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Pickled Okra And Diabetes

Is Okra Good For Diabetes?

Is Okra Good For Diabetes?

According to a handful of recent studies, okra may reduce symptoms of diabetes - a group of diseases that includes type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, and gestational diabetes. Diabetes claimed the lives of 75,578 Americans in 2013, according to the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In 2014, 8.5 percent of adults worldwide had the condition, the World Health Organization (WHO) report. By 2030, diabetes may be the seventh leading cause of death. A number of factors increase a person's risk of developing diabetes, including a family history of the disease. Lifestyle factors also play a role, so doctors routinely recommend diet changes and increased exercise to reduce blood sugar levels. Okra may help reduce blood sugar levels in some people with diabetes. Research into the effects of this seedy vegetable is still in the early stages, but the results are promising. Contents of this article: What is okra? Okra thrives in temperate climates, producing large hibiscus-like flowers that eventually give rise to green seed pods. It is a member of the mallow family, which includes a number of other popular plants, including hibiscus, cocoa, and cotton. Scientifically known as Abelmoschus esculentus, okra may have been grown as long ago as 2000 BCE in Egypt. Okra's flavor is mild, and the entire seed pod can be eaten. This vegetable-like fruit also has a long history in traditional medicine. Kew Royal Botanic Gardens report that in Eastern traditional medicine, okra leaves and fruit were used as pain relievers, moisturizers, and to treat urinary disorders. In Congolese medicine, okra is used to encourage a safe delivery during childbirth. Can okra help with symptoms of diabetes? Diabetes can often be well-managed with increasing a hormone called insulin Continue reading >>

What Is Okra?

What Is Okra?

Tweet Okra is fast gaining a reputation as a so-called 'superfood' for people with or at risk of diabetes or cancer. Commonly referred to as ladyfingers, or by its biological names Abelmoschus esculentus and Hibiscus esculentus, okra is known to have a positive effect on blood sugar control, among many other health benefits. Okra is a tall-growing vegetable that traces its origin from ancient Ethiopia (Abyssinia) through to Eastern Mediterranean, India, the Americas and the Caribbean. Parts of the plant (immature okra pods) are widely used vegetables in tropical countries and are typically used for making soups, stews or as a fried/boiled vegetable. These tender pods are very low in calories, providing just 30 calories per 100 g, and contain no saturated fats or cholesterol. They are also rich in nutrients, completely non-toxic, and have no adverse side effects. How can it help treat diabetes? Evidence of okra having anti-diabetic properties has increased in recent years, with multiple Vitro (laboratory) and Vivo (animal) studies confirming okra as a potent blood glucose-lowering (or anti-diabetic) food. In one study, published 2011 in the Journal of Pharmacy & BioAllied Sciences, researchers in India found that diabetic mice fed dried and ground okra peels and seeds experienced a reduction in their blood glucose levels, while others showed a gradual decrease in blood glucose following regular feeding of okra extract for about ten days. Outside of scientific research, many people with diabetes have reported decreasing blood sugar levels after soaking cut-up okra pieces in water overnight and then drinking the juice in the morning, while in Turkey roasted okra seeds have been used as a traditional diabetes medicine for generations. What's behind this effect? The superior Continue reading >>

Okra - Good For Diabetic (treatment Sugar Level)

Okra - Good For Diabetic (treatment Sugar Level)

Got this write up forwarded to me by a friend. Please read and pass on to your friends and relatives who are diabetic. I believe it’s worth trying. Make it your favourite drink. Last month in one of TV program I learned of a treatment of Sugar Level (Diabetes). Since I am diabetic, I tried it and it was very useful and my Sugar Level is in control now. In fact I have already reduced my medicine. Take two pieces of Lady’s Finger (Okra) or known as Bhindi in South Asia and remove/cut both ends of each piece. Also put a small cut in the middle and put these two pieces in glass of water. Cover the glass and keep it at room temperature during night. Early morning, before breakfast simply remove two pieces of Lady’s Finger (Okra) from the glass and drink that water. Keep doing it on daily basis. Within two weeks, you will see remarkable results in reduction of your SUGAR. My sister has got rid of her diabetes. She was on Insulin for a few years, but after taking the Lady’s Finger (Okra) every morning for a few months, she has stopped Insulin but continues to take the Lady’s Finger (Okra) every day. But she chops the Lady’s Finger (Okra) into fine pieces in the night, adds the water and drinks it all up the next morning. Please try it as it will not do you any harm even if it does not do much good to you, but you have to keep taking it for a few months before you can see results, as most cases might be chronic. Something2share: After reading it, I searched the internet to check on more information relating to the claim of Lady’s Finger (Okra) for treatment of sugar level. It is called bendi in Bahasa Malaysia. I wish to share the relevant information that I have found in various websites: Okra is good for preventing diabetes. Okra is good in normalizing the blood Continue reading >>

Okra: How To Cook It, Plus Recipes

Okra: How To Cook It, Plus Recipes

When Liz Williams was little, there was one vegetable her otherwise produce-loving mother couldnt stand: okra. "She called it slimy and disgusting," Williams says. "So I just assumed she was right." But her Louisiana-born father loved the veggie. For a family picnic outing, he brought along a jar of pickled okra. Snacking on the crunchy spears, 7-year-old Williams just about finished the jar. "What is this?" she asked. When she heard "okra," she was shocked and thrilled. "I couldnt wait to get home to tell my mom she was wrong about okra," Williams laughs. From then on, she badgered her mom to make more. Persistence paid off. "What mom would turn down a child asking to eat vegetables?" Williams says. Her mom pickled it, stewed it with tomatoes, and put it in gumbo and giardiniera (a spicy, pickled condiment or side dish). After a while, all that okra cooking won her mom over. "She actually embraced it and grew to like it herself," says Williams, who still prepares her moms giardiniera. "But," she confides, "with extra okra!" Okra is part of the mallow family, which includes cotton, the kola nut, and the durian fruit. The edible pods of the okra plant contain natural chemicals that mix to make mucilage, a sticky substance that becomes gooier when heated. Okra's sliminess makes it hard for some people to love, but its also what makes it so good for you. A soluble fiber much like the soluble fiber in oatmeal, okras mucilage helps lower blood cholesterol levels and prevent constipation . Its low in calories, too -- only 25 per half cup, cooked -- and rich in vitamins C and K and folates. Southern chefs have cooked okra for generations and know some tricks to minimize the veggies gumminess and maximize its more appealing traits: color, crunch, and flavor. Adding a green tom Continue reading >>

Pickled Okra

Pickled Okra

Yields: 6 jars Calories 52, fat 0g, carb 12g, fiber 6g, protein 4g, sodium 2,312mg Ingredients: 3 lbs raw okra, stem trimmed 6 dried Guajillo peppers 6 cloves fresh garlic 4 cups apple cider vinegar 4 cups water 2½ Tbsp kosher salt 2 Tbsp black or yellow mustard seed 1 Tbsp cumin seeds (place this mixture in a small bowl, stir and mix the seeds together) Clean and trim top stems of fresh okra. Place 6 sixteen ounce. jars in the canner and boil gently to sterilize for 10-12 minutes. Leave them in the water until you are ready to use them. In a larger pot, pour vinegar, water, and salt. Bring mixture to a boil. Shut the flame. Remove your jars from the canning pot and prepare as follows: Place 1½ tsp. of mustard and cumin seeds into each jar along with one clove of garlic and one Guajillo pepper. Place okra into the jar, stem side up and pack them as tight as possible. Using a canning funnel for easier handling, fill each 16 oz. jar with the hot vinegar mixture leaving ¼ in. headspace. Top jars with lids. Process in water bath for 6-8 minutes. Remove the jars and leave undisturbed for at least an hour and check for proper seal. If the jar had not sealed, simply place in the fridge and use from there. For the remainder of the jars, these can be labeled and sored in your pantry to use over the next 12 months. Continue reading >>

The Pickle (lover) Has Landed

The Pickle (lover) Has Landed

Pickles. Yum. Sweet pickles. Dill pickles. Bread and butter pickles. Half sours. Pickled eggs, pickled garlic, and pickled okra (not all at the same time). Yep. Im home. Got back last Friday afternoon. My refrigerator already had pickles in it although not all of the above. It will, by the end of the week, have pickled eggs in it, however. One of my nurses told me hed never seen a pickle on a patients tray at the hospital I was in. Then why do they put pickles on the menu? Why do hospitals do a lot of things? I had to request a chair so I could stop lounging around in bed and sit like a grown-up. Some complete strangers changed medications my docs and I had spent a lot of time choosing to get just the right drugs and dosages. The basal rates , insulin-to-carbohydrate ratio , and correction factors on my pump were changed. I was in a very tiny room with a half-bath I couldnt get into, so I requested a potty chair. It came up seven hours later. Can anybody out there hold it for seven hours? I cant. The chair didnt have anything on it to go into, anyway. My husband asked why, if I was having respiratory problems, wasnt a pulmonologist called in. Oh, I feel confident I can handle that, the doc said. I was then told to have my CPAP machine overnighted, and then take it to this place out of our way to have the CPAP converted to a BiPAP. You cant do that. So much for he knew what to do. They didnt want me to drive home (actually, my husband drove) without having a BiPAP. After finding out you cant convert one type of machine to another, did I go back to the hospital and confess? Heck, no! We came home sans BiPAP. I lived through it. Have I told you I was in the teaching hospital for a prestigious medical school? Well, I learned a few things, all right. This whole saga began w Continue reading >>

Okra & Diabetes: Does It Help With Blood Glucose?

Okra & Diabetes: Does It Help With Blood Glucose?

Okra & Diabetes: Does it Help with Blood Glucose? Okra & Diabetes: Does it Help with Blood Glucose? Diabetes is a complicated disease and a diabetic patient has to absorb a host of precautions while including something new in the daily diet. Okra has been in news for quite some time and it has been claimed to have anti-diabetic properties. Let us explore the relationship between okra and diabetes in this article. Join in for the article Diabetes and Okra: Does it Help in Blood Glucose? Very few people are aware of the term okra. Hence, before trying to understand the relation between okra and diabetes, let us know a few facts about the vegetable. It is also known as ladys fingers in most part of the world. It is a rich source of various minerals and vitamins such as potassium, calcium, folic acid, as well as Vitamin C. The vegetable is low in calories and has a high content of fibre in it. Most of the times, diabetes patients ask the question whether consumption of okra does any help to maintaining blood glucose. Okra water does help in improving the blood sugar levels. This is particularly true for gestational diabetes . Roasted okra seeds are also helpful in stabilizing blood sugar. Okra helps treat blood glucose by reducing the rate in which sugar is used up from the intestines of our body. Okra also contains insoluble fiber which is very important in stabilizing blood glucose. Health Benefits of Okra for Diabetes Patients The reason for all the hype about okra being beneficial for the diabetic patients is as follows: The vegetable is a rich source of fiber. Eight pods of okra contain about three grams of fiber. When a diabetes patient consumes food which is high in fiber, the insulin sensitivity of the body is said to increase. Besides, the fiber rich foods are als Continue reading >>

Okra And Diabetes

Okra And Diabetes

Ah yes, there’s that magical word again that all type 1 diabetics love to cringe and roll their eyes at (me included). Lets take a closer look at why Okra is a great addition to a healthy diet and why ITS NOT going to magically cure type 1 diabetes. Are you ready? Ok, lets go! Okra also known as gumbo or lady fingers, is a common vegetable in southern cooking, where it is fried, boiled or pickled, often along with tomatoes, corn or onions. Sliced, cooked okra releases a juice that thickens fluids, making it an essential ingredient of gumbo, a traditional Creole stew. Regardless of the cooking method, okra is a good low-calorie, fat-free, nutrient-dense addition to any diet. Okra And Fiber: A 1/2-cup serving of sliced, cooked okra provides 2 grams of dietary fiber. This amount supplies approximately 10 percent of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s recommended daily allowance of fiber for healthy adult men and women adhering to a 2,000-calorie diet. Okra’s fiber content is made up of both soluble and insoluble fiber. According to Mayo Clinic.com, soluble fiber may help prevent diabetes and high blood cholesterol, while insoluble fiber regulates digestive system functions. A 2009 “Nutrition Reviews” article adds that fiber may also lessen your risk of obesity, stroke, heart disease and hypertension.. Okra And Kidney Disease: One study published in the October 2005 Jilin Medical Journal found that regular consumption of okra can help prevent kidney disease. In the study, “those who ate okra daily reduced clinical signs of kidney damage more than those that simply ate a diabetic diet.” This also ties in with diabetes, as nearly 50% of kidney disease cases are caused by diabetes. Okra And Healthy Skin: Vitamin C helps keep the skin looking young and vibrant. T Continue reading >>

Benefits Of Okra For Diabetes

Benefits Of Okra For Diabetes

What Is Okra? Okra, also known as “lady’s fingers” and “gumbo,” is a green flowering plant. Okra belongs to the same plant family as hibiscus and cotton. The term “okra” most commonly refers to the edible seedpods of the plant. Okra has long been favored as a food for the health-conscious. It contains potassium, vitamin B, vitamin C, folic acid, and calcium. It’s low in calories and has a high dietary fiber content. Recently, a new benefit of including okra in your diet is being considered. Okra has been suggested to help manage blood sugar in cases of type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Incidences of diabetes diagnoses are only increasing, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The verdict is out on whether okra can be used successfully as a direct diabetes treatment. However, the okra plant does have many proven health benefits. Read on to see if okra could be a viable part of your diabetes treatment plan. Studies on Okra and Diabetes Medical research on okra for diabetes management is still in early stages. We do know that according to one study, okra water improved the blood sugar levels of pregnant rats that had gestational diabetes. Roasted okra seeds, which have long been used in Turkey to treat diabetes, have also been studied and proven to have a positive effect on lowering blood sugar. Okra Benefit #1: Dietary Fiber Okra is high in fiber. Eight medium-sized pods are estimated to contain 3 grams of fiber. This bulk fiber quality has several benefits. It helps digestion, cuts hunger cravings, and keeps those who eat it fuller for longer. Foods that are high in fiber content are an important part of dietary treatment options for diabetes. Increased dietary fiber intake has been shown to promote better glycemic control a Continue reading >>

Okra: Proven Health Benefits, Nutritional Content, Recipes And Much More

Okra: Proven Health Benefits, Nutritional Content, Recipes And Much More

Okra is rich in vitamin K which your body needs to help blood clot properly and prevent bruising and improve bone health. 2 Okra is also a rich source of vitamin A and other antioxidants that help to maintain good vision and rid your body of free radicals and the visible signs of aging. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, okra also contains high levels of magnesium. Magnesium is an essential nutrient to give you energy, regulate blood pressure, and control blood sugar levels. Other important beneficial nutrients in okra are calcium and potassium which help maintain good bone health and control muscle function. 3 Another beneficial nutritional value of okra is that it contains many B-group vitamins. For example, 100 grams of okra contains around 20% of your recommended daily folate (B9) intake. It is known that folate is essential during pregnancy. Your body needs folate and vitamin B12 to prevent anemia and to boost the immune system and brain function. Okra is also a healthy lower-carb vegetable if you consume low carb diet . Taking into consideration the many health benefits of okra, its not difficult to see why this wholesome pod can help boost your health. Lets look at what scientific research has revealed as to the benefits of consuming okra. One of the best reasons for consuming more okra is that it is packed full of nutrients that are essential for good health. The journal Food Science & Nutrition stated that okra is a rich source of vital nutrients required by the body to maintain a healthy immune system. The researchers stated that among the beneficial nutrients found in okra are: 4 Calcium that is needed for strong bones and healthy teeth. Iron to keep your blood healthy and produce red blood cells. Potassium for maintaining normal blood Continue reading >>

8 Great Benefits Of Okra

8 Great Benefits Of Okra

Okra is a tradition on many dinner tables, but did you know its packed with great health benefits, too? Its true: studies show nutrient-rich okra can make you look and feel great. Okra is high in Vitamin A, Vitamin C and a very special type of fiber that can really boost your health. New research is revealing more and more about this traditional dinner side. Okra can lower your blood sugar, regulate your digestive system and support a healthy pregnancy, scientists say. Here are 8 great benefits of okra. Diabetes isnt a recent phenomenon. In fact, it has a long history. Written reports from Greece and Turkey listing symptoms date back as far as two thousand years ago. The word diabetes is Greek for a siphon, as sufferers were seen to pass urine like a siphon (in other words, excessively). The seeds of the okra plant have been used for centuries in Turkish folk medicine to treat diabetes. And interestingly, current science is backing this age-old wisdom. Studies show that okra seeds can lower blood glucose , a component in treating diabetes and in controlling pre-diabetes as well. Diabetes develops when the bodys insulin is no longer able to keep up with glucose in the blood. This may be due to the body making too little insulin, or to the body beginning to resist insulins efforts. Lowering blood glucose can go a long way toward increasing insulin sensitivity in other words, allowing insulin to do its job. By adding okra to their health regimen, some individuals may be able to keep a full-blown diabetic condition from developing. And, while its important that you follow your doctors instructions, natural methods such as eating okra could help you feel better, experts say. Theres no doubt that diabetes is a serious condition that requires management. But potentially even Continue reading >>

Okra Nutrition:improve Heart Health, Eyesight & Cholesterol Levels - Dr. Axe

Okra Nutrition:improve Heart Health, Eyesight & Cholesterol Levels - Dr. Axe

Current: Okra Nutrition: Improve Heart Health, Eyesight & Cholesterol Levels Okra Nutrition: Improve Heart Health, Eyesight & Cholesterol Levels Dr. Axe on Facebook688 Dr. Axe on Twitter6 Dr. Axe on Instagram Dr. Axe on Google Plus Dr. Axe on Youtube Dr. Axe on Pintrest192 Share on Email Print Article Okra, both a common pod vegetable and nightshade vegetable eaten in the Deep South, is also called gumbo in the U.S. Although when we think of gumbo we usually think of soups, cajun and creole cuisine, okra has numerous health benefits. An edible ornamental flowering hibiscus, okra is an annual, erect herb with stems that contain stiff hairs. The whole plant has an aromatic smell resembling that of cloves and somewhat resembles the cotton plant, but okra has much larger and rougher leaves and a thicker stem. Its best to gather the pods while they are green, tender and at an immature stage. The okra plant is an annual, requiring warm, humid climates preferably where temperatures go above 85 degrees F, and is easily injured by frost as reported by theU.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). (1) The fruit is a long pod, generally ribbed and spineless in cultivated varieties; however, pods vary in length, color and smoothness depending on the variety and grow best in well-drained and manure-rich soil. The International Knowledge Sharing Platformstates that there are many okra uses , as itsan economically important vegetable crop of which itsfresh leaves, buds, flowers, pods, stems and seeds have value. (2) As a vegetable, it can be used in salads, soups and stews, fresh or dried, and fried or boiled. It offers mucilaginous consistency after cooking. Often, the extract obtained from the fruit is added to different recipes like stews and sauces as a thickener to increase the cons Continue reading >>

How To Make Okra Water To Support Healthy Blood Sugar Levels

How To Make Okra Water To Support Healthy Blood Sugar Levels

Okra is a comfort food in some parts of the world – often served battered and fried, it nevertheless has numerous health benefits when prepared properly. Also known as lady fingers, bhindi, or bamia, okra is a pod vegetable, filled with seeds and is often added to soups like gumbo for extra texture and flavor. What many people may not know about this often underrated veggie is that there is a well established connection between okra and diabetes treatment. Although all studies in this area to date have been done in animal models the evidence is hard to deny. Managing Blood Sugar Levels One study, published in the Journal of Pharmacy and Bioallied Sciences, found that diabetic rats given a solution of water with okra soaked in it had lower blood sugar levels than the control group of rats, who were given a cellulose gum instead. The study concluded that the seeds and peel of the okra plant have anti-diabetic properties: “The present study, for the first time, confirms that A. Exculentus peel and seed possess blood glucose normalization and lipid profiles lowering action in diabetic condition.”(1) Preparing Okra Water For Diabetes Treatment Although there is, so far, only anecdotal evidence of okra water being used to treat diabetes in humans, there’s no reason why you can’t give it a try yourself. Some people claim that okra water can help stave off the development of type 2 diabetes, and help individuals maintain healthy blood sugar levels. Preparing okra water is an easy step by step process: Wash 4 or 5 medium-sized okra pods. Clip both ends off the pods, then split the pods in half or pierce each side of the pods with a knife. Place the pods in a large mason jar, then cover them with water. Soak the pods overnight, at least eight hours (up to 24 hours). In Continue reading >>

7 Recipes For An Overabundance Of Okra

7 Recipes For An Overabundance Of Okra

Roasted, pickled, fried, stewed or baked into a cookie, this summer vegetable needs to be on your menu. Fresh, green okra is one of summer's treats.(Photo: Brent Hofaker/Shutterstock) Okra is a staple in Southern cooking, but this warm weather vegetable can be grown all over the United States. Its popularity is growing, and for good reason. Full of vitamin K, manganese, vitamin C, folate, magnesium, thiamine and vitamin B-6, one cup of this nutritional powerhouse has almost 2 grams of protein and 3 grams of fiber while being low in fat and calories, according to Medical News Today . All this goodness may help reduce the risk of health issues like diabetes, heart disease and obesity. So, what you are waiting for? Grab some okra and roast it, pickle it, stew it, or even bake it into cookies with one of these recipes. Stewed Okra and Tomatoes - Fresh picked okra is cooked with canned tomatoes although you could certainly use fresh tomatoes plus a few other veggies and bacon. It's a side dish that goes with almost any meal. Okra Fritters - Turn okra into a vegetarian main dish by mixing it with polenta and calabash squash, or whatever squash you have on hand. These fritters can be served on top of greens with a hard-boiled egg or served on their own with the sides of your choice. Make sure to add okra, at left, to your list of foods to preserve this summer. (Photo: Steve Legato/Food in Jars) Pickled Okra - This recipe is from small-batch canning expert Marisa McClellan's first book, "Food in Jars." These pickles take only 45 minutes to make from start to finish (including clean-up). The recipe makes four 1-pint jars of pickled goodness. After you've eaten your pickled okra, don't throw out the pickle juice . You can flavor potato salad, egg salad, coleslaw and pasta salad Continue reading >>

Is Okra Good For Diabetes?

Is Okra Good For Diabetes?

Okra, commonly known as lady’s finger and as Bhindi in Hindi, is one of the most favorite vegetables around the world. Besides its popularity for unique taste, okra provides numerous health benefits. It helps in controlling several serious health issues. If you are wondering, is okra good for diabetes? Then, the answer in yes. Consuming okra in moderation might not completely cure diabetes, but it has positive impact on blood sugar level, and thereby controls diabetes. Keep reading to discover the benefits of eating okra for diabetes. Why is Okra Good for Diabetes? Okra is a rich source of fiber, which is essential part of dietary plans for diabetes. Intake of fiber improves glycemic control, and even insulin sensitivity. Stress can be one of the causes of rise in blood sugar level, and managing stress level is important for managing diabetes. Okra has antioxidants that provides anti-stress effects in the bloodstream and can be used to reverse the effects of diabetes. Diabetes is often associated with unhealthy cholesterol level which harm your body further. Presence of antioxidants and fiber in okra helps in lowering the cholesterol level. Okra also ensures a diet of healthy cholesterol levels which is good for diabetes sufferers. Diabetes may lead to fatigues and decrease the recovery time of our body for any cuts, bruises, pain and infections. Studies say that okra can improve the recovery time and fatigue levels. Research on okra for diabetes has shown that okra is beneficial for people suffering from type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. How to Use Okra for Diabetes? Do you know how to prepare okra for the treatment of diabetes? There are several recipes for okra that have positive effect on diabetes. We have list down the recipes that makes okra a home remedy for Continue reading >>

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