diabetestalk.net

Partial Removal Of Pancreas And Spleen

Laparscopic Distal Pancreatectomy

Laparscopic Distal Pancreatectomy

A laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy is a minimally invasive surgical procedure that is performed to remove benign or malignant (cancerous) tumors in the body or the tail of the pancreas. The surgeon most often will need to remove the spleen because it is located near the pancreas and shares some of the blood vessels. What Should I Expect From a Laparoscopic Distal Pancreatectomy? You receive general anesthesia, meaning you will be asleep for the procedure. Your abdomen is filled with gas to expand the area and allow your surgeon to see the abdominal cavity better. Your surgeon inserts a tube through your nose and into your stomach to prevent nausea and vomiting. Your surgeon also inserts drainage tubes to aid with drainage of fluids that are produced during surgery and recovery. Your surgeon makes three small incisions. The first is for a small camera that allows your surgeon to see the pancreas and surrounding area; the second is for surgical instruments; and the third is for your surgeon's hand. Before continuing, your surgeon needs to make sure the cancer has not spread and that the tumor is still operable. Your surgeon removes the cancerous part of your pancreas, and if necessary, the spleen. The surgery takes between three to four hours. What is Recovery Like After a Laparoscopic Distal Pancreatectomy? You will need to stay in the hospital for three to five days. You will have an IV tube in your vein so you can receive fluids and medication. Here's what happens next: Immediately following surgery, you are in the Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) to be monitored for a few hours. Once you are stable, you are transferred to a regular surgical floor; if your surgeon feels you need extra monitoring, you may be moved to another unit in the hospital. For the first day or Continue reading >>

Surgery To Try To Cure

Surgery To Try To Cure

The type of operation you needdepends on where the cancer is in the pancreas. For cancers of the head of the pancreas,you might have either an operationto removethe head of the pancreas (PPPD) or a Whipple's operation. For cancers in the body or tail of your pancreas you will have a distal pancreatectomy. These are major operations. Because you keep part of your pancreas, you might not need to takeinsulin. You may not need to takeenzymesto help you digest food (although around 1 in 3 Whipple's patients do need enzymes). Your doctor will monitor your digestion and blood sugar to make sure you can manage on your own. You will need support with your eating and drinking after these types of surgery. It might take time to return to a normal diet. Taking out the head of the pancreas (PPPD) Taking out the head of the pancreas is called pylorus preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PPPD). your duodenum (the first part of your small bowel) your gallbladder and part of your bile duct The diagram below shows what your surgeon removes. After the surgery, the tail of the pancreas is joined to a bit of your small bowel. This diagram shows how the surgeon might repair what is left behind. This operation is the same as a PPPD but you also have part of your stomach removed. This diagram shows what your surgeon removes. This diagram shows how the surgeon might repair what is left behind. Removing the pancreas (total pancreatectomy) This operation is not done very often in the UK. It is very major surgery. the gallbladder and part of your bile duct This diagram shows you what the surgeon takes away. This diagram shows you how the surgeon repairs what is left behind. Youmust be fit enough forsuch major surgery, this is so youcancope with thelong general anaesthetic and get over the operatio Continue reading >>

Having An Operation On The Pancreas: Faq

Having An Operation On The Pancreas: Faq

Let us assume you (the reader) are going to have a pancreatic resection. The following section attempts to answer some of the questions you may have in mind, and the answers are addressed to you. We can start with the names of the operations. Whipple's operation isalso known as a pancreato-duodenectomy (a variation on this is called pylorus-preserving pancreato-duodenectomy) The head of the pancreas lies next to a part of your bowel called the duodenum. Also running within the head is a part of the bile duct (the tube that carries bile from the liver to the gut). So if you have a tumour in the head of the pancreas, and the head needs to be removed, it is usually removed along with the duodenum, and that part of the bile duct. Often, the gall bladder is removed as well. Once these have been removed, the surgeon rejoins bowel to bowel (so that food can go down), pancreas to bowel (so that pancreatic juice can flow into the bowel), and bile duct to bowel (so that bile can flow into the bowel). If a pylorus-preserving pancreato-duodenectomy (a form of the Whipple operation) is performed to remove a tumour in the head of the pancreas, the dotted red line in this diagram encircles the organs that are removed. Sometimes, the problem may lie in the body or tail of the pancreas, which need to be removed. The spleen lies close to the tail of the pancreas and often has to be removed during this operation. If a distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy is performed to remove a tumour in the tail of the pancreas, the dotted red line in this diagram encircles the organs that are removed. Total pancreatectomy, Central pancreatectomy and Enucleation Very rarely, it may be necessary to remove the entire pancreas (i.e. total pancreatectomy). This is possible, and generally involves removal Continue reading >>

What To Expect After An Operation

What To Expect After An Operation

Pancreatic Cancer Diagnosis, Prevention, and Treatment As with all major operations, recovering from pancreatic surgery takes time. Full recovery requires an average of two months. Your recovery can be divided into different stages, each of which carry a different set of expectations. However, it is important to remember that every patient's recovery is different, even patients undergoing the exact same procedure. Patients spend an average of 3-10 days in the hospital after pancreas surgery. While you are in the hospital, many members of your health care team will be checking in on you daily. Your in-house team consists of residents, medical students, nurses, and your surgeon. Your team will closely monitor your progress throughout your stay. You will be seen by residents and nurses several times each day and by your surgeon and/or one of our Pancreas Center surgeons at least once each day. It is normal to experience pain after pancreas surgery. While in the hospital, you will be able to manage your pain with intravenous pain medication. Once you are at home, you will manage your pain with oral medications prescribed by your health care team. After your operation, you will have staples and special dressings where incisions were made during your procedure. You may also have some surgical drainage tubes left in your abdomen. Your team will check your dressings regularly to ensure they are healing well and monitor any tubes to ensure proper drainage. It is normal to be discharged home with the surgical drainage tubes still in place, so do not be worried about your recovery if this happens to you. You will be given specific instructions on how to care for both the drainage tubes and your surgical dressing before you are discharged from the hospital; both will be removed du Continue reading >>

Distal Pancreatectomy, Total Pancreatectomy And Vein Resection In Pancreatic Cancer

Distal Pancreatectomy, Total Pancreatectomy And Vein Resection In Pancreatic Cancer

Distal pancreatectomy, total pancreatectomy and vein resection in pancreatic cancer A distal pancreatectomy is usually performed when a patient has a tumour in the body or tail (thin end) of the pancreas. This procedure involves having the tail (thin end) and body of your pancreas removed, leaving the head of the pancreas intact. Your surgeon will normally remove your spleen at the same time because it is located next to the tail of the pancreas. Even though a distal pancreatectomy is less complicated than the Whipples procedure , it is still major surgery. Thespleen is an important part of your immune system, and if it is removed, you will be on antibiotics for the rest of your life to prevent infections. Some specialists may opt to perform distal pancreatectomies via a laparoscopic procedure . This is not common,it only happens in a few specialist centres and generally only when the tumour is small. As it is keyhole surgery, recovery time for patients is usually faster than for open surgery. Copyright Pancreatic Cancer Action 2013. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission from Pancreatic Cancer Action Distal Pancreatectomy (after surgery). Copyright Pancreatic Cancer Action 2013. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission from Pancreatic Cancer Action This is very major surgery and involves the removal of the whole pancreas as well as your duodenum, part of the stomach, the gallbladder, part of your bile duct, the spleen, andmany of the surrounding lymph nodes. This operation is not often carried out as it has not been found to be any more effective for survival than either the Whipples procedure or the Pylorus Preserving Pancreatoduodenectomy (PPPD) procedure . There are some conditions for which it is used; for example, when tumours ar Continue reading >>

Life After Removal Of Pancreas, Gall Bladder, Spleen? Anyone Out There Please?

Life After Removal Of Pancreas, Gall Bladder, Spleen? Anyone Out There Please?

Hi loulou: I'm fearful I might have the same fate only different C What is renal cell C in the pancrea?? I have to say I woul;d love to keep in touch. I hope I will be eligible for the op your having, I know that might sound crazy but what is the alternative?? What state do you live in and what happened?/ I mean how did the symptoms start and what tests did thy do to give you this diagnosis?? Sincerely, Denise My email is you have to put in the at sign @ in the middle of 430 and hotmail I dont know if they allow you to post your email so I did it this way!! Please write....... ***this post is edited by moderator *** *** private e-mails not allowed ** Please read our Terms of Use Hi I had my pancreas, spleen & gallbladder out as well (also part of my bile duct & small intestine.) I am 2 1/2 yrs out of the surgery. I am Type 1 diabetic and that isn't easy but its become much easier since the pump/ I take great care of myself, have 2 young boys, exercise everyday, very active in all my kids activities and have full, good life. It takes determination and a VERY positive attitude. Choose to live and surround yourself with uplifting people. We all have crosses to bear and we choose how we carry them through life. Feel free to contact me anytime for support. It really helps Good luck!! Eileen Guest over a year ago Hi My friend is going to have her pancreas remove (total pancreatectomy), from your experience what should be prepared for the recovery period at home? Do you think we should get her professional help or can we nurse her ourselves? How long is the recovery? Hello! : ) I have had all three organs removed. In Jan 2007 I had my gallbladder out. My problem was I kept getting pancreatitis. I have had it since i was in 6th grade. The attacks stopped for awhile and then whe Continue reading >>

Surgery For Pancreatic Cancer

Surgery For Pancreatic Cancer

Two general types of surgery can be used for pancreatic cancer: Potentially curative surgery is used when the results of exams and tests suggest that it’s possible to remove (resect) all the cancer. Palliative surgery may be done if imaging tests show that the cancer is too widespread to be removed completely. This surgery is done to relieve symptoms or to prevent certain complications like a blocked bile duct or intestine, but the goal is not to try to cure the cancer. Staging laparoscopy To determine which type of surgery might be best, it’s important to know the stage (extent) of the cancer. But it can be hard to stage pancreatic cancer accurately just using imaging tests. Sometimes laparoscopy is done first to help determine the extent of the cancer and if it can be resected. For this procedure, the surgeon makes a few small incisions (cuts) in the abdomen (belly) and inserts long, thin instruments. One of these has a small video camera on the end so the surgeon can see inside the abdomen. The surgeon can look at the pancreas and other organs for tumors and take biopsy samples of abnormal areas to learn how far the cancer has spread. Potentially curative surgery Studies have shown that removing only part of a pancreatic cancer doesn’t help patients live longer, so potentially curative surgery is only done if the surgeon thinks all of the cancer can be removed. This is very complex surgery, and it can also be very hard for patients. It can cause complications and can take weeks to months to recover from. If you're thinking about having this type of surgery, it’s important to weigh the potential benefits and risks carefully. Fewer than 1 in 5 pancreatic cancers appear to be confined to the pancreas at the time they are found. Even then, not all of these cancer Continue reading >>

Distal Pancreatectomy: En-bloc Splenectomy Vs Spleen-preserving Pancreatectomy

Distal Pancreatectomy: En-bloc Splenectomy Vs Spleen-preserving Pancreatectomy

Distal pancreatectomy: en-bloc splenectomy vs spleen-preserving pancreatectomy Find articles by Miguel Angel Lpez-Boado Department of Surgery, Hospital Clinic i Provincial de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain Laureano Fernndez-Cruz, Biliary and Pancreatic Unit, Hospital Clinic i Provincial de Barcelona, University of Barcelona, C/Villarroel 170, 08036 Barcelona, Spain, Phone: 0034932275559, Fax: 0034932275769, Email: [email protected] . This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Distal pancreatectomy with en-bloc splenectomy has been considered the standard technique for management of benign and malignant pancreatic disorders. However, splenic preservation has recently been advocated. The aim of this study was to review the experiences of distal pancreatectomy using the open or the laparoscopic approach and to critically discuss the need to perform splenectomy. Original articles published in the English literature of peer-reviewed medical journals were selected for detailed analysis. In patients with malignant neoplasms in the body-tail of the pancreas, splenectomy has a negative influence on long-term survival after resection. The incidence of diabetes after spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy for chronic pancreatitis is less than after en-bloc splenectomy. Spleen salvage eliminates the risk of overwhelming infections. Laparoscopic spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy is feasible and safe. Laparoscopic spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy may be preferable for the advantages of a minimally invasive approach. Keywords: Laparoscopic pancreatic resection, spleen-preserving pancreatectomy, splenectomy In general, distal pancreatectomy is performed en-bloc along with resection of the spleen. Most of the time, the en-bloc pancreatic-spleen resection is perf Continue reading >>

Pancreatic Operations

Pancreatic Operations

Copyright 2016 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. JAMA. 2016;316(18):1932. doi:10.1001/jama.2016.11165 Diagnoses of pancreatic cancer or conditions such as cysts that lead to cancer may require an operation on the pancreas. The type of pancreatic surgery needed depends on the location of the cancer or cyst. These operations are complex and are usually performed by surgeons who specialize in pancreatic surgery. For lesions located in the body or tail of the pancreas, most often a distal or left partial pancreatectomy is recommended. The technique for a distal pancreatectomy can vary and includes removing part of the pancreas with or without the spleen. The reason the spleen often needs to be removed for this operation is because the artery to the spleen is located along the course of the body and tail of the pancreas. Removing the tail end of the pancreas is known as a distal pancreatectomy. For lesions located in the region of the head of the pancreas, a pancreaticoduodenectomy (Whipple procedure) is typically performed. This operation entails removal of the head of the pancreas. Because the head of the gland is located so close to other structures, these need to be removed along with the head of the pancreas. These structures include the duodenum (first part of the small intestine), bile duct, gallbladder, and sometimes part of the stomach. Once removed, a reconstruction of these structures needs to be performed reconnecting the pancreas, stomach, bile duct, and intestine. In rare cases in which patients have many tumors or multiple high-risk cysts, removal of the entire pancreas is required (total pancreatectomy). Because the pancreas is where metabolic hormones such as insulin are made, complete removal of the pancreas results in diabetes. In additio Continue reading >>

Distal Pancreatectomy

Distal Pancreatectomy

surgical techniques for pancreas preservation A distal pancreatectomy is where the bottom half of the pancreas is removed by a surgical procedure. The most frequent reason for performing a distal pancreatectomy is the presence of a tumor in the body or tail of the pancreas. After removal of the pancreas, the cut edge of the pancreas is often sutured to prevent leakage of pancreatic juice from this area. Most common complication of a distal pancreatectomy is leakage of pancreatic juice from the cut edge of the pancreas. Dilip Parekh M.D. has developed a specialized technique for suturing this part of the pancreas that has led to a very low incidence (less than 3%) of leakage of pancreatic juice after the surgery. This incidence is much less than what is usually reported from many of the major centers in the United States. Different techniques are available at USC for distal pancreatectomy. Open distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy In this procedure the body and tail of the pancreas is removed with the spleen. The spleen is removed with the pancreas since the blood supply to the spleen is intimately associated with the pancreas. This procedure is most frequently performed in patients with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. A surgical procedure is available where the spleen is preserved removing only the pancreas. USC is one of the few centers where this procedure is performed in Southern California. In this procedure the the blood vessels to the spleen that also provide blood supply to the pancreas are delicately separated from the pancreas and preserved and the tail of the pancreas is removed. This surgical procedure is indicated for patients with cystic tumors and islet cell tumors of the pancreas. This procedure is not indicated and should not be performed in patients w Continue reading >>

Distal Pancreatectomy: Indications And Outcomes In 235 Patients

Distal Pancreatectomy: Indications And Outcomes In 235 Patients

Distal Pancreatectomy: Indications and Outcomes in 235 Patients Copyright 1999 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Distal pancreatectomy is performed for a variety of benign and malignant conditions. In recent years, significant improvements in perioperative results have been observed at high-volume centers after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Little data, however, are available concerning the current indications and outcomes after distal pancreatectomy. This single-institution experience reviews the recent indications, complications, and outcomes after distal pancreatectomy. A retrospective analysis was performed of the hospital records of all patients undergoing distal pancreatectomy between January 1994 and December 1997, inclusive. The patient population (n = 235) had a mean age of 51 years, (range 1 month to 82 years); 43% were male and 84% white. The final diagnoses included chronic pancreatitis (24%), benign pancreatic cystadenoma (22%), pancreatic adenocarcinoma (18%), neuroendocrine tumor (14%), pancreatic pseudocyst (6%), cystadenocarcinoma (3%), and miscellaneous (13%). The level of resection was at or to the left of the superior mesenteric vein in 96% of patients. A splenectomy was performed in 84% and a cholecystectomy in 15% of patients. The median intraoperative blood loss was 450 ml, the median number of red blood cell units transfused was zero, and the median operative time was 4.3 hours. Two deaths occurred in the hospital or within 30 days of surgery for a perioperative mortality rate of 0.9%. The overall postoperative complication rate was 31%; the most common complications were new-onset insulin-dependent diabetes (8%), pancreatic fistula (5%), intraabdominal abscess (4%), small bowel obstruction (4%) Continue reading >>

Chronic Pancreatitis Treatments

Chronic Pancreatitis Treatments

Treatment of chronic pancreatitis depends on the cause of the disease, severity of the associated pain and effectiveness of former treatment approaches. The first step of treatment focuses on relieving pain and eating a diet that is high in carbohydrates and low in fat. It is essential to stop drinking alcohol entirely. Your doctor may prescribe pancreatic enzymes to take with meals if your pancreas does not secrete enough of its own enzymes. The supplemental enzymes should be taken with every meal to help your body digest food and regain some weight. If you have diabetes, insulin and other drugs may be needed to control blood sugar levels. There are a number of surgical procedures available for patients whose pain is not relieved by medications or other approaches. Surgery may involve removing stones from the pancreas, draining blocked ducts, or partial or entire removal of the pancreas. A partial pancreatectomy involves removing part of the pancreas, such as the body or tail, during a Puestow or Whipple procedure. A total pancreatectomy involves removing the entire pancreas. While a total pancreatectomy is usually effective in relieving pain in patients when all other treatments fail, it induces permanent diabetes, requiring patients to take insulin shots or use an insulin pump for the rest of their lives. This is because the pancreas contains Islets of Langerhans also known as islets or islet cells that regulate the body's blood sugar levels. UCSF's Islet and Cellular Transplantation Center is one the few medical centers in the country to offer a total pancreatectomy performed with an islet autotransplant. This innovative dual procedure helps alleviate pain caused by pancreatitis, while preserving the ability to secrete insulin and reducing the risk of developing su Continue reading >>

Distal Pancreatectomy And Splenectomy

Distal Pancreatectomy And Splenectomy

Illustration of distal pancreatectomy by Scott Weldon A distal pancreatectomy is the removal of the end of the pancreas while leaving the pancreatic head attached. It is performed to treat pancreatic cancer localized in the end of the pancreas, but may also be used for chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic pseudocysts, and injury due to trauma. When the disease affects the splenic artery or vein, the adjacent spleen is often removed. After removal of the end of the pancreas, the remaining portion of the organ functions normally by producing and releasing digestive enzymes and hormones. Compared to surgical procedures that remove the head of the pancreas, a distal pancreatectomy is performed in much less time and requires a shorter recovery period. The procedure can also be performed using laparoscopic instruments. Usually, patients undergo radiation therapy or chemotherapy in addition to the surgical procedure. Tumors in the tail of the pancreas are removed with a distal pancreatectomy. In cases of cancer, the tumor often invades the splenic artery or vein. In addition, cancers in this location can spread to the lymph nodes in the hilum of the spleen. For these reasons, it is frequently best to remove the spleen along with the tail of the pancreas. The pancreatic duct and cut edge of the pancreas is oversewn in an effort to prevent any leak of pancreatic juice. Continue reading >>

Distal Pancreatectomy With Splenectomy For The Management Of Splenic Hilum Metastasis In Cytoreductive Surgery Of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

Distal Pancreatectomy With Splenectomy For The Management Of Splenic Hilum Metastasis In Cytoreductive Surgery Of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

Distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy for the management of splenic hilum metastasis in cytoreductive surgery of epithelial ovarian cancer We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy for the management of splenic hilum metastasis in cytoreductive surgery of epithelial ovarian cancer Libing Xiang, Yunxia Tu, [...], and Huijuan Yang Distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy may be required for optimal cytoreductive surgery in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) metastasized to splenic hilum. This study evaluates the morbidity and treatment outcomes of the uncommon procedure in the management of advanced or recurrent EOC. This study recruited 18 patients who underwent distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy during cytoreductive surgery of EOC. Their clinicopathological characteristics and follow-up data were retrospectively analyzed. All tumors were confirmed as high-grade serous carcinomas. The median diameter of metastatic tumors located in splenic hilum was 3.5 cm (range, 1 to 10 cm). Optimal cytoreduction was achieved in all patients. Eight patients (44.4%) suffered from postoperative complications. The morbidity associated with distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy included pancreatic leakage (22.2%), encapsulated effusion in the left upper quadrant (11.1%), intra-abdominal infection (11.1%), pleural effusion with or without pulmonary atelectasis (11.1%), intestinal obstruction Continue reading >>

Life After Pancreatic Surgery | Upmc Healthbeat

Life After Pancreatic Surgery | Upmc Healthbeat

Surgery to treat pancreatic cancer can remove cancerous tumors and has the potential to extend life. At the same time, undergoing pancreatic surgery can be challenging. Even minimally invasive surgery still involves an operation, recovery time, and a hospital stay. Although most people wont experience major complications after these procedures, the experience can affect the way you live, at least while you recover. Heres what you can expect following your operation. The most common type of pancreatic surgery is called Whipple surgery . During this procedure, your surgeon will remove the head, or right-hand portion, of the pancreas , where most tumors occur. Because of the location of this organ, he or she must also remove: A new, less-invasive form of Whipple surgery uses a robotic device to more accurately guide surgical instruments in the abdomen. Whatever type of pancreatic surgery you have, youll experience some changes to your health and routine afterward. RELATED: What Do Intestines Do for the Body? Most post-surgical complications arent life-threatening, but they still require close observation from your health care team. The most frequent complication from pancreatic surgery is leaking of pancreatic juices from the incision. You may also experience bleeding or an infection of the surgical site. For these reasons, your doctor will recommend that you remain in the hospital for four to 10 days, depending on the type of surgery youve had. While in the hospital, youll be given medications to help ease the pain of surgery. Youve just had major surgery on many of the organs that make up your digestive system. So, it stands to reason that youll experience some changes to digestion. Following surgery, you will initially only be able to eat small amounts of food. You may Continue reading >>

More in diabetes