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Paresthesia Diabetes

“pins And Needles” And Diabetes

“pins And Needles” And Diabetes

Paresthesia. This is the medical term for the annoying and sometimes painful tingling, numbness, and “pins and needles” sensations that can sometimes come from diabetes. A good example of a temporary paresthesia is a foot “falling asleep” from sitting on it or the dead feeling in a hand after you slept with it tucked under your head. Compression of a nerve in your wrist can lead to carpal tunnel syndrome, making your hands ache and fingertips numb. Sometimes disc problems in the spine lead to numbness and pain. Those are also instances of parasthesia, but they are not caused by diabetes. The cause of our tingling and numbness from diabetes is usually peripheral neuropathy, or nerve damage in the arms, legs, hands, and feet. This complication results from high blood glucose levels damaging nerves and blood vessels. Since the damage hits our smallest blood vessels first, the nerves these vessels feed may develop paresthesia quickly. So tingling and numbness in our toes and fingers are often some of the earliest complications of Type 2 diabetes. But there are many other possible causes of paresthesia. A few of them are hypothyroidism (low thyroid), vitamin B12 deficiency, arthritis, poisoning, stroke, cancer, and conditions such as Lyme disease and HIV. People with diabetes often have problems with hypothyroidism and B12 deficiency. If you are plagued by paresthesia, it is a good idea to get blood tests for these conditions. “If I woke up without pain, I’d think I was dead” This phrase made me laugh, but only because it is so true. Pain is frequently part of life as we age. But I have found that paresthesia caused by diabetes can improve. Getting your blood sugar to the target recommended by your health-care provider will help over time. But in the meantime, Continue reading >>

Everything You Should Know About Diabetic Neuropathy

Everything You Should Know About Diabetic Neuropathy

What is diabetic neuropathy? Diabetic neuropathy is a serious and common complication of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. It’s a type of nerve damage caused by uncontrolled high blood sugar levels. You may not initially have any symptoms. The condition usually develops slowly, sometimes over the course of several decades. If you have diabetes and are experiencing numbness, tingling, pain, or weakness of your hands or feet, call your doctor. These are the early symptoms of peripheral neuropathy. In cases of severe or prolonged peripheral neuropathy, you may experience injuries or infections in your extremities. In some cases, these can lead to amputation. Damage to other nerves of the body can cause other symptoms. That’s why it’s important to regularly monitor your blood sugar levels and contact your doctor if have any symptoms of neuropathy. It’s common for symptoms of neuropathy to appear gradually. In many cases, the first type of nerve damage to occur involves the nerves of the feet. This can lead to symptoms such as the sensation of pins and needles in your feet. Symptoms vary depending on the nerves affected. Common signs and symptoms of diabetic neuropathy include: sensitivity to touch loss of sense of touch difficulty with coordination when walking numbness or pain in your extremities muscle weakness or wasting nausea and indigestion diarrhea or constipation dizziness upon standing excessive sweating vaginal dryness in women and erectile dysfunction in men Symptoms may vary depending on the type of neuropathy you’re experiencing. The term neuropathy is used to describe several types of nerve damage. In people with diabetes, there are four main types of neuropathy you may develop. Peripheral neuropathy The most common form of neuropathy is peripheral neuropa Continue reading >>

Does Pins And Needles Sensation Means You Have Diabetes?

Does Pins And Needles Sensation Means You Have Diabetes?

The sensation of “pins and needles” is technically known as a form of paresthesia. Paresthesias are abnormal sensations and include sensations of burning, tingling, prickling, skin crawling or itching, often in the hands and/or feet. All the forms of paresthesia are due to nerve damage, either because of some disease affecting the nerves (eg. Multiple sclerosis or diabetes), by traumatic injury or entrapment (eg. Carpel tunnel syndrome), by strokes or by tumors pressing on the nerves.[1] Paresthesias can also be caused by Vitamin B12 deficiency, heavy metal poisoning, alcohol abuse and by a low-functioning thyroid (hypothyroidism).[2] Paresthesias can also be caused by various medications such as antihistamines, blood pressure medication, antibiotics and other medications can cause paresthesias such as that sensation of pins and needles. Just about everyone has experienced temporary paresthesias—these are those times when your leg “fell asleep” as you sat cross-legged or your hands were tingling or vibrating for some time after weed whacking or using some power tool. Paresthesias are usually not painful unless they are cause by spinal or traumatic injury, but they can become chronic (long-term) and can affect your overall quality of life. For example, if the “pins and needles” sensation doesn’t let you sleep, that can affect your quality of life. If that “pins and needles” sensation make it difficult for you to type, hold a pen, use a tool, sew, garden or perform another activity that you enjoy—or that you have to do—THAT can affect your quality of life. In diabetes, paresthesias often precede and are part of a complication of diabetes, peripheral neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy is believed to result from chronically high levels of blood sugar. Continue reading >>

Paresthesias That Annoying Numbness And Tingling

Paresthesias That Annoying Numbness And Tingling

Paresthesias are the medical term for tingling and numbness of the nerves, and they are an annoying and even painful complication of diabetes. But what are they? A good example of a temporary paresthesia is "falling asleep." That's what you call it when you sit on your foot too long or sleep with your arms stretched above your head. Compression of nerves by repetitive actions as in carpal tunnel syndrome or by disk problems in the spine can lead to numbness and pain. Those are paresthesias too, but they are not directly related to diabetes. Peripheral Neuropathy The cause of tingling and numbness in diabetics is usually peripheral neuropathy. This is a diabetic complication rising out of damage to blood vessels and nerves from too much glucose traveling in the blood, or high blood sugar as we diabetics know it. Since the damage begins in the smallest blood vessels and nerves, paresthesias show up in your toes and fingers as some of the early symptoms of type 2 diabetes. However, it is not always diabetes that does this to you. Other causes might be hypothyroidism, B12 deficiency, arthritis, toxic poisoning, malignancy, infections like Lyme disease and HIV, and strokes. Since hypothyroidism and B12 deficiency are often found in diabetics, it is good to get those checked. Treating them can improve paresthesias fast. You might also try getting some vitamin D from sunshine. Low vitamin D causes lots of aches and pains. You Can Treat Diabetic Paresthesias You do not have to live with the tingling and numbness caused by diabetic peripheral neuropathy. When you get your blood sugar under the numbers recommended by your diabetes specialist, the paresthesias will get better too. I am living proof of this. Other things you can do will help the symptoms, but healthy diet and exerc Continue reading >>

Tingling In Hands And Feet

Tingling In Hands And Feet

Tingling hands, feet, or both is an extremely common and bothersome symptom. Such tingling can sometimes be benign and temporary. For example, it could result from pressure on nerves when your arm is crooked under your head as you fall asleep. Or it could be from pressure on nerves when you cross your legs too long. In either case, the "pins and needles" effect -- which is usually painless -- is soon relieved by removing the pressure that caused it. In many cases, however, tingling in the hands, feet, or both can be severe, episodic, or chronic. It also can accompany other symptoms. such as pain, itching, numbness, and muscle wasting. In such cases, tingling may be a sign of nerve damage, which can result from causes as varied as traumatic injuries or repetitive stress injuries, bacterial or viral infections, toxic exposures, and systemic diseases such as diabetes. Such nerve damage is known as peripheral neuropathy because it affects nerves distant from the brain and spinal cord, often in the hands and feet. There are more than 100 different types of peripheral neuropathy. Over time, peripheral neuropathy can worsen, resulting in decreased mobility and even disability. More than 20 million Americans, most of them older adults, are estimated to have peripheral neuropathy. It's important to seek prompt medical evaluation for any persistent tingling in your hands, feet, or both. The earlier the underlying cause of your tingling is identified and brought under control, the less likely you are to suffer potentially lifelong consequences. Causes of Tingling in the Hands and Feet Diabetes is one of the most common causes of peripheral neuropathy, accounting for about 30% of cases. In diabetic neuropathy, tingling and other symptoms often first develop in both feet and go up t Continue reading >>

Causes Of Peripheral Neuropathy: Diabetes And Beyond

Causes Of Peripheral Neuropathy: Diabetes And Beyond

Causes of peripheral neuropathy: Diabetes and beyond J Fam Pract. 2015 December;64(12):774-778,781-783 Department of Family and Community Medicine (Dr. L. Mayans), Department of Internal Medicine (Dr. D. Mayans), University of Kansas School of MedicineWichita; Neurology Consultants of Kansas, Wichita (Dr. D. Mayans) The authors reported no potential conflict of interest relevant to this article. Leg paresthesias can be challenging to evaluate because of the varied causes and clinical presentations. This diagnostic guide with at-a-glance tables can help. 1. Katirji B, Koontz D. Disorders of peripheral nerves. In: Daroff R, ed. Bradleys Neurology in Clinical Practice. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2012:1915-1983. 2. Azhary H, Farooq MU, Bhanushali M, et al. Peripheral neuropathy: differential diagnosis and management. Am Fam Physician. 2010;81:887-892. 3. Alport AR, Sander HW. Clinical approach to peripheral neuropathy: anatomic localization and diagnostic testing. Continuum (Minneap Minn). 2012;18:13-38. 4. England JD, Gronseth GS, Franklin G, et al. Practice parameter: evaluation of distal symmetric polyneuropathy: role of laboratory and genetic testing (an evidence-based review). Neurology. 2009;72:185-192. 5. Smith AG, Singleton JR. Diabetic neuropathy. Continuum (Minneap Minn). 2012;18:60-84. 6. Shenoy AM. Guidelines in practice: treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy. Continuum (Minneap Minn). 2012;18:192-198. 7. Gibbons CH. Small fiber neuropathies. Continuum (Minneap Minn). 2014;20:1398-1412. 8. So YT. Immune-mediated neuropathies. Continuum (Minneap Minn). 2012;18:85-105. 9. Dimachkie MM, Saperstein DS. Acquired immune demyelinating neuropathies. Continuum (Minneap Minn). 2014;20:1241-1260. 10. Patwa HS, Chaudhry V, Katzberg H, et al. Evidence-based guid Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy: Practice Essentials, Background, Anatomy

Diabetic Neuropathy: Practice Essentials, Background, Anatomy

Author: Dianna Quan, MD; Chief Editor: Romesh Khardori, MD, PhD, FACP more... Diabetic neuropathy is the most common complication of diabetes mellitus (DM), affecting as many as 50% of patients with type 1 and type 2 DM. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy involves the presence of symptoms or signs of peripheral nerve dysfunction in people with diabetes after other possible causes have been excluded. [ 1 ] In type 1 DM, distal polyneuropathy typically becomes symptomatic after many years of chronic prolonged hyperglycemia, whereas in type 2, it may be apparent after only a few years of known poor glycemic control or even at diagnosis. Symptoms include the following: Sensory Negative or positive, diffuse or focal; usually insidious in onset and showing a stocking-and-glove distribution in the distal extremities Motor Distal, proximal, or more focal weakness, sometimes occurring along with sensory neuropathy (sensorimotor neuropathy) Autonomic Neuropathy that may involve the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary systems and the sweat glands Physical examination should include the following assessments: Peripheral neuropathy testing Gross light touch and pinprick sensation; vibratory sense; deep tendon reflexes; strength testing and muscle atrophy; dorsal pedal and posterior tibial pulses; skin assessment; Tinel testing; cranial nerve testing Autonomic neuropathy testing Objective evaluation of cardiovagal, adrenergic, and sudomotor function in a specialized autonomic laboratory; may be preceded by bedside screening to assess supine and upright blood pressure and heart rate, with measurement of sinus arrhythmia ratio Two classification systems for diabetic neuropathy are the Thomas system and the symmetrical-versus-asymmetrical system. The Thomas system (modified Continue reading >>

Diabetes - A Paresthesia Cause

Diabetes - A Paresthesia Cause

Diabetes refers to a group of diseases of the metabolic type, in which the person has an elevated level of blood glucose (sugar). This can occur either because of a lack of cell response to insulin, or due to an insufficient production of insulin. There are three major forms of diabetes, and they are discussed briefly on this page. This group of diseases is also known by the slightly longer name of diabetes mellitus. Please keep in mind that this does not include the insipidus form. Patients with T1D have a failure in insulin production. In this type, the individual needs to have insulin injections. In the past, it was referred to as juvenile diabetes, however, this term is no longer used with much frequency. There is no one particular known cause for T1D, although it is suspected that genetics and environmental factors both are involved in the development of this condition. As with the type 2 form, some of the possible symptoms are the three Ps: polyuria, polydipsia, and polyphagia. T2D occurs due to a resistance to insulin, in which the cells do not use it as they normally would. It was previously known as the adult-onset form. There may also be somewhat of a deficiency of insulin. It is considered to be brought on by a combination of lifestyle factors and genetics. For instance, poor diet and low physical activity levels may contribute to the development of this condition. Medical conditions such as high blood pressure and obesity might also be factors. Those who have relatives with T2D also have a higher incidence of developing it themselves. This type takes place in women who are pregnant and had not been previously diagnosed with diabetes. When this happens, their blood glucose levels are high during pregnancy, particularly within the third and final trimester. I Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy: Can It Be Reversed?

Diabetic Neuropathy: Can It Be Reversed?

Neuropathy refers to any condition that damages nerve cells. These cells play a critical role in touch, sensation, and movement. Diabetic neuropathy refers to damage of nerves that’s caused by diabetes. Scientists believe that the high content of blood sugar in the blood of a person with diabetes damages nerves over time. There are several different types of neuropathies. They include: Peripheral: Pain and numbness in the extremities including arms, feet, legs, hands, and toes Proximal: Pain and numbness in the upper legs, specifically the buttocks, thighs, and hips Autonomic: Damage to nerves of the autonomic nervous system which control sexual response, sweating, urinary and digestive function Focal: Sudden loss of function in nerves causing pain and weakness of the muscles Neuropathy is one of the common effects of diabetes. It’s estimated that 60-70 percent of people with diabetes will develop some sort of neuropathy throughout their lives. By 2050, it’s estimated that over 48 million people in the United States will be diagnosed with diabetes. That means in the future, anywhere from 28-33 million Americans could be affected by diabetic neuropathy. Nerve damage from diabetes cannot be reversed. This is because the body can’t naturally repair nerve tissues that have been damaged. However, researchers are investigating methods to treat nerve damage caused by diabetes. While you cannot reverse the damage from neuropathy, there are ways to help manage the condition, including: lowering your blood sugar treating nerve pain regularly checking your feet to make sure they are free of injury, wounds, or infection Controlling your blood glucose is important because it can help prevent additional damage to your nerves. You can better control your blood glucose through Continue reading >>

Why Does Diabetes Cause Paresthesia?

Why Does Diabetes Cause Paresthesia?

Diabetic Neuropathy Nerve damage from diabetes is called diabetic neuropathy. They present like paresthesias. When the small nutritional arteries that supply the nerves in the body with nutrients, get damaged from arteriosclerotic disease due to uncontrolled diabetes, neuropathy damage is noted in various parts of the nervous system: polyneuropathy: when sensory nerves are affected there is often a glove stocking distribution of loss of feeling in both hands and both feet. This can lead to such things as unexpected burns or pressure ulcers, because the patient did not feel a pebble in the shoe. However, when the diabetic foot ulcer is being treated, it becomes often apparent that there is poor foot circulation because of severe occlusive arterial disease beyond repair and a foot amputation may have to be considered. Another manifestation of polyneuropathy may be shooting pains or severe deep seated gnawing pains in an affected extremity. mononeuropathy: this is an acute, painful condition where the blood supply to a nerve is suddenly interrupted due to a nerve infarction. This happens more often one of the 12 cranial nerves in the head area and in the femoral nerve of the leg. autonomic neuropathy: the autonomic nervous system (the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve fibers throughout the body) is very sensitive to elevated blood sugars from diabetes and damage to it is called autonomic neuropathy. When the autonomic nervous system is affected by a neuropathy, then a variety of body functions such as the heart rate and digestive system function, which normally are automatically regulated, are in disarray. The complaints span from impotence in males to sudden low blood pressure with dizziness on standing up, to delayed emptying of the stomach and bladder dysfunction. B Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic Neuropathy

Go to: Abstract Diabetic neuropathy (DN) refers to symptoms and signs of neuropathy in a patient with diabetes in whom other causes of neuropathy have been excluded. Distal symmetrical neuropathy is the commonest accounting for 75% DN. Asymmetrical neuropathies may involve cranial nerves, thoracic or limb nerves; are of acute onset resulting from ischaemic infarction of vasa nervosa. Asymmetric neuropathies in diabetic patients should be investigated for entrapment neuropathy. Diabetic amyotrophy, initially considered to result from metabolic changes, and later ischaemia, is now attributed to immunological changes. For diagnosis of DN, symptoms, signs, quantitative sensory testing, nerve conduction study, and autonomic testing are used; and two of these five are recommended for clinical diagnosis. Management of DN includes control of hyperglycaemia, other cardiovascular risk factors; α lipoic acid and L carnitine. For neuropathic pain, analgesics, non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs, antidepressants, and anticonvulsants are recommended. The treatment of autonomic neuropathy is symptomatic. Keywords: neuropathy, diabetes, treatment, classification, pathophysiology Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is a common disorder and is defined as signs and symptoms of peripheral nerve dysfunction in a patient with diabetes mellitus (DM) in whom other causes of peripheral nerve dysfunction have been excluded. There is a higher prevalence of DM in India (4.3%)1 compared with the West (1%–2%).2 Probably Asian Indians are more prone for insulin resistance and cardiovascular mortality.3 The incidence of DN in India is not well known but in a study from South India 19.1% type II diabetic patients had peripheral neuropathy.4 DN is one of the commonest causes of peripheral neuropathy. It a Continue reading >>

Peripheral Neuropathy

Peripheral Neuropathy

What is peripheral neuropathy? Peripheral neuropathy is disorder of nerve(s) apart from the brain and spinal cord. Patients with peripheral neuropathy may have tingling, numbness, unusual sensations, weakness, or burning pain in the affected area. Oftentimes, the symptoms are symmetrical and involve both hands and feet. Because the symptoms are often present in the areas covered by gloves or stockings, peripheral neuropathy is often described as having a “glove and stocking” distribution of symptoms. Peripheral neuropathy can involve different nerve types, including motor, sensory, and autonomic nerves. Peripheral neuropathy can also be categorized by the size of the nerve fibers involved, large or small. Neuropathy can present with many differing symptoms, including numbness, pain of different types, weakness, or loss of balance, depending on the type of nerve involved. Because the autonomic nerves control bodily functions that we do not consciously think of, such as heart rate, digestion, and emptying of the bowel and bladder, autonomic neuropathy manifests with symptoms affecting the loss of control of these functions. Symptoms may include problems with blood pressure, voiding, passage of stools (diarrhea, or constipation), heart rate, or sweating. Cranial neuropathy is similar to peripheral neuropathy, except that the cranial nerves are involved. Any of the cranial nerves can be involved. One of the more common causes of cranial neuropathy is loss of blood flow from the optic artery to the optic nerve, causing ischemic optic neuropathy. Amyloidosis is one of the more common causes of this rare disorder. Specific nerves can be involved in neuropathy. When a specific nerve is involved, the symptoms are limited to the distribution of that nerve. The most commonly i Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic neuropathies are nerve damaging disorders associated with diabetes mellitus. These conditions are thought to result from a diabetic microvascular injury involving small blood vessels that supply nerves (vasa nervorum) in addition to macrovascular conditions that can accumulate in diabetic neuropathy. Relatively common conditions which may be associated with diabetic neuropathy include third, fourth, or sixth cranial nerve palsy[1]; mononeuropathy; mononeuropathy multiplex; diabetic amyotrophy; a painful polyneuropathy; autonomic neuropathy; and thoracoabdominal neuropathy. Signs and symptoms[edit] Illustration depicting areas affected by diabetic neuropathy Diabetic neuropathy affects all peripheral nerves including sensory neurons, motor neurons, but rarely affects the autonomic nervous system. Therefore, diabetic neuropathy can affect all organs and systems, as all are innervated. There are several distinct syndromes based on the organ systems and members affected, but these are by no means exclusive. A patient can have sensorimotor and autonomic neuropathy or any other combination. Signs and symptoms vary depending on the nerve(s) affected and may include symptoms other than those listed. Symptoms usually develop gradually over years. Symptoms may include the following: Trouble with balance Numbness and tingling of extremities Dysesthesia (abnormal sensation to a body part) Diarrhea Erectile dysfunction Urinary incontinence (loss of bladder control) Facial, mouth and eyelid drooping Vision changes Dizziness Muscle weakness Difficulty swallowing Speech impairment Fasciculation (muscle contractions) Anorgasmia Retrograde ejaculation (in males) Burning or electric pain Pathogenesis[edit] The following factors are thought to be involved in the development of dia Continue reading >>

Early Diabetic Neuropathy: Triggers And Mechanisms

Early Diabetic Neuropathy: Triggers And Mechanisms

Early diabetic neuropathy: Triggers and mechanisms We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Early diabetic neuropathy: Triggers and mechanisms Maxim Dobretsov, Dmitry Romanovsky, and Joseph R Stimers Peripheral neuropathy, and specifically distal peripheral neuropathy (DPN), is one of the most frequent and troublesome complications of diabetes mellitus. It is the major reason for morbidity and mortality among diabetic patients. It is also frequently associated with debilitating pain. Unfortunately, our knowledge of the natural history and pathogenesis of this disease remains limited. For a long time hyperglycemia was viewed as a major, if not the sole factor, responsible for all symptomatic presentations of DPN. Multiple clinical observations and animal studies supported this view. The control of blood glucose as an obligatory step of therapy to delay or reverse DPN is no longer an arguable issue. However, while supporting evidence for the glycemic hypothesis has accumulated, multiple controversies accumulated as well. It is obvious now that DPN cannot be fully understood without considering factors besides hyperglycemia. Some symptoms of DPN may develop with little, if any, correlation with the glycemic status of a patient. It is also clear that identification of these putative non-glycemic mechanisms of DPN is of utmost importance for our understanding of failures with existing treatments and for the development of new Continue reading >>

Peripheral Neuropathy And Diabetes

Peripheral Neuropathy And Diabetes

Peripheral neuropathy is nerve damage caused by chronically high blood sugar and diabetes. It leads to numbness, loss of sensation, and sometimes pain in your feet, legs, or hands. It is the most common complication of diabetes. About 60% to 70% of all people with diabetes will eventually develop peripheral neuropathy, although not all suffer pain. Yet this nerve damage is not inevitable. Studies have shown that people with diabetes can reduce their risk of developing nerve damage by keeping their blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible. What causes peripheral neuropathy? Chronically high blood sugar levels damage nerves not only in your extremities but also in other parts of your body. These damaged nerves cannot effectively carry messages between the brain and other parts of the body. This means you may not feel heat, cold, or pain in your feet, legs, or hands. If you get a cut or sore on your foot, you may not know it, which is why it's so important to inspect your feet daily. If a shoe doesn't fit properly, you could even develop a foot ulcer and not know it. The consequences can be life-threatening. An infection that won't heal because of poor blood flow causes risk for developing ulcers and can lead to amputation, even death. This nerve damage shows itself differently in each person. Some people feel tingling, then later feel pain. Other people lose the feeling in fingers and toes; they have numbness. These changes happen slowly over a period of years, so you might not even notice it. Because the changes are subtle and happen as people get older, people tend to ignore the signs of nerve damage, thinking it's just part of getting older. But there are treatments that can help slow the progression of this condition and limit the damage. Talk to your doctors Continue reading >>

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