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Pancreas Health Supplements

Vitamin D And Pancreatic Cancer

Vitamin D And Pancreatic Cancer

Pancreatic cancer is cancer of the pancreas, the organ that produces insulin. Approximately 44,000 people in the United States are diagnosed with cancer of the pancreas each year. It is one of the most deadly cancers and causes as many as 37,000 deaths annually. The disease is often diagnosed at an advanced stage. By then, treatment may not be effective. Risk factors Some of the more important risk factors for this cancer include: Diet high in simple carbohydrates and meat: Simple carbohydrates (white rice, baked goods) are foods that turn into sugar quickly. Sugar, meat, and fat contribute to the metabolic syndrome. This is characterized by extra abdominal fat and insulin resistance. This syndrome increases the risk of many diseases. Obesity: This health threat may also contribute to the metabolic syndrome. Smoking: Smoking contributes to the risk of pancreatic cancer. A diet high in vegetables is associated with a reduced risk of pancreatic cancer Sunlight exposure and pancreatic cancer risk Several studies have researched solar ultraviolet-B (UVB) light, vitamin D, and pancreatic cancer. The studies concluded that: There was a lower incidence and death rate from pancreatic cancer in people exposed to higher levels of solar UVB light. These studies appear to be reliable and accurate. They researched the effects of UVB light during an entire lifetime. There have been similar results in Japan and the United States. People who live in warm, sunny climates produce adequate levels of vitamin D. They have a higher risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer. But they have a lower risk of pancreatic cancer. Vitamin D levels Two Harvard studies found a correlation between vitamin D and pancreatic cancer: One study compared people taking 150 vs 600 international units (IU) (3.8 vs 15 mcg) Continue reading >>

Pancreatitis Supplements For Pancreas Healing

Pancreatitis Supplements For Pancreas Healing

You can find all of the pancreatitis supplements I use daily, here on this page. This way you don’t need to guess about what to buy or what I use. It’s all here in one spot. One stop shopping with free shipping available on qualified orders within the U.S. If you want to buy them at your own health store feel free to print this pancreatitis supplements page so you have the info. IF I could only afford ONE of the pancreatitis supplemets I would choose Now Foods Grape Seed Extract 100mg Vcaps because grape seed extract is extremely anti-inflammatory, protects the pancreas from more damage, causes programmed cell death of cancer cells and this particular product formulation also contains 300 mgs of vitamin c in each cap. So it may not contain tons of vitamin c but it is grape seed extract and c together – 2 for one. Pancreatitis Supplements ALL of these pancreatitis supplements are important for various reasons the order in which the pancreatitis supplements are given means nothing in regards to importance. It is my humble opinion that grape seed extract and vitamin c are THE most important pancreatitis supplemets with curcumin and the enzymes tying for 2nd. The enzymes may prove very beneficial if you are not on an enzyme prescription such as creon. 1) Curcumin puts out the fire of inflammation and so helps control pain. Curcumin is a powerful pain reliever and one of the best pancreatitis supplements. It fights pancreas inflammation, check this research. Curcumin is also a very strong antioxidant which seems to inhibit cancer growth by actually causing cancer cells to die (according to some research). I use the Vcaps and I make sure I ingest plenty of black pepper during the day (in food) to help the absorption of the curcumin. There are those who will insist that Continue reading >>

How To Heal The Pancreas Naturally, Prevent & Treat Pancreatitis

How To Heal The Pancreas Naturally, Prevent & Treat Pancreatitis

Your pancreas has a huge part of digestion. What you eat and drink goes from your stomach into the small intestine. There, it mixes with the pancreas’ digestive enzymes in order to neutralize stomach acid so that damage to the intestines can be prevented. The pancreatic enzymes break down food so that nutrients can be absorbed by your body. Another huge job for the pancreas is producing insulin. Insulin in needed to reduce blood sugar levels and allows your body to store food energy for later use. You can heal your pancreas and keep it healthy to do its jobs and to keep it from being inflamed, which is otherwise known as pancreatitis. Pancreatitis inflammation is very painful. Foods that Are Good for the Pancreas Blueberries & Cherries – loaded with antioxidants to prevent cell damage Broccoli, Cauliflower, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Carrots – powerful chemicals to heal the pancreas and prevent inflammation as well as prevent cancers Garlic & Onions – beneficial nutrients for the pancreas & prevents pancreatic cancer & other cancers Sunflower Seeds, Pumpkin Seeds & Other Nuts - Loaded with healthy good omega 3 fatty acids, zinc and other much needed minerals, these healthy polyunsaturated fats keep the pancreas, spleen, colon, other organs, skin and brain super healthy. They also help to prevent and treat a swollen prostate, impotency, motion sickness, and nausea. Since nuts and seeds are a diuretic, they also help get rid of worms such as tapeworms and roundworms. Shell right before eating in order to get the most nutrients. Juicing – juice dark leafy greens, add lemon essential oil, raw garlic and/or garlic oil. The brand Naked makes a good dark greens and kale juice. Taking nutrients down to a liquid level such as when juicing allows for the body to absorb Continue reading >>

Effect Of Pancreatic Enzyme Supplements On Iron Absorption

Effect Of Pancreatic Enzyme Supplements On Iron Absorption

• Iron deficiency has been reported in one third of patients with cystic fibrosis. There are data that suggest that iron absorption is increased with exocrine pancreatic deficiency and that administration of pancreatic enzymes may impair oral iron absorption. We compared oral iron absorption over a 3-hour period in the presence and absence of exogenous pancreatic enzymes in 13 stable young-adult patients with cystic fibrosis and 9 age-matched control patients. Although none of the patients with cystic fibrosis had a hemoglobin level less than 119 g/L, serum ferritin levels were less than 25 μg/L in 5 of the 13 patients, and the mean corpuscular volume was significantly lower in the patient group (86.1 ± 2.7 vs 90.9 ± 5 fL). Baseline mean serum iron levels were higher in controls (18.9±5.9 μmol/L) than in patients (11.9 ±6.3 μmol/L). There was no difference in iron absorption in the absence of exogenous pancreatic enzymes. Significant impairment of iron absorption was detected in both patients with cystic fibrosis and controls after administration of a preparation of pancreatic enzymes. There was an inverse relationship between iron stores, as measured by serum ferritin, and iron absorption. These findings suggest that long-term consumption of pancreatic enzymes by patients with cystic fibrosis may contribute to iron deficiency. (AJDC. 1989;143:969-972) Continue reading >>

Is Your Pancreas A Pain?

Is Your Pancreas A Pain?

“The nausea and back pain are what bother me the most,” explained Ted, a 45-year-old banker with a history of pancreatitis. “My doctor wants me to stay home and rest and eat only soups. Thankfully it’s not so bad that I need to be in the hospital. I hope you have something to help me recover more quickly,” he pleaded. “Yes I do,” I replied. “The goal is to help you get over this acute flare-up and then to get on a preventive program so it doesn’t happen again.” Pancreatitis refers to inflammation of the pancreas. This important organ is located in the upper half of the abdomen and is surrounded by the stomach and small intestine. The pancreas has two primary functions. One is to produce digestive enzymes that are released into the small intestine to break down food. The other is to produce insulin and glucagon, hormones that regulate blood sugar levels. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Acute pancreatitis is often characterized by severe abdominal pain and may be accompanied by nausea and vomiting. In addition, fever, fast pulse, abdominal distention, low or high blood pressure, and abnormal stools may result. Most cases of acute episodes are due to either excessive alcohol consumption or gallstones. Pancreatic enzymes are released through the same duct used to transport bile from the gallbladder and so gallstones trap these enzymes, leading to tissue inflammation. Other causes of acute episodes can include viral infection, use of certain pharmaceuticals, pancreatic cancer or exposure to toxic chemicals. Blood tests help to confirm the diagnosis, and hospitalization is often required to stabilize an acute flare-up. Chronic pancreatitis often involves symptoms of abdominal pain, malabsorption, and susceptibility to acute flare-ups. Alcoholism is t Continue reading >>

Pancreatitis

Pancreatitis

Introduction Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas, an organ that produces several enzymes to aid in the digestion of food, as well as the hormone insulin, which controls the level of sugar (glucose) in the blood. The pancreas is located in the upper abdomen, behind the stomach. When the pancreas is inflamed, the body is not able to absorb the nutrients it needs. Pancreatitis may be either acute (sudden and severe) or chronic. Both types of pancreatitis can cause bleeding and tissue death in or around the pancreas. Mild attacks of acute pancreatitis can improve on their own, or with dietary changes. In the case of recurring pancreatitis, however, long-term damage to the pancreas is common, sometimes leading to malnutrition and diabetes. Necrotizing pancreatitis (in which pancreatic tissue dies) can lead to cyst-like pockets and abscesses. Because of the location of the pancreas, inflammation spreads easily. In severe cases, fluid-containing toxins and enzymes leak from the pancreas through the abdomen. This can damage blood vessels and lead to internal bleeding, which may be life threatening. Signs and Symptoms Common signs and symptoms of pancreatitis include the following: Mild to severe, ongoing, sharp pain in the upper abdomen that may radiate to back or chest Nausea and vomiting Fever Sweating Abdominal tenderness Rapid heart rate Rapid breathing Oily stools (chronic pancreatitis) Weight loss What Causes It? There are several possible causes of pancreatitis. The most common are gallstones, which block the duct of the pancreas (for acute pancreatitis), and excessive alcohol consumption (for chronic pancreatitis). Certain drugs, including azathioprine, sulfonamides, corticosteroids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and antibiotics such as tetracy Continue reading >>

Pancreatic Enzyme Replacement Therapy (pert)

Pancreatic Enzyme Replacement Therapy (pert)

Pancreatic Enzyme Replacement Therapy (PERT) Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy involves taking the digestive enzymes you need in the form of a tablet (capsule). All enzyme supplements contain Pancreatin a mixture of pancreatic enzymes, lipase, amylase and protease. These assist the digestion of fat, carbohydrates and proteins. Enzyme doses vary from person to person. A starting dose is 50,000 to 75,000 units of lipase with a meal and 25,000 units with a snack. Pancreatic enzyme preparations include Creon, Nutrizym, Pancrease and Pancrex. They commonly come in 2 capsule sizes; 10,000 unit (mainly used in children) and 25,000 unit capsules. Each capsule has a different number or letter following the name to indicate the strength of the dose. Most adults take either 2 or 4 of the 25,000 unit capsules per meal. Do not be alarmed by the high capsule units the number relates to the amount of lipase units it contains. A healthy pancreas will release about 720,000 lipase units during every meal! Pancreatic enzyme supplements are extracted from pig pancreas glands and there is currently no alternative to using pork products. However, it is important to know that for those who may have a religious objection to the ingestion of pork products, special dispensation to allow these products has been granted by religious organisations as they are a medicine. You will need to take enough enzymes to allow your body to break down your food. Your dietitian will recommend the amount to take. You may be started on a low dose at first which will increase gradually until your symptoms are under control. Capsules should be taken with all food directly i.e. with the first mouthful of food. All food includes meals, snacks and milky drinks including milk based nutritional supplement drinks su Continue reading >>

3 Of The Best Herbs And Supplements For Diabetes

3 Of The Best Herbs And Supplements For Diabetes

1. Chromium The second best-selling mineral supplement (after calcium), chromium has been hyped as a fat burner, muscle builder, treatment for diabetes and a weapon against heart disease. Although research has shown that this mineral is essential for growth and health, its more spectacular claims remain controversial. What is chromium? Chromium, a trace mineral, comes in several forms. Supplements usually contain chromium picolinate or chromium polynicotinate. Chromium supplements can help people who don’t get enough of this trace mineral in their diet. Chromium is found in whole grains, wholegrain breads and cereals, potatoes, prunes, peanut butter, nuts, seafood and brewer’s yeast. Low-fat diets tend to have a higher chromium content than high-fat ones. An adequate intake is 35 micrograms per day for men and 25 micrograms per day for women. What does chromium do? Chromium helps the body use insulin, a hormone that transfers blood sugar (glucose) to the cells, where it is burned as fuel. With enough chromium, the body can use insulin efficiently and maintain normal blood sugar levels. Chromium also helps the body to break down protein and fat. Getting sufficient chromium may prevent diabetes in people with insulin resistance. This disorder makes the body less sensitive to the effects of insulin, so the pancreas has to produce more of it to keep blood sugar levels in check. When the pancreas can no longer keep up with the body’s demand for extra insulin, type 2 diabetes develops. Chromium may help avert this by aiding the body in using insulin more effectively in the first place. Chromium may also help break down fats, so it may increase HDL (“good”) and reduce LDL (“bad”) cholesterol levels, lowering the risk of heart disease. The evidence for this is con Continue reading >>

Diet | Pancreatic Cancer | Cancer Research Uk

Diet | Pancreatic Cancer | Cancer Research Uk

Read about how pancreatic cancer can affect your diet, including information on enzyme supplements that some people might needto help with digestion. Having cancer of the pancreas will affect your eating and drinking habits, whatever yourstage of canceror treatment. Many people with pancreatic cancer lose weight.The pancreas is not only close to the stomach and bowel, it producesinsulinandenzymeswhich help to digest food. If you've had all or part of your pancreas removed, you may need to take insulin or tablets to regulate yourblood sugar.You may also need to takeenzyme supplementswhen you eat to help your digestion. If you are on insulin or tablets to regulate your blood sugar, your doctor will ask you to check your urine for sugar. Too much sugar in the urine indicates that the sugar balance of your body is not yet right. If you are on insulin, you will probably also have to test your blood sugar levels. You will have to prick your finger and squeeze a drop of blood onto a test strip.This will show how much sugar is in your blood. You will then know how much insulin to take. It takes time to get used to doing these tests. You will be shown how to do it before you leave hospital. You may also have a nurse to visit you at home to help you and answer your questions. Digestive enzymes help your body to break down and absorb fats and proteins. Without enoughenzymes, you may have diarrhoea or your poo (stools) may float, look pale and smell offensive. This is due to the undigested fat in the stool. It might be difficult to put on weight as you are unable to absorb the nutrients from your food. If your pancreas is not working properly due to the cancer or you've had all or part of your pancreas removed, you may need to take enzyme supplements to reduce these effects. There Continue reading >>

7 Strategies To Heal Pancreatitis Naturally

7 Strategies To Heal Pancreatitis Naturally

7 Strategies to Heal Pancreatitis Naturally Pancreatitis can be a debilitating condition that results in overwhelming pain and malnutrition. Chronic pancreatitis in the United States results in more than 122,000 outpatient visits and more than 56,000 hospitalizations per year. Painful flare ups bring these patients in for help. The most common causes of pancreatitis and additional flare ups include alcoholism and obstructive gallstones in the liver that block the pancreatic duct. As a healthcare provider, I feel compelled to help these patients deal with their pain naturally and relieve the causes as best as possible. Many of these patients experience their lives being changed forever due to an inflamed pancreas and they go to the medical doctor to receive pain medication and told to consume a low fat and low salt diet. This leaves the patient severely malnourished. They may be pain free, but the effects of opioids, NSAIDs, and malnutrition make the body function decline drastically. Unfortunately, there is currently little research done on natural ways to overcome pancreatitis. However, this article will dive into the few natural strategies that have been proven to help control pain and increase nutritional absorption. Anatomy and Physiology The pancreas is located in the upper abdomen close to the liver and rests just behind the stomach. It has a connecting entrance into the duodenum of the small intestine. The pancreas is known for having exocrine and endocrine functions, meaning that it secretes hormones externally and internally respectively. The pancreas has a pancreatic duct, which runs along the middle of the pancreas and joins the common bile duct and enters the duodenum at the ampulla of Vater. This opening is surrounded by the sphincter of Oddi, which helps t Continue reading >>

Pancreas Transplant

Pancreas Transplant

Overview A pancreas transplant is a surgical procedure to place a healthy pancreas from a deceased donor into a person whose pancreas no longer functions properly. Your pancreas is an organ that lies behind the lower part of your stomach. One of its main functions is to make insulin, a hormone that regulates the absorption of sugar (glucose) into your cells. If your pancreas doesn't make enough insulin, blood sugar levels can rise to unhealthy levels, resulting in type 1 diabetes. Most pancreas transplants are done to treat type 1 diabetes. A pancreas transplant offers a potential cure for this condition. But it is typically reserved for those with serious diabetes complications, because the side effects of a pancreas transplant are significant. In some cases, pancreas transplants may also treat type 2 diabetes. Rarely, pancreas transplants may be used in the treatment of pancreatic, bile duct or other cancers. A pancreas transplant is often done in conjunction with a kidney transplant in people whose kidneys have been damaged by diabetes. Why it's done A pancreas transplant can restore normal insulin production and improve blood sugar control in people with diabetes, but it's not a standard treatment. The side effects of the anti-rejection medications required after a pancreas transplant can often be serious. For people with any of the following, a pancreas transplant may be worth considering: Type 1 diabetes that can't be controlled with standard treatment Frequent insulin reactions Consistently poor blood sugar control Severe kidney damage Type 2 diabetes associated with both low insulin resistance and low insulin production A pancreas transplant usually isn't a treatment option for people with type 2 diabetes, because type 2 diabetes occurs when the body becomes res Continue reading >>

Pancreatic Diseases

Pancreatic Diseases

The pancreas is a gland behind your stomach and in front of your spine. It produces juices that help break down food and hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Problems with the pancreas can lead to many health problems. These include Pancreatitis, or inflammation of the pancreas: This happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself Cystic fibrosis, a genetic disorder in which thick, sticky mucus can also block tubes in your pancreas The pancreas also plays a role in diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the beta cells of the pancreas no longer make insulin because the body's immune system has attacked them. In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas loses the ability to secrete enough insulin in response to meals. Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose get into your cells to give them energy. Without insulin, too much glucose stays in your blood. Over time, high blood glucose can lead to serious problems with your heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. You have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if you are older, have obesity, have a family history of diabetes, or do not exercise. Having prediabetes also increases your risk. Prediabetes means that your blood sugar is higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. If you are at risk for type 2 diabetes, you may be able to delay or prevent developing it by making some lifestyle changes. The symptoms of type 2 diabetes appear slowly. Some people do not notice symptoms at all. The symptoms can include Being very thirsty Urinating often Feeling very hungry or tired Losing weight without trying Having sores that heal slowly Having bl Continue reading >>

What Is The Pancreas

What Is The Pancreas

The pancreas is a pear shaped organ that is found deep in the abdomen over the spine. A number of other organs cover the pancreas including the stomach, colon and the spleen. Because of the deep location of the pancreas, diseases that affect the pancreas are often diagnosed at a late stage since symptoms from pancreatic diseases are not very prominent during the early stage of the disease. The pancreas is really two organs in one, since it has two main functions. Insulin production The pancreas secretes the hormone insulin that is responsible for regulating the sugar level in the blood. The cells that produce insulin in the pancreas are called islet cells. The loss of islet cells leads to the development of diabetes mellitus; a condition where there is excessive sugar in the blood of the patient that can give rise to many medical problems. There are many causes for diabetes. In patients who have chronic inflammation of the pancreas, a condition called chronic pancreatitis, the inflammation destroy the islet cells and lead to the development of diabetes. Patients who undergo pancreatic surgery where part of the pancreas is removed are also at risk for developing diabetes. It is estimated that approximately 75% of the normal pancreas may be safely removed without the development of diabetes mellitus. Pancreatic enzyme production The pancreas also manufactures enzymes that play an important role in the digestion of food in the gastrointestinal tract. Some of the enzymes made by the pancreas include an enzyme called lipase that is responsible for breakdown of fats, amylase that is responsible for the breakdown of carbohydrates and trypsin which is responsible the for breakdown of proteins in the gastrointestinal tract. The body cannot absorb whole protein, fat or carbohydra Continue reading >>

Omega-3, Vitamins C And E May Boost Pancreatic Health

Omega-3, Vitamins C And E May Boost Pancreatic Health

Data from residents in the San Francisco Bay Area found that consuming at least 850 milligrams of omega-3 fatty acids per day was associated with a 53 percent reduction in the risk of pancreatic cancer, compared to intakes of between 330 and 580 milligrams per day. According to findings published in the International Journal of Cancer​, benefits were also observed for intakes of vitamin C and E, the highest average intakes associated with 31 and 33 percent reductions, respectively, compared with the lowest average intakes. On the flip side, researchers from the University of California San Francisco report that high intakes of saturated fats and certain monounsaturated fatty acids may increase the risk of pancreatic cancer – the fourth most common cause of cancer mortality in the US and the cause of 33,400 deaths among men and women in 2007. “Results from this large population-based case-control study provide additional evidence that dietary factors and use of supplements may affect risk of pancreatic cancer,”​ wrote the researchers, led by Paige Bracci from the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics. “Our results showing increased risk of pancreatic cancer with increased saturated fatty acid intake and decreased risk with high intake of long-chain omega-3 fatty acid and of vitamin C and E from supplements contribute new data to the epidemiologic literature on pancreatic cancer,”​ they added. Study details​ Bracci and her co-workers analysed data from 532 people with pancreatic cancer and compared this with data from 1,701 cancer-free individuals. High intakes of saturated fats were associated with a 60 percent increase in the risk of pancreatic cancer, while intakes of palmitoleic and oleic monounsaturated fatty acids were associated with 60 and Continue reading >>

What Are Pancreatic Enzymes?

What Are Pancreatic Enzymes?

Good nutritional care improves outcomes and is critical for your quality of life. The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network strongly recommends that patients have access to pancreatic enzymes and see a registered dietitian. Pancreatic enzymes help break down fats, proteins and carbohydrates. A normally functioning pancreas secretes about 8 cups of pancreatic juice into the duodenum, daily. This fluid contains pancreatic enzymes to help with digestion and bicarbonate to neutralize stomach acid as it enters the small intestine. Types of Pancreatic Enzymes and Their Effects Lipase Effects: Lipase works with bile from the liver to break down fat molecules so they can be absorbed and used by the body. Shortage may cause: Lack of needed fats and fat-soluble vitamins. Diarrhea and/or fatty stools. Protease Effects: Proteases break down proteins. They help keep the intestine free of parasites such as bacteria, yeast and protozoa. Shortage may cause: Allergies or the formation of toxic substances due to incomplete digestion of proteins. Increased risk for intestinal infections. Amylase Effects: Amylase breaks down carbohydrates (starch) into sugars which are more easily absorbed by the body. This enzyme is also found in saliva. Shortage may cause: Diarrhea due to the effects of undigested starch in the colon. Reasons to Take Pancreatic Enzymes Pancreatic insufficiency is the inability of the pancreas to secrete the enzymes needed for digestion. Having an insufficient amount of pancreatic enzymes is very common among people with pancreatic cancer. When the pancreas does not produce enough enzymes to break down food, pancreatic enzyme products are needed. Doctors sometimes prescribe digestive enzymes, including pancreatic enzymes, to patients who have conditions that cause poor absorpt Continue reading >>

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