diabetestalk.net

Physical Activity And Diabetes

Diabetes And Physical Activity

Diabetes And Physical Activity

Practice Synopsis Introduction Physical activity is a cornerstone of type 2 diabetes prevention and treatment. Comorbid conditions such as hypertension, depression and heart disease can also be treated with a regular exercise program. It received renewed attention when the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Diabetes Association released a joint position statement in 2010 recommending regular exercise for persons with diabetes.1 Recent statistics suggest that less than 50% of all Americans meet the Physical Activity Guidelines of 30 minutes of moderate-to- vigorous intensity aerobic exercise at least 5 days a week or a total of 150 minutes per week; and less than 21% meet the physical activity guidelines for both aerobic and muscle- strengthening.2 Beyond general guidelines and support, the diabetes educator addresses diabetes-specific safety considerations at all times. Diabetes educators play a unique and influential role in promotion of regular physical activity as a tool to support optimal diabetes management and overall health. Background In the United States, diabetes imposes direct and indirect costs of $245 billion3 The burden of diabetes in the U.S. has risen exponentially as the prevalence of the disease has reached epidemic proportions. Physical activity is defined as bodily movement produced by the skeletal muscle that requires energy expenditure.4 Planned, structured, and repetitive physical activity (exercise) can offer general as well as diabetes-specific health benefits. Habitual participation in physical activity can reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, body weight and percentage of body fat5 along with positively affecting lipids, blood pressure, cardiovascular events, mortality, and quality of life.1,6 This is an important consi Continue reading >>

Physical Activity And Diabetes: Opportunities For Prevention Through Policy

Physical Activity And Diabetes: Opportunities For Prevention Through Policy

Physical Activity and Diabetes: Opportunities for Prevention Through Policy AD Deshpande, PhD, MPH, is Research Assistant Professor, Division of Health Behavior Research, Washington University School of Medicine, 4444 Forest Park Ave, Box 8504, St Louis, MO 63108 (USA) Address all correspondence to Dr Deshpande Search for other works by this author on: EA Dodson, PhD, MPH, is Program Manager, Prevention Research Center in St Louis, George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Washington University, St Louis, Missouri Search for other works by this author on: I Gorman, PT, MSPH, is Assistant Professor, School of Physical Therapy, Rueckert-Hartman College for Health Professions, Regis University, Denver, Colorado Search for other works by this author on: RC Brownson, PhD, is Professor of Epidemiology, Prevention Research Center in St Louis, George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Washington University, and Department of Surgery and Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine Search for other works by this author on: Physical Therapy, Volume 88, Issue 11, 1 November 2008, Pages 14251435, Anjali D Deshpande, Elizabeth A Dodson, Ira Gorman, Ross C Brownson; Physical Activity and Diabetes: Opportunities for Prevention Through Policy, Physical Therapy, Volume 88, Issue 11, 1 November 2008, Pages 14251435, Over the past decade, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus has reached epidemic levels in the United States and other developed countries. With a concomitant rise in obesity levels in the United States and advances in the treatment of diabetes and its complications, the prevalence of diabetes is expected to continue to rise through the year 2050. Despite strong evidence that regular physical activity can prevent or delay the onset of diabetes, too Continue reading >>

The Health Benefits Of Physical Activity: Diabetes

The Health Benefits Of Physical Activity: Diabetes

GPs, Hospital doctors, Practice nurses, Other healthcare professionals The health benefits of physical activity: diabetes This module covers the importance and effectiveness of physical exercise as both a preventer and combatant to diabetes, plus how recommend it to patients. With multimedia video. After completing this module, you should understand: How physical activity can prevent or delay the onset of diabetes How physical activity is an essential part of treatment for patients with diabetes How to recommend physical activity in patients with diabetes. Biography : William Bird is a GP who has specialised in physical activity for 17 years. He set up Green Gyms and the national Health Walk programme in 1995 which now delivers 175,000 walks a year through Macmillan Cancer Support and the Ramblers. He was chair of the physical activity alliance and advises Public Health England. He is an advisor to the WHO to help develop a physical activity strategy across the Middle East. He is co-editor of the Oxford Textbook of Nature and Public Health due to be published in 2015 and regularly addresses conferences around the world on physical activity, natural environment and health. He is CEO of Intelligent Health which delivers physical activity strategies and schemes to local authorities and CCGs to get whole populations more active. Disclosure : William Bird is CEO of Intelligent Health who commissioned to deliver this work. He is a GP working within with the NHS, and is on the board of the charity Get Berkshire Active. Biography : Ricky Shamji is a sports and exercise medicine physician and a GP principal in Birmingham. He created and developed Prescription for Exercise, an initiative designed to empower clinicians and patients to discuss physical activity for the treatment o Continue reading >>

Physical Activity: Warnings And Safeguards

Physical Activity: Warnings And Safeguards

Your health care team can help you plan your meals, snacks and when to take your medication based on the type of physical activity you do. If you have been living with diabetes for several years and have such chronic diabetes complications as heart, neurological or other problems have begun to appear, or if you have been sedentary for many years, consult your doctor before starting any exercise program more intense than brisk walking. Before you begin Before embarking on a physical activity program, it is recommended that you have a complete medical checkup (blood pressure, cholesterol levels in the blood, glycated hemoglobin (A1C) and glycemia, heart and circulatory system, kidney function, eye and feet health). This checkup will help identify the most appropriate type of physical activity for you. Contra-indications (unless directed otherwise by your physician): cardiovascular problems can make certain high-intensity activities unsafe. Your doctor can also advise you as to the best time of day to do physical activity based on your type of medication and when you take it. He can also adjust our insulin dosage based on the type of physical activity you do. Some tips when doing physical activity: Listen to your body and stop if you feel unwell. Stay hydrated by drinking regularly. Make sure you have identification on you (e.g.: bracelet, medallion or card) that indicates that you are diabetic. Wear appropriate shoes and socks. Inspect your feet carefully before and after exercise to detect any blisters or other wounds. Talk to your doctor if any of the following symptoms occur when exercising: nausea, fainting, severe fatigue, headache, blurred vision, dizziness, shortness of breath. Don’t hesitate to ask for advice from an exercise professional, like a kinesiologist. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise

When you have type 2 diabetes, physical activity is an important component of your treatment plan. It’s also important to have a healthy meal plan and maintain your blood glucose level through medications or insulin, if necessary. If you stay fit and active throughout your life, you’ll be able to better control your diabetes and keep your blood glucose level in the correct range. Controlling your blood glucose level is essential to preventing long-term complications, such as nerve pain and kidney disease. Exercise has so many benefits, but the biggest one is that it makes it easier to control your blood glucose (blood sugar) level. People with type 2 diabetes have too much glucose in their blood, either because their body doesn’t produce enough insulin to process it, or because their body doesn’t use insulin properly (insulin resistant). In either case, exercise can reduce the glucose in your blood. Muscles can use glucose without insulin when you’re exercising. In other words, it doesn’t matter if you’re insulin resistant or if you don’t have enough insulin: when you exercise, your muscles get the glucose they need, and in turn, your blood glucose level goes down. If you’re insulin resistant, exercise actually makes your insulin more effective. That is—your insulin resistance goes down when you exercise, and your cells can use the glucose more effectively. Exercise can also help people with type 2 diabetes avoid long-term complications, especially heart problems. People with diabetes are susceptible to developing blocked arteries (arteriosclerosis), which can lead to a heart attack. Exercise helps keep your heart healthy and strong. Plus, exercise helps you maintain good cholesterol—and that helps you avoid arteriosclerosis. Additionally, there ar Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Physical Activity

Diabetes And Physical Activity

The final prices may differ from the prices shown due to specifics of VAT rules, postage and handling. You already have online access to this title. If you would like to buy a personal digital or print copy, please click here . VIII + 158p.,15fig.,8tab.,hard cover,2014 The latest knowledge on the relationship between exercise and diabetes Presenting current knowledge regarding the relationship between exercise and diabetes, this publication discusses in detail the physiologic, molecular and genetic mechanisms involved in this interaction. Further, the book presents valuable information on the role of exercise in the treatment and management of diabetes through the life course, including gestational diabetes, diabetes in children, and in the elderly. Notably, the role of diet in modulating the relationship between exercise and diabetes is explored, and for the first time, the importance of sedentary behavior, rather than exercise, is highlighted. The current public health guidelines for type 2 diabetes are presented, as well as practical recommendations for the management of type 1 diabetes. Finally, in each chapter areas of further investigations are emphasized. The book provides a valuable and up-to-date overview and is highly recommended to researchers, students, clinicians, including physicians, dieticians, biokineticists, physiotherapists, nurses and diabetes educators. Continue reading >>

6 Great Exercises For People With Diabetes

6 Great Exercises For People With Diabetes

iStock.com; Raymond Forbes/Stocksy; iStock.com Making Exercise a Routine Do you get enough exercise? If you're like many Americans, the answer is no — and that's especially true for those of us with diabetes. Studies show as few as 39 percent of people with type 2 diabetes participate in regular physical activity, compared with 58 percent of other Americans. And that's a shame, because working out can help increase insulin action and keep blood sugars in check, says Sheri Colberg-Ochs, PhD, founder of the Diabetes Motion Academy in Santa Barbara, Califorinia, and professor emerita of exercise science at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. Exercise also helps you lose weight and improve balance, which is important because many people with type 2 diabetes are at risk for obesity and for falls. “I fully recommend that anyone over 40 with diabetes include balance training as part of their weekly routine, at least two to three days per week,” says Dr. Colberg-Ochs. “It can be as simple as practicing balancing on one leg at a time, or more complex — like tai chi exercises. Lower body and core resistance exercises also double as balance training.” Here are six great workouts you can easily work into your daily routine. Be sure to check with your doctor before beginning any exercise regimen, and go slowly at first. Over time, you can increase the length and intensity of your routine. Continue reading >>

Getting Active And Staying Active

Getting Active And Staying Active

While we all know that being active is good for our health, both physical and emotional, it’s important to be aware that getting active and staying active can help you manage your Type 1 diabetes, Type 2 diabetes or help you reduce your risk of Type 2 diabetes. For example, UK Chief Medical Officers’ Guidelines state that physical activity can reduce your chance of Type 2 diabetes by up to 40 per cent as well as reduce risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, joint and back pain, depression and dementia. Being active will: help you lose weight or maintain a healthy weight increase the amount of glucose used by the muscles for energy, so it may sometimes lower blood glucose (sugar) levels help the body to use insulin more efficiently – regular activity can help reduce the amount of insulin you have to take improve your diabetes management (particularly Type 2 diabetes) strengthen your bones reduce stress levels and symptoms of depression and anxiety improve your sleep How much activity do we need to do? The good news is all physical activity helps – whether you are a busy parent, teenager, sat at a desk all day or in your retirement years, doing any amount of activity can be beneficial. As well as activity in your daily routine such as getting to work, gardening or doing the housework, if you’re able, try to do some exercise. You can start with something gentle, like walking, and gradually work your way up to 30 minutes a day of moderate intensity exercise, five times a week. Whatever your age, the less time you are sedentary the better, except for time spent sleeping. Department of Health guidelines recommend: Early Years (Under-5s, not yet walking) For children not yet walking physical activity should be encouraged from birth, through floor-based play and wate Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Nutrition and physical activity are important parts of a healthy lifestyle when you have diabetes. Along with other benefits, following a healthy meal plan and being active can help you keep your blood glucose level, also called blood sugar, in your target range. To manage your blood glucose, you need to balance what you eat and drink with physical activity and diabetes medicine, if you take any. What you choose to eat, how much you eat, and when you eat are all important in keeping your blood glucose level in the range that your health care team recommends. Becoming more active and making changes in what you eat and drink can seem challenging at first. You may find it easier to start with small changes and get help from your family, friends, and health care team. Eating well and being physically active most days of the week can help you keep your blood glucose level, blood pressure, and cholesterol in your target ranges prevent or delay diabetes problems feel good and have more energy What foods can I eat if I have diabetes? You may worry that having diabetes means going without foods you enjoy. The good news is that you can still eat your favorite foods, but you might need to eat smaller portions or enjoy them less often. Your health care team will help create a diabetes meal plan for you that meets your needs and likes. The key to eating with diabetes is to eat a variety of healthy foods from all food groups, in the amounts your meal plan outlines. The food groups are vegetables nonstarchy: includes broccoli, carrots, greens, peppers, and tomatoes starchy: includes potatoes, corn, and green peas fruits—includes oranges, melon, berries, apples, bananas, and grapes grains—at least half of your grains for the day should be whole grains includes wheat, rice, oats, co Continue reading >>

Get Active! | Living With Diabetes | Diabetes | Cdc

Get Active! | Living With Diabetes | Diabetes | Cdc

To receive email updates about this page, enter your email address: Physical activity is very important for people with diabetes! Good news its not as hard as you might think to be more active. If you have diabetes , being active makes your body more sensitive to insulin (the hormone that allows cells in your body to use blood sugar for energy), which helps manage your diabetes. Physical activity also helps control blood sugar levels and lowers your risk of heart disease and nerve damage . Being physically active can be fun. When its possible, go outside with a friend, connect, and enjoy the weather. Lowering LDL (bad) cholesterol and raising HDL (good) cholesterol The goal is to get at least 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity physical activity. One way to do this is to try to fit in at least 20 to 25 minutes of activity every day. Also, on 2 or more days a week, include activities that work all major muscle groups (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders, and arms). Examples of moderate-intensity physical activities include: These activities work your large muscles, increase your heart rate, and make you breathe harder, which are important goals for fitness. Stretching helps to make you flexible and prevent soreness after being physically active. Find out more by reading tips for being active with diabetes [PDF 240 KB] . Finding an activity you enjoy and having a partner helps you stick with it. Find something you like. Exercising by doing something you enjoy is important because if you dont like it, you wont stick with it. Find an activity that you and your health care provider agree you can do regularly for the best results. Start small. If youre not already physically active you should begin slowly and work your way up to the desired level. For example, Continue reading >>

Physical Activity & Diabetes

Physical Activity & Diabetes

Regular physical activity is one of the most important things you can do to manage and live well with your diabetes. Regular exercise also has special advantages if you have type 2 diabetes. It can also help prevent or delay type 2 diabetes from developing. Regular physical activity improves your body’s sensitivity to insulin and helps manage your blood glucose (sugar) levels. What is physical activity? Physical activity is any form of movement that causes your body to burn calories. This can be as simple as walking, gardening, cleaning and many other activities you may already do. During a physical activity, active muscles use up glucose as a source of energy. Regular physical activity helps to prevent glucose from building up in your blood. Many people do not get enough physical activity to be healthy in today’s society. Technology and modern living have removed many regular forms of physical activity from our daily lives. Cars replace walking and biking. Elevators and escalators replace stairs. Dishwashers replace doing dishes by hand. Computers replace manual labour. Snow blowers and ride-on lawn mowers replace physical yard work. TV and computer games replace fun physical activities for both children and adults. Because of modern living, it is important to think about being physically active each day. Adding more physical activity to your day is one of the most important things you can do to help manage your diabetes and improve your health. Did you know? Low physical fitness is as strong a risk factor for mortality as smoking. Fitness level is one of the strongest predictors of all-cause mortality in people with diabetes. Physical activity can be as powerful as glucose-lowering medication… with fewer side effects. Regular physical activity, in conjunction wi Continue reading >>

Physical Activity/exercise And Diabetes: A Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association

Physical Activity/exercise And Diabetes: A Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association

The adoption and maintenance of physical activity are critical foci for blood glucose management and overall health in individuals with diabetes and prediabetes. Recommendations and precautions vary depending on individual characteristics and health status. In this Position Statement, we provide a clinically oriented review and evidence-based recommendations regarding physical activity and exercise in people with type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes mellitus, and prediabetes. Physical activity includes all movement that increases energy use, whereas exercise is planned, structured physical activity. Exercise improves blood glucose control in type 2 diabetes, reduces cardiovascular risk factors, contributes to weight loss, and improves well-being (1,2). Regular exercise may prevent or delay type 2 diabetes development (3). Regular exercise also has considerable health benefits for people with type 1 diabetes (e.g., improved cardiovascular fitness, muscle strength, insulin sensitivity, etc.) (4). The challenges related to blood glucose management vary with diabetes type, activity type, and presence of diabetes-related complications (5,6). Physical activity and exercise recommendations, therefore, should be tailored to meet the specific needs of each individual. TYPES AND CLASSIFICATIONS OF DIABETES AND PREDIABETES Physical activity recommendations and precautions may vary by diabetes type. The primary types of diabetes are type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes (5%–10% of cases) results from cellular-mediated autoimmune destruction of the pancreatic β-cells, producing insulin deficiency (7). Although it can occur at any age, β-cell destruction rates vary, typically occurring more rapidly in youth than in adults. Type 2 diabetes (90%–95% of cases) resul Continue reading >>

The Role Of Physical Activity In Diabetes Prevention And Control

The Role Of Physical Activity In Diabetes Prevention And Control

The Role of Physical Activity in Diabetes Prevention and Control Volume 17 Issue 2 March/April 2007 | Download PDF We know from research that 30 minutes of physical activity a day, at least five days a week, can help in delaying or preventing the onset of Type 2 diabetes. We also know that many people want to start a program for increasing their level of physical activity but simply dont know where to begin. Lynn Nicholas, FACHE, CEO of the American Diabetes Association Despite the proven benefits of physical activity, more than 50 percent of American adults do not get enough physical activity to provide health benefits. Physical Activity and Health: A Report of the Surgeon General (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1996) What can a physically active lifestyle do for me? Research has shown that physical activity can Lower your blood glucose and your blood pressure Lower your bad cholesterol and raise your good cholesterol Improve your bodys ability to use insulin Lower your risk for heart disease and stroke Physical activity also plays an important part in preventing Type 2 diabetes. A major government study, the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), showed that a healthful diet and a moderate exercise program resulting in a 5 to 7 percent weight loss can delay and possibly prevent Type 2 diabetes. What kinds of physical activity can help me? Four kinds of activity can help. You can try Being extra active can increase the number of calories you burn. There are many ways to be extra active, including the following: Get up to change the TV channel instead of using the remote control. Stretch out your chores. For example, make two trips to take the laundry downstairs instead of one. Park at the far end of the shopping center lot and walk to the store. At the groc Continue reading >>

The Best Physical Activities To Do For Diabetes (and Life)

The Best Physical Activities To Do For Diabetes (and Life)

Home / Resources / Featured Writers / The Best Physical Activities to Do for Diabetes (and Life) The Best Physical Activities to Do for Diabetes (and Life) Most of the best physical activities dont require a gym membership, and you certainly dont have to be able to run a marathon to gain health benefits that will allow you to live a long and healthy life, with or without diabetes. As is widely known, the benefits of being active are innumerable, including prevention of type 2 diabetes, weight loss and maintenance, improved quality of life, longer self-care abilities, reduced arthritic pain in joints and increased mobility, better balance and falls prevention, stronger bones, and a better memory, just to name a few. I recently read an online report promoted by the American College of Sports Medicine through social media outlets about five of the best exercises you can ever do. I agreed with them all in principle, but I just want to add my two cents as an exercise professional and diabetes expert about why these (and other) exercises are particularly good for people with diabetes. The online report stated that no matter your age or fitness level, these five activities can help you get in shape and lower your risk for disease: swimming, tai chi, strength training, walking, and Kegel exercises. For people with diabetes, however, I would change and update them to the following instead, including a new order of importance: In recent years, the most compelling scientific evidence for diabetes management has been the inclusion of resistance/strength training as part of an exercise routine. Think of it this way: muscles are the main place we have to store excess carbohydrates that we eat, and the bigger the muscle tank, the more carbs we can store there. Aging by itself causes Continue reading >>

Exercise

Exercise

Everybody benefits from regular exercise. If you have diabetes, or are at risk of diabetes it plays an important role in keeping you healthy. For a person with diabetes exercise helps: Insulin to work better, which will improve your diabetes management Maintain a healthy weight Lower your blood pressure Reduce your risk of heart disease Reduce stress. Warning- Don’t take part in strenuous physical activity if you are feeling unwell or have ketones present in your blood or urine. Before commencing a regular exercise program see your doctor for a full medical examination. Initially take it slow - you don’t want to start off too hard, if you are not used to the exercise you will be sore the next day and this will not make exercising a fun experience! Over time, you can slowly increase the intensity of the exercise. If you have any diabetes complications like retinopathy, nephropathy, you should talk to your doctor or an accredited exercise physiologist before you start increasing the intensity of your exercise. Anything that gets you moving. Here are some suggestions for you to discuss with your doctor: Walking Swimming Cycling/ exercise bike Dancing Gardening Golfing Weight training Tai Chi Water aerobics Increasing your general physical activity is also helpful, e.g. taking the stairs instead of the lift, getting up to change the TV station instead of using the remote control, housework, and gardening. Avoid watching too much TV or sitting at the computer for a long time. For good health, you should be doing about 30 minutes of exercise every day. If this is not possible, then this time can be divided in 3 x 10 minutes sessions. You can break up exercise throughout the day. If you need to lose weight, 45-60 minutes everyday. You do not need to puff to gain the benefi Continue reading >>

More in diabetes