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Pcos And Diabetes Type 1

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (pcos)

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (pcos)

Tweet Polycystic ovary syndrome is a condition that can affect a woman’s ability to produce eggs. PCOS is linked with higher levels of circulating insulin, which is characteristic in type 2 diabetes. A UK study in 2012 showed that the risk of type 2 diabetes for women with PCOS was notably higher. What is polycystic ovary syndrome? PCOS is a condition that affects women’s ovaries causing an abnormal number of cysts to appear on the surface of the ovaries. The cysts are follicles which contain undeveloped eggs. The cysts are follicles which contain undeveloped eggs. The condition often results in an irregular release of eggs. In some women, PCOS may prevent any eggs being released. Having a higher than normal level, or activity, of male hormones is also a relatively common feature of PCOS. PCOS is a treatable condition and a healthy lifestyle is a key part of this. What are the symptoms of PCOS? The symptoms of PCOS may include one or more of the following: Irregular or loss of periods Fertility problems Weight gain Hirsutism (excessive hair growth) Thinning of or loss of hair Acne How common is polycystic ovary syndrome? Diabetes UK states that PCOS is a common condition affecting about 1 in 5 women at some point in their lives. How is PCOS diagnosed? The NHS states that the appearance of two or more of following three conditions can lead to a diagnosis of PCOS: A number of cysts developing around the edge of the ovaries (polycystic ovaries) Failure in ovulation (release of eggs) A higher than normal levels of male hormones or more active male hormones than normal A diagnosis of PCOS will typically involve a number of tests which may include blood tests, blood pressure checks and ultrasound scans. NICE guidelines recommend that all women with PCOS receive a screenin Continue reading >>

Metformin In Pcos In Type 1 Diabetes

Metformin In Pcos In Type 1 Diabetes

there are no studies regarding medical treatment of ovarian function in PCOS patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus; however, metformin is reported to be helpful for reducing daily insulin doses and body weight, leading to improved insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia (1,2,3): in a twelve month study comparing addition of metformin to placebo for type 1 diabetics (3): total daily insulin dose was reduced in the metformin group > -5.7 U/day (-8.6; -2.9), p<0.001; body weight was reduced in the metformin group -1.74 kg (-3.32; -0.17), p = 0.030 Reference: Miyoshi A et al. Ovarian morphology and prevalence of polycystic ovary syndrome in Japanese women with type 1 diabetes mellitus. J Diabetes Investig. 2013 May 6;4(3):326-9. Vella S, Buetow L, Royle P, et al Metformin in type 1 diabetes reduces insulin requirements without significantly improving glycaemic control. Reply to Schatz H [letter]. Diabetologia 2011; 54: 203-204 Continue reading >>

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (pcos)

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (pcos)

PCOS is the most common hormonal condition likely to affect women of child-bearing age. Women of childbearing age generally produce an ovum (egg from the ovaries) from each ovary every month. Women with PCOS produce too much testosterone and / or too much insulin, which stop the ovaries from producing and releasing eggs. These eggs do not mature properly and can stay in the ovaries rather than being released each month. They build up in the ovaries and are known as cysts. The hormone testosterone can cause insulin resistance (high insulin levels) or it can be the other way around, where high insulin levels can increase the amount of testosterone produced in the body. Insulin resistance is a condition where the body produces more insulin in order to keep blood glucose levels within the normal range. Sometimes, the body cannot produce enough insulin to keep glucose levels within the normal range and the woman develops pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes. What causes PCOS? Experts do not know what causes PCOS but, in some cases, it seems to be genetic because it often runs in families. Who gets PCOS? PCOS can begin at puberty or even in early to mid 20s. Approximately 12–21 per cent of Australian women of reproductive age are affected by this condition but about 70 per cent of women with PCOS don't know they have it. Although not all women with PCOS are overweight, it is more common in overweight women and women of indigenous backgrounds. What are the signs and symptoms of PCOS? Signs and symptoms can be very different from woman to woman. Some women may have only a few signs and symptoms while others may have many of the features of PCOS. These can include: Irregular periods (more or less often) or no periods (amenorrhea) Pelvic pain Many cysts on one or both ovaries seen o Continue reading >>

Five Things To Know About Diabetes And Pcos

Five Things To Know About Diabetes And Pcos

September is Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) Awareness Month, an opportunity to raise awareness of a health problem that you may not be familiar with. For example: Did you know that PCOS is the most common cause of female infertility? Or that about 5 million women in the United States are affected by it? Wait, what!? Let’s start from the beginning… A woman’s ovaries have follicles (tiny, fluid-filled sacs that hold the eggs). When an egg is mature, the follicle releases the egg so it can travel to the uterus for fertilization. In women with PCOS, immature follicles group together to form large cysts or lumps. The eggs mature within the bunched follicles, but the follicles don’t break open to release them. Because of this, women with PCOS often don’t have menstrual periods or only have them on occasion. And because the eggs are not released, most women with PCOS have trouble getting pregnant. We’re sure you still have plenty of questions about PCOS—and what it means for women with diabetes. Keep reading! ____________________________ 1) What are the causes and symptoms of PCOS? Unfortunately, we don’t yet know the cause of PCOS, but based on studies of twins, scientists believe there’s a good chance genetics could play a role. But not everyone with PCOS genes develops the condition, so researchers are looking for lifestyle factors that affect a woman’s risk for PCOS. Though the cause is fuzzy, researchers know one thing for sure: There’s a link between PCOS and diabetes. How so? Women with type 1 diabetes are at increased risk for PCOS, which suggests that insulin may play a part. Ovaries see more insulin from people with type 1 diabetes than they would from those without diabetes. This extra insulin has a direct effect on ovaries by enhancing the p Continue reading >>

Pcos In Women With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Is Not Related To Diabetes Duration Or Insulin Dose

Pcos In Women With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Is Not Related To Diabetes Duration Or Insulin Dose

Introduction: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is highly prevalent in women with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), possibly due to premenarchal exogenous hyperinsulinism (supraphysiological doses and nonphysiologic route of insulin administration). Our aim was to determine if PCOS was related to daily or basal insulin dose or T1DM duration. Methods: We examined 47 women with T1DM (mean age 36.02 years, ±6.03) treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (78.7%) or basal/bolus insulin therapy. Rotterdam criteria were used to diagnose PCOS. Participants reported medical history, underwent clinical examination, endocrine testing and ovarian ultrasound scan. Results: PCOS was confirmed in 20 women (42.5%). Mean HbA1c in PCOS was 7.36% (±0.81%), mean T1DM duration was 20 years (±7.16); daily insulin dose (DID) 36.11 IU (±10.02), basal insulin dose (BID) was 17.72 IU (±7.13) in PCOS and 7.22% (±0.83%), 23.17 years (±11.74), 35.25 IU (±13.34), 17.28 IU (±7.15) in non-PCOS group respectively. Neither comparison of DID and BID, premenarchal onset and T1DM duration nor multivariable logistic regression revealed statistically significant differences between the groups. No significant correlation between PCO ovarian morphology, DID and/or BID and/or T1DM duration was found. Statistically significant correlations in our sample were: correlation of DID to weight (P<0.001) and BMI (P<0.001), BID to BMI (P=0.001), DID to free testosterone concentration (P=0.001), BID to free testosterone concentration (P=0.014) and T1DM duration to BMI (P=0.022). Conclusion: We confirmed high prevalence of PCOS in our population with long duration and good metabolic control of T1DM. However, no difference was observed in DID or BID and T1DM duration and premenarchal onset of T1DM betwe Continue reading >>

Too Old For Acne? Difficult-to-diagnose Pcos May Be The Cause

Too Old For Acne? Difficult-to-diagnose Pcos May Be The Cause

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, or PCOS, is a health condition resulting from a hormonal imbalance that affects approximately one in every 10 to 15 women in the United States. More than half of women with PCOS will have diabetes or prediabetes by age 40. Learn more about the link and how to treat these often-related conditions. Though the exact cause of PCOS is unknown, many scientists believe that a combination of environmental and genetic factors are involved. Your risk may be higher if you are overweight or if your mother, aunt, or sister has PCOS. As Andrea Dunaif, MD, Chief of the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Bone Disease at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai points out, “The name can be confusing and misleading, because not all women with PCOS have cysts on their ovaries.” In fact, many experts and patient advocates are joining an international effort to change the name to something that is more reflective of what PCOS actually is – a metabolic issue. The hope is that having a more accurate name will help further research and improve treatment. Signs and Symptoms Most women are diagnosed in their twenties and thirties, but PCOS often starts in adolescents and can affect girls before they begin menstruating. The hormonal imbalance can interrupt the development and release of eggs from the ovaries. It often goes undiagnosed because many of the symptoms can be attributed to other causes. Common symptoms of PCOS include: Irregular or missed periods Weight gain Fatigue Unwanted hair growth on the face, arms, chest, back, abdomen, and extremities Thinning hair on the head Infertility Acne Mood changes, depression, and anxiety Pelvic pain Headaches Sleep problems such as insomnia, sleep apnea, or poor sleep These symptoms are caused by hormonal im Continue reading >>

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

What is the relationship between PCOS and type 2 diabetes? Between 65-80% of women with PCOS have insulin resistance which occurs when the insulin made by the body is not working as well as it should. Insulin is an important hormone for regulating blood glucose levels. When insulin resistance occurs, the pancreas needs to make more and more insulin to effectively control blood glucose levels. Insulin resistance is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) and pre-diabetes. High insulin levels also reduce fat breakdown and stimulate fat storage, blood lipid problems such as low HDL-C (good cholesterol) and/or high triglycerides, and the overproduction of androgens (so-called ‘male hormones’). This can contribute to obesity and an increased risk of heart disease and stroke as well as the other symptoms previously listed. As women with PCOS are likely to have insulin resistance, they have a greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) and pre-diabetes. PCOS is usually diagnosed after consideration of medical history, symptoms, hormonal testing and sometimes ultrasound. Treatment can vary depending on these findings however diagnosis of PCOS often requires lifestyle changes. These generally include following a low fat, high fibre, low glycemic index, healthy eating plan, giving up smoking and doing regular physical activity which can help with weight management and improve insulin sensitivity. A weight loss of as little as 5% can improve insulin levels, acne, ovulation, fertility, reduce excessive hair growth and improve mental health. These lifestyle changes can also assist with managing other risk factors including high blood lipids, blood pressure and hormone levels. In many wom Continue reading >>

Diabetic Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome When Pcos And Diabetes Combine

Diabetic Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome When Pcos And Diabetes Combine

Diabetic polycystic ovarian syndrome is a combination of two hormonal disorders, and they will make a woman's life miserable. It is much worse if you have no clue what is causing your misery. Diabetes is a disease, and PCOS is a syndrome. What is the difference? If you have all of the symptoms you have a disease. If you have some symptoms but not all, you have the syndrome. You may only have two out of three of the markers for polycystic ovarian syndrome, but it means you have the hormone disorder that causes it. And diabetic polycystic ovarian syndrome is a combination of two problems with an inflammatory root. If you have PCOS you may also be prediabetic. PCOS was discovered in 1935 and its discoverers gave it their names. It was called Stein-Leventhal syndrome for a while, but today we know it as polycystic ovarian syndrome. When it joins with prediabetes it becomes diabetic polycystic ovarian syndrome. The name is misleading, giving you the idea that this is a gynecological disorder. But it is not. Just like type 1 and type 2 diabetes, PCOS is a hormone or endocrine disorder that needs to be treated by an endocrinologist. Doctors know the name confuses us, and they tried to think of something else to call it, but the name PCOS has stuck. It also confuses women that many of them are diagnosed with polycystic ovarian syndrome when they have normal ovaries on ultrasound. But this is a syndrome and abnormal ovaries are only one symptom. The cause of polycystic ovaries seems to be that hormones are not letting the eggs go when it is time. The cysts are cavities in the ovary where an egg is stuck. Those eggs were supposed to be released, but in PCOS the hormones are not doing their job. So more and more of these cysts form around the outside of the ovary, giving it a bump Continue reading >>

Gazzetta Medica Italiana Archivio Per Le Scienze Mediche

Gazzetta Medica Italiana Archivio Per Le Scienze Mediche

A Journal on Internal Medicine and Pharmacology Indexed/Abstracted in: BIOSIS Previews, EMBASE, Scopus, Emerging Sources Citation Index ORIGINAL ARTICLES Gazzetta Medica Italiana Archivio per le Scienze Mediche 2014 March;173(3):87-90 Copyright © 2014 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA language: English Polycystic ovary syndrome in women with type 1 diabetes mellitus Grigoryan O., Absatarova J., Andreeva E., Melnichenko G., Dedov I. Federal State Facility, Endocrinological Scientific Centre under the RF Ministry of Public Health, Moscow, Russia Aim: Women with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have normal level of sex hormone binding globulin, suggesting that the pathophysiology of hyperandrogenism in PCOS patients with T1DM appears to be different from that in PCOS without T1DM. The aim of this study is a definition of hormonal features in women with PCOS and T1DM. Methods: The study included 50 women (mean age 27.4±6.9 years) with PCOS, including 25 with T1DM and satisfactory glycemic control, the level of glycosylated hemoglobin was 5.8±0.8%, and 25 without carbohydrate metabolism disturbance. The control group included 25 healthy women with normal menstrual cycle (22-34 days). All patients underwent an examination, including assessment of anthropometric data (BMI was calculated as weight/height2 (kg/m2), Ferriman-Gallwey hirsutism score, Ludwig alopecia score, pelvic ultrasound and research a concentration of hormones in the blood serum. Results: Hirsutism is less severe and oligomenorrhea is less common in women with T1DM and PCOS compared with nondiabetic PCOS women. Conclusion: Physicians, treating women with T1DM should be aware of the risk of hyperandrogenism and include evaluation of hirsutism, menstrual disorders, and biochemical hy Continue reading >>

Pcos, Diabetes, And Ttc#1

Pcos, Diabetes, And Ttc#1

Hey All I'm new to this particular group and am TTC#1. I was wondering if there were any women out there with PCOS who have also been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes? I was diagnosed with PCOS when I was in my mid-20s and told that it would be difficult for me to get pregnant, but not impossible. At the time, I was considered pre-diabetic and put on Glucopghage (Metformin generic version) to help me ovulate. I was also told to lose weight and carefully watch my diet to prepare my body for pregnancy. I started having regular periods and ovulating when I lost 10-15lbs at the end of 2007. We began TTC (trying to conceive) in February 2008 and in September, we were blessed with the news that we were expecting. I am now 28 weeks into my pregnancy and I am due on May 29th. The pregnancy so far has been a little challenging, at 9 weeks my doctor gave me the glucose test and my blood sugars were out of control. I thought once I got pregnant it would be a carefree pregnancy -WRONG! I have been taking insulin three to four times a day, moderately exercising and adhering to a strict healthy diet to keep my blood sugars under control. So just know that it is incredibly important to get healthy (weight & diet) and your blood sugars under controlbefore you get pregnant. Continue reading >>

When Diagnoses Collide- Pcos And Diabetes

When Diagnoses Collide- Pcos And Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes has been joining me in this journey called life since I was 7 years old. I’m a born and raised GA peach who graduated from the University of Georgia in 2015 and hightailed it up to Boston immediately after graduation to start working for the College Diabetes Network as the Program Assistant, and I haven’t looked back. I loved being involved in the diabetes community every chance I get. I’ve been volunteering at Camp Kudzu since 2012 where I was a camper growing up. I also blog and rant on the internet about type 1 diabetes, mental health, and now PCOS. What’s PCOS, you ask? Polycystic Ovary Syndrome, a condition in which a woman’s levels of the sex hormones estrogen and progesterone are out of balance. This leads to the growth of ovarian cysts. PCOS can cause problems with a woman’s menstrual cycle, fertility, cardiac function, and appearance. I will talk more about this definition and other information about PCOS throughout my posts now and in the future. But back to the diabetes part… After about a year of being sick and getting told by doctors in the small Southern town where we lived that nothing was wrong, something else was wrong, or my parents were overreacting, we went to an eye appointment where we were lucky to see a doctor that works with children with diabetes in developing countries. He told my parents that based off of my eyes he thought I might have Type 1 Diabetes, and we should seek a diagnosis immediately. We didn’t know anything about diabetes at all and went home to look it up in the big medical book (the days before google and WebMD), and all of the symptoms fit. The doctors tried to turn us away again, but we demanded that they check my blood sugar, and on March 8, 2000 I was finally diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. A Continue reading >>

Positive Pcos

Positive Pcos

PCOS & Diabetes Women with PCOS are at higher risk of long term health issues such as hypertension, cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. In fact, approximately 30% of those with PCOS have type 2 diabetes and, conversely, 27% of premenopausal women with diabetes also have PCOS (1). Relatively few studies have examined the prevalence of type 1 diabetes in the condition. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a long term health problem which occurs when cells in the body don’t respond to insulin or when insufficient amounts of insulin are produced by the pancreas. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Symptoms of type 2 diabetes include frequent urination, especially at night, blurred vision, excessive thirst and tiredness. What are the long-term complications associated with type 2 diabetes? If left untreated or poorly controlled, diabetes can lead to serious health problems such as stroke, heart disease, artherosclerosis (arteries becoming clogged with fatty substances), kidney disease and diabetic retinopathy. Diabetes UK is the leading national charity and you can read more about the condition on their website. If you are worried that you may have diabetes, speak with your GP or relevant medical practitioner. Why do some women with PCOS develop type 2 diabetes? Both PCOS and type 2 diabetes are obesity-related health conditions (2). In type 2 diabetes insufficient levels of insulin are produced. In response, beta cells in the pancreas secrete higher levels of insulin resulting in hyperinsulinemia (excessive amounts of insulin in the blood). PCOS is associated with insulin resistance, which affects approximately 50-70% of women with the condition and particularly those who are obese (1). Insulin resistance results in hyperinsulinemia (1) which, as exp Continue reading >>

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (pcos) In Juvenile And Adult Type 1 Diabetes In A German/austrian Cohort.

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (pcos) In Juvenile And Adult Type 1 Diabetes In A German/austrian Cohort.

Abstract Context While an association between PCOS and type 2 diabetes is well established, to date there have been few data on clinical care of type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients with PCOS. Objective The aim of our study was to characterize T1D patients with the comorbidity of PCOS within the DPV cohort with regard to diabetes phenotype, therapy and metabolic control. Design and Setting Clinical data from the prospective German/Austrian DPV cohort on patients with T1D and documented PCOS (n=76) were compared to female T1D controls (n=32,566) in reproductive age. Results The age at T1D manifestation in PCOS patients was later than in the control group (14.9±8.2 vs. 11.8±7.0 years, p<0.001). PCOS patients had higher BMI-SDS (0.92±0.11 vs. 0.38±0.01, p<0.001), metformin and oral contraceptives were used more frequently (p<0.001). A1c levels were significantly lower (7.92 +/- 0.23% vs. 8.43±0.01%, p<0.05) despite of lower insulin requirements (0.76±0.04 IU/kg/d vs. 0.84±0.00 IU/kg/d, p<0.05). In the PCOS group, higher rates of dyslipidemia (63.4 vs. 48.7%, p =0.032) and thyroid disorders (42.2% vs. 21.2%, p<0.001) were present. Discussion While patients with T1D and comorbid PCOS showed features of a "type 1.5 diabetes" phenotype, insulin requirements per kg body weight were not higher and metabolic control was better, which could be explained only partially by additional metformin therapy. A more precise genetic and metabolic characterisation of these patients is needed to answer open questions on the underlying autoimmune process and residual ß-cell function. Continue reading >>

Pcos And Hyperandrogenism In Type 1 Diabetes

Pcos And Hyperandrogenism In Type 1 Diabetes

Women with both type 1 diabetes and polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) represent a unique population, with long term implications on fertility and diabetic complications, which need to be addressed. The studies reviewed herein address the increased incidence of PCOS in women with type 1 diabetes. The leading theories suggest that the underlying pathophysiology is related to intensive insulin therapy and resulting ovarian hyperandrogenism. We have searched the literature to determine what studies have been done to address the role of insulin resistance and insulin sensitizers for reduction of hyperandrogenism in these patients. According to the available evidence, we conclude that metformin may have a role in reducing the androgenic picture in type 1 patients with PCOS and insulin resistance. Cite this paper Tibuni-Sanders, S. and Nader, S. (2012) PCOS and hyperandrogenism in type 1 diabetes. Open Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2, 76-80. doi: 10.4236/ojog.2012.21015. [1] Ehrmann, D. (2005) Medical progress: Polycystic ovarian syndrome. The New England Journal of Medicine, 352, 1223-1236. doi:10.1056/NEJMra041536 [2] Strotmeyer, E., Steenkiste, M.S., Foley, S. and Dorman, J. (2003) Menstrual cycle differences between women with type 1 diabetes and women without type 1 diabetes. Diabetes Care, 26, 1016-1021. doi:10.2337/diacare.26.4.1016 [3] Adcock, C.J., Perry, L.A., Lindsell, D.R., Taylor, A.M., Holly, J.M. and Dunger, D.B. (1994) Menstrual irregularities are more common in adolescents with type 1 diabetes: Association with poor glycemic control and weight gain. Diabetic Medicine, 11, 465-470. doi:10.1111/j.1464-5491.1994.tb00307.x [4] Escobar-Morreale, H.F., Roldan, B., Barrio, R., Alonso, M., Sancho, J., De la Calle, H. and Garcia-Robles, R. (2000) High prevalen Continue reading >>

How Pcos Leads To Diabetes?

How Pcos Leads To Diabetes?

Share PCOS – Polycystic Ovaries Syndrome is a sexual hormonal disorder in women. But did you know that it can lead to diabetes? Keep a check before it’s too late. A ccording to a study by PCOS society, one in 10 Indian women suffer from Polycystic Ovaries Syndrome (PCOS), and more than 10 million women globally are affected by this disease. PCOS is a disorder of the endocrinal system that causes an imbalance of female sex hormones. It is considered to be the most common cause of female infertility. Most urban women are somewhat familiar with this condition. However, not many are aware that PCOS is closely related to a much more serious lifestyle disease – diabetes. In fact, PCOS is often referred to as a form of prediabetes, because the conditions have a lot in common. For instance, just like with type 2 diabetes, Polycystic Ovary Syndrome often starts with insulin resistance. Some studies show that 50 to 90 per cent of women with PCOS are insulin resistant. According to the American Diabetes Association, insulin resistance leads the body to produce high levels of insulin, very similar to the early stage of type 2 diabetes. Moreover, a study by Australian researchers found that women who had PCOS were three to five times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than women who didn’t have PCOS. Conversely, another study by the Medical College of Virginia found that up to 27 per cent of premenopausal women with type 2 diabetes also have PCOS, signifying that both conditions are inter-related. Here’s how they help A mobile intervention platform for diabetic patients provides patients with day-to-day support and real-time guidance to adhere to their treatment plan and manage their glycaemic levels. Armed with the right digital app one can: 1. Initiate better diagnos Continue reading >>

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