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Pancreas Surgery Recovery Time

What To Expect After An Operation

What To Expect After An Operation

Pancreatic Cancer Diagnosis, Prevention, and Treatment As with all major operations, recovering from pancreatic surgery takes time. Full recovery requires an average of two months. Your recovery can be divided into different stages, each of which carry a different set of expectations. However, it is important to remember that every patient's recovery is different, even patients undergoing the exact same procedure. Patients spend an average of 3-10 days in the hospital after pancreas surgery. While you are in the hospital, many members of your health care team will be checking in on you daily. Your in-house team consists of residents, medical students, nurses, and your surgeon. Your team will closely monitor your progress throughout your stay. You will be seen by residents and nurses several times each day and by your surgeon and/or one of our Pancreas Center surgeons at least once each day. It is normal to experience pain after pancreas surgery. While in the hospital, you will be able to manage your pain with intravenous pain medication. Once you are at home, you will manage your pain with oral medications prescribed by your health care team. After your operation, you will have staples and special dressings where incisions were made during your procedure. You may also have some surgical drainage tubes left in your abdomen. Your team will check your dressings regularly to ensure they are healing well and monitor any tubes to ensure proper drainage. It is normal to be discharged home with the surgical drainage tubes still in place, so do not be worried about your recovery if this happens to you. You will be given specific instructions on how to care for both the drainage tubes and your surgical dressing before you are discharged from the hospital; both will be removed du Continue reading >>

After Pancreatic Surgery: Know Your Epi Risk

After Pancreatic Surgery: Know Your Epi Risk

Everyday Health Digestive Health Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency After Pancreatic Surgery: Know Your EPI Risk Developing exocrine pancreatic insufficiency isn't a given after surgery. The key is how much of your pancreas has been removed. Sign Up for Our Healthy Living Newsletter Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . Although it helps resolve a critical health problem, surgery to treat a diseased pancreas may create another issue: exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) . Your pancreas is a vital organ because it produces enzymes that help you digest your food and absorb its nutrients, according to the National Pancreas Foundation. But if your pancreas becomes diseased or you have a tumor, you may need surgery. You also may need surgery to treat conditions that cause inflammation of the pancreas, called pancreatitis. Sometimes surgeons must remove the entire pancreas, and other times they may need to take only a portion, says Timothy B. Gardner, MD , an associate professor of medicine at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth in Lebanon, New Hampshire. If 90 percent or more of your pancreas is removed, youll develop EPI the condition that occurs when your pancreas doesnt make the digestive enzymes your body needs to function. If less than that is removed, you may or may not develop EPI. Its a volume issue, Dr. Gardner says. The less pancreas you have, the less ability you have to make enzymes. The odds of developing EPI as a result of surgery depend in part on the type of surgery you have, which depends on why youre having it. The Whipple procedure, also known as a pancreaticoduodenectomy, is the most common surgery for pancreatic cancer , according to the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network. During a standard Whipple procedure, the surgeon removes the Continue reading >>

Potentially Curative Surgery

Potentially Curative Surgery

Previous Topic | Treating the initial symptoms Chemotherapy | Next Topic Surgery is the treatment of choice for pancreatic cancer, but can only be used if the cancer is small and hasnt spread. It is the only treatment that can cure pancreatic cancer, but only15-20% of patients are suitable for such surgery (NHS Choices 2014). Mr Ross Carter is a consultant surgeon in upper gastrointestinal (GI) and pancreatico-biliary surgery at Glasgow Royal Infirmary. So in every patient, what we need to do is to assess the stage of disease, and thats usually done by a CT scan, and secondly, we have a number of tests where we look at the function of the heart and the lungs to try and get a gauge as to how fit the patient is and, therefore, how much of a stress an operation is going to put on their ability to recover from the operation. Can you summarise the different types of surgery that might be appropriate? There is; the common types of surgery are either an attempt to remove the tumour itself and this is what we would call a pancreaticoduodenectomy or a Whipple resection, which is removing the head of the gland of the pancreas. Sometimes with a tumour in the tail of the pancreas we would perform removal of the tail of the pancreas, which is called a distal pancreatectomy. And, thirdly, occasionally, when we find at operation that the tumour is actually more advanced than was indicated on the pre-operative staging, in those patients we would perform a bypass operation, which is to allow the liver to drain into the intestine and the stomach to drain into the intestine without having problems with blockages of either the bile duct or the duodenum. In that case, youd leave the pancreas then? Doctors had told some people that they were suitable candidates for surgery which might lead Continue reading >>

About Your Distal Pancreatectomy

About Your Distal Pancreatectomy

An arrowing pointing forward, usually indicating forward movement, or the ability the share something via social media. An icon showing an uppercase letter "X", indicating that this will close the current element. This guide will help you prepare for your distal pancreactectomyat Memorial Sloan Kettering (MSK). It will also help you understand what to expect during your recovery. Read through this guide at least once before your surgery and use it as a reference in the days leading up to your surgery. Bring this guide with you every time you come to MSK, including the day of your surgery. You and your healthcare team will refer to it throughout your care A distal pancreatectomy (pan-krea-tek-tuh-me) is a surgery that removes a tumor from the body or tail of your pancreas. Your pancreas is located in the back of your abdomen (belly) behind your stomach and just above your small intestine (see Figure 1). It makes hormones called insulin and glucagon which help to regulate your blood sugar levels. Your pancreas also makes enzymes that help to digest fat. Figure 1. Your pancreas before your distal pancreatectomy Although part of your pancreas will be removed during surgery, there is usually enough of it left to produce hormones and enzymes. If your remaining pancreas doesnt make enough enzymes to digest the food you eat, you may have diarrhea. If this happens, you may need to take pills with meals and snacks to replace the enzymes. If your remaining pancreas doesnt make enough insulin, you may have high blood sugar level. High blood sugar level is rarely a problem but if you do experience it, your healthcare team will help you. Your spleen is located next to your pancreas. It makes white blood cells that help your body fight infections. Your spleen also filters your blood, Continue reading >>

Complications Of Pancreatic Surgery

Complications Of Pancreatic Surgery

Department of General Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Germany Markus W. Bchler, Department of General Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany, Fax: +49 6221 56 6903, Email: [email protected]_sukram . This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Pancreatic resection is the only treatment option that can lead to a meaningful prolonged survival in pancreatic cancer and, in some instances, perhaps a potential chance for cure. With the advent of organ and function preserving procedures, its use in the treatment of chronic pancreatitis and other less common benign diseases of the pancreas is increasing. Furthermore, over the past two decades, with technical advances and centralization of care, pancreatic surgery has evolved into a safe procedure with mortality rates of <5%. However, postoperative morbidity rates are still substantial. This article reviews the more common procedure-related complications, their prevention and their treatment. Keywords: Abscess, chronic pancreatitis, complication, fistula, haemorrhage, morbidity, mortality, pancreatic cancer, pancreatic surgery, somatostatin Pancreatic surgery, in particular pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD), has been called a 'formidable' operation 1 . It is not only a technical challenge to surgeons, it is also demanding for patients, and it exerts a substantial logistical strain on healthcare resources. Resection of the pancreatic head includes the standard PD popularized by Whipple, as well as its modifications such as the pylorus-preserving (PP) PD and the duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR). Distal pancreatectomy is used to resect lesions in the body and/or tail of the pancreas. Early series published in the late 1960s reported postopera Continue reading >>

Graham's Story - He Had A Whipple's Operation To Treat Pancreatic Cancer.

Graham's Story - He Had A Whipple's Operation To Treat Pancreatic Cancer.

Graham's experience of recovering from a Whipple's operation Graham, 49, was diagnosed in 2009 and had aWhipple's operation I was told that I was a priority for a Whipples operation. The date was set, about 8 weeks from the initial diagnosis scan. I drove myself to hospital for the operation. (My wife couldnt face taking me and leaving me there.) I was given a bed and then I had all sorts of visits from different people. All through this I remained happy and relaxed. I dont know why because this was a major operation and my life depended on it but I was giggling and having fun with the staff, but thats just the way I am. The following day, I had the usual checks, , and then I was taken into the anaesthetic room to have my epidural placed in my back, then the magic milk into my hand. It was 9.10 am and that was the last I remember until I came around in the recovery room at 6 oclock pm feeling groggy, and sporting a scar across my stomach containing 35 staples and tubes hanging from everywhere. I was in the high dependency unit (HDU), wondering what the hell had just happened. I wasnt in any pain as I had the epidural in my back. I also had a tube coming out of my neck, two tubes which were drains coming out of my stomach, a tube going in my nose for oxygen, a catheter in my private parts, and a couple of vent flows in my hands for pain killers and whatever else. I was fully conscious when I went into HDU, and was greeted by my wife and sister-in-law, who were just as pleased to see me as I was them because I knew that I had made it through the biggest operation I would ever have. I was drifting in and out of consciousness and was totally knackered but I was alive! The following day I was a little more with it, and the physiotherapist got me out of bed, and sat me in th Continue reading >>

After Your Operation

After Your Operation

An operation to remove a pancreatic tumour can take between4 and 8 hours. After your operation youwill usually wake up in the recovery room near to the operating theatre, where a nurse will care for you. You will then be taken to the High Dependency Unit (HDU) or occasionally the Intensive Care Unit (ITU) for 2 to 3 days so you can be monitored closely. From there you will be taken to the specialist surgical ward. Patients usually stay in hospital for between 10 to 14 days. When you wake up from your operation you will have some tubes and drains attached to you. These will have been placed while you were asleep under anaesthetic. The type and number you will have depends on what type of operation you had but will often include: Tubes inserted into a vein inyour arm and neck to provide you with fluids or medicines A drain is usually placed under the skin near the wound site to drain off fluid A catheter (a fine tube) will be placed into your bladder to collect your urine into a bag. This means you dont have to worry about getting out of bed to go to the toilet and the nurses can monitor how much urine you are producing An epidural catheter system (an injection into the back) will often be used to deliver pain relief immediately following the operation A feeding tube either going through your nose or directly into your tummy. Your tubes and drains will be removed as soon as your medical team feels they are no longer needed. The amount of pain experienced differs between individuals. Your medical team will work with you to ensure pain is kept to a minimum and it is essential you tell the nurses if you are feeling pain or if that pain gets worse. Some of the ways pain can be managed in hospital are: Epidural Catheter system (injection into the back usually immediately foll Continue reading >>

Surgery For Pancreatic Cancer

Surgery For Pancreatic Cancer

Two general types of surgery can be used for pancreatic cancer: Potentially curative surgery is used when the results of exams and tests suggest that it’s possible to remove (resect) all the cancer. Palliative surgery may be done if imaging tests show that the cancer is too widespread to be removed completely. This surgery is done to relieve symptoms or to prevent certain complications like a blocked bile duct or intestine, but the goal is not to try to cure the cancer. Staging laparoscopy To determine which type of surgery might be best, it’s important to know the stage (extent) of the cancer. But it can be hard to stage pancreatic cancer accurately just using imaging tests. Sometimes laparoscopy is done first to help determine the extent of the cancer and if it can be resected. For this procedure, the surgeon makes a few small incisions (cuts) in the abdomen (belly) and inserts long, thin instruments. One of these has a small video camera on the end so the surgeon can see inside the abdomen. The surgeon can look at the pancreas and other organs for tumors and take biopsy samples of abnormal areas to learn how far the cancer has spread. Potentially curative surgery Studies have shown that removing only part of a pancreatic cancer doesn’t help patients live longer, so potentially curative surgery is only done if the surgeon thinks all of the cancer can be removed. This is very complex surgery, and it can also be very hard for patients. It can cause complications and can take weeks to months to recover from. If you're thinking about having this type of surgery, it’s important to weigh the potential benefits and risks carefully. Fewer than 1 in 5 pancreatic cancers appear to be confined to the pancreas at the time they are found. Even then, not all of these cancer Continue reading >>

Whipple Procedure - Uchicago Medicine

Whipple Procedure - Uchicago Medicine

Why should I choose UChicago Medicine for my Whipple surgery? Q. What is a Whipple procedure (pancreaticoduodenectomy)? A. The Whipple surgical procedure involves removing the head of the pancreas (approximately 50 percent of the organ), first portion of the small intestine (duodenum), gallbladder, part of the bile duct, and occasionally a small portion of the stomach (approximately 10 percent) and sections of nearby blood vessels. The goal of this complex surgery is to completely remove the tumor and all surrounding lymph nodes where cancer cells can spread. At the end of the procedure, the surgeon reconnects the pancreas, bile duct and small intestine to restore function in the digestive tract. The Whipple operation was credited to an American surgeon, Allen O. Whipple, MD in a 1945 report. On February 11, 1937, Alexander Brunschwig, MD, actually performed the first true anatomic resection with complete removal of the head of the pancreas at the University of Chicago Hospital. This was performed as two sequential operations that preserved the entire stomach. Q. What are the benefits of the Whipple procedure? A. The Whipple procedure is the only potential curative surgery for pancreatic cancer. Q. Who is eligible for the Whipple procedure? A. Anyone who has been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer is potentially eligible for the Whipple procedure. At UChicago Medicine, a group of oncologists, surgeons, radiologists, geneticists and pathologists with special expertise in pancreatic cancer meet to discuss every case. This team offers guidance about the best course of treatment for each patient. If the Whipple procedure is recommended, you and your surgeon will decide if the treatment is right for you. Q. How is the Whipple procedure performed? A. At UChicago Medicine, the Continue reading >>

Postoperative Care Following Pancreatic Surgery

Postoperative Care Following Pancreatic Surgery

Postoperative Care Following Pancreatic Surgery Volker Keim , Prof. Dr. med.,1 Ernst Klar , Prof. Dr. med.,2 Michael Poll , Prof. Dr. med.,*,3 and Michael H. Schoenberg , Prof. Dr. med.4 1Department fr Innere Medizin, Medizinische Klinik fr Gastroenterologie und Rheumatologie, Universitt Leipzig 2Abteilung fr Allgemeine, Thorax-,Gef-und Transplantationschirurgie, Universitt Rostock This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. After pancreatic surgery, some patients have complications that require treatment. Review article based on a selective literature search and the German S3 guideline on pancreatic carcinoma. Detailed knowledge of the surgical procedure and its potential early and late complications is a prerequisite for the recognition and treatment of problems occurring after pancreatic surgery. These may be due either to the operation itself or to the progression of the underlying pancreatic disease. Both diabetes mellitus and exocrine insufficiency are common long-term sequelae. If persistent pain should arise, its cause must be identified and treated. To prevent malnutrition and vitamin deficiency after pancreatic resection, patients should be given a diet with an increased fat content and with supplemental enzymes. Appropriate methods are available for the accurate diagnosis and, in most cases, successful treatment of complications arising after pancreatic surgery. Keywords: pancreatectomy, surgical treatment, postoperative phase, diagnosis, morbidity Since the initial description of a pancreatic resection by the Knigsberg surgeon Walter Kausch in the year 1909 these operations have become part of the options for surgical treatment. This surgical technique was later termed the Whipple procedure. Over the years numerous other resection and drainage ope Continue reading >>

Pancreatic Cyst Treatment

Pancreatic Cyst Treatment

Ronald DeMatteo, Head of the Division of General Surgical Oncology, is part of our experienced surgical team. Being told you have a cyst in your pancreas can be scary and unsettling. Usually this kind of growth is harmless and doesnt need to be removed or actively treated in any way. Still, its important to monitor the cysts carefully over time, since they sometimes do progress to a point where its best to surgically remove them. At Memorial Sloan Kettering, weve developed a Pancreatic Cyst Surveillance Program to safely and systematically monitor cysts in the pancreas. As a participant in this program, youll regularly see your doctor as well as our dedicated nurse practitioner to help you best manage your health. Sometimes its best to remove a cyst through surgery . The following are possible reasons: The main draining system of the pancreas referred to as the pancreatic duct is widened, or dilated. The cyst is growing and causing pain or pressure on other structures such as the bile duct. Although these developments may not exist when youre first diagnosed with a pancreatic cyst, they can develop over time which is part of why being followed in a formal Pancreatic Cyst Surveillance Program can be so important. When helping you decide between surgery and surveillance, we carefully consider the risk that your cyst contains cancer or could progress to cancer. Pancreatic surgery is also a major, physically demanding operation because of where the organ is located. Cysts in the pancreas cant be simply drained or aspirated (suctioned out). Your MSK team experts nationally recognized for their leadership in evaluating and treating pancreatic cysts will consider various factors to customize a plan of care that best fits your needs. Book traversal links for Pancreatic Cyst Tr Continue reading >>

Laparoscopic Pancreatic Surgery

Laparoscopic Pancreatic Surgery

surgical techniques for pancreas preservation At USC we have used new technology and advanced laparoscopic techniques to develop new laparoscopic operations for pancreas, liver and bile duct diseases. New laparoscopic hand-access devices allows the surgeon to place a hand into the abdomen during laparoscopic surgery and perform many of the different functions with the hand that were previously possible only during open surgery. Dilip Parekh M.D. at USC has utilized this new device to develop laparoscopic surgical procedures such as the Whipple operation, distal pancreatectomy and liver resection. Benefits of minimally invasive or laparoscopic procedures include less post operative discomfort since the incisions are much smaller, quicker recovery times, shorter hospital stays, earlier return to full activities and much smaller scars. Furthermore, there may be less internal scarring when the procedures are performed in a minimally invasive fashion compared to standard open surgery. The laparoscopic procedures performed on the pancreas at USC are: Diagnostic and exploratory laparoscopy in patients with cancer of the pancreas It is estimated that 10 to 15% of all patients who are thought to have cancer confined to the pancreas on preoperative x-ray studies including CT scan are shown to have metastatic disease at the time of surgery. To avoid unnecessary open surgery we perform a diagnostic laparoscopic procedure before making a large open incision. A complete examination of the abdomen is performed to rule out the presence of metastatic disease. The patient will undergo open surgery for removal of the pancreatic cancer, if the diagnostic laparoscopic examination is normal. We offer laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy for endocrine and cystic tumors of the body and tail pan Continue reading >>

Whipple Procedure: Effects, Success Rate, And More

Whipple Procedure: Effects, Success Rate, And More

Among common cancers, pancreatic cancer has one of the poorest prognoses. Because pancreatic cancer often grows and spreads long before it causes any symptoms, only about 6% of patients are still alive five years after diagnosis. For some pancreatic patients, however, a complex surgery known as the Whipple procedure may extend life and could be a potential cure. Those who undergo a successful Whipple procedure may have a five-year survival rate of up to 25%. The classic Whipple procedure is named after Allen Whipple, MD, a Columbia University surgeon who was the first American to perform the operation in 1935. Also known as pancreaticoduodenectomy, the Whipple procedure involves removal of the "head" (wide part) of the pancreas next to the first part of the small intestine (duodenum). It also involves removal of the duodenum, a portion of the common bile duct, gallbladder , and sometimes part of the stomach . Afterward, surgeons reconnect the remaining intestine, bile duct, and pancreas . Who Is a Candidate for the Whipple Procedure? Only about 20% of pancreatic cancer patients are eligible for the Whipple procedure and other surgeries. These are usually patients whose tumors are confined to the head of the pancreas and haven't spread into any nearby major blood vessels, the liver , lungs , or abdominal cavity. Intensive testing is usually necessary to identify possible candidates for the Whipple procedure. Some patients may be eligible for a minimally invasive (laparoscopic) Whipple procedure, which is performed through several small incisions instead of a single large incision. Compared to the classic procedure, the laparoscopic procedure may result in less blood loss, a shorter hospital stay, a quicker recovery, and fewer complications. The Whipple procedure isn't a Continue reading >>

Pancreas Surgery - University Surgeons Associates, Pc - Pancreas Surgery

Pancreas Surgery - University Surgeons Associates, Pc - Pancreas Surgery

The surgeons at University Surgeons Associates, PC are experienced in using laparoscopic techniques to treat problems of the pancreas. They participate regularly in a multidisciplinary GI conference that reviews imaging, endoscopic findings and biopsies with the gastroenterologists, radiologists and pathologists. We utilize laparoscopic techniques to treat tumors in this region. Each year, a number surgical procedures are performed in the United States to treat diseases of the pancreas. Most of these are for pancreatic inflammation or tumors. Although surgery is not always a cure, it is often the best way to stop the spread of disease and alleviate symptoms. Patients undergoing pancreatic surgery often face a long and difficult recovery because the traditional "open" procedures are highly invasive. In most cases, surgeons are required to make a long incision. Pancreatic operations are frequently lengthy and complex procedures. Surgery results in an average hospital stay of a week or more and usually 6 weeks of recovery. Thepancreasis aglandlocated deep in theabdomenbetween the stomach and the spine (backbone). Theliver,intestine, spleen and other organs surround the pancreas. The pancreas is about 6 inches long and is shaped like a flat pear. The widest part of the pancreas is the head, the middle section is the body, and the thinnest part is the tail. The pancreas makes insulin and other hormones. These hormones enter the bloodstream and travel throughout the body. They help the body use or store the energy that comes from food. For example, insulin helps control the amount of sugar in the blood. The pancreas also makes pancreatic juices. These juices contain enzymes that help digest food. The pancreas releases the juices into a system of ducts leading to the common b Continue reading >>

Pancreatic Cancer Surgery: What To Expect At Home

Pancreatic Cancer Surgery: What To Expect At Home

Pancreatic Cancer Surgery: What to Expect at Home By the time you go home, most of your pain will probably be gone. If you have pain, you will have medicine you can take. You will probably feel very tired and weak. Even simple tasks may tire you. Take naps when you wish, but try to get some exercise. You may have trouble concentrating or difficulty sleeping. This usually goes away in 2 to 4 weeks. You will probably be able to return to work or your normal routine in about 1 month. It will probably take about 3 months for your strength to come back fully. You may need more treatment for the cancer, such as chemotherapy or radiation. Food may not taste good to you and may have a metallic taste. Your stomach may not empty as it should after eating. This may cause nausea, vomiting, and loss of appetite. These usually go away 2 to 6 weeks after surgery. Most people regain their normal appetite in about 8 weeks. You will probably lose some weight. This is normal. You may have a feeding tube (J-tube) coming out of your belly. If you have one, your doctor will decide when to take it out. You may have it for several months or longer. When you find out that you have cancer, you may feel many emotions and may need some help coping. Seek out family, friends, and counsellors for support. You also can do things at home to make yourself feel better while you go through treatment. Call the Canadian Cancer Society (1-888-939-3333) or visit its website at www.cancer.ca for more information. This care sheet gives you a general idea about how long it will take for you to recover. But each person recovers at a different pace. Follow the steps below to get better as quickly as possible. Rest when you feel tired. Getting enough sleep will help you recover. You will probably want to nap often Continue reading >>

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