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Paleo Diabetes Reversal

Can The Paleo Diet Help Diabetics?

Can The Paleo Diet Help Diabetics?

November is National Diabetes Month, so now is a great time to reflect upon the 26 million people who already have diabetes, as well as the nearly 80 million with pre-diabetes (those on high alert for developing the condition). If you fall into any of these groups, or know someone who does, take the time to consider what kinds of food choices may lead to better health. Sometimes, better health means that weight loss is necessary. Obesity increases the risk for diabetes, and losing weight can help keep your blood glucose level on target. Luckily, it may not be necessary to lose all those excess pounds to improve diabetes outcomes. Losing just 5-10% of your body weight can help lower your blood glucose, total cholesterol, and blood pressure levels. Here, we will outline one eating plan that can help people with diabetes lose weight, among many other possible benefits. The Paleo Diet Often, people do not make time to prepare their own meals or even monitor their food intake. This can lead to regular intake of packaged, processed foods. Many experts believe that this trend away from carefully prepared whole foods has contributed to the rise in obesity, diabetes, and other chronic diseases. A growing number of nutrition researchers and doctors now suggest that we try a return to simpler diets, based on grass-fed and free-range animal products, fresh seafood, and whole fruit, vegetables, seeds, and nuts. The Paleo (Paleolithic) Diet, also known the Hunter-Gatherer Diet, is a healthy-eating plan based on fresh, unprocessed plants and animals. Even though it is modeled after human diets from thousands of years ago, the Paleo Diet consists of easy-to-find foods, such as fish, eggs, fruit, vegetables, nuts, and grass-fed meats. Most versions of the diet do not include grains (lik Continue reading >>

Can The Paleo Diet Reverse Diabetes?

Can The Paleo Diet Reverse Diabetes?

Is Paleo the Best Diet For Reversing Diabetes? If you are one of the more than 25 million people suffering with type-2 diabetes or one of the 80 million who is pre-diabetic (will soon be diabetic) you probably know that being overweight or obese increases the risk for diabetes and consequently, losing the excess weight can help you control your blood glucose level. The good news for overweight diabetics is that you may not necessarily have to lose all the excess weight to notice an improvement in reversing your diabetes. In fact you may only have to reduce your body weight by around 5% to 10% to realise a reduction in your blood sugar levels. Eating a diet full of nutrient rich, natural foods such as those in the Paleo diet could help you control your blood sugar levels & reverse your diabetes… Start the Paleo diet with this fantastic collection of delicious Paleo recipes & 8-Weak meal plan » To achieve these benefits there is one particular way of eating that may help diabetics achieve a significant amount of weight loss as well begin the process to reverse their diabetes. A report complied by Dr Loren Cordain, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus (an authority on the Paleo diet) comes out strongly in favour of eating according to the natural Paleo styled diet over any other diabetic type of diet as an effective way of eating to help reverse diabetes. “Diabetes Cannot Be Reversed Through Diet” – The Biggest Lie According to the American Diabetes Association “for most people type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease & eventually oral medications won’t be enough to keep blood sugar levels normal – insulin will be necessary…” “Type 2 diabetes is a chronic and progressive disease” – this is one big fat lie Well according to this article appearing in The Intens Continue reading >>

What About Type 1 Diabetes?

What About Type 1 Diabetes?

You hear a lot about type 2 diabetes on this and other sites in the community. It’s easy to see why: type 2 diabetes is the “lifestyle” diabetes, the preventable one, the one that “doesn’t have to happen” and that you can “fix if you just dial in the food.” All true, for the most part. Whether you’re in the camp that thinks it’s red meat or egg yolks causing it, or fatty liver from excess PUFAs and fructose, the point is that people commonly accept the idea that T2D is preventable and manageable with the right diet and lifestyle. But what about type 1 diabetes? Why don’t we hear so much about it? First of all, it’s rarer than T2D. For better or for worse, there simply isn’t as large an audience for stuff about type 1 diabetes. Second, type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease. In T1D, the pancreatic beta cells that produce insulin in the body are destroyed by an autoimmune attack. Left untreated without exogenous infusions of insulin, T1D results in severely elevated blood sugar and, eventually, death. Autoimmune diseases are confusing, tricky, and hard to manage. I mean, your body is attacking itself and preventing a completely necessary physiological function – insulin release! It’s not something you want to mess around with. It’s not a subject you can tackle lightly. And I think that’s why people have steered clear of making any absolute recommendations regarding T1D and Primal or paleo. That said, we can make some general recommendations, I think, that won’t cause many problems and can even help solve some of them (with a doctor’s approval and assistance, of course). I find the standard issue protocol a little odd: let people eat all the carbs they want and supplement with, as Dr. Kurt Harris once put it, “massive doses o Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Diabetes – How Les Shed 80+ Pounds, Surprised His Doctors, And Manhandled Type 2 Diabetes

How To Reverse Diabetes – How Les Shed 80+ Pounds, Surprised His Doctors, And Manhandled Type 2 Diabetes

Disclaimer: This is not a medical recommendation or take on type 2 diabetes. Talk to your doctors before undertaking any program or diet. That said, this is a true story, and Les’s story is real. If you’re cool with that, read on. We’ve had tons of people drop 20-30 pounds, and a couple people lose 30-50. But few people have impressed me as much as Les – a 56 year old college professor who (in just 9 months), dropped over 80 pounds, reversed his type 2 diabetes, got off his medication, and left his doctors shaking their heads in awe. This is how he did it: Hey, Les. Before we get started, tell us a little bit of your background – what’s your story? I’m 56, married to a wonderful woman, and I live in Bristol in the UK. I’ve studied Chemistry, had my own business, worked as a consultant, and now I lecture on business and human resources at a local college. What was your fitness history like before trying Impossible Abs? I was a bit of a weed growing up to be honest. I was never really ‘one of the lads’. Years later when I was writing up my doctoral thesis I decided that I wanted to get fit. I felt that as I was at the proper start of my adulthood (aka getting older) I should start being more proactive. I wanted to become a more well-rounded person. (Talk about a self-fulfilling prophecy!) Anyway, I threw myself in at the deep-end, and I started training in martial arts (Tae Kwon Do). I was pretty good, if I say it myself. I was junior student of the year at my club, and was getting ‘A’ grades for my belts. From a standing start I could kick a trainer out of someone’s hand while they were sitting on someone’s shoulders! Anyway, I moved jobs. And area. And got married (for the first time). Then I had other priorities and pressures, and the fitnes Continue reading >>

Lchf, Keto And Paleo – Intermittent Fasting And Type 2 Diabetes

Lchf, Keto And Paleo – Intermittent Fasting And Type 2 Diabetes

Intermittent Fasting For Everyone – Including Type 2 Diabetics What is intermittent fasting? Intermittent fasting is not a diet, but rather a dieting pattern. It’s compatible with LCHF, KETO and Paleo Diet Programs – along with many others. In simpler terms: it’s making a conscious decision to skip certain meals. By fasting and then feasting on purpose, intermittent fasting means eating your calories during a specific window of the day, and choosing not to eat food during the rest. Now, there are a few different ways to take advantage of intermittent fasting: Regularly eat during a specific time period. For example, only eating from noon-8 PM, essentially skipping breakfast. Some people only eat in a 6-hour window, or even a 4-hour window. Skip two meals one day, taking a full 24-hours off from eating. For example, eating on a normal schedule (finishing dinner at 8PM) and then not eating again until 8PM the following day. It is sugges ted that if you decide to “skip” breakfast, you drink one of the many “power” coffees each morning – even with breakfast on your regular meal days. A popular ‘blend is the Bulletproof Coffee Mix Now, you might be thinking: “okay, so by skipping a meal, I just eat less than normally overall, and thus I will lose weight, right?” Well, that’s partly true. Yes, by cutting out an entire meal, you are able to eat MORE food during your other meals and still consume a caloric deficit (which is an important for losing weight). However, as we already know that not all calories all created equal, the timing of meals can also influence how your body reacts. How does intermittent fasting work? With intermittent fasting, your body operates differently when “feasting” compared to when “fasting”: When you eat a meal, your Continue reading >>

Paleo And Diabetes (+5 Reasons The Paleo Diet Can Help)

Paleo And Diabetes (+5 Reasons The Paleo Diet Can Help)

In 2015, it was estimated that over 415 million adults around the world have diabetes. By 2040, this figure will have risen to 642 million adults, that means every 1 in 10 adults will have this completely preventable and manageable disease (1). In addition almost 1 in 3 adults in America have pre-diabetes (insulin resistance) (2). The scariest of the statistics available to us is the fact that North America and the Caribbean region has the highest incidence of Type 2 Diabetes, directly as a result of an increasingly poor diet, increased sugar intake and decreased physical activity (3). But why are we getting so sick? There are many factors to blame for the rapid increase in pre-diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes,but Type 2 Diabetes is primarily a lifestyle related disease and our modern lifestyles are to blame. The facts are that we as humans are moving a lot less, we are eating food which is poor in nutrients and highly processed, and we are consuming too much of it (4). It seems only logical then, that if we are getting fatter and sicker from our processed, adulterated food, something needs to change? The principles of the Paleo lifestyle underline the return to a time when our food more closely resembled its natural state. For this reason All Paleo appropriate food is food which we would have eaten before the rise of agriculture and mass crop planting. We also would not have kept animals and therefore dairy would not have been consumed. Our ancestors did not have to worry about lifestyle related diseases as processed food did not exist and we had to move a lot more to survive. We hunted and gathered our food for survival. This is where the Paleo lifestyle comes in. Preventing and Reversing Diabetes with the Paleo Diet Let’s look at the dietary factors which may help to, Continue reading >>

Paleo Diet Touted As Better For Diabetics Could Cause Rapid Weight Gain, Research Finds

Paleo Diet Touted As Better For Diabetics Could Cause Rapid Weight Gain, Research Finds

Researchers who set out to prove the benefits of the Paleo diet have instead discovered it could cause significant and rapid weight gain. The study by Melbourne University researchers, took two groups of overweight mice with pre-diabetes symptoms. One group was put on the low-carb, high-fat Paleo diet, and the other on their normal diet The scientists found that mice on the Paleo diet gained 15 per cent of their body weight, in only eight weeks. The findings, published in Nature's Nutrition and Diabetes journal have reignited the debate between scientists and celebrity chefs over the controversial diet. The increasingly popular Paleo (or "caveman") diet has been touted as a way to lose weight and even reverse or better manage conditions like diabetes, irritable bowel syndrome, and multiple sclerosis. Media player: "Space" to play, "M" to mute, "left" and "right" to seek. But University of Melbourne diabetes researcher Associate Professor Sof Andrikopoulos said the results of his study were a cautionary tale about fad diets. Professor Andrikopoulos began research to find out whether the Paleo diet could benefit patients with diabetes or pre-diabetes. Mice were used for the study due to their genetic, biological, and behavioural characteristics which closely resemble that of humans. Professor Andrikopoulos said he expected some weight loss, but was instead surprised by the extent of weight gain. "The fat mice became even fatter and their glucose control became even worse," Professor Andrikopoulos said. He said, comparing this to a person, it would mean an 80-kilogram man would soon hit 92 kilograms on the scales. "The Paleo diet may not necessarily be good for everybody. My advice is that if you're concerned about weight and your health, go and seek professional advice, g Continue reading >>

Diabetes And A Paleo Diet

Diabetes And A Paleo Diet

Every minute, three people in the U.S. are diagnosed with diabetes, for a total of 20.9 million people living with the disease (as of 2011, so that number is probably even higher now). That’s up from just 5.6 million in 1980. Currently, about 7% of people in the US have diabetes, but that doesn’t actually tell the whole story. An estimated 86 million more have pre-diabetes (blood sugar high enough to be dangerous, but not enough to be diabetes. Diabetes is sometimes called a “lifestyle disease,” meaning that it’s caused by lifestyle factors like diet and exercise, rather than a particular germ or gene. It’s often (but not always!) associated with other lifestyle diseases like obesity, high cholesterol, and high blood pressure, because the same kinds of lifestyle patterns tend to cause more than one of those problems. When the Paleo crowd starts talking about diabetes, we typically start from the fact that it’s almost unknown in traditional cultures, even among people in later middle-age. The natural suggestion from there is to eat like people in those cultures – minimal processed and refined foods. But there are a few problems with this: All those traditional groups eat differently, so who do you want to imitate, the ultra low-carb and diabetes-free Maasai, or the high-carb and equally diabetes-free Kitavans? Diet isn’t the only difference. Lifestyle factors like sleep and exercise also have a huge effect on diabetes: it’s not just food. A diet that works in the context of one lifestyle might not work in another. Prevention isn’t the same as cure. People who’ve lived in the modern world their whole lives might need more intensive intervention than people who’ve always been healthy. For a really comprehensive look at diabetes, we need to get bey Continue reading >>

Reversing Type 1 Diabetes With Diet – Another Case Study

Reversing Type 1 Diabetes With Diet – Another Case Study

It’s supposed to be impossible to reverse Type 1 diabetes, which is a form of diabetes where the Beta cells in the pancreas, which produce insulin, are basically stressed to death or at least, into paralysis. All this means a Type 1 diabetic loses the ability to produce life-giving insulin. A Type 1 diabetic must survive by injecting insulin for the rest of his/her life. At least, that’s the conventional view. And while it MIGHT be true, what about exceptions? Michelle is a college student who was first diagnosed as a Type 1 Diabetic in May 2008. She tracked changes in her Type 1 Diabetes symptoms after switching to a diet that’s much different from how most Americans eat, and also a huge change from how the American Diabetes Association tells diabetics to eat. For roughly 2 years, Michelle said it was still touch-and-go, how she’s doing, but overall, she’s much, much better than when she was first diagnosed. Naysayers would say that Michelle is in a honeymoon period, where things get better for a Type 1 diabetic before they get worse. But that “honeymoon” period usually lasts less than a year, and it’s nearly 2 years since Michelle was first diagnosed. However, in March 2010, she posted a blog report that she was back on insulin, with this report: I’m back… Sorry everyone for the lack of blogging, but this is probably my last one. I’m back on insulin and I quit the paleo diet. In that blog post, she explains that for her, compliance was too challenging, and while it may have helped extend her honeymoon period away from insulin, she didn’t think that in the long run, paleo worked successfully for her . . . although she does still try to keep her diet lower in carbs than the average American, it seems . . . In Michelle’s case, she cut back enorm Continue reading >>

Latest In Paleo 152: Reverse Diabetes

Latest In Paleo 152: Reverse Diabetes

Today's show begins with new documentary and book recommendations. The News & Views segment features stories about the new USDA guidelines, beating diabetes vs. managing the disease, and why beards are good for your health. In the Shinrin-Yoku segment, thoughts on nature therapy "going mainstream." In the Moment of Paleo segment, we explore tweaking self-talk and inner dialogs. After the Bell we feature a talk about introversion. Sponsor PuraKai - NEW!! Use coupon code "latestinpaleo" for 15% off clothing orders. Amazingly comfortable, responsible and stylish clothing & now eco-friendly stand-up paddle (SUP) boards, too! PuraKai: beach clothing & crafts for a Pure Ocean! Intro New Book Recommendation News & Views Dietary Guidelines Boston Globe: Beating Diabetes with Diet, Not Managing It Shinrin Yoku Update Support the Show! Donations Visit LatestInPaleo.com and see the right-hand sidebar to make a donation with PayPal or Bitcoin. Thank you to everyone who continues to support the show with their recurring donations. Amazon! This site participates in the Amazon Associates Program, which provides us with a means to earn advertising fees: Moment of Paleo After the Bell This Week's Music Selections Continue reading >>

Dr. Jason Fung: How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes – The Quick Start Guide

Dr. Jason Fung: How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes – The Quick Start Guide

Dr. Fung is a nephrologist and huge advocate of intermittent fasting. He has an article over at DietDoctor that you may find interesting (link below). Beware: at the link you will find an accurate photo of a gangrenous foot that you may find nauseating or disturbing. I see gangrene in the hospital once a month. It’s one of the things that keeps me motivated to help PWDs (people with diabetes) learn to conquer diabetes. Another caveat. If you take drugs that have the potential to cause hypoglycemia, you may indeed suffer life-threatening hypoglycemia if you drastically cut back on sugar and other refined carbohydrates. You better know what you’re doing. Dr. Fung writes: “Once we understand type 2 diabetes, then the solution becomes pretty bloody obvious. If we have too much sugar in the body, then get rid of it. Don’t simply hide it away so we can’t see it. There are really only two ways to get rid of the excessive sugar in the body. Don’t put sugar in [nor refined starches] Burn it off That’s it. That’s all we need to do. The best part? It’s all natural and completely free. No drugs. No surgery. No cost.” Source: How to Reverse Type 2 Diabetes – The Quick Start Guide – Diet Doctor Jardiance is a diabetes drug in the class called SGLT2 inhibitors. How do they work? Our kidneys filter glucose (sugar) out of our bloodstream, then reabsorb that glucose back into the bloodstream. SGLT2 inhibitors impair that reabsorption process, allowing some glucose to be excreted in our urine. You could call it a diuretic effect. For example, an SGLT 2 inhibitor called dapagliflozin, at a dose of 10 mg/day, causes the urinary loss of 70 grams of glucose daily. How drugs like this could prevent cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetics is a mystery to me. From MPT: Continue reading >>

Testimonial: Completely Reversed Type 2 Diabetes After 3 Months

Testimonial: Completely Reversed Type 2 Diabetes After 3 Months

Testimonial written by: Dr. Iulian Novak Sharon is a very busy mom. Besides taking care of her 2 kids in her “spare time”, she also works at a call center. She was diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes 6 months ago. Her blood sugar was constantly around 250 after eating, the fasting blood sugar was 160 and her HbA1c was 8.2. She read all the books she could find. She tried dieting, medicating and anything that promised results. Results did come – but were very transitory and poor. None of them were sustainable or addressed the real, root cause of her elevated blood sugar. When we started working together, I found myself hitting my head against the same brick wall – how do I explain to her that fat and protein are good for her and that we got the nutrition thing wrong for decades? How can I explain to her what I know so intuitively, yet after reading hundreds of books? The solution was just around the corner – “Hey, I recommend reading this book. It’s great at explaining things way better than I can, it’s very educational and funny in the same time.” How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes, Step by Step While reading the book, we got to work. I recommended changing one of her meals and keep at it for 2 weeks. Small but consistent changes. For example, she changed her breakfast from skim milk with cereal and muesli to an omelet with bacon and a small salad. She kept at it for 2 weeks – obviously, alternating her omelet with other high-fat meals. Then she changed her lunch and kept at it for 2 weeks. Finally, her dinner. All she had to do was respect the “Sugarless Principle” – she could eat anything except foods that are, in one way or another, sugar. I won’t lie to you – it was tough. She relapsed to processed foods a couple of times, felt very depressed so Continue reading >>

What If Type 2 Diabetes Could Be Completely Reversed

What If Type 2 Diabetes Could Be Completely Reversed

I have recently spent more time in drugs stores than I would like helping my sister on her journey through (and hopefully to the other side of) cancer. Rite Aid, CVS and Walgreens all had large diabetes sections offering support for a “diabetes lifestyle” — glucose monitors, lancets, blood pressure cuffs, medications, supplements and pharmacy magazines heavily supported by pharmaceutical advertising. Patients are encouraged to get their eye check ups, monitor their blood pressure, track their blood sugars, have foot exams and see their doctor regularly for better management of their blood sugars — all apparently sensible advice for diabetics. But ? What if it weren’t, as we believe, an inexorable, progressive disease that has to be better “managed” by our health care system with better drugs, surgery and coordination of care? What if intensive lifestyle and dietary changes could completely reverse diabetes? A ground breaking new study in Diabetologia proved that, indeed, Type 2 diabetes can be reversed through diet changes, and, the study showed, this can happen quickly: in one to eight weeks. That turns our perspective on diabetes upside down. Diabetes is not a one-way street. We used to believe that once cells in your pancreas that make insulin (beta cells) poop out there was no reviving them and your only hope was more medication or insulin. We now know that is not so. Continuing misconceptions about what causes diabetes and our unwillingness to embrace methods know to reverse it have lead to a catastrophic increase in the illness. Today one in four Americans over 60 years old has Type 2 diabetes. By 2020, one in two Americans will have pre-diabetes or diabetes. Tragically, physicians will miss the diagnosis for 90 percent with pre-diabetes or diabetes. Continue reading >>

Pre-diabetes Goes Into Remission On Higher Protein, Lower Carbohydrate Diet (zone Diet Balance)

Pre-diabetes Goes Into Remission On Higher Protein, Lower Carbohydrate Diet (zone Diet Balance)

Can pre-diabetes be reversed with diet? This study says it can be Type 2 diabetes currently affects 29.1 million people in the USA, 8 million do not know teh have it, they are currently undiagnosed. Pre-diabetes affect 86 million Americans. This refers to having impaired glucose tolerance, which means glucose is not being cleared properly from the bloodstream and blood glucose remains higher than it should be. They do not yet have high enough blood glucose to warrant the diagnosis of diabetes. Study protocol Men and women between 20 and 50 whose BMI categorised them as obese (30 to 55 kg/m2) All had prediabetes They were randomly assigned to a high protein (18) or a high carbohydrate diet (20) The study was for 6 months, 6 dropped out of HP group and 8 from HC group, 24 completed the study, 12 in each group The HP diet was 30% kcals from protein, 40% kcals from CHO, 30% kcals from fat, versus HC diet; 15% kcals from protein, 55% kcals from CHO, 30% kcals from fat. Subjects diet was calculated for each individual using resting metabolic rate (RMR) and 500 calories per day was subtracted in order to make it a calorically reduced diet to achieve weight loss. Meals were pre-prepared and daily allowance was given as 3 meals and 2 snacks. All subjects were not very active and stayed mainly inactive during the 6 months Food Diets were designed so that all nutrients were covered, and they met all the recommended daily intake (RDI) goals for vitamins and minerals. Dietary fat was primarily monounsaturated and polyunsaturated, plant oils, nuts and semi-liquid margarine. Carbohydrate sources emphasized whole grains, fruits, vegetables and legumes; and dietary protein sources included lean meats, fish, chicken, eggs and non-fat dairy foods, that is, fat-free milk and low-fat cheese Continue reading >>

On The Paleo Diet And Diabetes

On The Paleo Diet And Diabetes

The Paleo Diet, otherwise known as the “Caveman Diet,” is hugely popular at the moment. And lots of folks want to know how it plays with diabetes... The DiabetesMine Team has taken a deep dive here into what this eating plan entails, and what nutrition experts and research have to say about it. What is Paleo? The basic idea of the Paleo Diet is returning to our dietary roots. That is, the name is short for “Paleolithic” referring to the Stone Age, when humans had a very simple diet of whole, unprocessed foods. The theory here is that if we go back to eating that way, we’ll all be healthier and toxin-free. This diet is super-trendy at the moment as almost a modern “cure-all,” but the premise is based on scientific evidence about what early humans ate. Established by health scholar Loren Cordrain, Paleo assumes that humans were genetically and evolutionarily designed to eat foods that were available during the Paleolithic era, versus the agriculturally-based diet that was only developed in the last 10,000 years -- and even more so the processed and chemically-based diet of the last hundred years. The diet consists of lean meats, vegetables, fruits, and nuts. What’s missing are all processed foods, grains, dairy, and legumes, along with simple sugars and artificial sweeteners. Because, you know... cavemen didn’t eat that stuff. According experts, the Paleo Diet is high in protein, fiber and healthy fats; high in potassium salt intake and low in sodium salt (healthier option); and provides dietary acid and alkaline balance as well as high intake of vitamins, minerals, plant phytochemicals and antioxidants. It’s also quite low-carb -- a plus for those of us with diabetes, to be sure! But for many people, it is difficult to make a long-term commitment to s Continue reading >>

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