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Peanut Butter Substitute For Diabetics

12 Healthy Alternatives To Peanut Butter

12 Healthy Alternatives To Peanut Butter

Anyone whos ever dined with me knows how much I love peanut butter. (An entire jar of Jif may or may not disappear from Greatist HQ in one afternoon.) But those with peanut allergies or those turned off by the taste of a spoonful of heaven can still participate in the festivities. Here weve rounded up a list of 12 healthy replacements for peanut butter, from almond butter (duh) to sesame tahini (say what?). So dont worry about saying sayonara to the Skippyfind out how to use these PB replacements pronto. Before we pass on the peanuts, lets take a look at whats really going on in that jar. Two tablespoons of peanut butter has about 190 calories, 16 grams of fat (3 grams saturated fat), 8 grams of protein, and three grams of sugar. And while peanut butters a great source of omega-6 fatty acids , important for strong bones, metabolism, and reproductive health, its not such a great source of omega-3 fatty acids , which boost brain function, ward off diseases, and reduce inflammation. Theres not too much difference between processed and natural peanut butter, though the specific ingredients in any jar depend on the brand. Natural peanut butter contains peanuts plus any combination of salt, sugar, and oil, while processed peanut butter usually includes all those ingredients. But beware of the butter: In 2008, more than three million Americans had some kind of nut allergy. A peanut allergy can mean different things to different people, often involving hives, itching, vomiting, and in some situations anaphylaxis and death. Doctors often advise patients allergic to peanuts to avoid all nuts, just in case. But peanuts are actually legumes, so other people allergic to peanuts are free to roam the nut aisle at the supermarket. (They can also enjoy most other legumes , like beans a Continue reading >>

The Peanut Institute - Diabetes And Blood Sugar

The Peanut Institute - Diabetes And Blood Sugar

Health and Nutrition Research Landing Page Plant Protein Reduces Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Major new Harvard School of Public Health study published in American Journal of Epidemiology shows consuming peanuts and peanut butter reduces Type 2 diabetes risk. Harvard researchers investigated over 20 years of data that followed over 200,000 people in the United States. Research centered on the relationship between plant and animal protein consumption and Type 2 diabetes risk. Investigators found: Study participants who ate high levels of plant protein reduced their risk of Type 2 diabetes by 9% In contrast, those participants with higher animal protein diets increased their risk of Type 2 diabetes by 13% (see graph below) In the study, whole grains and peanuts and peanut butter were the most commonly consumed major food sources of vegetable protein (p. 9-10) Healthy Substitutions Lead to Major Health Benefits in the Future Substitution of 5% of energy from plant protein (legumes, peanuts, peanut butter, other nuts and whole grains) was made for an equal amount of total carbohydrate, refined carbohydrate, or animal protein. These substitutions resulted in a 19-23% reduced risk of diabetes: Continue reading >>

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," said Dr. Gerald Bernstein, director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, said Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11 percent for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," Andrews said. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, Andrews said. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabetes. A 16-ounce Continue reading >>

Can People With Diabetes Eat Peanut Butter?

Can People With Diabetes Eat Peanut Butter?

Peanut butter may help people to manage diabetes, a condition that affects blood sugar levels. How exactly does this popular snack help to control the condition? A diet high in magnesium is thought to offer protective benefits against the development of diabetes. Peanuts are a good source of magnesium. Natural peanut butter and peanuts are also low glycemic index (GI) foods. This means that they have a lower effect on blood sugar levels. This article explores research into the impact of peanut butter on diabetes, to help people with diabetes decide whether eating it could improve their condition. It also considers any risks involved and looks at other healthful snacks for people with diabetes. How GI affects blood sugar GI is a 100-point scale applied to foods. This scale measures how blood sugar and insulin spike after eating specific food types. Foods that are digested slowly and release sugar gradually into the blood stream have a lower GI. Peanuts have a GI score of just 14, making them one of the lowest GI foods. Foods high in GI cause blood sugar and insulin to spike severely after eating them. This is followed by a crash in blood sugar that can result in hunger, cravings, and tiredness. These cycles of spiking and crashing blood sugar and insulin levels are not good for the body. They can contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes. Research into peanut butter and blood sugar By contrast, low-GI foods can help people to better control their blood sugar levels. For example, a 2012 study looked into eating peanut butter or peanuts at breakfast. This helped obese women who were at risk of developing type 2 diabetes to control their blood sugar throughout the day. In the study, the beneficial effects of the peanuts were observed. They were looked at hours later, Continue reading >>

Peanuts Vs. Peanut Butter In A Diabetic Diet

Peanuts Vs. Peanut Butter In A Diabetic Diet

Peanuts Vs. Peanut Butter in a Diabetic Diet Kathryn Gilhuly is a wellness coach based in San Diego. She helps doctors, nurses and other professionals implement lifestyle changes that focus on a healthy diet and exercise. Gilhuly holds a Master of Science in health, nutrition and exercise from North Dakota State University. Peanuts contain fewer calories and carbohydrates than peanut butter.Photo Credit: iuliia_n/iStock/Getty Images Raw peanuts and peanut butter are both healthy choices on a diabetes diet. Choose plain raw peanuts and unsalted peanut butter. Either option can fit comfortably within a diabetes meal plan and help fulfill your protein requirements. Peanuts, peanut butter and other nuts and nut spreads provide excellent sources of plant-based protein. Both peanuts and peanut butter belong to the protein foods group. In general, you should consume about 2 to 5 ounces of protein at each meal on a diabetes diet. One half ounce of raw peanuts or 1 tablespoon of peanut butter is equivalent to 1 ounce from the protein foods group. Peanuts and peanut butter are energy-dense, meaning they contain a high amount of calories in a small portion. Peanut butter is slightly higher in calories, containing about 94 calories per serving, while peanuts contain about 80.5 calories per serving. Because peanuts and peanut butter are high in calories, keep your portions small to help maintain a healthy weight on a diabetes diet. Nuts contain very small amounts of carbohydrate. Consuming a serving of them will not cause your blood glucose levels to rise. Foods that contain 5 grams of total carbohydrate or less per serving are considered a free carbohydrate on a diabetes diet. One serving of raw peanuts -- 1/2 ounce -- contains 1.76 grams of total carbohydrate. One serving of plai Continue reading >>

10 Best Type 2 Diabetes Snacks

10 Best Type 2 Diabetes Snacks

Healthy Combinations Ready in Minutes When you have type 2 diabetes, a smart strategy for controlling your blood sugar levels is to think of snacks as miniature versions of meals and plan your carbs accordingly. Snacks with a good mix of protein, fat, and fiber will help keep hunger at bay and your blood sugar on an even keel throughout the day. "Since a meal should include 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates, a snack should have around 15 to 20 grams," says Katherine Basbaum, MS, RD, a clinical dietitian in the Cardiology and Cardiac Rehabilitation departments at University of Virginia Health System in Charlottesville. By the same token, she says, fill your snack plate the same way you would for a regular meal. That means half should be non-starchy vegetables, one-quarter should be lean protein, and one-quarter a starchy carb. Here are 10 terrific options for healthy diabetes snacks. Continue reading >>

Is Margarine Safe For People With Diabetes?

Is Margarine Safe For People With Diabetes?

Nutritional recommendations always seem to be changing. Oneyear we’re advised to switch from butter to margarine. A year later, we learn that margarine is worse for us than butter. With all the conflicting information, it’s not surprising that many people are often confused. Margarine and the Trans Fat Bad Rap Margarines are notoriously high in trans fats. Onceit was discovered that trans fats are as bad for youas saturated fats (if not worse), margarine got a badrap. Manufacturers responded to these concerns bydeveloping trans fat free margarines, but they had toreplace this emulsifying ingredient with a long list ofother ingredients. But are these ingredients safe? Is butter still thebetter alternative? The problem is that the body treats trans fat as if itwere a saturated fat. Trans fats have adverse actionson lipid profiles because they raise LDL (“bad”)cholesterol and decrease HDL (“good”) cholesterol.A study published in the Journal of Nutrition alsofound that trans fats negatively affect plasmamarkers of inflammation and reduce endothelialfunction, effects that are associated with an increasedcardiovascular disease risk. This is particularly important for people withdiabetes. Since they already have an elevated riskof cardiovascular disease, diabetics need to takeprecautions to ensure that all controllable aspects ofhealth are practiced. There is no recommended intake for trans fats; however, there is no requirement for trans fats in the diet, either, and it is suggested that our intake of trans fats be as low as possible. Butter or Margarine? Butter is a more natural product than margarine, composed of onlyone or two ingredients (cream and sometimes salt). Trans fat freemargarines may have little or no hydrogenated oils, but they docontain many natur Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Butter: Is Butter Good For Diabetes?

Diabetes And Butter: Is Butter Good For Diabetes?

Despite the fact that health professionals for years have recommended reducing its intake, butter intake is still quite high, at 23 sticks per American per year. Its creamy delicious goodness just has not gone away. But is butter making a comeback in the nutrition science world? Is it really not as bad as we once thought? Although it was vilified in the 1980’s and 1990’s, has it been pardoned from its unhealthy label? History Butter has always been a staple in the American diet. In the 1920’s, Americans consumed approximately 72 sticks (18 pounds) of butter per year. The Great Depression hit and then World War II, with these events causing a steep decline in butter consumption with a concurrent rise in margarine use. Butter continued to decrease in the American diet throughout the 1950’s – 1980’s. At that point, the role of butter stayed fairly steady at around 20 sticks (5 pounds) per year. Rising intake just recently started in the 2010’s decade. Nutritional Content Butter is 100% fat, meaning all of the calories that butter provides are in the form of fat. One tablespoon of butter contains 102 calories, all from the 11 grams of total fat. Looking at the fat content more closely, that tablespoon of butter contains 7 grams of saturated fat and 3 grams of monounsaturated fat, as well as approximately 31 mg of cholesterol. Is Butter Recommended for Diabetics? For years, saturated fats in butter and other foods were discouraged because of the strong association with cardiovascular diseases. Eating a diet high in saturated fat raises blood lipids, increasing the likelihood that arteries will be occluded by the lipids and eventually lead to serious complications such as heart attack and stroke. This is a known scientifically proven fact. The American Heart Ass Continue reading >>

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

"Don't eat between meals." That's one piece of advice diabetics might want to take with a grain of salt. If you go more than four or five hours between meals, a mid-afternoon snack might be just what the doctor ordered to help you keep your blood sugar steady. Snacking is also important if you're taking medication that could cause a blood-sugar low between meals. Discuss with your doctor or a registered dietitian what snacking approach is right for you. Keep your snacks to 150 calories or less The danger of snacks is that they can become more like extra meals if you go overboard. First, make sure you're truly hungry—and not just bored or stressed or craving chocolate—before reaching for a snack. Then limit yourself to 150 calories per snack. (Cutting calories is easier than you think.) This will help keep your snacking "honest." After all, it's hard to find a candy bar with only 150 calories. And if you're hankering for a candy bar, but a healthier snack doesn't appeal, you're probably not truly hungry. Beware of low-fat snacks Studies show that people tend to eat about 28 percent more of a snack when it's low-fat because they think they're saving on calories. But low-fat snacks, such as cookies, only have about 11 percent fewer calories than their full-fat counterparts. Stick to the same amount you'd eat if you thought the snack was full-fat. Need more snack ideas? Check out these delicious snacks for adults. Check the ingredients Avoid heavily processed crackers and chips. If the list of ingredients is long and has big words with lots of syllables, put it back on the shelf. Stay away from these worst eating habits for diabetics. Watch those carbs Carbohydrates are major culprits when it comes to raising blood sugar (though there are some good carbs for diabetes). Continue reading >>

6 Great Alternatives To Peanut Butter

6 Great Alternatives To Peanut Butter

If you read my personal blog Carrots 'N' Cake, it's no secret that I love peanut butter . I eat it every daywith sliced banana, blended into smoothies, straight from the jar on a spoon, and even sometimes in savory noodle dishes. My goodness, it's delicious! I have a feeling some of my blog readers might get tired of seeing the same old peanut butter over and over again, so I decided to branch out and discover some new spreads to add to my regular repertoire. Here's what I found. MaraNatha All Natural No Stir Creamy Almond Butter Made with heart-healthy, dry roasted almonds, MaraNatha All Natural No Stir Creamy Almond Butter has only three other ingredients in it: organic unrefined cane sugar, palm oil, and sea salt. In a perfect world, my almond butter would be made with strictly nuts and no other additions, but four ingredients isn't too shabby. The flavor was a little bland compared to other almond butters I've tried, but the texture is really something specialthick, creamy, and smooth. Nutrition Facts per serving (2 tbsp): Calories 190, Total Fat 16g, Saturated Fat 2g, Sodium 60mg, Carbs 7g, Fiber 3g, Protein 6g Justin's All Natural Chocolate Hazelnut Butter Chocolate Hazelnut Butter? You're probably thinking 'sounds delicious, but not very healthy'. You're in for a (scrumptious) surprise! Justin's All Natural Chocolate Hazelnut Butter is a yummy combination of hazelnuts and homemade chocolate without all of the sugar and crazy additives that some dessert-like nut butters have. Everything in this nut butter (dry roasted hazelnuts, organic evaporated cane sugar, organic cocoa, organic coconut butter, organic palm fruit oil, vanilla, sea salt) are familiar ingredients and ones that actually sound quite appetizing mixed together. I have to admit a taste of was sort of Continue reading >>

The Benefits And Risks Of Peanuts For People With Diabetes

The Benefits And Risks Of Peanuts For People With Diabetes

Peanuts are packed with a variety of nutritious properties that may benefit people with type 2 diabetes. Eating peanuts and peanut products may help: promote weight loss lower the risk of cardiovascular disease control blood sugar prevent people from developing diabetes in the first place However, peanuts also carry some potential risks. If you have type 2 diabetes, read on to learn more about the risks and benefits of eating peanuts. Adding peanuts and peanut butter to your diet may be beneficial, especially if you have type 2 diabetes. While not technically nuts, peanuts provide many of the same health benefits as tree nuts, such as walnuts, almonds, and pecans. Peanuts are also less expensive than most other nuts, which is great if you’re looking to save money but still want the nutritional rewards. Peanuts help control blood sugar If you have diabetes, you need to consider the glycemic content of the foods you eat. Glycemic content is based on how quickly your body converts carbohydrates into glucose, or blood sugar. The glycemic index (GI) is a 100-point scale that rates foods on how rapidly they cause blood sugar to rise. Foods that cause a rapid rise in blood sugar are given a higher value. Water, which has no effect on blood sugar, has a GI value of 0. Peanuts have a GI value of 13, which makes them a low GI food. According to an article in the British Journal of Nutrition, eating peanuts or peanut butter in the morning may help control your blood sugar throughout the day. Peanuts may also help lessen the insulin spike of higher GI foods when paired together. One reason that peanuts may help control blood sugar is because they contain a large amount of magnesium. A single serving of peanuts (about 28 peanuts) contains 12 percent of the daily recommended amount Continue reading >>

14 Foods That Could Change A Diabetic's Life

14 Foods That Could Change A Diabetic's Life

Print Font: When you think of managing blood sugar, odds are you obsess over everything you can't have. While it's certainly important to limit no-no ingredients (like white, refined breads and pastas and fried, fatty, processed foods), it's just as crucial to pay attention to what you should eat. We suggest you start here. Numerous nutrition and diabetes experts singled out these power foods because 1) they're packed with the 4 healthy nutrients (fiber, omega-3s, calcium, and vitamin D) that make up Prevention's Diabetes DTOUR Diet, and 2) they're exceptionally versatile, so you can use them in recipes, as add-ons to meals, or stand-alone snacks. 1. Beans Beans have more to boast about than being high in fiber (plant compounds that help you feel full, steady blood sugar, and even lower cholesterol; a half cup of black beans delivers more than 7 grams). They're a not-too-shabby source of calcium, a mineral that research shows can help burn body fat. In ½ cup of white beans, you'll get almost 100 mg of calcium—about 10% of your daily intake. Beans also make an excellent protein source; unlike other proteins Americans commonly eat (such as red meat), beans are low in saturated fat—the kind that gunks up arteries and can lead to heart disease. How to eat them: Add them to salads, soups, chili, and more. There are so many different kinds of beans, you could conceivably have them every day for a week and not eat the same kind twice. 2. Dairy You're not going to find a better source of calcium and vitamin D—a potent diabetes-quelling combination—than in dairy foods like milk, cottage cheese, and yogurt. One study found that women who consumed more than 1,200 mg of calcium and more than 800 IU of vitamin D a day were 33% less likely to develop diabetes than those taki Continue reading >>

5 Common Food Myths For People With Diabetes Debunked

5 Common Food Myths For People With Diabetes Debunked

There are many misconceptions that people with diabetes must follow a strict diet, when in reality they can eat anything a person without diabetes eats. Amy Campbell, MS, RD, LDN, CDE, nutritionist at Joslin Diabetes Center and co-author of 16 Myths of a "Diabetic Diet," debunks some common food myths for people with diabetes. 1. People with diabetes have to eat different foods from the rest of the family. People with diabetes can eat the same foods as the rest of their family. Current nutrition guidelines for diabetes are very flexible and offer many choices, allowing people with diabetes to fit in favorite or special-occasion foods. Everyone, whether they have diabetes or not, should eat a healthful diet that consists of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean protein foods, and heart-healthy fats. So, if you have diabetes, there's no need to cook separately from your family. 2. People with diabetes should never give in to food cravings. Almost everyone has food cravings at some point, and people with diabetes are no exception. It's not uncommon for people with diabetes to cut out all sweets or even cut way back on food portions in order to lose weight. In turn, your body often responds to these drastic changes by creating cravings. Nine times out of ten, your food choices in these situations tend to be high in fat and/or sugar, too. The best way to deal with food cravings is to try to prevent them by following a healthy eating plan that lets you occasionally fit sweets into your diabetes meal plan. If a craving does occur, let yourself have a small taste of whatever it is you want. By doing so, you can enjoy the flavor and avoid overeating later on. 3. People with diabetes shouldn't eat too many starchy foods, even if they contain fiber, because starch raises your blo Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Peanut Butter?

Can Diabetics Eat Peanut Butter?

Rich in unsaturated fat and protein, all-natural peanut butter can make a nutritious addition to meals and snacks for individuals with diabetes. Peanut butter's low carbohydrate content keeps blood sugar under control, while its healthy fats satisfy the appetite for several hours. While people with diabetes should limit their portion size to avoid weight gain, peanut butter can still be a healthy addition to a diabetic diet. In its natural form with no added fats, sweeteners or sugars, peanut butter is considered a nutritional powerhouse. Two tablespoons of peanut butter contain approximately 12 grams of healthy poly- and monounsaturated fats, and nearly 8 grams of protein. Because there is no cholesterol and very little saturated fat in peanut butter, it is also appropriate for people with cardiac problems. The carbohydrate content of peanut butter is minimal, with less than 7 grams per serving. Because of its low carbohydrate and high healthy fat and protein content, peanut butter does not elevate blood sugar. Serving Size for Those With Diabetes According to the American Diabetes Association, individuals with diabetes should consume no more than 2 tablespoons of peanut butter at one snack or meal. Even though peanut butter does pack a healthy nutritional punch, it is also high in calories, and 2 tablespoons equals roughly 200 hundred calories, or 10% of the daily caloric needs for a 2,000-calorie diet. Individuals who are diabetic and who want to lose weight may consider reducing their portion size of peanut butter to 1 tablespoon at a time, simply to cut the calories but still reap some of the nutritional benefits. Healthy Snack Ideas Diabetic snacks should ideally contain carbohydrate, fat and protein, and peanut butter meets the fat and protein requirement. To mee Continue reading >>

Diabetics And Butter

Diabetics And Butter

If you have diabetes, following a healthy diet is one of the most important steps you can take to control blood sugar levels. A healthy diet also lowers your risk for cardiovascular disease, which is higher when you have diabetes. Butter is a source of unhealthy fats, which can contribute to heart disease, so it should not be a regular component of your healthy diet for diabetes management. Video of the Day Obesity is a risk factor for developing Type 2 diabetes, and the majority of individuals with the condition are overweight or obese. If you are overweight and have high blood sugar levels, losing weight can help you control your blood sugar levels. With 102 calories per tablespoon, butter can contribute to weight gain or interfere with efforts to lose weight. As a healthier option, take smaller portions of butter or switch to a small amount of an unsaturated fat option, such as olive oil. Avoid Butter for a Healthier Heart Diabetes increases your risk for heart disease, and a healthy diet supports heart health as well as a healthy weight and lower blood sugar levels. Butter is a poor dietary choice because each tablespoon contains 7.3 grams of saturated fat, or nearly 37 percent of the daily value -- a total of 20 grams of saturated fat daily -- based on a 2,000-calorie diet. Saturated fat can raise your cholesterol levels and increase your risk for heart disease, according to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Plant-based oils are lower in saturated fat, making them healthier choices than butter. Your blood sugar levels rise after you eat foods with carbohydrates, and individuals with diabetes must carefully monitor the quantity of carbohydrates they consume and the timing. High-glycemic carbohydrates can spike your blood sugar levels, while a low-glycemic d Continue reading >>

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