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Perks Of Being Type 1 Diabetic

A Glass Of Wine May Have Health Perks For People With Type 2 Diabetes

A Glass Of Wine May Have Health Perks For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Tuesday, October 13, 2015 A daily glass of wine with dinner may offer modest health benefits for people with type 2 diabetes, according to a new study led by Israeli researchers. The results add to a controversial — and still inconclusive — body of evidence supporting the positive effects of moderate alcohol consumption on cardiovascular function. The study tested the effect of daily wine intake on cholesterol levels, blood sugar, and other health markers in people with type 2 diabetes, a group at increased risk for heart disease because of their condition. In one of the longest randomized trials of alcohol consumption, 224 middle-aged men and women with well-controlled diabetes were assigned to drink a five-ounce (oz) glass of red wine, white wine, or mineral water with their evening meal every night for two years. All of the participants were alcohol abstainers prior to enrollment, and all were counseled to follow a Mediterranean diet. The amount of wine used in the study falls within health organizations’ guidelines for moderate drinking, defined as no more than one drink per day for women, or two drinks for men. One drink is equivalent to 5 oz of wine, 12 oz of beer, or 1.5 oz of hard liquor. Compared to those who drank water, participants who drank red wine increased their HDL, the so-called good cholesterol, by 2 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl) and decreased their total cholesterol to HDL ratio — changes that indicate a modest improvement in cardiovascular health. High HDL levels are thought to be protective against heart disease and stroke, although the benefits of raising HDL cholesterol have been called into question recently by experts. White wine consumption did not alter cholesterol levels, but did lower participants' fasting blood sugar levels and Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Social Security Disability

Diabetes And Social Security Disability

Diabetes - Condition Diabetes is a medical condition in which a person’s level of glucose, or blood sugar, is elevated. In a properly functioning circulatory system, blood carries glucose to all the cells in the body in order to produce energy, while the pancreas produces insulin to help the body absorb excess glucose. High levels of glucose in the blood are an indication that the body is not producing enough insulin, or that the insulin produced is not working as it should to help the body absorb glucose, indicating a Diabetic or pre-Diabetic condition. There are three types of Diabetes: Type 1, or “juvenile” Diabetes Type 2, or “adult onset” Diabetes, and Gestational Diabetes Diabetes mellitus is the medical name for both Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes. Pre-Diabetes is a condition in which blood glucose levels are elevated, indicating that an individual has a high risk of developing full-fledged Diabetes. Diabetes is a very serious disease which can result in high blood pressure, damage to the eyes, nerve damage, kidney disease, heart disease, blindness, and stroke. In addition, it is not uncommon for a long term diabetic to loose limbs to amputation because of poor circulation. Symptoms The presence of Diabetes is generally indicated by some combination of several symptoms. A diabetic will often experience unexplained: frequent need to urinate, especially if it is combined with extreme thirst, chronic hunger, especially between meals, fatigue, weight loss, and/or general feelings of irritability Many diabetics report dry, itchy skin and trouble with genital itching and fungal infections. A tingling sensation or numbness in the feet is another indication, as is blurred vision. Finally, the skin of many diabetics is slow to heal from wounds, skin abrasions, or so Continue reading >>

Disadvantages Of Having Diabetes–and Advantages

Disadvantages Of Having Diabetes–and Advantages

Abstract About three years ago I became a diabetic, and since then I have been very interested in learning all I can about the disease. I am interested in the medical profession and am considering going into diabetes research. As with other diseases, there are disadvantages to having diabetes. I have found that I must maintain a delicate balance between insulin injections, diet, and exercise in order to keep my blood sugar at a normal level. The maintenance of this balance requires a great deal of my attention, so occasionally I am unable to concentrate completely on some activity. I must always be conscious of my sugar level and be ready to make adjustments if my level is too high or too low. Another problem I have experienced is that other people do not understand diabetes. I have encountered people who think diabetics are sick and cannot lead normal lives. Other disadvantages of diabetes are the daily insulin injections I must take and the complications that can occur if proper control is not maintained. Although I have not experienced complications, some diabetics experience slow healing of wounds and impairments of eyesight and circulation. Despite the disadvantages of diabetes, I have found that having it is advantageous in some aspects. My healthy diet and regular exercise have allowed me to stay in good shape. Some doctors consider diabetes "the healthiest disease." Another advantage of diabetes actually stems from the disadvantages of the disease. In some ways the problems involved with diabetes have made me more determined to excel at whatever I do. Continue reading >>

Ten Good Things About Having Diabetes

Ten Good Things About Having Diabetes

The idea for this article came to me one night after attending a diabetes support group at a local hospital. During the meeting, the discussion of serious complications became so graphic that there was an air of melancholy and hopelessness permeating the entire room. I thought, "What we really need is the good news." I tried to imagine whether I would miss any part of having diabetes if I could be cured today. Socrates said, "The unexamined life is not worth living." Over the years, because of diabetes, Ive learned a few facts about myself: I have a powerful liver that likes any excuse to pump out glycogen, raising my blood glucose. If Ive been losing my patience a lot, my blood glucose has been too high. If my legs feel weak at the top of the stairs, my blood glucose is too low. If I wake up in the night to tell my husband how to solve the worlds problems, my blood glucose is probably near 40! Who else but a person with diabetes would know this much about himself or herself? Marge, a friend of mine with type 1, remarks: "I feel like I have more insight into how I react to certain stimuli, because you have to know how your bodys going to react to anything you put into itlike cream in my coffee raising my blood glucose. I know better than a doctor that my body reacts to phases of the moon, which affect hormones, which affect my glucose." 2. Seizing the Opportunity to Be the Best I Can Be I believe all people naturally want to excel. Diabetes gives us a framework to know how were doing. Blood-glucose tests, A1Cs, even the first sign of a complication are signposts telling us to get our blood glucose under better control. After the initial frustration with a higher number, I find gratitude for this cue and get back on track. "We have better signposts than most people," of Continue reading >>

The Advantages Of Being Diabetic.

The Advantages Of Being Diabetic.

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Discussion in ' Parents ' started by flojo1234 , Jan 1, 2009 . i decided ( as i was feeling a bit down about being diabetic) i would write down a list of all the good things about being a diabetic. so here it goes!: 1. people who are diabetic have a very healthy lifestyle in all sorts of areas, ( eating, fitness,skin health e.t.c) 2.at christmas,halloween and easter all diabetics think 'do i really want these sweets and choclate enough to give myself an extra injection?' 3. if we ever feel down we just have too think, 'there are much worse things that could have happend or we could have got.' 4.we are not much different from anyone else realy even though sometimes it feels like it! if anyone could think of anything please post me back! Another advantage to being diabetic, if you break down, the AA get to you a lot quicker!! Hope you had a good christmas, and a very happy healthy new year to you and your family. a)you have to become responsible for your items(ie bs kit ect) but if your like Andrew you can never remember where you put them!but then he's a boy lol) b)sometimes you get out during school, because the hospital makes appointments during school hours.(this can be a good/bad thing) c)theres never anything you can't do that your friends can, just that sometimes you have to plan better ahead.Which isn't a bad thing. d)Andrew got a mobile at the age of 8yrs, when all his friends had to wait til they were 10yrs old, plus he got a lovely silver SOS tailisman, which his friends envy. e)you find out who your real friends are, early in life. And all of the things you said, you'll become a very healthy,beautiful adult. Hahaha Suzi, your post just remin Continue reading >>

Money Matters

Money Matters

Money is often a problem, whether you're a student or have just started a job (people rarely start on decent salaries). You'll want to economise, but don't sacrifice your health for the sake of a slightly bigger bulge in your wallet. It's one thing you can't afford to do if you have diabetes. Life on a shoestring One big weekly shop at your supermarket will work out cheaper than lots of single trips to the local shops over the week.One big weekly shop at your supermarket will work out cheaper than lots of single trips to the local shops over the week. Bread, cereals, pasta and potatoes are relatively cheap and filling.Bread, cereals, pasta and potatoes are relatively cheap and filling. Look out for supermarket ‘own brands’ and in-house specials.Look out for supermarket ‘own brands’ and in-house specials. Some supermarkets sell produce at reduced prices near the end of the day (but always check the sell-by date).Some supermarkets sell produce at reduced prices near the end of the day (but always check the sell-by date). Market stalls are cheaper for fish, eggs, fruit and veg.Market stalls are cheaper for fish, eggs, fruit and veg. Buy some foods in bulk, such as pasta, potatoes, rice, dried beans and pulses.Buy some foods in bulk, such as pasta, potatoes, rice, dried beans and pulses. Frozen veg and tinned fruit are useful if you find fresh ones go off before you use them.Frozen veg and tinned fruit are useful if you find fresh ones go off before you use them. Beans and pulses are cheap, filling and as nutritious as meat or fish – they take more imagination to cook with, but it's worth it.Beans and pulses are cheap, filling and as nutritious as meat or fish – they take more imagination to cook with, but it's worth it. On prescription People with Type 1 diabet Continue reading >>

The Perks Of Type 1 | Day-to-day Diabetes

The Perks Of Type 1 | Day-to-day Diabetes

Posted in Diabetes , Education , Life , Positive Thinking by kbajac22 So Ive just realised that this is something that I have talked about with my friends/family quite a fair bit, but not actually anything Ive ever written down. So here goes The Perks of Type 1 Diabetes! (yes, there are some) 1. No sir, sorry cant run today, by blood sugars are playing up -I was never really a fan of sport at school, particularly running so yeah I may have once or twice (or, like 60 times) told the teacher I couldnt participate during sport. 2.Oh I just gotta go get a juice from my bag cause I feel low and Madi has to go with me in case I pass out on the way to my locker I think this is an actual sentence I used at school frequently, mainly during science. 3.Yes thank you I will take my break now and eat and drink all of this delicious food on my desk during this exam All throughout exam time and especially the H.S.C I was given extra time and breaks in order to check my blood sugar and eat food to correct any lows. Nothing is better than opening a popper in a dead silent room and slurping all the goodness up through a straw while everyone else is starving! Additionally if I had wanted I couldve gotten a whole room to myself! 4 . Filling out your timetable preferences before any one else! This was probably the best perk of diabetes ever! As a Type 1 Diabetic I was able to select the classes and units I wanted to be enrolled in before anyone else. This was amazing because it meant that I didnt have to fight for my classes and get stressed about being stuck with a dodgy timetable! 5. Again eating and receiving extra breaks and additional times during examsSCORE! 6. Being able to miss a larger amount of tutorials/lectures than normal people and without having to supply a doctors certifica Continue reading >>

10 Perks Of Being Diabetic

10 Perks Of Being Diabetic

Wheelchair Mom Blog | Foster Mom Parenting Blog | Wheelchair Mom | Central PA Mom Blog After gorging on takeout pizza last night, I was feeling guilty about the inevitable skyrocketing blood sugars I was sure Id be dealing with over the next few days. I laid in bed, running through the mental list of everything I had consumed in the past 12 hours (oye.) and was just generally feeling sorry for myself. In attempt to get myself out of a sugar funk (and the general bad mood Ive been fighting this week), I started thinking of the positives of having Diabetes, which I haphazardly typed out on my iPhones notepad at 2 am. And because I had nothing better to post about today, I thought Id share them with you. Youre welcome. 1.) Wanna play naughty nurse/doctor? Diabetics have great props for medical role play. Plus, an emergency drop in blood sugar is the perfect transition to bring some sweets (sugar free, or course) into the bedroom. 2.) Were a dieters best friend. Who else can you count on to know the carbohydrates in your food options at a moments notice? Atkins, shmatkins. Diabetics have low-carb eating and carb counting down pat. 3.)Hungry? Diabetics usually carry snacks and/or candy with them, in case of lows. In the mood for peanut butter crackers? Sure, just check my purse! 4.) Well never hate on you for your extreme dependence on diet cola. 5.) Were great cooks! When you have to change your eating habits and lifestyle, you learn how to make healthy food taste good. And our fridges are usually well stocked. 6.) We can get you out of boring situations. Three hour committee meeting? Sallys blood sugar just dropped you should really accompany her to the break room to make sure shes all right. Safety first. 7.) Diabetics have an easily accessed excuse for bad moods, withou Continue reading >>

The 10 Best Things About Diabetes

The 10 Best Things About Diabetes

Living with diabetes is stressful, frustrating and exhausting, and my general response to people who encourage me to find the bright side of diabetes is to want to slap them. Nonetheless, while I’d take a successful pancreas transplant in a heartbeat, there are certain benefits that diabetes can provide. 1. A medical reason to eat cheese I will never be able to eat a cupcake without worrying about its consequences, and I get physically anxious at the sight of pasta. But while diabetes may have taken away my bagels, it has given me the gift of guilt-free cheese. So filling. So low-carb. So delicious. 2. An increased tolerance for needles Being diagnosed with diabetes makes your tolerance for needles go way up. It’s nice to be able to watch someone draw blood or put an IV in your arm without worrying that you’re going to pass out. And if you’re consistent about where you test your blood sugar, you can also benefit from strategically placed calluses – I’m hoping that if I only test on the tips of my left fingers, I might be able to toughen up my skin to the point where I can play the guitar for more than two minutes at a time. 3. An escape hatch for social situations Desperate to escape from a cocktail party? Caught in a tedious conversation with a stranger? Pull out your glucometer/pump/CGM and say that there’s something urgent you need to take care of. 4. Business ideas Living with diabetes makes you an expert in living with diabetes, and that in turn can give you business ideas (or job opportunities) that someone without diabetes might not have. Plenty of people have used their personal experience to launch diabetes-inspired businesses, like the folks behind Glucolift tablets, Sugar Medical’s carrying cases, and PocketBra’s pump-friendly lingerie. Cons Continue reading >>

Having Type 1 Diabetes Can Be A Positive Thing (kind Of..!)

Having Type 1 Diabetes Can Be A Positive Thing (kind Of..!)

Having type 1 diabetes can be a positive thing (kind of..!) Having type 1 diabetes can be a positive thing (kind of..!) Author: Sarah Jordan's story | Posted: 27 July 2015 My best attributes can be linked to having type 1. Ive been living with the condition for 16 years now. Weve had our ups and downs, me and ol diabetes, but now Ive reached 30 (gasp) I feel more at peace with it. Dont get me wrong, there are serious downsides. Theres no cure, we have to plan and take extra care, not to mention scary stuff like the looming possibilities of blindness and loss of limbs (always really cheery thoughts for day to day life, eh?) but some of my finest traits can be linked to having type 1 and for that Im lucky. Organisation. Theres nothing like testing your blood sugar eight times a day, pumping four times (goodbye injections, I dont miss you!) and constantly having sugar supplies to make you organised. Im so organised I made a career out of it for years. Organised = Event Coordinator = not too shabby for Sarah. Empathy. Living with a condition every day that people cant really see makes you realise that other people are going through things we dont know about and even if people seem ok, they might be hiding something. Ive learned to talk and really listen as Im lucky to have some people whove really listened to me. Living for now and planning for the future. Gasp. You CAN do both. Knowing that my health will seriously suffer if I dont have stable blood sugars makes me realise life is precious, so I try and do positive things that scare me, spend loads of time with my beautiful family and have fun! The future. I already have medium diabetic retinopathy (scary eye problems) and I dont want any other problems, thank you very much! Some people waste life and I know with absolute Continue reading >>

The Pros And Cons Of Type 1

The Pros And Cons Of Type 1

A little while back, I asked some of my friends with Type 1 diabetes what their favorite thing was about living with the condition, followed by their least favorite thing. I’ve decided to make a post out of those responses, in the hopes that those of you with Type 1 will be reminded that you’re not alone in this and that there is always someone else out there who gets what you’re going through! The list of least favorite things ranged from minor things to pretty substantial issues. I’ll start with those little things that just really push our buttons: One of the first responses I got was, “I absolutely hate it when my tubing gets caught on doorknobs!” I can’t even begin to describe how many times this very thing has happened to me and how annoying it is! In my case, it usually ends up hurting more when my site stays in rather than the entire thing just getting pulled out. It is such a quick little nuisance, but when it happens it is so irritating! Another response that I got quite a few times was “I hate it when people ask me if I’m allowed to eat certain things.” This is one thing that is of course annoying after it happens a million and one times, but it’s one of the things that annoys me the least. Whenever it does happen (and don’t get me wrong, it definitely bugs me), I just remind myself that this person doesn’t understand Type 1 diabetes. They hear “diabetes” and automatically assume it means no sugar because of the misperceptions and confusion between Type 1 and Type 2. A little spin-off of this particular situation that really got to me about two weeks ago was when I had an episode of low blood sugar, and a friend of mine told me that I should take better care of myself and not let my blood sugar get to that point. I can’t think Continue reading >>

Take Your Perks With Type 1

Take Your Perks With Type 1

Having Type 1 diabetes has many downsides, or lows, if you will. It is often difficult to look on the bright side of any illness. However, there are certain instances where we get treated to some unexpected daily life perks!Lets take a look at some scenarios where T1Ds get the sweeter end of the deal. Pretty much nobody can tell us not to have food or juice with us. A quick flash of a medical bracelet, prescription or doctors note can sidestep most rules about not bringing food or drinks into a venue! Places where T1Ds are allowed to bring food whereas others are not can include but are not limited to: Not every student gets to head out of class early before lunch, but in most elementary, middle and high schools, thats exactly what kids with Type 1 can do before heading to the nurses office to take insulin, check BG levels, etc! Teachers frown upon technology in the classroom, but T1Ds are always allowed to keep their technology on their person (pumps, meters, etc). Even cell phones are permitted if it is connected to your CGM. As mentioned before, food and drink are always allowed in case of a low. Registering for accommodationsin college can afford you such perks as early registration for classes, preferred room location or rooms with refrigerators, and other benefits to make life easier. For US residents, the Diabetes Scholars Foundation awards scholarships to high school seniors who have high academic performance, are actively involved in their community and the diabetes community. Diabetes Scholars Foundation scholarships are not based on financial need and are due in April each year. For Canadian residents, the Diabetes Hope Scholarship provides education grants to students living with diabetes. Other scholarships for US and Canadian incoming freshman, typically Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Benefits

Diabetes And Benefits

Tweet There are a number of free welfare benefits that may be available to people with diabetes if complications lead to difficulty in daily life. In addition, all people with diabetes mellitus in the UK are entitled to free eye checks and all people on diabetes medication should receive free prescriptions. In terms of the benefits related to long term health conditions and disabilities, eligibility for benefits depends on to what extent the life of an individual is affected by diabetes or any addition health issues. The most likely people to be eligible for these kind of benefits include: What is the purpose of disability benefits? The aim of disability benefits is to help those people that need it, whilst incapacity benefits are intended for those that, physically or mentally, are unable to work. What benefits are available to me? There are a number of benefits available for people with diabetes and/or their carers. Disability Living Allowance (DLA) Disability Living Allowance is available for people over the age of 16 years old with care and/or mobility needs. For care needs, there are three tiers of benefit from needing care for short periods up to care covering both night and day. For mobility needs there are two tiers, covering care for those who need guidance and the higher tier for people who find the act of moving around difficult. DLA for parents of children with diabetes Parents of diabetic children may also claim for disability living allowance if there are significant care needs above those of other children of the same age. Personal Independence Payment (PIP) In 2013, Personal Independence Payment replaced Disability Living Allowance for people between the ages of 16 and 64. For care needs, there are two tiers of benefit for both mobility and daily living Continue reading >>

The Benefits Of Growing Up With Type 1 Diabetes

The Benefits Of Growing Up With Type 1 Diabetes

Brought to you by Lilly Diabetes | Disney The Benefits of Growing Up With Type 1 Diabetes Kim Vlasnik, guest blogger, TextingMyPancreas.com When a child is diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, a lot of things that were never worrisome before suddenly can seem kind of scary. Before I was diagnosed at the age of 6 in 1986, eating a sandwich was a pretty low-stress activity. Kicking a soccer ball around didnt require much planning past remember to bring a soccer ball, and the most difficult part of spending an afternoon at the pool was avoiding some very obvious tan lines on my face from the swim goggles I wore. And I never worried about what might happen to me while I slept, except for a potential attack by the monster that I was sure resided in my closet. My diagnosis dramatically changed a lot of what was required for me to participate in these everyday activities, but when I look back on my childhood, I dont remember much of that part. Maybe it was because my parents were so cognizant of keeping the focus on the life part of life with diabetes. Or maybe its my tendency to be aware of the good in even the most challenging of situations. My life lived with type 1 diabetes could rarely be described as easy, but I think it very clearly falls under the category of good. Really good. As a parent of a child with type 1 diabetes, you may be wondering what the future holds for your son or daughter. While I dont have a super-clear answer to that, I do have a few light-hearted thoughts to offer on the plus-side of growing up with type 1. Continue reading >>

10 Perks Of Having Type 1 Diabetes

10 Perks Of Having Type 1 Diabetes

Nine years ago, I was lying on a bed in the emergency room when a doctor rushed in and told me that my year-and-a-half long battle with a mystery illness had a name: type 1 diabetes. I would spend the next five days on an insulin drip while I learned how to count carbohydrates, dose and inject insulin, and test my blood sugar. Nurses handed me glossy brochures with diabetes printed across the top in a font that suggested I was bound for an exotic vacation, not a lifetime of disease management. The potential complications of my disease include, but arent limited to: blindness, kidney failure, depression, cancer, sexual dysfunction, amputation of feet or legs, and developing other chronic diseases. Until forevermore, Im insulin-dependent, which means that without the life-giving hormone, I will die. However, modern technology is a beautiful thing, and Im staying alive with the use of an insulin pump and continuous glucose monitor, two devices I have on me at all times. Despite having many sick days, frustrations, and falters, there are some perks to having Type 1 Diabetes: 1. I get felt up before every flight.The devices, tubing, and transmitter I use to stay alive are of great interest to the TSA. I get the whole stand on this square spread your legs and arms and Im going to use the back of my hands on your sensitive areas such as your breasts and buttocks spiel. While my husband and children (as well as the handful of strangers who want to see what Im in trouble for) stand on the sidelines gawking, I get to chit-chat with the stranger who gropes my sensitive areas. Unfortunately, my feeler-upper has yet to be Ryan Gosling. 2. I get to pick the restaurant, every time.Inevitably, when its the rare occasion when I get to eat out with friends, they always insist I choose t Continue reading >>

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