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Phases Of Type 2 Diabetes Progression

New Insights Into The Progression Of Type 1 Diabetes

New Insights Into The Progression Of Type 1 Diabetes

If you have Type 1 diabetes or know someone who does, you’re likely aware that this type of diabetes is an autoimmune disorder that results in the destruction of the beta cells (the cells that make insulin) in the pancreas. Having Type 1 diabetes means having to take lifelong insulin injections, and people who are diagnosed with this condition must start on insulin right away. Type 1 diabetes progresses Type 2 diabetes, the “other” type of diabetes, is a whole different ball of wax. This type of diabetes partly stems from insulin resistance, meaning that the pancreas produces insulin but the body has a hard time using it. Type 2 diabetes is often described as being “progressive”: caught in the early stages, for example, it’s possible to manage it through healthy eating, weight loss (if necessary), and physical activity. But over time, many people require the help of medication, often in the form of diabetes pills, and then, perhaps, noninsulin injectable meds. Eventually, insulin injections may be needed. In the case of Type 1 diabetes, researchers now believe that this disease also progresses at predictable rates and stages before a person develops signs and symptoms. The discovery of these stages is a big deal, as it will enable researchers to find ways to intervene to delay and hopefully prevent progression to the onset of symptoms and lifelong insulin dependence. Stages of Type 1 diabetes The discovery of the various stages leading up to symptomatic Type 1 diabetes are outlined in the October 2015 issue of the journal Diabetes Care. The paper is entitled “Staging Presymptomatic Type 1 Diabetes: A Scientific Statement of JDRF, the Endocrine Society, and the American Diabetes Association.” Here’s a closer look at the crux of this paper. Stage 1: Auto Continue reading >>

Human Beta Cell Mass And Function In Diabetes: Recent Advances In Knowledge And Technologies To Understand Disease Pathogenesis - Sciencedirect

Human Beta Cell Mass And Function In Diabetes: Recent Advances In Knowledge And Technologies To Understand Disease Pathogenesis - Sciencedirect

Volume 6, Issue 9 , September 2017, Pages 943-957 Human beta cell mass and function in diabetes: Recent advances in knowledge and technologies to understand disease pathogenesis Author links open overlay panel ChunguangChen123 Christian M.Cohrs123 JuliaStertmann12 RobertBozsak12 StephanSpeier12 Plasma insulin levels are predominantly the product of the morphological mass of insulin producing beta cells in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans and the functional status of each of these beta cells. Thus, deficiency in either beta cell mass or function, or both, can lead to insufficient levels of insulin, resulting in hyperglycemia and diabetes. Nonetheless, the precise contribution of beta cell mass and function to the pathogenesis of diabetes as well as the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. In the past, this was largely due to the restricted number of technologies suitable for studying the scarcely accessible human beta cells. However, in recent years, a number of new platforms have been established to expand the available techniques and to facilitate deeper insight into the role of human beta cell mass and function as cause for diabetes and as potential treatment targets. This review discusses the current knowledge about contribution of human beta cell mass and function to different stages of type 1 and type 2 diabetes pathogenesis. Furthermore, it highlights standard and newly developed technological platforms for the study of human beta cell biology, which can be used to increase our understanding of beta cell mass and function in human glucose homeostasis. In contrast to early disease models, recent studies suggest that in type 1 and type 2 diabetes impairment of beta cell function is an early feature of disease pathogenesis while a substantial decrease in beta Continue reading >>

Late Stage Complications Of Diabetes And Insulin Resistance

Late Stage Complications Of Diabetes And Insulin Resistance

1Department of Microbiology, Chaitanya Postgraduate College, Kakatiya University, Warangal, India 2Department of Biotechnology, Presidency College, Bangalore University, India *Corresponding Author: Department Of Microbiology, Chaitanya Postgraduate College affiliated to Kakatiya University, Warangal, India E-mail: [email protected] Citation: Soumya D, Srilatha B (2011) Late Stage Complications of Diabetes and Insulin Resistance. J Diabetes Metab 2:167. doi:10.4172/2155-6156.1000167 Copyright: © 2011 Soumya D, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Visit for more related articles at Journal of Diabetes & Metabolism Abstract Diabetes mellitus is considered one of the main threats to human health in the 21st century. Diabetes is a metabolic disorder or a chronic condition where the sugar levels in blood are high. Diabetes is associated with long-term complications that affect almost every part of the body and often leads to blindness, heart and blood vessel disease, stroke, kidney failure, amputations, and nerve damage. Also it is associated with significantly accelerated rates of several debilitating microvascular complications such as nephropathy, retinopathy, and neuropathy, and macrovascular complications such as atherosclerosis and stroke. In the present article it has been discussed about the resistance of insulin and its consequences in diabetic patients. Insulin resistance results in various disorders. Metabolic syndrome is predicted to become a major public health problem in many developed, as well as developing countries. Keywords Diabetes; Complications Continue reading >>

Defining And Characterizing The Progression Of Type 2 Diabetes

Defining And Characterizing The Progression Of Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease in which the risks of myocardial infarction, stroke, microvascular events, and mortality are all strongly associated with hyperglycemia (1). The disease course is primarily characterized by a decline in β-cell function and worsening of insulin resistance. The process is manifested clinically by deteriorations in multiple parameters, including A1C, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and postprandial glucose levels. In this review, we will evaluate our current understanding of the role played by deteriorating β-cell function and other abnormalities linked with the progression of type 2 diabetes. An improved understanding of these abnormalities may provide the scientific groundwork for novel therapies that may help achieve and maintain good glycemic control. CHARACTERISTICS OF DISEASE PROGRESSION Progression from pre-diabetes to overt diabetes Because glucose is a continuous variable, the use of thresholds to make a diagnosis is somewhat arbitrary. The term “pre-diabetes” has become well established and implies a risk of progression to overt diabetes. However, although such progression is well studied in prevention trials, little is known about the rate of progression and the characteristics of such progression in the population at large. Table 1 summarizes some of the factors associated with such progression. Nichols et al. (2) studied the progression of pre-diabetes to overt disease and observed that 8.1% of subjects whose initial abnormal fasting glucose was 100–109 mg/dl and 24.3% of subjects whose initial abnormal fasting glucose was 110–125 mg/dl developed diabetes over an average of 29.0 months (1.34 and 5.56% per year, respectively). A steeper rate of increasing fasting glucose; higher BMI, blood pressure, and triglycer Continue reading >>

Importance Of -cell Failure In The Development And Progression Of Type 2 Diabetes | The Journal Of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism | Oxford Academic

Importance Of -cell Failure In The Development And Progression Of Type 2 Diabetes | The Journal Of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism | Oxford Academic

The pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes is complex and in most instances clearly requires defects in both -cell function and insulin sensitivity ( 1 ). Together, these abnormalities result in increased rates of glucose release by the liver and kidney as well as decreased clearance from the circulation ( 2 , 3 ). For the last decade, a great deal of attention has been directed at further understanding the role of insulin resistance as an important contributor to the development and maintenance of the hyperglycemia of type 2 diabetes. During this same period, the well described vital role of the pancreatic islet, and specifically the -cell, in this process has been largely neglected. Perhaps one of the most striking and sobering findings of the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) was the reaffirmation of the clinically recognized progressive nature of type 2 diabetes ( 4 ). Every day clinicians all over the world find themselves struggling to maintain good glycemic control in subjects with type 2 diabetes, and the results of this study clearly confirm that, even with the use of algorithmic approaches aimed at maintaining superb glucose control, it is very difficult to maintain individuals at the desired levels of glycemia. In fact, in the UKPDS after 9 yr only 25% of the subjects in the intensive treatment arm were achieving a HbA1c less than 7% with monotherapy alone ( 5 ). When one examines the outcome in the different groups based on their initial assignment, this goal was attained in 8% of subjects given dietary therapy, 13% receiving metformin, 24% taking sulfonylureas, and 42% of individuals using insulin. The reason(s) for the progressive deterioration in glycemic control observed in the UKPDS have been addressed using the Homeostasis Model Assessment (H Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Overview Type 2 diabetes, once known as adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition that affects the way your body metabolizes sugar (glucose), your body's important source of fuel. With type 2 diabetes, your body either resists the effects of insulin — a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into your cells — or doesn't produce enough insulin to maintain a normal glucose level. More common in adults, type 2 diabetes increasingly affects children as childhood obesity increases. There's no cure for type 2 diabetes, but you may be able to manage the condition by eating well, exercising and maintaining a healthy weight. If diet and exercise aren't enough to manage your blood sugar well, you also may need diabetes medications or insulin therapy. Symptoms Signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly. In fact, you can have type 2 diabetes for years and not know it. Look for: Increased thirst and frequent urination. Excess sugar building up in your bloodstream causes fluid to be pulled from the tissues. This may leave you thirsty. As a result, you may drink — and urinate — more than usual. Increased hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your cells, your muscles and organs become depleted of energy. This triggers intense hunger. Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, you may lose weight. Without the ability to metabolize glucose, the body uses alternative fuels stored in muscle and fat. Calories are lost as excess glucose is released in the urine. Fatigue. If your cells are deprived of sugar, you may become tired and irritable. Blurred vision. If your blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your eyes. This may affect your ability to focus. Slow-healing sores o Continue reading >>

Diabetes Update: The Untold Story Of Disease Progression

Diabetes Update: The Untold Story Of Disease Progression

CE credit is no longer available for this article. Originally posted March 2001 Pick up the paper. Turn on the radio. Diabetes is rapidly becoming a national epidemic. An estimated 18 million Americans have diabetes—and that number is growing, particularly among children. Certain ethnic groups, such as African-Americans, Hispanics, and Native Americans, have the highest incidence. Among those groups, one in four over the age of 45 will most likely develop diabetes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that between 1990 and 1998, the incidence of diabetes rose by 70% among people ages 30 - 39; by 40% among those 40 - 49; and by 31% among those 50 - 59. What may be even more disturbing is the percentage of people who don't even know that they have diabetes: About 33% of the population with Type 1 diabetes and up to 55% of people with Type 2 go undiagnosed. Many patients are hyperglycemic for up to six years before finding out they have diabetes. The toll diabetes takes is staggering. It is the leading cause of new cases of adult blindness, end-stage renal disease, and nontraumatic lower extremity amputations. And patients with diabetes have an incidence of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality four times that of non-diabetics. In fact, 65% of patients with Type 2 diabetes will die of a cardiovascular complication. The cost is enormous: $138 billion annually. The average per capita medical expenditure is $10,000 per diabetic patient, vs. $2,700 for the non-diabetic individual. The good news is that complications of diabetes can be limited and its progression slowed with strict control of blood sugar and new treatment protocols. New drugs provide more therapeutic options. Insulin sensitizers, insulin secretagogues, medications that alter the diges Continue reading >>

How Type 2 Diabetes Can Change Over Time

How Type 2 Diabetes Can Change Over Time

You probably already know that type 2 diabetes can cause long-term damage if you don’t control it, but it’s also important to understand that even well-controlled diabetes progresses over time — meaning you may have to adjust your treatment plan more than once. The key to learning about the progression of diabetes is to understand the role of your pancreas, which produces insulin. For people with type 1 diabetes, the pancreas does not make any insulin, so they must take it through injections. With type 2, the pancreas doesn’t make enough insulin or the cells don’t respond to it adequately, according to the American Academy of Family Physicians. This means that the body has trouble moving sugar from the blood into cells to be used for energy. Diet, exercise, and medication, if prescribed, can all help those with type 2 diabetes lower their blood sugar levels and help their bodies use insulin made by the pancreas, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). If blood sugar levels remain high, the ADA says, you may be at risk for such diabetes complications as vision loss, heart disease, nerve damage, foot or leg amputation, and kidney disease. However, proper diabetes management can help prevent or delay the onset of these complications. How Your Diabetes Treatment Plan Might Change Over time, your medications, diet, and exercise goals may need to be adjusted. “Initially the pancreas produces extra insulin to make up for insulin resistance, but in most people, the pancreas eventually is unable to make the extra insulin to keep blood sugar levels normal,” says Marc Jaffe, MD, a San Francisco endocrinologist in practice with Kaiser Permanente in Northern California. After a type 2 diabetes diagnosis, your doctor will set blood sugar goals for you, rec Continue reading >>

The Natural History Of Type 2 Diabetes: Practical Points To Consider In Developing Prevention And Treatment Strategies

The Natural History Of Type 2 Diabetes: Practical Points To Consider In Developing Prevention And Treatment Strategies

CLINICAL DIABETES VOL. 18 NO. 2 Spring 2000 PRACTICAL POINTERS Type 2 diabetes, previously referred to as adult-onset or non-insulin-dependent diabetes, progresses from an early asymptomatic stage with insulin resistance to mild postprandial hyperglycemia to frank diabetes requiring pharmacological intervention. Understanding this natural history of type 2 diabetes will guide primary care providers in formulating effective treatment regimens that reflect the pathological differences between these stages of the disease. The optimal medication regimen, when used in conjunction with dietary changes and exercise, will require modifications for each patient as the disease progresses. The term impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or pre-diabetes was first coined in 1979 by the World Health Organization and the National Diabetes Data Group to replace the terms borderline, chemical, and asymptomatic diabetes mellitus. In 1997, an expert committee of the American Diabetes Association recommended the following criteria for IGT: a normal fasting plasma glucose (<126 mg/dl) with a postprandial plasma glucose of >140 mg/dl but <200 mg/dl 2 h after a 75-g oral glucose challenge.1 This stage of mild postprandial hyperglycemia is an extremely useful marker of patients at risk for the eventual development of type 2 diabetes. Patients with IGT may benefit from timely patient education and perhaps even more aggressive forms of intervention, such as diet, exercise, or medication. An estimated 15.7 million Americans have type 2 diabetes, representing 5.9% of the population. Only two-thirds of those affected are diagnosed and are being actively treated. Although these numbers are staggering, there are even more potential diabetic patients waiting in the wings: the prevalence of IGT is estimated Continue reading >>

Stages Of T1d

Stages Of T1d

Type 1 diabetes can now be most accurately understood as a disease that progresses in three distinct stages. TrialNet screening looks for five diabetes-related autoantibodies that signal an increased risk of T1D. The JDRF, ADA and Endocrine Society now classify having two or more of these autoantibodies as early stage T1D. Finding T1D in its earliest stage allows for prompt intervention aiming to change the course of the disease. T1D starts with a genetic predisposition—gene(s) that put you at higher risk. Risk for people in the general population is about 1 in 300. If you have a family member with T1D, your risk is 1 in 20. There are three distinct stages of T1D. The first two stages can be identified by TrialNet screening prior to symptoms. Our goal is to identify the disease in its earliest stage and stop disease progression by preserving beta cell production. Stages of T1D Continue reading >>

The Role Of Islet-cell Function In The Onset And Progression Of Type 2 Diabetes

The Role Of Islet-cell Function In The Onset And Progression Of Type 2 Diabetes

The Role of Islet-cell Function in the Onset and Progression of Type 2 Diabetes European Endocrinology, 2006(1):1-5; DOI: Citation European Endocrinology, 2006(1):1-5; DOI: Studies of the natural history of type 2 diabetes have transformed views on the nature of the condition in the last two decades. The Belfast Study is one of the earliest and most complete studies to observe the change in blood glucose control during six years of best possible management by dietary means.1 After the rapid initial fall from presenting blood glucose levels over 11mM, mean fasting blood glucose was maintained around 8mM for only two years before an inexorable rise occurred. By six years after diagnosis mean plasma glucose was over 10mM. This work is all the more impressive as no oral agent therapy was used during the course of the study, which truly observed natural history modified only by consistent and expert dietary advice. Calculated beta-cell function revealed a fall from around 30% of normal function at diagnosis to around 22% after six years.2 Immediately these data raise questions as to: how much loss of islet-cell function can be tolerated without elevation of blood glucose levels; what was happening in the islets during and beyond the phase leading up to diabetes; whether these processes are modifiable; and whether the process really commenced at the time suggested by extrapolating backwards the rate of decline around nine years before diagnosis. Subsequently, the UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) confirmed that type 2 diabetes is a moving target, requiring successive addition of oral hypoglycaemic agents and eventually insulin therapy.3 Extrapolation suggested a prodromal phase of islet-cell decline of around 12 years. Minds became concentrated on unravelling the mysteri Continue reading >>

Defining And Characterizing The Progression Of Type 2 Diabetes

Defining And Characterizing The Progression Of Type 2 Diabetes

Go to: Progression from pre-diabetes to overt diabetes Because glucose is a continuous variable, the use of thresholds to make a diagnosis is somewhat arbitrary. The term “pre-diabetes” has become well established and implies a risk of progression to overt diabetes. However, although such progression is well studied in prevention trials, little is known about the rate of progression and the characteristics of such progression in the population at large. Table 1 summarizes some of the factors associated with such progression. Nichols et al. (2) studied the progression of pre-diabetes to overt disease and observed that 8.1% of subjects whose initial abnormal fasting glucose was 100–109 mg/dl and 24.3% of subjects whose initial abnormal fasting glucose was 110–125 mg/dl developed diabetes over an average of 29.0 months (1.34 and 5.56% per year, respectively). A steeper rate of increasing fasting glucose; higher BMI, blood pressure, and triglycerides; and lower HDL cholesterol predicted diabetes development. The Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (3) concluded that although phenotypic differences in rates of progression are partly a function of diagnostic thresholds, fasting and postchallenge hyperglycemia may represent phenotypes with distinct natural histories in the evolution of type 2 diabetes. Does hyperglycemia evolve from normoglycemia gradually over time or as a step increase? Ferrannini et al. (4) measured plasma glucose and insulin levels during oral glucose testing at baseline and after 3 and 7 years of follow-up. In subjects with normal glucose tolerance on all three occasions (nonconverters), FPG increased only slightly over 7 years. In contrast, conversion to both impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and diabetes among normal glucose tolerance subjects Continue reading >>

The 3 Stages Of Type 1 Diabetes Development

The 3 Stages Of Type 1 Diabetes Development

Home / The 3 Stages of Type 1 Diabetes Development The 3 Stages of Type 1 Diabetes Development Type 1 diabetes is a medical disorder characterized by the autoimmune destruction of the pancreatic islet cells, eventually leading to the absence of the production of insulin and other important hormones. The lack of insulin results in a decreased ability of glucose to enter the cells, leading to hyperglycemia , or high blood glucose levels. Type 1 diabetes is believed to be caused by the combination of a genetic predisposition and an environmental trigger. Formerly known as juvenile diabetes, type 1 diabetes can be diagnosed in childhood, as well as in adulthood. In fact, between 25% and 50% of type 1 diabetes diagnoses today occur in individuals over 18 years old. The main symptoms of untreated type 1 diabetes include: Frequent infections and slow wound healing Individuals with type 1 diabetes must monitor their blood glucose levels and administer exogenous insulin via injections or an insulin pump to allow for glucose metabolism. Left untreated, the condition is deadly and suboptimal management can result in numerous complications, including micro- and macrovascular problems in numerous organ systems as well as nerve damage. However, with optimal blood glucose control, the likelihood of complications can be minimized. There are several main steps in the typical pattern of developing of type 1 diabetes: Islet cell autoimmunity, characterized by the presence of autoantibodies, A decrease in beta cell mass that reduces insulin production and results in slightly elevated blood glucose levels, and Overt hyperglycemia accompanied by the clinical symptoms of diabetes. A diabetes diagnosis is typically made based on blood glucose levels and the hemoglobin A1c test. In general, tw Continue reading >>

The Stages Of Type 1 Diabetes (it Starts Earlier Than We Thought)

The Stages Of Type 1 Diabetes (it Starts Earlier Than We Thought)

My daughter Bisi was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes three years ago at the age of six. The first night after she was diagnosed, once she finally fell asleep in her hospital bed, tossing and turning despite the IV in her arm, I remember standing outside in the hall with my husband and a couple of medical residents, talking with them about her diagnosis. “Could this have been coming on for a while?” we asked them. I described how for a couple of years, Bisi had been almost unbearably cranky when she was hungry—to the point where I’d asked her pediatrician more than once if something might be wrong. No, the residents told us. Type 1 diabetes comes on very suddenly, in a matter of weeks, as the body’s beta cells suddenly die out under attack from the immune system. Every doctor or nurse we spoke with during the three days in the hospital (except for one, who said that our instincts were probably right), echoed what the two residents, fresh from medical school, told us. But it turns out they were wrong. JDRF and the American Diabetes Association, supported by other organizations in the field, recently put forth a new staging system for type 1 diabetes, where full-blown disease, like what landed Bisi in the hospital, is characterized as stage 3, part of an extended auto-immune process that often starts in infancy. This fall, Dr. Richard Insel, JDRF’s Chief Scientific Officer, explained the classification system to a group of reporters, talking through the importance of early diagnosis, and the hope that diagnosing the disease at an earlier stage could lead to breakthroughs in stopping the beta-cell destruction process—essentially, stopping the disease before it starts. Insel explained that stage 1 is when people test positive for multiple pancreatic islet auto-a Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Whether you have type 2 diabetes, are a caregiver or loved one of a person with type 2 diabetes, or just want to learn more, the following page provides an overview of type 2 diabetes. New to type 2 diabetes? Check out “Starting Point: Type 2 Diabetes Basics” below, which answers some of the basic questions about type 2 diabetes: what is type 2 diabetes, what are its symptoms, how is it treated, and many more! Want to learn a bit more? See our “Helpful Links” page below, which provides links to diaTribe articles focused on type 2 diabetes. These pages provide helpful tips for living with type 2 diabetes, drug and device overviews, information about diabetes complications, nutrition and food resources, and some extra pages we hope you’ll find useful! Starting Point: Type 2 Diabetes Basics Who is at risk of developing type 2 diabetes? What is the risk of developing type 2 diabetes if it runs in the family? What is type 2 diabetes and prediabetes? Behind type 2 diabetes is a disease where the body’s cells have trouble responding to insulin – this is called insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone needed to store the energy found in food into the body’s cells. In prediabetes, insulin resistance starts growing and the beta cells in the pancreas that release insulin will try to make even more insulin to make up for the body’s insensitivity. This can go on for a long time without any symptoms. Over time, though, the beta cells in the pancreas will fatigue and will no longer be able to produce enough insulin – this is called “beta burnout.” Once there is not enough insulin, blood sugars will start to rise above normal. Prediabetes causes people to have higher-than-normal blood sugars (and an increased risk for heart disease and stroke). Left unnoticed or Continue reading >>

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