's no denying that these quick-bite chains seem to be everywhere — the United States has about 7.52 fast-food restaurants per 100,000 residents, according to a study published in December 2011 in the journal Critical Public Health. If you do find yourself needing to order at the drive-thru, don't fret. The key is knowing what to order to get the nutrition you need without jeopardizing your health. Type 2 Diabetes: Better Fast-Food Choices Common sense says that fast food isn't likely to be on the preferred-foods list for people with diabetes. After all, a typical fast-food breakfast can put you at or over your daily limit for fat, cholesterol, and carbohydrates. But many fast-food restaurants offer smart choices that can help you get the nutrition you need with the convenience you desire. For starters, fast food doesn’t have to mean fat-laden fare. Planning ahead is key, says Jenny Dejesus, NP, CDE, a diabetes educator at Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York City. Many fast-food chains now feature healthier choices, and these are the restaurants you want to go to. “If possible, look at the menu ahead of time Continue reading >>

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