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Parents Of Type 1 Diabetes Blogs

What It’s Like When Your Child Has Type 1 Diabetes

What It’s Like When Your Child Has Type 1 Diabetes

Leah, a beautiful little girl I call my niece, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D) this summer. She had been napping multiple times a day, soaking through diapers in an hour. She was begging for water all day long. Her parents knew something was wrong, but they had no idea it would be this serious. When the doctor called with Leah’s urine test results, they told her parents to rush to the hospital, where they spent the next three days having their lives flipped upside down and all around. Leah is 2 years old. The first time I saw her after her diagnosis, I got a picture of just what this family is dealing with. We were out to eat and were all deciding what to order. Leah’s mother googled the carb counts for Leah’s favorite lunch: mozzarella sticks. Then they tested her sugar, which meant pricking her for a few drops of blood. Then they calculated how much insulin she needed. Finally, they gave her insulin, pricking her again, just so she could eat her lunch. Our server took a long time to bring the food. With that came the worrying they might have given her the insulin too early and her sugar would drop too low before the food arrived. Leah’s type 1 diabetes is hard on her Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is nothing like type 2. T1D can’t be prevented. It is unrelated to your diet. Researchers still don’t completely understand what causes it. When you have T1D, your pancreas either stops functioning fully or entirely, causing you to rely on insulin to regulate your blood sugar. It can have serious complications if not treated properly. Leah is doing well, but her life has changed forever. She can only be left with caregivers who are trained to take care of her. For now, when she’s a toddler, this part is no big deal. But as she gets older, play dates, field trip Continue reading >>

Mother Of A Type 1 Diabetic (my Mother's Perspective) - The Diabetic Journey

Mother Of A Type 1 Diabetic (my Mother's Perspective) - The Diabetic Journey

I asked my mother to write about my diagnosis and theyears following. Ive always wanted to get her perspective as being a mother of a Type 1 Diabetic. Now that Im a mother, I can empathizewith a mothers love and how far it will go. I wanted her to share her thoughts, fears, and doubts. Now that Im older and wiser Ive been able to mourn the loss of the life that didnt consist of diabetesand close that chapter in my life. Finding out that diabetes has made me who I am. That when I thought I was handed the wrong card, it actually led me to where I was meant to be. Its made every success, achievement, or victory just that much sweeter. Mother Of a Type 1 Diabetic: (My Mothers Perspective) As a mother your first instinct is to love and protect, that is what I sought out to do. From the day she was born, I felt an overwhelming sense of obligation to fulfill. But nothing prepared me for what life had in store. In 2002 when she was at the age of 12, I woke in the middle of the night to my child rocking in our recliner. I found it quite odd and I asked: Brittany whats wrong? She replied, mom I have no saliva and Im very thirsty. I knew then something was terribly wrong. I took her of course to the emergency room. We sat there for what seemed like an eternity. I was told she had to be transported to All Childrens Hospital. Her blood sugar was over 900! By the grace of GOD, she didnt slip into a coma. That was the day that changed our lives as we know iteven more so for hers. It felt like someone ran me over. Type 1 diabetic? I asked in disbelief. For how long? Forever I was told. I didnt know what to do. I was now a mother of a Type 1 Diabetic, and trying to process all of this at once. I knew nothing about this disease, for this was all new to me. This child that I vowed to pro Continue reading >>

That’s How We Found Out...

That’s How We Found Out...

One of the questions we get asked most is, “how did you know?”. Interestingly, I’ve never met a parent of a child with type I that hasn’t told me their 'diagnosis' story. It seems to be a right of passage. I’ve avoided telling our story on the site so far... But today I think I’m ready to share. Arden turned two years old on July 22nd 2006. A few weeks later she had her two year well visit with our pediatrician. Everything looked great, she got her immunizations and we went home. The next day Arden seemed sick, she had a slight fever and was lethargic, I assumed that was from the inoculations. When she didn't get better after a few days I took her back to the doctors office. Arden was then diagnosed with Hand, Foot and Mouth disease (HFMD). A common illness for infants and small children. What was strange about the diagnosis was that she already had HFMD previously and it’s supposed to be one of those things you get once and then build a natural defense against, like chicken pox. I was really hoping she would start feeling better fast because we were leaving for a family vacation in three days and I wanted Arden to be able to enjoy the beach. Arden had been urinating more then usual for about a week, not in frequency but volume. I attributed this to her recent switch from bottles to cups, as she was drinking more and it just seemed to make sense. The next day I realized that I couldn’t remember when her last bowel movement was. Later that day she finally had one but it was dry, actually crushable, like dirt that was barely held together by moisture. That is when I started to really worry, I called the pediatrician and we agreed that she was dehydrated from being sick and that I’d begin to push liquids. This moment is the first time I failed as Arden’ Continue reading >>

A Day In The Life Of A Type 1 Diabetes Mom - Leaf & Love

A Day In The Life Of A Type 1 Diabetes Mom - Leaf & Love

Its that time again. Classrooms around the country are filled with excitement and anticipation for what the year will bring. Teachers dressed in crisp outfits present to eager parents and we all feel the excitement in the air. Im talking about Back-to-School night. At our big night, after our lovely new teacher spoke to the attentive parents, she turned to me and asked me to give a brief explanation of my daughters circumstances to the group. You see, my daughter has Type 1 diabetes. I had already come in earlier that day to explain her disease and devices to her first grade class. I talked in simple terms about checking blood sugar, needles, and the devices she wears on her body. The children were amazingly receptive and calm during the presentation. So was I. But here I was, suddenly tongue-tied to share a few sentences about Type 1 diabetes to a group of adults. It seems silly that I would be paralyzed by talking to parents. I had been a teacher and school administrator for years before becoming a mom. I always loved speaking to hundreds of parents and felt very comfortable in the role. But last night felt different. I barely remember what I said. It was something short and upbeat like, My daughter has Type 1 diabetes. You will see her pump and her continuous glucose monitor inserted on different parts of her body and she has a 1:1 aide with her at all times. Parents nodded and smiled. That was it. In retrospect, Im not really sure how or why I kept it short, sweet and free of emotion. I think its partly because I never want to be seen as a complainer or a drama queen. It is also likely that I didnt want to melt into a pool of blubbering tears in front of everyone on their own childs Back-to-School Night! If I could do it again, and there were no time constraints, t Continue reading >>

Diabetes Blogs And Forums

Diabetes Blogs And Forums

There are many resources available for people with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes online, including some excellent blogs and patient forums. To connect with other people living with diabetes, or to read perspectives from other patients, we’ve compiled a list of some popular forums and blogs below (ordered alphabetically). While not exhaustive by any means, we hope this list serves as a good starting point for exploring the diabetes online community (the "DOC"). Table of Contents: Diabetes Forums Children with Diabetes – Founded in 1995, Children with Diabetes is a forum where parents and other family members of children with diabetes can connect and share information and tips about schools and daycare, sports and athletics, nutrition and food, pregnancy, and other information related to raising a child with diabetes. It was started by type 1 parent Mr. Jeff Hitchcock after his daughter Marissa was diagnosed with diabetes. CWD also holds an amazing conference, Friends for Life, every July in Orlando. Diabetes Daily Forum – Diabetes Daily contains a collection of forums where patients, family members, and others in the diabetes community can post personal stories, ask questions, share news, and much more. Topics range from exercise and diet to clinical trial recruitment to how diabetes is portrayed in the arts and modern culture. Diabetes Daily Forum, along with the DiabetesDaily blog, was founded in 2005. Diabetic Connect - Diabetic Connect is an online diabetes community that provides people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes with treatment information, recipes, news, several discussion forums, videos, and more. The website also includes an “Ask an Expert” feature in which users can post questions to be answered by health care professionals. TuDiabetes – A pro Continue reading >>

Parenting A Child With Type 1 Diabetes

Parenting A Child With Type 1 Diabetes

I can picture him now — his eyes were bloodshot from chronic sleep deprivation, his hands shaky from anxiety; he talked like someone stuck in a losing battle from which there was no escape; he was angry, scared, and unsettled and had no idea what to do next. He was a parent of a young child with Type 1 diabetes. I met with him (and his daughter) years ago because I was a therapist who also happened to have Type 1 diabetes. We weren’t meeting in any official capacity — it was arranged through a family friend who knew this man and his daughter were going through an incredibly tough transition and figured I would be the person to talk to, given my combination of personal and professional experience. I have seen that combination of fear, helplessness, and exhaustion in parents several times since, and every time I see it, my heart goes out to them. Being a parent of a child with Type 1 diabetes is not easy! I say this as someone who hasn’t had the experience of being a parent, but as someone who has lived with Type 1 diabetes for over 23 years. So I don’t presume to know what it must feel like to parent a child with this disease, but I hope that my combination of experiences might mean I have some meaningful advice to give to those of you who are in this most stressful situation. You have diabetes, too A friend of mine raising a five-year-old with Type 1 once said that she and her husband felt like they had “Type 3” diabetes. I thought that was a great description. She explained that in many ways, it really felt like she might as well have diabetes, since the management of the disease fell so squarely on her shoulders. After all, there is only so much a five-year-old can take on! Managing diabetes takes a lot of calculating and analyzing that is simply too muc Continue reading >>

A Moms Advice For Parents Of Children With Diabetes

A Moms Advice For Parents Of Children With Diabetes

A Moms Advice for Parents of Children with Diabetes Athina was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when she 5 years old. Her mother, Louise, was giving birth to her son during the very same week of her daughters diagnosis. Today, Louise and Eyob, and their family of two kids, live in Canada, and while life with diabetes is never easy, Louise shares a day in her shoes and advice for parents of newly diagnosed children. Mostly, youll find, she promises it does get easiersort of. Ginger: In your own words, how you describe what it feels like to be the parent when your child is diagnosed with type 1 diabetes? Louise & Eyob:It basically feels like youve been thrown into a dark abyss. Things that used to be simple, routine are now daunting. There is a tremendous fear that sets in right after your child becomes symptomatic. That sickening feeling you get when you know something dangerous and unpleasant is happening. However,as parents we like to think, Sure, it can happen to other people but Its highly unlikely something of such magnitude will hit home sweet home. I think psychologists call that Optimisim bias. Were delusional. Even though you know very well that all variables and parameters clearly point to the inevitable that your child has T1, this fear blinds your good judgment and you get stuck in the first 4 stages of grief for a while. Ginger: In a play-by-play, could you list the tasks and responsibilities that take place each day around your daughters type 1 diabetes? Louise & Eyob:12:00 AM Check BG. If high correct, if potentially low,and she is asleep, create a temp basal at a reduction of 70-100%, if awake, give carbs in the form of juice and cheese n crackers. If dangerously low and if she is asleep, wake her up and treat the low.Reset the alarm to 3:00 AM.3:00 AM tre Continue reading >>

A D-mom's Tips For Parents Of Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Kids

A D-mom's Tips For Parents Of Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Kids

Today, we welcome Sylvia White from Memphis, TN, who is not only a D-Mom, but also a certified diabetes educator (CDE) and insulin pump trainer (first for Medtronic and now for Tandem Diabetes), plus a registered dietician and licensed counselor. She's also a D-blogger, offering education and support to our online community at her Parenting Diabetes blog. With 10 years of T1D under her belt from all these angles, we're honored to have Sylvia share her great sentiments for parents of newly-diagnosed kids here at the 'Mine: A Letter to New T1D Parents, by Sylvia White Two of my three children are living with type 1 diabetes, and they have recently had their 10-year “Dia-versary.” For those not familiar with the term, it is an anniversary of the diagnosis of diabetes. It isn’t something we necessarily celebrated, but thinking about it made me reflect on how much we have learned and how far we have come over the past decade. Having a child diagnosed with type 1 is a scary and emotional time. I’ve been there twice, and it doesn’t get easier the second time. At the end of 2006, my husband and I were finally getting comfortable with caring for our 12-year-old son who was diagnosed that previous February, when our 6-year-old daughter was diagnosed. Once again we were thrown into the abyss of feeling shocked, worried, and overwhelmed. My children were diagnosed at very different ages emotionally and developmentally. At 12 years old, Josh was able to mostly take care of himself with our help. Sara, on the other hand, was in kindergarten and needed much more hands-on care. I remember the night I checked Sara’s blood sugar with Josh’s meter when she was showing signs of diabetes. Unfortunately, the meter read 354. I still remember that first number from 10 years ago. Continue reading >>

What It’s Really Like To Have A Child With Type 1 Diabetes

What It’s Really Like To Have A Child With Type 1 Diabetes

I have two daughters with Type 1 diabetes, and in my experience there’s a disconnect between what people think it’s like to have Type 1 diabetes and what it actually is like. Many people are not aware of all the variables that come into play to control blood sugars. Some people think you take your medicine and you get a steady blood glucose of 120. In reality, you have to guess what the dose of your insulin is based on your guess of what the carbs in the food are based on what your guess is of the portion of food that will be eaten. Plus, you must take into account your guess of the amount of fat and protein in the food, and whether one has just exercised or is about to exercise (and how much exertion that exercise will involve). If you are about to go to sleep that must be taken into account, or if you’re going to be somewhere difficult to treat a low (such as a child on a school bus) keep that in mind as well. And don’t forget to pray that your pump infusion set is working and that your insulin didn’t fry in the heat. Now push go on your pump, or poke your arm with a needle and, voilà, you’re done! A diabetes disconnect also results from confusing headlines, such as Cure for Type 1 Discovered (it’s in mice) or New Drug for Diabetes (it’s for Type 2). Many book titles are misleading as well, often using language like ‘Reversing Diabetes’ or ‘Preventing Diabetes’ while meaning Type 2 diabetes and not Type 1. Even medical journals often don’t distinguish between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes in their titles. Recently, I saw a friend whom I hadn’t seen for a long time. When I pulled out my daughters’ meters and lancets to check blood sugars, she said “I didn’t think you still had to do that.” This is not the first time I’ve heard someon Continue reading >>

The Top 10 Challenges For Parents Of Type 1 Diabetics - Get Real Health

The Top 10 Challenges For Parents Of Type 1 Diabetics - Get Real Health

A childs type 1 diabetes diagnosis brings with it a variety of challenges for parents.From kids sneaking candy to skipping insulin injections in an effort to just be normal, the trials are numerous for parents of type 1 diabetics. According to the American Diabetes Association, more than 200,000 American children are living with juvenile diabetes, also known as type 1 diabetes. In an effort to raise awareness and ease parents minds during Juvenile Diabetes Month and all year long, we have solutions to 10 of the most common challenges parents of type 1 diabetics face. Navigating the sea of candy that flows at school events and friends birthday parties is tough, and adhering to dietary guidelines that may preclude piatas can be difficult for a kid. Especially since no parents wants their children to feel like the odd man out at celebrations. But diabetes-friendly alternatives help. We would frequently drop off low-carb-but-still-yummy alternatives for our daughter at birthday or school parties, says Red Maxwell, whose daughter Cassie, now 17, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at 18 months old. Often my wife would make enough for the whole class. Some of the moms would even make or bake a treat especially for Cassie. Kids with diabetes dont want to stand out or be perceived as different during recess, on the bus or whenever peers are around. By taking a direct approach when hurtful questions are asked, children can prevent (or stop) hurtful situations from arising. We teamed up to bring in a diabetes educator, recommended by my sons physician, to teach the whole class about type 1 diabetes, including issues like what it is, how it works and how its managed, says Robin Wiener , a Rockville, Maryland, mom whose son Ben was diagnosed at age 11. The kids saw how Ben checks h Continue reading >>

8 Diabetes Blogs For Kids

8 Diabetes Blogs For Kids

The Internet has given us many wonderful things, like dogs looking guilty on YouTube, mug shots of embarrassed celebrities and an infinite variety of zany time wasters, both in words and video. But as a person living with Type 1 diabetes, the thing I love most about the Internet is the knowledge it offers for free our ability to type and click and instantly find the answer to most any question about diabetes and its management. The second best thing is the DOC the diabetes online community. This extraordinary group of people is sharing their experiences and their knowledge on some extraordinary blogs, for free. They teach us, warn us, inspire us and some even make us laugh. Here are eight great juvenile diabetes blogs you should be reading if your child has Type 1 diabetes. The Princess and the Pump The adventures of 5-year-old Sweetpea, a darling little girl diagnosed at 3. Although she is a tiny little pea, she is one tough cookie, her mom (and scribe) Hallie Addington writes. We love Hallies description of herself as a mom, wife and pancreas, as well as her cheerful, determined outlook on T1 life. Death of a Pancreas You gotta laugh, right? Even babies can get a DX of Type 1, as Joanne writes in this moving blog about her daughter Elise. Joannes terrific disclaimer: If your child has diabetes, or if you suspect that your child has diabetes, please seek the attention of a healthcare professional, and not some crazy, over-worked, frazzled, sleep-deprived nutjob who has staked out her corner of the world-wide-web-information-super-highway and is espousing her viewpoints from it. But theyre really good viewpoints, Joanne! . Texting my Pancreas Kim Vlanik found the DOC late in 2009 and began her own blog the following summer. She writes amazing, poignant stuff about livi Continue reading >>

Living Positively: D-mom Of 4 Children With Type 1 Diabetes

Living Positively: D-mom Of 4 Children With Type 1 Diabetes

On the surface, Elissa Renouf looks like your typical mother of five beautiful, happy, healthy, well-loved children, four boys and one girl, ages 13 to 21. Digging further, you’ll learn their family’s life is a little more complicated than others – four children with type 1 diabetes (two with celiac disease), and one child with epilepsy and suspected brain tumor. Even with the constant on going management of the health issues they’ve been handed, they’ve never lost determination to live as positive as possible. Q. Tell us what it’s like being a D-Mom to four children with diabetes, and one without? A. It’s a full time job, but having five kids in general is a full time job. Charlie was my first child diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 2002, at the age of three. My responsibility helping manage my children’s diabetes was a general progression, and every eight months, it seemed like another child had a diagnosis. I wanted a positive, stress-free life for myself and children, so had no other way but to learn to manage and accept it. Q. How do you help each of them manage their diabetes? How does it differ from the next child? A. It is important for my children to manage their diabetes self-sufficiently, so I had each of them involved in their management from day one. The more they understood how to manage their diabetes, the better control they could have so they could grow into happier, healthier adults. I taught them how to count their carbs and the glycemic index in food, and that if they wanted food, they would also need insulin. Empowering them to manage their diabetes gave them the confidence to make sound diabetes management decisions the rest of their lives. Q. With four children with diabetes, how do you keep track of their blood sugar trends and di Continue reading >>

12 Diabetes Blogs You Should Be Reading

12 Diabetes Blogs You Should Be Reading

We spend a lot of time reading blogs and news stories to stay on top of what’s going on in the DOC (diabetes online community). Because of that, we’ve piled up our RSS reader with tons of great articles and have found some bloggers that really stick out above the rest. Here’s 12 diabetes blogs that you should be reading on a regular basis, in no particular order. 1. Six Until Me (www.sixuntilme.com) – The brainchild of Kerri Sparling, Six Until Me is a first person account of life with diabetes. Kerri started the blog after getting frustrated by not being able to find any resources that spoke positively about life with diabetes. Six Until Me helped pave the way for the larger network of diabetes focused blogs today. 2. Diabetes Mine (www.diabetesmine.com) – Diabetes Mine is a community of PWDs that covers almost every facet of life with diabetes. They have facts about diabetes, tips for management, interviews and write-ups about celebrities with diabetes, as well as diabetes product reviews and research papers. 3. Insulin Nation (www.insulinnation.com) – Insulin Nation is a great resource for the PWD community and focuses entirely on diabetes therapy, covering news and research about insulin and insulin related products and technology. 4. A Sweet Life (– A Sweet Life was started by a couple, Mike and Jessica, after they were both diagnosed with T1D. Their blog has grown tremendously and features staples like diabetes-friendly recipes, diet tips, and news. They’ve also got a great section of personal blogs covering diabetes from almost every perspective – college students, young adults, endurance trainers, parents, and seniors. 5. Scott’s Diabetes (– Run by Scott K. Johnson, this blog covers the personal aspects of managing T1D, along with some gene Continue reading >>

To The Parents Of Children With Type 1

To The Parents Of Children With Type 1

Whatever your worst fears are for your child with Type 1 diabetes, I guarantee my parents had (and have) them, too; the only difference is that I lived out each and every one of them.I was an awful child in general (moody, tantrum-prone, stubborn) which made me an even worse child with diabetes. I rejected any and every activity my parents suggested related to my disease; camps and fundraisers, seminars and play dates. I would lie about blood sugar readings and refuse to give insulin. I yelled at doctors and shunned my parents from annual appointments. If they dared to mention my diabetes in public, I would pout and brood for days. Unfortunately, this rejection of my diabetes stayed with me through my teens and college years. As a result, I spent the early part of my 20s battling severe diabetic eye complications. It was a terrible period in my life, and an even worse time for my poor parents who were powerless in the wake of my defiance. Perhaps thats why we were all equal parts shocked and amused when, at the age of 23, I was offered a job at JDRF. 23was a turning point for me both professionally and personally; Id ignored my diabetes for the better part of a decade and was certainly reaping the consequences. Yet the year prior, Id made a quiet but stern decision to do better. Id been working hard to relearn how to live healthily with diabetes and trying desperately to heal the damaged parts of myself still capable of healing. I reasoned that part of that healing process meant I had no choice but to accept that job offer. During my first week at JDRF, I came across some historical donation data and, for fun, decided to look up my mothers name. What I saw not only shocked me, but instantly brought tears to my eyes. Listed neatly in chronological order were dozens of s Continue reading >>

The Best Diabetes Blogs Of The Year

The Best Diabetes Blogs Of The Year

We’ve carefully selected these blogs because they are actively working to educate, inspire, and empower their readers with frequent updates and high-quality information. If you would like to tell us about a blog, nominate them by emailing us at [email protected]! Diabetes is one of the largest health issues facing Americans today. More than 29 million adults in the U.S. have diabetes — and almost one quarter of them don’t know they have it. A further 86 million adults in the U.S. have prediabetes, a condition which increases your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. A whopping 90 percent of these people are unaware of that, too. Both forms of diabetes — type 1 and type 2 — are chronic conditions, meaning they require a lifetime of careful treatment to be properly managed. If left untreated or improperly managed, diabetes can cause serious health complications. For those living with diabetes, the condition can be isolating and take up a significant amount of time as well as mental and emotional energy. Staying on top of your treatments can also be challenging, as everyday things can make a big impact on blood glucose readings, and treatment options are always changing. That’s why we’ve rounded up the best diabetes blogs out there. Whether you’re looking for recipes, resources, treatment options, or simple tips for living well, you’re sure to find something here for you. Diabetes Self-Management Blog Diabetes Self-Management has provided health information to the diabetes community for over 35 years. Their companion blog rounds up tips and info from both healthcare professionals and people living with diabetes. Posts range from hard-hitting news to tips and information you can use, like busting myths about grain. There are also personal stories, to Continue reading >>

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