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Parents Of Type 1 Diabetics

Why Do Parents Of Type 1 Kids Fear The Night?

Why Do Parents Of Type 1 Kids Fear The Night?

You may hear many parents of Type 1 kids talk about how they don’t sleep much at all and how scary night time really is. But do you really know why it’s so scary? Let’s look at it this way as a person without diabetes, your pancreas is still fully working properly, you can go to bed and not have to worry about anything going wrong with your blood sugar, that’s because your pancreas is working around the clock to ensure you are stable all though the night with insulin and glucagon (if you happen to get low). However, with Type 1 diabetes my children’s pancreas decided to give up and quit their job. Now instead, it’s left to us, it’s our job to function as their vital organs, the pancreas. Unlike a pancreas which really doesn’t require sleep, we as human beings do. There are a few things I’ve learned about night time. The first is I truly, truly locate night time with my entire being. And the second is because of the unpredictability of diabetes during the night. I’ve had an endo tell me once to stop testing overnight so much, that really all they needed was 2 overnight tests each week. Well that didn’t sit too well with me, but overworked, and sleep deprived I decided to give it a shot one time, and go to bed without testing my child. Yes, that might shock pretty much all of you, but we were new to this and I decided to listen to the medical professional. Well what happened you might ask? My son woke up at 3am and was “dizzy“, after testing him he was low with a blood sugar of 50! I knew that feeling in the pit of my stomach was something to listen to when I went to bed. For more diabetes information related to parenting read the following: So as we move on in this life I am always learning something new, in fact when my son was to have dental s Continue reading >>

A D-mom's Tips For Parents Of Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Kids

A D-mom's Tips For Parents Of Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Kids

Today, we welcome Sylvia White from Memphis, TN, who is not only a D-Mom, but also a certified diabetes educator (CDE) and insulin pump trainer (first for Medtronic and now for Tandem Diabetes), plus a registered dietician and licensed counselor. She's also a D-blogger, offering education and support to our online community at her Parenting Diabetes blog. With 10 years of T1D under her belt from all these angles, we're honored to have Sylvia share her great sentiments for parents of newly-diagnosed kids here at the 'Mine: A Letter to New T1D Parents, by Sylvia White Two of my three children are living with type 1 diabetes, and they have recently had their 10-year “Dia-versary.” For those not familiar with the term, it is an anniversary of the diagnosis of diabetes. It isn’t something we necessarily celebrated, but thinking about it made me reflect on how much we have learned and how far we have come over the past decade. Having a child diagnosed with type 1 is a scary and emotional time. I’ve been there twice, and it doesn’t get easier the second time. At the end of 2006, my husband and I were finally getting comfortable with caring for our 12-year-old son who was diagnosed that previous February, when our 6-year-old daughter was diagnosed. Once again we were thrown into the abyss of feeling shocked, worried, and overwhelmed. My children were diagnosed at very different ages emotionally and developmentally. At 12 years old, Josh was able to mostly take care of himself with our help. Sara, on the other hand, was in kindergarten and needed much more hands-on care. I remember the night I checked Sara’s blood sugar with Josh’s meter when she was showing signs of diabetes. Unfortunately, the meter read 354. I still remember that first number from 10 years ago. Continue reading >>

Patient Guide To Managing Your Child's Type 1 Diabetes

Patient Guide To Managing Your Child's Type 1 Diabetes

This Patient Guide is designed especially for parents of children with type 1 diabetes. Here, you'll learn about some of the most important aspects of managing your child's condition. Taking care of a child who has type 1 diabetes can be very difficult because it requires constant attention. You need to make sure your child is eating the right foods at the right times and injecting the right amount of insulin at the right times. Plus, you have to alert the people who spend a lot of time with your child—such as teachers and coaches—to your child's condition. It's a lot of work. The goal of this Guide is to help you understand type 1 diabetes so you can effectively address the needs of your child. In it, you'll find information on: If you take the time to learn all you can about type 1 diabetes, you'll be better able to respond to the unique needs of your child. We hope this Patients' Guide is a useful resource that helps answer some of your questions about type 1 diabetes management. However, always follow your doctor's specific recommendations. Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Be Prevented?

Can Diabetes Be Prevented?

en espaolSe puede prevenir la diabetes? Diabetes is a disease that affects how the body uses glucose , the main type of sugar in the blood. Glucose, which comes from the foods we eat, is the major source of energy needed to fuel the body. To use glucose, the body needs the hormone insulin . But in people withdiabetes, the body either can't make insulin or the insulin doesn't work in the body like it should. Type 1 diabetes, in which the immune system attacks the pancreas and destroys the cells that make insulin. Type 2 diabetes, in which the pancreas can still make insulin, but the body doesn't respond to it properly. In both types of diabetes, glucose can't get into the cells normally. This causes a rise in blood sugar levels , which can make someone sick if not treated. Type 1 diabetes can't be prevented. Doctors can't even tell who will get it and who won't. No one knows for sure what causes type 1 diabetes, but scientists think it has something to do with genes . But just getting the genes for diabetes isn't usually enough. In most cases, a child has to be exposed to something else like a virus to get type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes isn't contagious, so kids and teens can't catch it from another person or pass it along to friends or family members. And eating too much sugar doesn't cause type 1 diabetes, either. There's no reliable way to predict who will get type 1 diabetes, but blood tests can find early signs of it. These tests aren't done routinely, however, because doctors don't have any way to stop a child from developing the disease, even if the tests are positive. Unlike type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes can sometimes be prevented. Excessive weight gain, obesity , and a sedentary lifestyle are all things that put a person at risk for type 2 diabetes. In the Continue reading >>

Genetics And Type 1 Diabetes

Genetics And Type 1 Diabetes

If you have type 1 diabetes, you might wonder if your child would get it, too. Or if one of your parents has it, what it means for you. Your genes definitely play a role in type 1, a less common form of diabetes that’s often diagnosed in children and young adults. But they’re not the whole story. Like much in life, it’s a mix of nature and nurture. Your environment, from where you grow up to the foods you eat, also matters. Researchers don’t know exactly how -- and how much -- all those things affect your chances of getting the disease. Your genes set the stage, but you can’t be certain how it'll all play out. There’s no diabetes gene that gets turned on or off to give you type 1. Instead, a bunch of them play a role, including a dozen or so that have the biggest say: the HLA genes. They make proteins your immune system uses to keep you healthy. Since type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease -- your body destroys the cells that make insulin -- it makes sense that HLA genes are front and center. There are thousands of versions of them in the human gene pool. Which ones you get from your parents affect your chances of diabetes in a big way. Some make you more likely to get it, while others can help protect you from it. You have type 1 if your body makes little or no insulin, a hormone that helps your body turn sugar into energy. Certain genes are more common in one group of people than in another. That’s why race and ethnicity affect things, too. For example, white people are more likely to have type 1 diabetes than others. But even if you have genes that make you more likely to get type 1, that doesn’t mean you definitely will. Even with identical twins -- who have the same exact genes -- sometimes one gets it and the other doesn’t. That’s where the e Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It?

Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It?

Diabetes is a disease that affects how the body uses glucose , the main type of sugar in the blood. Our bodies break down the foods we eat into glucose and other nutrients we need, which are then absorbed into the bloodstream from the gastrointestinal tract. The glucose level in the blood rises after a meal and triggers the pancreas to make the hormone insulin and release it into the bloodstream. But in people with diabetes, the body either can't make or can't respond to insulin properly. Insulin works like a key that opens the doors to cells and lets the glucose in. Without insulin, glucose can't get into the cells (the doors are "locked" and there is no key) and so it stays in the bloodstream. As a result, the level of sugar in the blood remains higher than normal. High blood sugar levels are a problem because they can cause a number of health problems. The two types of diabetes are type 1 and type 2. Both make blood sugar levels higher than normal but they do so in different ways. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas loses its ability to make insulin because the body's  immune system attacks and destroys the cells that produce insulin. No one knows exactly why this happens, but scientists think it has something to do with genes. But just getting the genes for diabetes isn't usually enough. A person probably would then have to be exposed to something else — like a virus — to get type 1 diabetes. In type 2 diabetes , the pancreas still makes insulin but the body doesn't respond to it normally. Glucose is less able to enter the cells and do its job of supplying energy (a problem called insulin resistance ). This raises the blood sugar level, so the pancreas works hard to make even more insulin. Eventually, this strain can make the pancreas unable to produce enough ins Continue reading >>

What To Do When Your Child's Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes

What To Do When Your Child's Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes

Managing type 1 diabetes requires a 24-7 commitment, and that can be overwhelming. But it does get easier, and there is lots of help available. Maybe you're frightened. Or exhausted. Or worried that you won't be able to figure out the equipment or the insulin or how to get your child to sit still for another finger stick. When your kid is diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D), the learning curve is steep -- but manageable. Here is the short version of what's going on: Your child's pancreas no longer produces insulin, a hormone your cells use to turn sugar (or glucose) into energy. Now, your child must take insulin, either by injection or through a pump attached to the body, to keep blood sugar levels in range in efforts to avoid serious long-term complications such as kidney failure, heart disease, lower-limb amputations, and blindness. This disease has no cure, but there are great ways to manage it (and amazing technologies on the horizon). For now, you'll be checking your kid's blood sugar several times throughout the day and night. You'll do this by taking a drop of blood from a finger poke, and placing it on a glucose meter. You'll use each sugar result as a guideline for how much insulin your child needs to eat or how to adjust for exercise to simply keep that blood sugar level in the target range. A child with T1D requires insulin through injection or a pump attached to the body. Both the shots and the site changes for the pump, which happen every two to three days to avoid infection and to maximize insulin absorption, can be painful at first, but kids generally get used to it within a few weeks. Until then, you can use numbing cream called EMLA, or an ice cube, plus distractions such as a special TV show or a stuffed animal to hug. There are even special distracti Continue reading >>

Top 10 Things Never To Say To A T1d Parent

Top 10 Things Never To Say To A T1d Parent

They mean well. They really do. But many people just don’t realize that the seemingly “helpful,” reassuring, or casual, off-hand remarks they make upon learning that your child has type 1 diabetes just…aren’t. And who can blame them? They probably know as much about type 1 as you did before your son or daughter was diagnosed. Still, some of the comments T1D parents hear can be supremely frustrating or even downright hurtful. So here’s your chance to set these well-intentioned friends, family members and acquaintances straight — by sharing this list as a public service announcement or by picking up some ideas for clever, tactful ways to respond when you hear one of these doozies, courtesy of Jeniece Trast, R.N., C.D.E., M.A., clinical research nurse manager and certified diabetes educator at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City. 1. “Well, at least it’s not fatal.” This type of statement minimizes all the work parents do to manage their child’s diabetes — and ignores the fact that many parents do worry very much about their child’s long-term health and safety. “Diabetes is a challenging disease to manage because it involves food, insulin, blood sugar monitoring, exercise and so much more,” says Trast. “People who are able to manage their diabetes well are usually healthy individuals who lead long successful lives. However, there is always the risk of low and high blood sugars no matter how well controlled a person’s diabetes is, and both of these things can be life-threatening if not properly treated.” Parents, consider responding: “I am so glad that my child is happy and healthy right now. However, diabetes unfortunately can cause medical emergencies that can be very dangerous, so we work hard every day to try to prevent those. Continue reading >>

To The Parents Of Children With Type 1

To The Parents Of Children With Type 1

Whatever your worst fears are for your child with Type 1 diabetes, I guarantee my parents had (and have) them, too; the only difference is that I lived out each and every one of them.I was an awful child in general (moody, tantrum-prone, stubborn) which made me an even worse child with diabetes. I rejected any and every activity my parents suggested related to my disease; camps and fundraisers, seminars and play dates. I would lie about blood sugar readings and refuse to give insulin. I yelled at doctors and shunned my parents from annual appointments. If they dared to mention my diabetes in public, I would pout and brood for days. Unfortunately, this rejection of my diabetes stayed with me through my teens and college years. As a result, I spent the early part of my 20s battling severe diabetic eye complications. It was a terrible period in my life, and an even worse time for my poor parents who were powerless in the wake of my defiance. Perhaps thats why we were all equal parts shocked and amused when, at the age of 23, I was offered a job at JDRF. 23was a turning point for me both professionally and personally; Id ignored my diabetes for the better part of a decade and was certainly reaping the consequences. Yet the year prior, Id made a quiet but stern decision to do better. Id been working hard to relearn how to live healthily with diabetes and trying desperately to heal the damaged parts of myself still capable of healing. I reasoned that part of that healing process meant I had no choice but to accept that job offer. During my first week at JDRF, I came across some historical donation data and, for fun, decided to look up my mothers name. What I saw not only shocked me, but instantly brought tears to my eyes. Listed neatly in chronological order were dozens of s Continue reading >>

Psychological Experience Of Parents Of Children With Type 1 Diabetes

Psychological Experience Of Parents Of Children With Type 1 Diabetes

Psychological Experience of Parents of Children With Type 1 Diabetes Robin Whittemore , PhD, APRN, FAAN, Sarah Jaser , PhD, Ariana Chao , MSN, Myoungock Jang , MSN, and Margaret Grey , DrPH, RN, FAAN Yale School of Nursing, New Haven, Connecticut Correspondence to Robin Whittemore, PhD, APRN, FAAN, Yale School of Nursing, 100 Church Street South, New Haven, CT 06536-0740 ( [email protected] ) The publisher's final edited version of this article is available at Diabetes Educ See other articles in PMC that cite the published article. The purpose of this review is to describe the prevalence of psychological distress in parents of children with type 1 diabetes (T1DM), the relationship between parental psychological distress and health outcomes, and parents psychological experience of having a child with T1DM. Clinical and research implications are presented. A systematic mixed-studies review was undertaken to review the quantitative and qualitative research on the parental experience of having a child with T1DM. A total of 34 articles met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. The prevalence of parental psychological distress across all studies ranged from 10% to 74%, with an average of 33.5% of parents reporting distress at diagnosis and 19% of parents reporting distress 1 to 4 years after diagnosis. Parental psychological distress in parents of children with T1DM, regardless of how it was defined, was associated with higher child self-report of stress and depressive symptoms, more problematic child behavior, and lower child self-report of quality of life. Parental psychological distress also had negative effects on diabetes management. Themes of the qualitative synthesis indicated that parents perceived T1DM as a difficult diagnosis that contribu Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Risk Factors

Type 1 Diabetes Risk Factors

There are several risk factors that may make it more likely that you’ll develop type 1 diabetes—if you have the genetic marker that makes you susceptible to diabetes. That genetic marker is located on chromosome 6, and it’s an HLA (human leukocyte antigen) complex. Several HLA complexes have been connected to type 1 diabetes, and if you have one or more of those, you may develop type 1. (However, having the necessary HLA complex is not a guarantee that you will develop diabetes; in fact, less than 10% of people with the “right” complex(es) actually develop type 1.) Other risk factors for type 1 diabetes include: Viral infections: Researchers have found that certain viruses may trigger the development of type 1 diabetes by causing the immune system to turn against the body—instead of helping it fight infection and sickness. Viruses that are believed to trigger type 1 include: German measles, coxsackie, and mumps. Race/ethnicity: Certain ethnicities have a higher rate of type 1 diabetes. In the United States, Caucasians seem to be more susceptible to type 1 than African-Americans and Hispanic-Americans. Chinese people have a lower risk of developing type 1, as do people in South America. Geography: It seems that people who live in northern climates are at a higher risk for developing type 1 diabetes. It’s been suggested that people who live in northern countries are indoors more (especially in the winter), and that means that they’re in closer proximity to each other—potentially leading to more viral infections. Conversely, people who live in southern climates—such as South America—are less likely to develop type 1. And along the same lines, researchers have noticed that more cases are diagnosed in the winter in northern countries; the diagnosis rate Continue reading >>

Information For Parents Of Children With Type 1 Diabetes | Joslin Diabetes Center

Information For Parents Of Children With Type 1 Diabetes | Joslin Diabetes Center

Click here for more information on type 1 diabetes research at Joslin . Insulin cant be given orally because it is a protein and would be digested instead of getting to the bloodstream where it is needed. Just about all of the commercially available insulins now are genetically engineered as human insulin. Insulin comes in a variety of preparations that differ according to how fast it takes effect, when that effect is the greatest, and how long it continues to work in the body. What seems overwhelming now will eventually become routine. One of the first hurdles to get over is that to help your child, you must prick him or her with a needle. This will get easier for all involved. There are new devices as well as some in development that make blood glucose testing and insulin injections less painful, easier and more precise. To live successfully with diabetes essentially means to learn how to be a pancreas. You have to learn how to monitor blood glucose levels and adjust the levels of insulin needed accordingly. To do this, you must consider several factors: Blood glucose levels, measured several times a day. The timing and content of meals eaten (specifically, considering type and amount of carbohydrates in the foods). The amount of physical activity, which requires more glucose and thus more insulin. And then based on need, getting doses of insulin through multiple injections or an insulin pump into the body multiple times a day. Your healthcare team will be your main helpline. But you will find many more resources as you are ready to seek more information. We have more informationin our online libraryinformation sheets on such topics as "Diabetes at a Glance," "Getting High Quality Medical Care Amid Changes in Healthcare Insurance," and on monitoring, insulin, nutriti Continue reading >>

The Top 10 Challenges For Parents Of Type 1 Diabetics - Get Real Health

The Top 10 Challenges For Parents Of Type 1 Diabetics - Get Real Health

A childs type 1 diabetes diagnosis brings with it a variety of challenges for parents.From kids sneaking candy to skipping insulin injections in an effort to just be normal, the trials are numerous for parents of type 1 diabetics. According to the American Diabetes Association, more than 200,000 American children are living with juvenile diabetes, also known as type 1 diabetes. In an effort to raise awareness and ease parents minds during Juvenile Diabetes Month and all year long, we have solutions to 10 of the most common challenges parents of type 1 diabetics face. Navigating the sea of candy that flows at school events and friends birthday parties is tough, and adhering to dietary guidelines that may preclude piatas can be difficult for a kid. Especially since no parents wants their children to feel like the odd man out at celebrations. But diabetes-friendly alternatives help. We would frequently drop off low-carb-but-still-yummy alternatives for our daughter at birthday or school parties, says Red Maxwell, whose daughter Cassie, now 17, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at 18 months old. Often my wife would make enough for the whole class. Some of the moms would even make or bake a treat especially for Cassie. Kids with diabetes dont want to stand out or be perceived as different during recess, on the bus or whenever peers are around. By taking a direct approach when hurtful questions are asked, children can prevent (or stop) hurtful situations from arising. We teamed up to bring in a diabetes educator, recommended by my sons physician, to teach the whole class about type 1 diabetes, including issues like what it is, how it works and how its managed, says Robin Wiener , a Rockville, Maryland, mom whose son Ben was diagnosed at age 11. The kids saw how Ben checks h Continue reading >>

Dear Fellow Type 1 Diabetes Parent

Dear Fellow Type 1 Diabetes Parent

Medically reviewed by George Krucik, MD MBA on June 24, 2016 Written by Mila Ferrer Ten years ago, our family was sucked into the type 1 diabetes whirlwind. Everything was new. We were told there was no way out. Saying that I was scared is an understatement. I was actually terrified! I had a few questions for myself: Will I be capable of taking care of my son? Will he be OK? Will he grow up to be a healthy boy? Would he be able to achieve his dreams and reach his goals? All of these questions came up while I was trying to grasp some of the education we were given at the hospital and begin to understand diabetes. I wont lie. Managing type 1 diabetes is not an easy job. There will be days when you just want to run, scream, cry, and not think about this disease ever again. But then you realize there is someone who sees you as a superhero, someone who sees you as capable of everything and anything, and someone whos in need of your help, love, and support. That someone is your child with type 1 diabetes. Whenever you feel like diabetes is too much for you to handle, look at your kids smile. Think about their wishes, dreams, and goals. This will be the fuel, the power, and the energy that keeps you going and will not let diabetes be a barrier to your familys healthy and happy journey. Our kids need us to be ready, and they need to see us be strong! Its OK to cry. Its OK to ask for help. We have all been there. But always remember that you are not alone! Even though we will never be able to get out of the diabetes whirlwind, the more we learn about diabetes education and empower ourselves, the less we feel the strong winds of fear and distress. Believe me, things will get better. Everything will be OK. I know you can do it! Mila Ferrer started to blog about type 1 diabetes in Continue reading >>

[full Text] Supporting Parents Of Children With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Litera | Pi

[full Text] Supporting Parents Of Children With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Litera | Pi

Editor who approved publication: Dr Johnny Chen 1Graduate School, Gordon College of Education, 2Department of Nursing, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel Abstract: This review provides the reader with an integrative view of the literature on the challenges families of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus face, and the interventions proposed in research and practice to facilitate their coping and efficacy in supporting patient care. We present background information regarding the condition and the general challenges it poses, and then focus on younger patients and their families, while reviewing the literature and emerging patterns describing pitfalls and proposed interventions. We present directions for future thought and further research based on what we find (and fail to find) in the literature. Keywords: challenges, interventions, patient care, blood sugar, emotional, psychological Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a condition affecting younger patients, challenging them with life-threatening outcomes. The condition requires that patients adopt a restrictive lifestyle and diet, and monitor their blood sugar levels frequently. The young patients, naturally, must rely on their parents and families for instruction, support, and daily help with coping with such a complex set of demands. Moreover, beyond the challenges of daily care and monitoring, living with the constant threat of health deterioration and future complications, the young patients face emotional and psychological difficulties that reflect on their own coping as well as their social circle and family. The condition may therefore be considered a family condition challenging the patients entire social and familial circle in numerous ways. While the literature is replete with medical aspects of diagnosis Continue reading >>

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