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Physical Therapy And Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes Rehabilitation

Diabetes Rehabilitation

Kitsap physical therapy offers a program for individuals with Diabetes to assist with managing the condition and restoring a healthy lifestyle. Diabetes results from impaired insulin production (type 1) or impaired cellular sensitivity/utilization of insulin (type 2). The body uses insulin to get sugar (glucose) into the cells to be used for energy. When that process is disrupted and the body cant get glucose into the cells, the excess sugar remains in the bloodstream and causes damage throughout the body. This damage includes: Peripheral (leads to impaired sensation and poor balance) More severe neurological deficits following The good news is that exercise allows glucose to enter the cell without the use of insulin. So, whether your diabetes is caused by a lack of insulin or a lack of cellular sensitivity to insulin, exercise can bridge the gap and assist in controlling glucose levels within the blood stream. Exercise can help lower blood glucose levels, assist in weight loss (decrease BMI), help lower blood pressure, improve balance and decrease risk of falls, improve energy levels and activity tolerance, and decrease joint pain. The challenge is getting started with a safe and effective exercise program.At Kitsap Physical Therapy, your physical therapist can help design an exercise program specific to your individual needs, that takes into consideration your current fitness level, and any joint pain or injuries you may already have. We will work with you throughout this process, answering any questions/concerns that arise along the way. This program will consist of multiple components that may include: Cardiovascular exercise for endurance to improve activity tolerance Upper and lower body strengthening to assist with performing functional tasks Balance exercises t Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Associated Risk Factors In Patients Referred For Physical Therapy In A National Primary Care Electronic Medical Record Database

Diabetes And Associated Risk Factors In Patients Referred For Physical Therapy In A National Primary Care Electronic Medical Record Database

The prevalence of diabetes (type 2) in the general population has increased dramatically over the last decade, yet patients with diabetes are rarely referred for physical therapy management of their condition. The majority of patients referred for outpatient physical therapy have musculoskeletal-related conditions. Secondary conditions, such as diabetes, may be prevalent in this population, and physical therapists need to be aware of this to adjust interventions and treatment. The purpose of this article is to describe the prevalence of diabetes and the associated risk factors in adults referred for physical therapy in a primary care outpatient setting. Patients aged 18 years or older referred for physical therapy were identified from the Centricity Electronic Medical Records database during the period of December 13, 1995, to June 30, 2007. Patients were evaluated on the basis of clinical (height, weight, blood pressure, laboratory values), treatment (prescriptions), and diagnostic (ICD-9 codes) criteria to identify the presence of diabetes or associated risk factors (eg, hypertension, elevated triglycerides, low high-density lipoprotein, body mass index, and prediabetes). There were 52,667 patients referred for physical therapy, the majority of whom were referred for a musculoskeletal-related condition. Approximately 80% of the total study population had diabetes, prediabetes, or risk factors associated with diabetes. The prevalence of diabetes in the study population was 13.2%. Of the diabetes-associated risk factors evaluated, hypertension was the most prevalent (70.4%), and less than half (39.1%) of the study population had an elevated body mass index. Only 20% of the study population had values within normal limits for all clinical, treatment, and diagnostic crit Continue reading >>

Exercises For Diabetics

Exercises For Diabetics

The article describes the benefits of exercises for diabetics patients. The best and suitable exercises for diabetics patients are demonstrated with aid of videos. Diabetes is one of the most prevalent lifestyle diseases in modern world but still the awareness about the risks and benefits of exercises to patients with diabetes is limited. There are two distinct types of diabetes mellitus: lnsulin dependent (type 1) and Non insulin dependent (type 2) with distinct challenges associated with exercises. Insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) It is an inherited autoimmune disease in which antibodies are produced against the beta cells of pancreas. Type 1 diabetes represents approximately 10-15% of the diabetic cases. It is characterized by absence of endogenous insulin production. Therefore insulin administration is essential to prevent ketosis, coma, and death. Non-Insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) Type 2 diabetes is linked to both genetic and lifestyle factors, It is characterized by diminished insulin secretion relative to serum glucose levels in conjunction with peripheral insulin resistance, both of which result in chronic hyperglycemia. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by three major metabolic abnormalities: Impairment in pancreatic beta cell insulin secretion in response to a glucose stimulus. Reduced sensitivity to the action of insulin in major organ systems such as muscle, liver and adipose tissue. Excessive hepatic glucose production in the basal state. Exercise and Diabetes When considering exercise prescription for a diabetic patient target should be to achieve at least 30 minutes of continuous moderate activity (e.g. brisk walking) five or six days a week provided that cardiovascular and hypertensive problems are accounted for. Both insulin and e Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Moveforwardpt.com

Diabetes - Moveforwardpt.com

Diabetes is diagnosed by a physician, based on a test of your blood glucose level. This test is often ordered by a physician when a person reports some of the signs and symptoms listed in the previous section, or has risk factors determined by a physician. If you are diagnosed with diabetes, a physical therapist can evaluate your symptoms and problems associated with the condition. A physical therapist will identify physical problems that can be helped with an individualized exercise program, and provide specialized treatments based on your needs and goals. Physical therapists help people with diabetes participate in safe, effective exercise programs to improve their ability to move, perform daily activities, reduce their pain, and possibly lower their blood glucose levels. Physical therapy treatments also can help people with diabetes heal any associated skin problems faster than they would without treatment. Your physical therapist will examine your record of blood glucose levels, and will check your skin for wounds. Your physical therapist will conduct a complete assessment of your strength, flexibility, endurance, and balance, and use the results of the testing to design an individualized treatment program that addresses your problems and needs. Your treatment program can help improve your: Motion. Your physical therapist will choose specific activities and treatments to help restore normal movement. These might begin with passive motions that the physical therapist performs for you to gently move your joints, and progress to active exercises and stretches that you do yourself. Strength. Your physical therapist will choose and teach you the correct exercises and equipment to use to steadily and safely restore your strength. Flexibility. Your physical therapist will Continue reading >>

A Guide To Diabetes Part Two

A Guide To Diabetes Part Two

Hyun J. (June) Park, PT, DPT Leave a comment If youre an avid reader of our blog youll know that last week we took a look at diabetes, the different kinds and what causes it. As usual in the two part series this blog will focus on how seeing a physical therapist can help if you have diabetes. What a lot of people dont know is that physical activity, along with diet and medication, is the cornerstone of treatment for diabetes. Physical activity alone is a cornerstone for prevention of diabetes, but if you already have diabetes it is essential that you control your glucose, lower your blood pressure and cholesterol, and maintain a healthy weight. In addition regular physical activity can also reduce the need for medication, so its important to make sure you are active. That being said I guess I should get into the specifics about how much physical activity is recommended. The American Diabetes Association says that 30 minutes of exercise at least 5 days per week is ideal and that both cardio and strength workouts are helpful. Well in short physical therapy will help you improve your blood sugar levels, manage your weight, and reduce your risk of heart disease. Based on your health status, your PT will recommend exercises that are tailored to your needs: Moderate intensity cardio (or aerobic) exercise, where your heart and breathing rate increase. During these exercises you are likely to sweat, but can easily carry on a conversation. Vigorous aerobic exercise, where you breathing will be rapid, you will sweat a lot, and you will only be able to speak in short phrases. In addition your heart rate will increase substantially. With the majority of cases your PT will recommend that you are working out at least 3 days a week, and that you have no more than 2 days off in a row. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Rehabilitation

Diabetes Rehabilitation

Kitsap physical therapy offers a program for individuals with Diabetes to assist with managing the condition and restoring a healthy lifestyle. Diabetes results from impaired insulin production (type 1) or impaired cellular sensitivity/utilization of insulin (type 2). The body uses insulin to get sugar (glucose) into the cells to be used for energy. When that process is disrupted and the body cant get glucose into the cells, the excess sugar remains in the bloodstream and causes damage throughout the body. This damage includes: Peripheral (leads to impaired sensation and poor balance) More severe neurological deficits following The good news is that exercise allows glucose to enter the cell without the use of insulin. So, whether your diabetes is caused by a lack of insulin or a lack of cellular sensitivity to insulin, exercise can bridge the gap and assist in controlling glucose levels within the blood stream. Exercise can help lower blood glucose levels, assist in weight loss (decrease BMI), help lower blood pressure, improve balance and decrease risk of falls, improve energy levels and activity tolerance, and decrease joint pain. The challenge is getting started with a safe and effective exercise program.At Kitsap Physical Therapy, your physical therapist can help design an exercise program specific to your individual needs, that takes into consideration your current fitness level, and any joint pain or injuries you may already have. We will work with you throughout this process, answering any questions/concerns that arise along the way. This program will consist of multiple components that may include: Cardiovascular exercise for endurance to improve activity tolerance Upper and lower body strengthening to assist with performing functional tasks Balance exercises t Continue reading >>

Health Education Strategies Used By Physical Therapists To Promote Behaviour Change In People With Lifestyle-related Conditions: A Systematic Review - Sciencedirect

Health Education Strategies Used By Physical Therapists To Promote Behaviour Change In People With Lifestyle-related Conditions: A Systematic Review - Sciencedirect

Volume 30, Issue 2 , December 2012, Pages 57-75 Health education strategies used by physical therapists to promote behaviour change in people with lifestyle-related conditions: A systematic review Epidemiological data support an increasing prevalence of lifestyle-related conditions globally. As established healthcare professionals, physical therapists are well positioned to be clinically competent in patient education to effect long-term lifestyle behaviour change, to improve health and physical therapy outcomes. A scoping systematic review was conducted to identify educational strategies used by physical therapists and their attributes to prevent, reverse and manage lifestyle-related conditions. Stringent search strategies of related databases and research mining identified eight source studies. Heterogeneity of the studies disallowed pooling of the results and meta-analysis. Attributes of commonly-reported educational strategies included: theories (e.g., transtheoretical model and 5A's approach); timing (e.g., pre- and post-assessments and follow-up); session structure (e.g., brief advice, one-on-one, group and telephone); technique (e.g., motivational prompts, individualised programmes and goal-setting); and delivery method (e.g., brochures, diaries, audiovisual or video, handouts and skills demonstrations). Educational strategies related to lifestyle-related conditions used by physical therapists and their attributes vary. Observational studies need to confirm these findings clinically. Also, the cost-effectiveness of the education strategies used by physical therapists and their attributes need to be evaluated. Such knowledge will enable physical therapists to effectively address lifestyle-related conditions as a health priority in patients, irrespective of their Continue reading >>

Daily Physical Activity And Type 2 Diabetes: A Review

Daily Physical Activity And Type 2 Diabetes: A Review

Daily physical activity and type 2 diabetes: A review Hidetaka Hamasaki, Department of Internal Medicine, National Center for Global Health and Medicine Kohnodai Hospital, Chiba 272-8516, Japan Hidetaka Hamasaki, Hamasaki Clinic, Kagoshima 890-0046, Japan Author contributions: Hamasaki H wrote the review. Correspondence to: Hidetaka Hamasaki, MD, PhD, Department of Internal Medicine, National Center for Global Health and Medicine Kohnodai Hospital, 1-7-1 Kohnodai, Chiba 272-8516, Japan. [email protected] Telephone: +81-47-3723501 Fax: +81-47-3721858 Received 2016 Jan 26; Revised 2016 Apr 5; Accepted 2016 May 7. Copyright The Author(s) 2016. Published by Baishideng Publishing Group Inc. All rights reserved. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Physical activity improves glycemic control and reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Moderate to vigorous physical activity is recommended to manage T2D; however, patients with T2D can be physically weak, making it difficult to engage in the recommended levels of physical activity. Daily physical activity includes various activities performed during both occupational and leisure time such as walking, gardening, and housework that type 2 diabetic patients should be able to perform without considerable physical burden. This review focuses on the association between daily physical activity and T2D. Walking was the most common form of daily physical activity, with numerous studies demonstrating its beneficial effects on reducing the risk of T2D, CVD, and mortality. Walking for at least 30 min per day was shown to reduce the risk of T2D by approximately 50%. Additionally, walking was associated with a reduction in mortality. In contrast, evidence was Continue reading >>

Study: Pt-designed Exercise Improved Strength For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Study: Pt-designed Exercise Improved Strength For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Study: PT-Designed Exercise Improved Strength for People with Type 2 Diabetes Study: PT-Designed Exercise Improved Strength for People with Type 2 Diabetes Exercise Counseling and Fitness Center Training Equally Effective as Supervised Exercise Program ALEXANDRIA, VA, September 22, 2009 Physical therapist-directed exercise counseling combined with fitness center-based exercise training can improve muscular strength and exercise capacity in people with type 2 diabetes, with outcomes similar to those of supervised exercise, according to a randomized clinical trial published in the September issue of Physical Therapy, the scientific journal of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA). Type 2 diabetes is associated with numerous health complications, including a decline in muscular strength and exercise capacity. Studies show that a decline in muscular strength increases the risk of loss of physical function and that a decline in exercise capacity increases the risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. "Improving muscular strength and exercise capacity in people with type 2 diabetes is crucial to preventing loss of physical function and decreasing comorbidity and mortality in these patients," said lead researcher J. David Taylor, PT, PhD, CSCS, assistant professor in the Department of Physical Therapy at the University of Central Arkansas. Supervised exercise programs improve both muscular strength and exercise capacity in people with type 2 diabetes; however, Medicare and other health insurance programs do not currently reimburse physical therapists and other clinicians for these exercise programs. In this study, 24 people with type 2 diabetes were randomly allocated to either an experimental group that received two months of physical therapist-directed exer Continue reading >>

6 Facts On Diabetes And How Pt Can Prevent It

6 Facts On Diabetes And How Pt Can Prevent It

6 Facts on Diabetes and How PT Can Prevent It Home Blog 6 Facts on Diabetes and How PT Can Prevent It Posted On: November 24, 2017 by Core Physical Therapy in: Diabetes Prevention PT November is American Diabetes Month. As of 2012, its estimated that 9.3 percent of the population has diabetes, but a third of them dont realize it. We would like to bring you the following facts about diabetesand how physical therapy can help prevent it! Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body doesnt produce enough insulin, while type 2 occurs when the body uses insulin ineffectively. Gestational diabetes is when a woman temporarily gets diabetes when shes pregnant. Hyperglycemia is when your blood sugar is higher than normal. Also known as prediabetes, this can lead to type 2 diabetes. Those with type 1 diabetes only account for about 5% of all those who have the condition. You will not always have symptoms with type 2 diabetes If you meet the risk factors for this condition, it is a good idea to consult your doctor! Approximately 54% of all amputations performed in the United States are due to vascular disease, including diabetes. It is the leading cause of blindness in working-age adults The World Health Organization also cites it as a leading cause of kidney failure, and its linked to cardiovascular issues. Lifestyle changes can help prevent type 2 diabetes. Even 30 minutes a day can make a difference. If youre at risk of developing this condition, increased exercise is a big step to prevention. The physical therapists at Core PT can show you how to participate in safe, effective activities. These exercises can reduce pain, lower blood glucose levels and increase mobility. Its not too late to make a change for the better! We can create an exercise program thats tailored to your specific Continue reading >>

Evidence For The Benefit Of Exercise Therapy In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Evidence For The Benefit Of Exercise Therapy In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Evidence for the benefit of exercise therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes VITALiTY (Vancouver Initiative to Add Life to Years) Research Laboratory, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada VITALiTY (Vancouver Initiative to Add Life to Years) Research Laboratory, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada Correspondence: Kenneth M Madden, University of British Columbia, Room 7185, Gordon and Leslie Diamond Health Care Centre, 2775 Laurel St, Vancouver, BC, Canada, V5Z 1M9, Tel +1 604 875 4931, Fax +1 604 875 5696, Email [email protected] Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer Copyright 2013 Madden, publisher and licensee Dove Medical Press Ltd This is an Open Access article which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Exercise interventions are recommended in most guidelines for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Although most guidelines suggest a combination of both aerobic and resistance training, the exact benefits of these interventions remain unclear. Although either modality alone or in combination seems to have an identical impact on glycated hemoglobin levels, resistance training and aerobic training have independent effects on other parameters of cardio-metabolic risk. This review examines the current evidence for aerobic and resistance training on glycemic control, lipid profile, body composition, vascular health, and mental health in patients with type 2 diabetes. The uncertainties surrounding exercise modality, volume and intensity are also addressed. Keywords: aerobic exercise, resistance exer Continue reading >>

Physical Exercise As Therapy For Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

Physical Exercise As Therapy For Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

Diabetes Metab Res Rev. 2014 Mar;30 Suppl 1:13-23. doi: 10.1002/dmrr.2514. Physical exercise as therapy for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Metabolic Fitness Association, Rome, Italy; Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, 'La Sapienza' University, Rome, Italy; Diabetes Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Rome, Italy. Many studies have highlighted the importance of physical activity (PA) for health, and recent evidence now points to the positive improvements associated with exercise in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, few physicians are willing to prescribe exercise as a therapy for diabetic patients. In addition, there is a lack of information on how to implement exercise therapy especially in long-term exercise regimens. The purpose of this manuscript is to summarize standards of exercise therapy for patients with T2DM, both in terms of prescribing and monitoring, according to the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Diabetes Association guidelines. We present details of the exercise therapies used in long-term studies, describing how the parameters for exercise prescription were applied in clinical practice. These parameters are described in terms of frequency, intensity, duration, mode and rate of progression in long-term therapeutic prescriptions. Individual responses to exercise dose are discussed, and critical issues to be considered in patients with underlying disease and in T2DM patients are highlighted. dose-response; physical activity; prescribing exercise therapy; type 2 diabetes Continue reading >>

How Does Physical Therapy Help With Diabetes?

How Does Physical Therapy Help With Diabetes?

How Does Physical Therapy Help with Diabetes? How Does Physical Therapy Help with Diabetes? You probably know someone with diabetes. It always hits the top list of conditions that affect both children and adults across America. Most people know that medication can help diabetes, but a less known fact is how physical therapy can help manage it. Here is a few things PTs can do to help not only manage but improve a diabetic condition. Diabetes usually falls into 2 categories: Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus or Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. The difference between the two is the way the body produces and responds to a hormone called insulin. Insulin is important because it is responsible for helping the body absorb sugars. In type 1 diabetes the body is not able produce insulin, but this type is not as prevalent. In type 2 diabetes the body makes insulin, howeverthe body cant use nor respond to it normally. In either condition, without your bodys ability to use sugars and other carbohydrates, your organs and vital body processes cannot function well. There at least 3 areas that a PT can help with when seeing a patient that has diabetes: One of the primary causes of diabetes especially with type 2 is obesity. A PT can help assess body mass and use those measurements to track progress throughout the course of an exercise program. This will also help create achievable goals and help losing weight for decreased diabetes symptoms. A good resistance exercise program along with proper diet has been known to reverse the effects of type 2 diabetes. The effects are reversed because resistance exercise causes muscles to respond to insulin many times more than when at rest. This increased ability for the body to use insulin allows sugars to be absorbed instead of staying in the blood stream. Phys Continue reading >>

How Physical Therapy Can Help You Manage Type Ii Diabetes - Cyberpt

How Physical Therapy Can Help You Manage Type Ii Diabetes - Cyberpt

PT Classroom - How Physical Therapy Can Help You Manage Type II Diabetes by Daniel Seidler, MS, PT Daniel Seidler is the Executive Director of WSPT . He is a Columbia University graduate with a Masters in Physical Therapy. His areas of expertise are aquatic therapy and orthopedic manual physical therapy based on the Maitland technique of assessment and treatment. Daniel is a self-proclaimed fitness freak, having completed 3 NYC marathons and the 2010 NYC Triathlon. How Physical Therapy Can Help You Manage Type II Diabetes Type II Diabetes is usually a result of poor nutrition combined with a lack of exercise or activity. The bodys ability to produce insulin or use it to break down sugar becomes compromised from being overworked for a prolonged period of time. Some people are born with a predisposition for acquiring Type II Diabetes, but ultimately it is a preventable disease. For the same reasons, it also is manageable to the point that its effects are minimal if approached effectively. If you do have diabetes, its important that you have a plan and you stick with it. Complications from diabetes tend to build and become more difficult to reverse over time. An effective means of managing diabetes is to have a capable health care team on your side to advise and work with you. A good doctor, nurse, pharmacist, nutritionist and Physical Therapist should all be on your speed dial if you have diabetes. A Physical Therapist can be an extremely valuable member of your team because of their knowledge, skills, and accessibility. Ways a Physical Therapist can help someone with Diabetes: 1. The key to managing diabetes is being able to balance your blood-sugar levels. This can be accomplished through proper nutrition, exercise and medication. By prescribing an appropriate exercise Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2

Diabetes is caused by a problem in the way your body makes or uses insulin[1]. Insulin moves blood sugar (glucose) into cells where it is stored and later used for energy. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2 [1]. Type 1 diabetes is also called insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), whereas Type 2 diabetes is also called adult onset diabetes or non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM)[1]. Diabetes is a chronic condition that affects how the body metabolizes glucose[1]. When you have type 2 diabetes, your fat, liver, and muscle cells do not respond correctly to insulin, known as insulin resistance[1]. As a result, blood sugar does not get transported into these cells to be stored for energy and builds up in the bloodstream; this is known as hyperglycemia[1]. In a healthy person, blood glucose levels are normalized by insulin secretion and tissue sensitivity to insulin [1]. With Type 2 diabetes, the mechanisms become faulty; the pancreatic beta-cell, which releases insulin, becomes impaired and tissues develop insulin resistance[1][2]. This pathology has a genetic link, although it is somewhat unclear[1]. Risk factors for developing Type 2 diabetes include: background of African-Caribbean, Black African, Chinese, or South-Asian, and over 25 years old, or other ethnic background over 40 years old[3] According to the International Diabetes Federation (2014), 8.3% of the population or 387 million people are living with diabetes worldwide.[4] Diabetes prevalence increases with age across all regions worldwide and income groups.[5] This number is expected to increase by 205 million by the year 2035.[6] Diabetes is most prevalent in people aged 60-79 years, with 18.6%, though those aged 40-59 have the highest number (184 million) of people living Continue reading >>

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