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People With Diabetes

Food Safety For People With Diabetes

Food Safety For People With Diabetes

Food Safety for People with Diabetes (PDF - 2.78MB) - En español (Spanish) (PDF - 2.90MB) A need-to-know guide for those who have been diagnosed with diabetes U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Food and Drug Administration September 2006; Slightly revised September 2011 Food safety is important for everyone – but it’s especially important for you. That’s why the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Food and Drug Administration have prepared this booklet. It is designed to provide practical guidance on how to reduce your risk of foodborne illness. In addition to this guide, we encourage you to check with your physician or health care provider to indentify foods and other products that you should avoid. You have a special need for this important information . . . so read on! What’s Inside Food Safety: It’s Especially Important for You Eating at Home: Making Wise Food Choices Common Foods: Select the Lower Risk Options Taking Care: Handling and Preparing Food Safely Foodborne Illness in the United States When certain disease-causing bacteria, viruses or parasites contaminate food, they can cause foodborne illness. Another word for such a bacteria, virus, or parasite is “pathogen.” Foodborne illness, often called food poisoning, is an illness that comes from a food you eat. The food supply in the United States is among the safest in the world – but it can still be a source of infection for all persons. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 48 million persons get sick, 128,000 are hospitalized, and 3,000 die from foodborne infection and illness in the United States each yea Continue reading >>

Overview

Overview

The importance of both diabetes and these comorbidities will continue to increase as the population ages. Therapies that have proven to reduce microvascular and macrovascular complications will need to be assessed in light of the newly identified comorbidities. Lifestyle change has been proven effective in preventing or delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes in high-risk individuals. Based on this, new public health approaches are emerging that may deserve monitoring at the national level. For example, the Diabetes Prevention Program research trial demonstrated that lifestyle intervention had its greatest impact in older adults and was effective in all racial and ethnic groups. Translational studies of this work have also shown that delivery of the lifestyle intervention in group settings at the community level are also effective at reducing type 2 diabetes risk. The National Diabetes Prevention Program has now been established to implement the lifestyle intervention nationwide. Another emerging issue is the effect on public health of new laboratory based criteria, such as introducing the use of A1c for diagnosis of type 2 diabetes or for recognizing high risk for type 2 diabetes. These changes may impact the number of individuals with undiagnosed diabetes and facilitate the introduction of type 2 diabetes prevention at a public health level. Several studies have suggested that process indicators such as foot exams, eye exams, and measurement of A1c may not be sensitive enough to capture all aspects of quality of care that ultimately result in reduced morbidity. New diabetes quality-of-care indicators are currently under development and may help determine whether appropriate, timely, evidence-based care is linked to risk factor reduction. In addition, the scientific evid Continue reading >>

What People With Diabetes Wish You Knew

What People With Diabetes Wish You Knew

Its no surprise that managing diabetes is more than a full-time job. It doesnt go away and it doesnt give you a break. Diabetes self-management can be hard, and in many cases, people with the condition could use some help. Maybe you dont have diabetes but you have a spouse, a family member, a friend, or a coworker who does. Chances are, you want to help and be supportive, but you may not always know how. Asking how you can be helpful is step number one, but wouldnt it be great to get inside your loved ones or friends head? To give you an inside scoop on what its like to have diabetes, here are few things that might help you support that special person in your life. Skip the blame game. Dont blame me for having diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition. The immune system destroys the beta cells in the pancreas. As a result, the pancreas produces little, if any, insulin. Type 2 diabetes is more of a condition of insulin resistance. The bodys insulin doesnt work as well as it should. Lifestyle factors, like weight loss, healthy eating, and exercise can help, but Type 2 tends to be progressive. I didnt get diabetes because I was lazy many risk factors raised the likelihood of me getting it, like my family history, my age, and my race. While I can try to eat better and be more active, some things are out of my control. Diabetes cant really be controlled. Diabetes has its own mindset. I can do my best to manage my diabetes by counting my carbs, taking my medication, and being physically active, but sometimes, despite all of my efforts, it does its own thing. I cant always explain why my blood sugar is high or what caused it to go low. Nagging doesnt help. I know what Im supposed to do. But Im only human. Some days, Im tired and I dont feel like going to the gym. O Continue reading >>

55+ Famous People With Diabetes

55+ Famous People With Diabetes

List of Famous People with Diabetes, loosely ranked by fame and popularity. Diabetes is a term for metabolic diseases that result in and individual having high blood sugar. Type I diabetes results from the body's failure to produce insulin. Type II diabetes is a condition where cells fail to properly use the insulin that the body produces. Type I diabetes is typically caused by genetics and is unrelated to lifestyle, whereas Type II diabetes is primarily caused by lifestyle choices. There is no known cure for diabetes although it is treatable. Who is the most famous person with diabetes? Halle Berry tops our list. The “Catwoman” actress drastically changed her diet upon receiving the diagnosis and she tests her insulin levels multiple times a day. Berry's “Cloud Atlas” co-star Tom Hanks announced in an interview with David Letterman that he also suffers from Type II diabetes. Hanks has repeatedly gained and lost weight for various roles, which may have played into his diabetes diagnosis. Celebrity chef Paula Deen, who is known for making decadent dishes with lots of butter and bacon, is also diagnosed with Type II diabetes. Deen still loves her southern cooking, but she adapted a healthier lifestyle upon hearing the diagnosis. That's more than can be said about Elvis Presley, who chose not to treat his diabetes. Many people believe that this is one of the factors of his early death. Why do you think so many famous people have been diagnosed with diabetes? Share your thoughts in the comments section. Continue reading >>

General Diabetes Facts And Information

General Diabetes Facts And Information

What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease in which the body is unable to properly use and store glucose (a form of sugar). Glucose backs up in the bloodstream — causing one’s blood glucose (sometimes referred to as blood sugar) to rise too high. There are two major types of diabetes. In type 1 (fomerly called juvenile-onset or insulin-dependent) diabetes, the body completely stops producing any insulin, a hormone that enables the body to use glucose found in foods for energy. People with type 1 diabetes must take daily insulin injections to survive. This form of diabetes usually develops in children or young adults, but can occur at any age. Type 2 (formerly called adult-onset or non insulin-dependent) diabetes results when the body doesn’t produce enough insulin and/or is unable to use insulin properly (insulin resistance). This form of diabetes usually occurs in people who are over 40, overweight, and have a family history of diabetes, although today it is increasingly occurring in younger people, particularly adolescents. How do people know if they have diabetes? People with diabetes frequently experience certain symptoms. These include: being very thirsty frequent urination weight loss increased hunger blurry vision irritability tingling or numbness in the hands or feet frequent skin, bladder or gum infections wounds that don't heal extreme unexplained fatigue In some cases, there are no symptoms — this happens at times with type 2 diabetes. In this case, people can live for months, even years without knowing they have the disease. This form of diabetes comes on so gradually that symptoms may not even be recognized. Who gets diabetes? Diabetes can occur in anyone. However, people who have close relatives with the disease are somewhat more likely to develop it. Continue reading >>

Famous People With Diabetes

Famous People With Diabetes

Diabetes is a pain, but it doesn’t have to stop you from achieving your greatest ambitions. Here are over 200 people with diabetes that have risen to the very top of their respective fields. If you have someone to add, please post a link in the comments! Jack Benny, 1950s television host, type 1 Wilford Brimley, of television and films, “Cocoon” and “The Firm”, type 2 Delta Burke, of television’s “Designing Women”, type 2 James Cagney, producer, director and actor, type not known Drew Carey, comedian, type 2 Nell Carter, of the television show “Gimme a Break”, type 2 Dick Clark, host of “American Bandstand”, type 2 Paula Deen, television chef, type 2 Dale Evans, actress, singer and wife of Roy Rogers, type 2 Stephen Furst, actor on the television shows “St. Elsewhere” and “Babylon 5”, type 2 Victor Garber, “Alias”, type 1 Jackie Gleason, funny star of “The Honeymooners”, type 2 Tom Hanks, type 2 Salma Hayek, gestational diabetes Gabriel Iglesias, American comedian, actor, writer, producer and voice actor, type 2 Randy Jackson of “American Idol”, type 2 Gordon Jump, actor on “WKRP in Cincinnati”, type 2 Larry King, “Larry King Live”, type 2 Mabel King, actress who played Mama on “What’s Happening”, type not known Jerry Lewis, comedian, type 1 George Lucas, creator of Star Wars Saga, type 2 Marcello Mastroianni, actor who appeared in 142 films, type not known Jerry Mathers, actor of “Leave It To Beaver” fame, type 2 Richard Mulligan, actor on the television show “Empty Nest”, type not known Minnie Pearl, entertainer, actress on the variety show “Hee Haw”, type 2 Aida Turturro, plays Tony’s sister on the Sopranos, type 2 Ehster Rolle, actress on the TV Show “Good Times”, type not known George C. Sc Continue reading >>

Diabetes Control: Why It's Important

Diabetes Control: Why It's Important

People who have diabetes may hear or read a lot about controlling, or managing, the condition. But what is diabetes control and why is it so important? When you hear your doctors or health care providers talk about "diabetes control," they're usually referring to how close your blood sugar, or , is kept to the desired range. Having too much or too little sugar in your blood can make you feel sick now and cause health problems later. Managing diabetes is like a three-way balancing act: The medicines you take (insulin or pills), the food you eat, and the amount of exercise you getall need to be in sync. don't take diabetes medicines as directed don't follow the meal plan (like eating too much or not enough food without adjusting diabetes medicines) don't get regular exercise or exercise more or less than usual without making changes to the diabetes plan What Can Happen if Diabetes Is Not Under Control? Out-of-control blood sugar levels can lead to short-term problems like hypoglycemia , hyperglycemia , or diabetic ketoacidosis . In the long run, not controlling diabetes can damage important organs, like the heart, kidneys, eyes, and nerves. This means that heart disease and stroke, kidney disease, vision problems, and nerve problems can happen to people with diabetes. These problems don't usually show up in kids or teens who have had the disease for only a few years, but they can happen to adults with diabetes. Kids and teens with diabetes who don't control their blood sugar levels can be late going into puberty and might not end up as tall as they would have otherwise. The good news is that keeping blood sugar levels under control can help keep you healthy and prevent health problems from happening later. How Do I Know When My Diabetes Is Under Control? If you have diab Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medication Metformin: Why Patients Stop Taking It

Diabetes Medication Metformin: Why Patients Stop Taking It

Gretchen Becker, author of The First Year: Type 2 Diabetes: An Essential Guide for the Newly Diagnosed , has been taking metformin for more than 20 years after receiving a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes in 1996. I never had any problems with metformin until I took a pill that I thought was the extended-release version, but it wasnt, Becker told Healthline. Beckers doctor had accidentally prescribed the regular form of metformin. I had very loose bowels for several months until I figured out what the problem was, Becker said. After getting the proper prescription, it took several months for Beckers digestive system to recover. Corinna Cornejo, who received a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes in 2009, told Healthline that her digestive woes didnt start until shed been taking metformin for more than a year. At first, I thought it was a response to dairy, but my doctor eventually switched my prescription to the extended-release version, Cornejo recalled. That has helped, but the side effect has not gone away completely. For some people, however, metformins unpleasant side effect of loose stools provides a much-needed balance to the side effects that can result from other diabetes drugs theyre taking. GLP-1 drugs, like Victoza or Byetta, can cause constipation, explained Robinson. Taking metformin with a GLP-1 drug means they actually complement each other, balancing out those side effects. And for some, metformin simply isnt the right drug. No matter what you do, some patients just dont tolerate the side effects well, said Robinson. Although there are many diabetes drugs on the market today, doctors will likely push metformin first. There has never been as many diabetes treatment options available as there are now, explained Robinson. But doctors look at cost, and metformin is th Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Symptoms, Causes And Treatments

Diabetes: Symptoms, Causes And Treatments

Diabetes, often referred to by doctors as diabetes mellitus, describes a group of metabolic diseases in which the person has high blood glucose (blood sugar), either because insulin production is inadequate, or because the body's cells do not respond properly to insulin, or both. Patients with high blood sugar will typically experience polyuria (frequent urination), they will become increasingly thirsty (polydipsia) and hungry (polyphagia). Here are some key points about diabetes. More detail and supporting information is in the main article. Diabetes is a long-term condition that causes high blood sugar levels. In 2013 it was estimated that over 382 million people throughout the world had diabetes (Williams textbook of endocrinology). Type 1 Diabetes - the body does not produce insulin. Approximately 10% of all diabetes cases are type 1. Type 2 Diabetes - the body does not produce enough insulin for proper function. Approximately 90% of all cases of diabetes worldwide are of this type. Gestational Diabetes - this type affects females during pregnancy. The most common diabetes symptoms include frequent urination, intense thirst and hunger, weight gain, unusual weight loss, fatigue, cuts and bruises that do not heal, male sexual dysfunction, numbness and tingling in hands and feet. If you have Type 1 and follow a healthy eating plan, do adequate exercise, and take insulin, you can lead a normal life. Type 2 patients need to eat healthily, be physically active, and test their blood glucose. They may also need to take oral medication, and/or insulin to control blood glucose levels. As the risk of cardiovascular disease is much higher for a diabetic, it is crucial that blood pressure and cholesterol levels are monitored regularly. As smoking might have a serious effect on c Continue reading >>

How To Find Experienced Mental Health Care Providers For People With Diabetes

How To Find Experienced Mental Health Care Providers For People With Diabetes

How to Find Experienced Mental Health Care Providers for People with Diabetes A new online directory locates professionals who are trained to work with the specific mental health needs of people with diabetes The American Diabetes Association (ADA) is partnering with the American Psychological Association (APA) to make it easier for people with diabetes to get quality mental health care. The organizations have created a new directory of healthcare providers in the United States trained to meet the psychosocial and mental health needs of people with diabetes. Currently, this directory has about 60 providers, but this list will expand as more professionals apply to be included in the directory. Of these, about 40 provide pediatric services. If interested, just enter your zip code and whether youre looking for adult or pediatric services, and the directory will identify a diabetes-trained healthcare provider nearby. Clicking on a specific name pulls up the type of insurance that provider accepts, their address, their phone number, and more. Though most of these professionals are based in major US cities, about a third do provide telemedicine (remote) care. To search for telemedicine providers, click here . Mental health is central to diabetes care, especially because anxiety, depression, and diabetes distress feeling overwhelmed, worried, or burnt out are common. At any given time, an estimated 39% of people with type 1 diabetes and 35% of people with type 2 diabetes experience significant levels of diabetes distress, yet it can be hard to find mental health professionals whospecialize in diabetes. The providers listed in this directory must have either completed the ADA-APAs continuing education program in diabetes mental health or have two or more years of experience wo Continue reading >>

Foot Care Advice For People With Diabetes

Foot Care Advice For People With Diabetes

When you’re living with diabetes, what you can’t feel can still hurt you. This is especially true when it comes to your feet and the nerve damage you may be suffering. If you’ve just learned you have diabetes, you should arrange to meet with a podiatrist and talk about the importance of foot care, say experts Erika M. Schwartz, DPM, a spokesperson for the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA) and Dr. David G. Armstrong, a podiatric surgeon and professor at the University of Arizona’s Department of Surgery. Here, the doctors help you sidestep the foot pain complications of diabetes: Q. When it comes to foot care, what is the first thing someone just diagnosed with diabetes should know? Besides building a relationship with a podiatrist, a person with diabetes should know that most ulcerations and amputations are preventable, but proper foot care is essential. Q. What is actually happening when you lose sensation in your feet? Neuropathy describes the loss of sensation that arises from nerve damage. Over time, diabetes leads to what’s called a “loss of protective sensation,” or LOPS and because it occurs so slowly, many people don’t notice it. According to the National Diabetes Clearing House, about 60 to 70 percent of people with diabetes have some form of neuropathy, which can occur in other organ systems, not just the feet. Q. How can I protect myself from nerve damage? Neuropathies are the result of several factors, the largest being exposure to high blood glucose levels. Keeping blood sugar levels low is the best protection against nerve damage in a diabetic person. “There is some compelling emerging evidence that controlling high lipid levels may reduce the progression of neuropathy, too,” says Dr. Armstrong. Q. Do feet need to be examined Continue reading >>

Celebrities With Diabetes Slideshow

Celebrities With Diabetes Slideshow

The Oscar-winning actor announced he has type 2 diabetes when late-night host David Letterman commented on his newly slim figure in October 2013. "I went to the doctor and he said, ‘You know those high blood sugar numbers you’ve been dealing with since you were 36? Well, you’ve graduated. You’ve got type 2 diabetes, young man.'" Hanks added that the condition is controllable, but he joked that he couldn't get back down to his high-school weight of 96 pounds. "I was a very skinny boy!" The talk show host has type 2 diabetes. "It's definitely controllable," King has said on his show. Diabetes makes heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, and other serious health problems more likely. King has had bypass heart surgery. Diabetes wasn't the only thing that raised his risk for ticker trouble: King had been a heavy smoker, and smoking hurts the heart. But by taking care of his diabetes (and quitting smoking), King helps his ticker and the rest of his body. Salma Hayek The Oscar-nominee had gestational diabetes, which happens during pregnancy, while expecting her daughter, Valentina. Hayek has a family history of diabetes. Experts say all women should get checked for gestational diabetes when they are 24-28 weeks pregnant. Those at risk for type 2 diabetes are checked at their first prenatal visit. Gestational diabetes usually goes away after delivery, but it could return with a later pregnancy. It can also make you more likely to get type 2 diabetes later on. This singer went public with his type 1 diabetes in 2007. He has said that his symptoms included weight loss and thirst. When diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, his blood sugar was over 700 -- and normal blood sugar levels are from 70 to 120. Jonas was hospitalized, but he learned to manage his condition. Once called Continue reading >>

Is Intermittent Fasting Safe For People With Diabetes?

Is Intermittent Fasting Safe For People With Diabetes?

When the now 46-year-old Mary Roberts from Lockhart, Texas, was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2008, her doctor immediately put her on Metformin (glucophage), a drug to help stabilize blood sugar. “When I got the diagnosis, I guess I wasn’t surprised,” says Roberts, explaining that not only was she overweight but her mom had been on insulin for type 2 diabetes. Not wanting to be on medication herself for her entire life, Roberts set out on a path to control the diabetes through diet, but a few years of nutrition classes proved unsuccessful in lowering her blood sugar level. It was after her doctor suggested insulin on top of the high dose of Metformin that Roberts switched gears. “I really wanted to find a way to get healthy,” she says. She found the solution in changing her approach to eating — just not the way she expected. Intermittent fasting (IF) combined with the popular ketogenic diet, which emphasizes dramatically reducing carbohydrate intake, helped her lose weight and lower her A1C. “I feel amazing,” Roberts says. What Is Intermittent Fasting and How Is It Done? Although IF has become more popular in recent years, the diet plan isn’t new. In fact, many religions (including Christianity, Judaism, and Islam) have followers who practice fasting of some variety throughout the year. Fasting is often required for blood tests, medical procedures, or surgery. The reason IF has gained so much attention recently is likely due to the release of new diet books plugging the plans and celebrity endorsements. “I think that it has gained popularity because anytime a person drastically cuts calories from their diet, they’re going to lose weight. And we’re so results driven that by seeing that happen we think, This is a great solution,” says Despina Continue reading >>

18 Celebrities With Type 2 Diabetes

18 Celebrities With Type 2 Diabetes

Famous people with diabetes People often think that type 2 diabetes strikes only the overweight and sedentary, or unhealthy eaters. But anyone can be diagnosed with diabetes, even world-class athletes, or the rich and famous. The following celebrities all had some risk factors for diabetes (such as weight, ethnicity, or family history), but many were still shocked to hear the diagnosis. They’ve all made healthy changes in their lives, and many now speak out about the dangers of type 2 diabetes. Gabourey Sidibe When Oscar nominee Gabourey Sidibe was diagnosed with diabetes, she took charge of her health, secretly going under the knife after more than a decade of trying to lose weight naturally. “I truly didn’t want to worry about all the effects that go along with diabetes,” she told People. “I genuinely [would] worry all the time about losing my toes.” Since having bariatric surgery in 2016, the Brooklyn-born actress, beloved for her breakout role in the 2009 film Precious, continued to make positive lifestyle changes by working with a nutritionist and amping up her fitness regimen. S. Epatha Merkerson This Emmy award-winning actress won us over as Lt. Van Buren on Law & Order and then as hospital administrator Sharon Goodwin on Chicago Med. In her off-screen life, Merkerson is both a diabetes patient and advocate. She encourages others to reach their A1c goals. Even though she had a family history of type 2 diabetes, “my diagnosis was a wake-up call,” she told USA Today in 2016. “I knew I had to start making serious changes to my lifestyle to take control of my health.” That included making more nutritious food choices and taking up brisk walking. Tom Hanks When Tom Hanks announced in 2013 that he had type 2 diabetes, he joined millions of other Ame Continue reading >>

Beta-blockers May Raise Mortality In People With Diabetes

Beta-blockers May Raise Mortality In People With Diabetes

Beta-Blockers May Raise Mortality in People With Diabetes Use of beta-blockers may be associated with an increased mortality risk in patients with diabetes, particularly among those who have coronary heart disease (CHD), new research suggests. The findings, from prospective cohort data from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 19992010, were published in the April issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings by Tetsuro Tsujimoto, MD, PhD, of the Department of Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolism, Center Hospital, Tokyo, Japan, and colleagues. Among nearly 3000 participants with diabetes, all-cause mortality over 5 to 6 years was significantly higher in those taking beta-blockers than those who were not, with an even more pronounced effect among those with CHD. In contrast, among nearly 15,000 participants without diabetes who had CHD, all-cause mortality was significantly reduced among those who took beta-blockers versus those who didn't. Beta-adrenergic receptor blockers have been shown to improve survival in patients following myocardial infarction (MI), and in those with congestive heart failure (CHF) because of left ventricular systolic dysfunction. But beyond that, Tsujimoto and colleagues note, "Beta-blockers have never been found to improve survival in all other patients with stable CHD in the absence of [MI] or CHF without systolic dysfunction. Moreover, the efficacy of beta-blockers in diabetic patients with CHD/CHF remains unknown." The new findings for people with diabetes are "sobering," say Franz H Messerli, MD, and Thomas Suter, MD, of the Department of Cardiology and Clinical Research, University Hospital Bern, Switzerland, and Sripal Bangalore, MD, Leon H Charney Division of Cardiology New York University School of Medicine, in an accompanying Continue reading >>

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