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Peripheral Neuropathy Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes And Peripheral Neuropathy: To Walk Or Not To Walk?

Type 2 Diabetes And Peripheral Neuropathy: To Walk Or Not To Walk?

It is now well known that engaging in light to moderate physical activity on a regular basis is of significant value for most people that have either Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. In fact the American Diabetes Association recommends that people with diabetes should get a minimum of 150 minutes of light to moderate exercise per week including aerobic and resistance training. What the ADA says... It has also been recommended that people with peripheral diabetic neuropathy that have reduced or absent feeling in their feet should not engage in any form of weight bearing exercise activity. The American Diabetes Association recommends that people with diabetes-related peripheral neuropathy should limit the amount of weight-bearing physical activity they perform due to their increased risk of foot ulcers and amputation (1, 2). This is based on the fact that with peripheral neuropathy there is either a decreased ability or total inability in the feet to feel pain or discomfort. As an example, standing barefoot on hot asphalt maybe in a parking lot in the middle of the summer would be very uncomfortable for someone with normal sensation in their feet, however go unnoticed for someone with peripheral neuropathy. Similarly, the person with peripheral neuropathy may develop a painful nickel-sized blister after walking too far or when wearing new shoes and not even feel it. Without daily inspection of the ankles and feet (which a lot of people do not do) this blister could go unnoticed for days resulting in a potentially infected, slow to heal, or non-healing wound. In the worst case this could lead to an amputation. All of this is the result of losing what is called the protective sensation in the feet. In the absence of peripheral neuropathy whenever there is insult to the foot or fe Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Symptoms Of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a condition caused by long-term high blood sugar levels, which causes nerve damage. Some people will not have any symptoms. But for others symptoms may be debilitating. Between 60 and 70 percent of people with diabetes have some form of neuropathy, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Peripheral neuropathy, the most common form of diabetic neuropathy, affects the legs, feet, toes, hands, and arms. Many people do not know that they have diabetes. People unaware of their diabetes may not know what’s causing some of the unusual sensations they’re experiencing. Nerve damage is the result of high levels of blood glucose over long periods of time. It isn’t entirely clear why high glucose levels damage nerves. A number of factors may play a role in nerve fiber damage. One possible component is the intricate interplay between the blood vessels and nerves, according to the Mayo Clinic. Other factors include high blood pressure and cholesterol levels and nerve inflammation. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy usually first appears in the feet and legs, and may occur in the hands and arms later. A common symptom of diabetic peripheral neuropathy is numbness. Sometimes you may be unable to feel your feet while walking. Other times, your hands or feet will tingle or burn. Or it may feel like you’re wearing a sock or glove when you’re not. Sometimes you may experience sudden, sharp pains that feel like an electrical current. Other times, you may feel cramping, like when you’re grasping something like a piece of silverware. You also may sometimes unintentionally drop items you’re holding as a result of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Walking with a wobbly motion or even losing your balance can res Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Nutritional Deficiency And Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

What You Should Know About Nutritional Deficiency And Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

What You Should Know About Nutritional Deficiency And Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy In a thorough review of the relationship between nutrition and diabetic peripheral neuropathy, this author discusses key vitamin deficiencies, the impact of oxidative stress in patients with diabetes, and the need for close postoperative nutrition monitoring in those who have bariatric surgery. Peripheral neuropathy is a highly prevalent and comorbid condition affecting 2 to 7 percent of the population.1 An estimated 20 million people in the United States have some form of peripheral neuropathy.2 There are more than 100 types of peripheral neuropathy, each with its own characteristic set of symptoms, pattern of development and prognosis. Peripheral neuropathy may be either inherited or acquired. Neuropathic pain results from primary lesions or dysfunction of the central or peripheral nervous system (see A Closer Look At The Mechanisms Of Neuropathic Pain at right).3,4 The causes of acquired peripheral neuropathy include trauma to a nerve, tumors, toxins, autoimmune responses, nutritional deficiencies, alcoholism, medical procedures, and vascular and metabolic disorders. Distal symmetric polyneuropathy, the most common subtype of peripheral neuropathy, is a major complication of both insulin-dependent and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and is the most common form of neuropathy in the developed world.3 There are two main types of neuropathy. The most common is a nerve fiber length-dependent, distal symmetrical sensory polyneuropathy with little motor involvement but frequent and potentially life-threatening autonomic dysfunction.5 The second pattern is a focal neuropathy, which more commonly complicates or reveals type 2 diabetes. Several recent studies have implicated poor gly Continue reading >>

Types Of Peripheral Neuropathy -

Types Of Peripheral Neuropathy -

Diabetic Neuropathy Diabetic neuropathy, or nerve damage caused by diabetes, is one of the most common known causes of neuropathy. It is one of many complications associated with diabetes, with nearly 60 percent of diabetics having some form of nerve damage. It is a progressive disease that can involve loss of sensation, as well as pain and weakness, in the feet and sometimes in the hands. Peripheral neuropathy may be more prevalent in people who have difficulty managing their blood sugar levels, have high blood pressure, are overweight, and are over 40 years old. A clinical examination may identify early signs of neuropathy in diabetics without symptoms. The first sign of diabetic neuropathy is usually numbness, tingling or pain in the feet, legs or hands. Over a period of several years, the neuropathy may lead to muscle weakness in the feet and a loss of reflexes, especially around the ankle. As the nerve damage increases, the loss of sensation in the feet can reduce a person's ability to detect temperature or to notice pain. Because the person can no longer notice when his/her feet become injured, people with diabetic neuropathy are more likely to develop foot problems such as skin lesions and ulcers that may become infected. Diabetic neuropathy may suddenly flare up and affect a specific nerve or group of nerves. When this occurs, the result may be weakness and muscle atrophy in various parts of the body, such as involvement of the eye muscles or eyelid (e.g., causing double vision or a drooping eyelid) or thigh muscles. Alternatively, neuropathy caused by diabetes may slowly progress over time. It also can interfere with the normal functioning of the digestive system and sexual organs. SYMPTOMS AND SIGNS (Not all symptoms and signs may be present.) Numbness, tingli Continue reading >>

Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

With 25 million affected individuals, diabetes, known medically as diabetes mellitus, affects nearly one out of every 12 people in the United States. Patients with diabetes suffer from high blood sugar levels as a result of poor insulin production or insulin insensitivity. Insulin is a molecule produced by the pancreas and is responsible for removing excess glucose from the bloodstream. The two types of diabetes are referred to as Type 1 and Type 2. Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in patients below 30, hence the additional term “juvenile diabetes,” although it may be diagnosed at older ages in some cases. Type 1 diabetes is caused by a loss of insulin production associated with the depletion of insulin producing beta cells from the pancreas. This form of diabetes may occur suddenly, and is more common in individuals with an affected family member. Symptoms include weight loss, blurred vision, increased urination, and thirst. Type 2 diabetes symptoms develop more gradually, but are similar to Type 1 diabetes symptoms. However, the causes of these two diseases vary. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by insulin sensitivity, wherein the body no longer responds to insulin production. Initially, this is compensated by overproduction of insulin, but consistent overproduction often leads to a loss of insulin production. Type 2 diabetes is sometimes referred to as adult-onset diabetes, although the ages of diagnosis overlap. Type 2 diabetes is highly associated with weight, with about 90% of Type 2 diabetes patients being overweight. Must Watch Video – What is Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy? A frequent complication of diabetes is diabetic peripheral neuropathy, affecting nearly half of all diabetic patients. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is nerve damage in the limbs a Continue reading >>

Neuropathy

Neuropathy

What is neuropathy? Neuropathy – also called peripheral neuropathy – refers to any condition that affects the normal activity of the nerves of the peripheral nervous system. The peripheral nervous system is the network of nerves that connects the central nervous system – the brain and spinal cord – to the rest of the body. The peripheral nervous system is made up of 3 types of nerves, each with an important role to play in keeping your body healthy and functioning properly. Sensory nerves carry messages from your senses through your spinal cord to your brain. For example, they tell your brain you are touching something hot. Motor nerves travel in the opposite direction. They carry messages from the brain to your muscles. They tell your muscles to move you away from the hot surface. Autonomic nerves are responsible for controlling body functions that occur outside our control, such as breathing, digestion, heart rate, and blood pressure. Neuropathy results when nerve cells, or neurons, are damaged or destroyed. This distorts the way the neurons communicate with each other and with the brain. Neuropathy can affect 1 nerve or nerve type, or a combination of nerves. How common is neuropathy? Neuropathy is very common. It is estimated that about 25% to 30% of Americans will be affected by neuropathy. Neuropathy occurs in 60% to 70% of people with diabetes. Who gets neuropathy? Neuropathy affects people of all ages; however, older people are at increased risk. It is more common in men and in Caucasians. People in certain professions, such as those that require repetitive motions, have a greater chance of developing compression-related neuropathy. What causes neuropathy? There are many causes of neuropathy. The cause can be hereditary (runs in families) or acquired (de Continue reading >>

Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy (dpn)

Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy (dpn)

Definition Diabetic neuropathies are a family of nerve disorders caused by diabetes. People with diabetes can, over time, develop nerve damage throughout the body. Some people with nerve damage have no symptoms. Others may have symptoms such as pain, tingling, or numbness—loss of feeling—in the hands, arms, feet, and legs. Nerve problems can occur in every organ system, including the digestive tract, heart, and sex organs. About 60 to 70 percent of people with diabetes have some form of neuropathy. People with diabetes can develop nerve problems at any time, but risk rises with age and longer duration of diabetes. The highest rates of neuropathy are among people who have had diabetes for at least 25 years. Diabetic neuropathies also appear to be more common in people who have problems controlling their blood glucose, also called blood sugar, as well as those with high levels of blood fat and blood pressure and those who are overweight. Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy, also called distal symmetric neuropathy or sensorimotor neuropathy, is nerve damage in the arms and legs. Feet and legs are likely to be affected before hands and arms. Causes Diabetic peripheral neuropathy doesn’t emerge overnight. Instead, it usually develops slowly and worsens over time. Some patients have this condition long before they are diagnosed with diabetes. Having diabetes for several years may increase the likelihood of having diabetic neuropathy. The nerve damage that characterizes diabetic peripheral neuropathy is more common in patients with poorly managed diabetes. However, even diabetic patients who have excellent blood sugar (glucose) control can develop diabetic neuropathy. There are several theories as to why this occurs Continue reading >>

Exercises To Improve Diabetes Nerve Pain

Exercises To Improve Diabetes Nerve Pain

Slow or Prevent Diabetes Nerve Damage If you have nerve pain or peripheral neuropathy due to diabetes there is some evidence exercise may either improve or worsen nerve damage. Consequently, people with diabetes should always speak with their doctors to see which exercise program might be the best for them to participate in. People with diabetes will need to make exercise a regular part of their ongoing treatment. Look for Low-Impact Exercise Low–impact exercises seem to be useful and well-tolerated by many people with diabetes. Exercises such as swimming, water aerobics, yoga, or tai chi are usually good choices. These exercises may also help you improve balance and relaxation skills. High-impact exercises may actually make symptoms such as peripheral neuropathy worse or cause damage that you are not easily able to detect because of peripheral neuropathy. Start Slow to Overcome Fear For many people with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy, a regular exercise program is something they haven't done in a while. You need to begin to exercise, but begin slowly and gradually over days and weeks. You can slowly improve so you can exercise about 30 minutes a day, five times a week. The key for beginning an exercise program is to go slowly and improve by making small advances over long periods of time. Working on Balance With peripheral neuropathy, sometimes balancing yourself is difficult. Balancing can be improved slowly by doing some simple exercises. For example, you can practice getting out of a chair slowly by using your arms to help steady yourself. This exercise can be easily repeated several times during the day and it can build confidence and show you have the ability to do simple tasks without asking others for help. Improved balance may help you to take another ste Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Peripheral Neuropathy

Diabetes And Peripheral Neuropathy

Peripheral neuropathy is nerve damage caused by chronically high blood sugar and diabetes. It leads to numbness, loss of sensation, and sometimes pain in your feet, legs, and hands. Neuropathy linked with diabetes is also called diabetic polyneuropathy. It is a very common complication of diabetes. The NHS says the longer you have diabetes, the greater your chances are of developing diabetic polyneuropathy. It estimates that around half of all people who have had diabetes for 25 years or more have diabetic polyneuropathy. Studies have shown that people with diabetes can reduce or delay their risk of developing nerve damage by keeping their blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible. What causes peripheral neuropathy? Chronically high blood sugar levels damage nerves not only in your extremities but also in other parts of your body. These damaged nerves cannot effectively carry messages between the brain and other parts of the body. This means you may not feel heat, cold or pain in your feet, legs, or hands. If you get a cut or sore on your foot, you may not know it, which is why it's so important to inspect your feet daily. If a shoe doesn't fit properly, you could even develop a foot ulcer and not know it. An infection that will not heal because of poor blood flow increases the risk of developing ulcers and can lead to amputation, even death. This nerve damage shows itself differently in each person. Some people feel tingling, then later feel pain. Other people lose the feeling in fingers and toes - they have numbness. These changes happen slowly over a period of years, so you might not even notice it. Because it happens as people get older, experts say they tend to ignore the little tingles or subtle loss of sensation that is occurring - the signs of nerve dama Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy Overview

Diabetic Neuropathy Overview

Diabetes can damage nerves throughout your body. In fact diabetic neuropathy (neuro- means nerves; -pathy means disease or suffering) is the most common, chronic complication of diabetes according to the American Diabetes Association.1 It affects 60-70% of people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease. 2 Diabetic neuropathy can be extremely painful. It can also pave the way for health-threatening and even life-threatening problems including foot ulcers, amputations, heart attacks, digestion problems and difficulty recognizing low blood sugar episodes. While it cannot be cured, smart lifestyle steps may prevent diabetic neuropathy for some people and slow its progression for others. Medications and other approaches can treat symptoms, such as pain. And awareness—through steps like good foot care, regular foot exams and telling your doctor about other symptoms—can help prevent this blood-sugar-related nerve damage from spiraling into even more serious health issues. The best-known type of diabetic neuropathy is called diabetic peripheral neuropathy. It can cause burning, stabbing or electric-shock-type pain or tingling in your feet, legs, hands or arms. The pain may be worse at night; treatment options range from over-the-counter patches to prescription drugs. But there’s growing evidence that diabetes causes deeper nerve damage that affects more people with high blood sugar than experts once understood. Other types of diabetic neuropathy include: “Silent” diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Up to 50% of people with peripheral neuropathy have no pain3 and may not realize their feet are numb. 4 This boosts the risk for foot ulcers (if you don’t notice cuts or blisters, for example) 5 and inc Continue reading >>

Treating Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: An Update

Treating Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: An Update

Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy occurs in approximately 25% of patients with diabetes mellitus who are treated in the office setting and significantly affects quality of life. It typically causes burning pain, paresthesias, and numbness in a stocking-glove pattern that progresses proximally from the feet and hands. Clinicians should carefully consider the patient's goals and functional status and potential adverse effects of medication when choosing a treatment for painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Pregabalin and duloxetine are the only medications approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treating this disorder. Based on current practice guidelines, these medications, with gabapentin and amitriptyline, should be considered for the initial treatment. Second-line therapy includes opioid-like medications (tramadol and tapentadol), venlafaxine, desvenlafaxine, and topical agents (lidocaine patches and capsaicin cream). Isosorbide dinitrate spray and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation may provide relief in some patients and can be considered at any point during therapy. Opioids and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are optional third-line medications. Acupuncture, traditional Chinese medicine, alpha lipoic acid, acetyl-l-carnitine, primrose oil, and electromagnetic field application lack high-quality evidence to support their use. Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) occurs in approximately 30% of patients with diabetes mellitus who are hospitalized and in 25% of patients with diabetes who are treated in the office setting.1 It develops as a late manifestation of uncontrolled or long-standing diabetes.1 As many as 12% of patients with painful DPN do not report symptoms, and 39% of patients with the disorder do not receive any Continue reading >>

Peripheral Neuropathy: The Effects On Diabetics And Wound Healing

Peripheral Neuropathy: The Effects On Diabetics And Wound Healing

Peripheral neuropathy is a condition that involves damage to the nerves and can inhibit healthy wound healing. People living with diabetes must deal with a wide variety of complications, from a higher risk of glaucoma to poor wound healing. Many also suffer from peripheral neuropathy, a condition that affects the way the nerves communicate with the brain and that can further exasperate diabetics’ capacity to recover from a wound. Learn more about this disorder, how it affects wound healing and advancements in medical science that can help people cope with the condition. What is peripheral neuropathy? According to the National Institutes of Health, this condition involves damage or disease that inhibits function of the nerves. It develops due to damage to the peripheral nervous system, the system of communication within the body that transmits information from every part of the body to the brain and spinal cord. It’s what tells the central nervous system that you’re experiencing pain and other sensations. It can also inhibit muscle movement and, in severe cases, cause debilitating pain. The symptoms of this condition generally include: A numbness or tingling of the feet or hands that gradually worsens and may spread to the legs and arms Heightened sensitivity to touch Sharp pain or a sensation of burning Muscle weakness or paralysis Lack of coordination that can lead to falls and potentially injury In severe cases, neuropathy can cause damage of the autonomic nerves. This may lead to more intense symptoms, such as digestive issues, heat intolerance, excessive sweating and sudden changes in blood pressure that cause lightheadedness or dizziness. The devastating effects of diabetic neuropathy As the NIH reported, peripheral neuropathy affects an estimated 20 million Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy (nerve Damage) - An Update

Diabetic Neuropathy (nerve Damage) - An Update

Nerve damage or diabetic neuropathy resulting from chronically high blood glucose can be one of the most frustrating and debilitating complications of diabetes because of the pain, discomfort and disability it can cause, and because available treatments are not uniformly successful. Some patients find some relief from this nerve damage or neuropathy by keeping blood sugars as closely controlled as possible, getting regular exercise and keeping their weight under control. Using non-narcotic pain relievers consistently throughout the day—rather than waiting until nighttime when symptoms can become more severe—also seems to help if pain is the major symptom. Surprisingly, clinicians have also found that certain antidepressants may be helpful and can take the edge off the pain of neuropathy. Although pain or numbness in the legs or feet may be the most common complaint from people diagnosed with neuropathy, it is not the only symptom of this complication. Neuropathy can cause a host of different types of symptoms, depending on whether nerves in the legs, gastrointestinal tract, or elsewhere in the body are affected. If you have any of these symptoms, neuropathy may be the culprit: inability to adequately empty the bladder of its contents, resulting in frequent infections; nausea, vomiting, abdominal fullness or bloating, diarrhea, or constipation; low blood pressure upon standing that causes fainting or dizziness; inability to lift the foot or new deformities of the foot, or foot ulcers; trouble achieving or maintaining an erection. Although physicians have found some medications and other treatments that help ease these symptoms in some people, prevention continues to be the key. "Hemoglobin A1C readings should ideally be at 7.0% or lower. Those that are consistently n Continue reading >>

Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy In Ambulatory Patients With Type 2 Diabetes In A General Hospital In A Middle Income Country: A Cross-sectional Study

Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy In Ambulatory Patients With Type 2 Diabetes In A General Hospital In A Middle Income Country: A Cross-sectional Study

Abstract Methods Cross-sectional study, data was gathered at Peru's Ministry of Health national specialized hospital for endocrinological conditions through standardized interviews, anthropometric measurements and blood tests for glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c). DPN was evaluated using two techniques: the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test and the diabetic neuropathy symptom score. Overall prevalence and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated. Potential factors related to DPN explored included body mass index, years with disease (<10 vs. ≥10 years), glycaemic control (HbA1c <7% vs. ≥7%), microalbuminuria, retinopathy, and current pharmacological treatment. Multivariable analysis was performed using Poisson analysis to calculate prevalence ratios. DPN was observed in 73/129 (56.6%) patients. In multivariable analysis adjusted by age and sex, the prevalence ratio of neuropathy was 1.4 times higher (95% CI 1.07–1.88) in patients who took insulin plus metformin compared to patients who used one treatment alone, and 1.4 higher (95% CI 1.02–1.93) in patients with ≥10 years of disease compared to those with a shorter duration of disease. Also we found some characteristics in foot evaluation associated to neuropathy such as deformities (p<0.001), onychomycosis (p = 0.012), abnormal Achilles reflex (p<0.001), pain perception (p<0.001) and vibration perception (p<0.001). DPN is highly frequent among patients with diabetes in a national specialized facility from Peru. Associated factors to DPN included being a diabetic patient for over ten years, and receiving insulin plus metformin Citation: Lazo MdlA, Bernabé-Ortiz A, Pinto ME, Ticse R, Malaga G, Sacksteder K, et al. (2014) Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy in Ambulatory Patients with Type 2 Diabetes in a General Continue reading >>

What Are The Treatments For Non-diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy?

What Are The Treatments For Non-diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy?

Peripheral neuropathy is a condition that causes numbness, tingling, pain, weakness, and other aggravating sensations in the hands and feet, according to Mayoclinic.com. Peripheral neuropathy occurs because of nerve damage, whether it be from systemic diseases, injuries, vitamin level abnormalities, infections or exposure to toxins. While these risk factors may cause peripheral neuropathy, diabetes is the most common cause. Treatment requires a thorough assessment of the patient's risk factors so the proper treatment plan can be constructed. Video of the Day According to MedlinePlus, treatment of the underlying disease which is causing peripheral neuropathy should be the first step in the treatment plan. Treatment of diseases such as diabetes, Guillain-Barre syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, sarcarcoidosis, or other underlying diseases will prevent further nerve damage and in some cases heal damaged nerves. If a patient is unaware of underlying diseases that are causing peripheral neuropathy, he should be sure to let his doctor know of other abnormal symptoms he is experiencing. In this case, a physician may run blood tests, or perform other diagnostic tests, to determine if an underlying disease is causing peripheral neuropathy. If a test becomes positive, then the physician will treat the underlying disease to relieve the peripheral neuropathy symptoms. According to MayoClinic.com, peripheral neuropathy can be treated with different medications. The first type of medication used to treat mild symptoms include over-the-counter pain medications. In more severe cases, the doctor may prescribe opiates, or other narcotic medications. Other options include anti-seizure medications which may also help treat peripheral neuropathy symptoms. Although effective, physicians do not Continue reading >>

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