diabetestalk.net

Other Options Besides Metformin 2017

Berberine For Diabetes – Is It A Natural Alternative To Metformin?

Berberine For Diabetes – Is It A Natural Alternative To Metformin?

Incidence of insulin resistance, obesity, and other metabolic diseases have reached massive proportions in our culture. The current popular glucose-lowering drug treatment, Metformin comes with some potential serious side effects. However, there is a natural Metformin alternative that can help the body efficiently process sugar, thereby being safer than pharmaceutical interventions. It’s known as Berberine. What is Berberine and Where Does it Come From? Berberine is a plant photochemical that’s found in several different plants, including goldenseal, European barberry, phellodendron, goldthread, Oregon grape, and tree turmeric. It possesses powerful anti-diabetic properties, as well as being anti-bacterial and immune system enhancing. As well as diabetes it can be used as a treatment for a number of other health problems including hyperlipidemia, heart disease, and cancer. It can regulate blood glucose, increase insulin sensitivity as well as metabolizing fats (burning fat). Berberine has been widely studied, with nearly 1000 studies published on it in the last 5 years alone. There is a body of evidence supporting it’s efficacy in lowering blood-glucose and increasing insulin sensitivity for both humans and animals. However, Berberine is not a new discovery. For thousands of years the Chinese and Ayurvedic communities has been aware of the amazing benefits of Berberine. The blood-sugar lowering effects have been documented in China and India for hundreds of years. Although it was primarily used for treating inflammation, infections, and diarrhea, as diabetes was not as common then as it is now (1). A Natural Substitute For Metformin? However, as the incidence of diabetes has grown, the recent studies have focused on it’s ability to treat the condition. The studi Continue reading >>

A Diabetes Medication That Costs 6 Cents A Pill Could Be A Key To Living Longer

A Diabetes Medication That Costs 6 Cents A Pill Could Be A Key To Living Longer

American Federation for Aging Research Deputy Scientific Director Nir Barzilai, MD, discusses the promise of the FDA-approved drug Metformin to delay multiple age-related conditions at a 2016 event. AP A generic drug that's used to treat type 2 diabetes could help people live longer, healthier lives. Metformin, a drug that's been approved in the US for decades, is typically taken as a pill every day by people with diabetes. But now researchers are looking into whether the drug could hold the key to living longer — and early research seems promising. Dr. Nir Barzilai, the director of Institute for Aging Research at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York, has been researching the drug, with the hopes of one day getting it approved as an anti-aging treatment by the FDA. If future research yields good results, metformin could become a much cheaper option than other approaches biotech companies are taking to help us live healthier, longer lives. A potential anti-aging drug that's been around for ages Metformin has been around in one form or another for centuries — Wired reports that it's actually a modified version of a compound found in the flower Galega officinalis, which you may know as French lilac. It was approved by the FDA for diabetes treatment of type 2 diabetes in 1994 (not type 1, which is the result of an autoimmune disorder) though it was available in other countries before then. Today, metformin one of the most popular prescriptions in the US, according to GoodRx. The drug can cost as little as $4, or 6 cents a pill. Since metformin was approved for diabetes, it has started to be used off-label to treat conditions like pre-diabetes, gestational diabetes, and polycystic ovarian disease. Some retrospective studies and preclinical work have indica Continue reading >>

What Next When Metformin Isn't Enough For Type 2 Diabetes?

What Next When Metformin Isn't Enough For Type 2 Diabetes?

› Turn first to metformin for pharmacologic treatment of type 2 diabetes. A › Add a second oral agent (such as a sulfonylurea, thiazolidinedione, sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitor, or dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor), a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, or basal insulin if metformin at a maximum tolerated dose does not achieve the HbA1c target over 3 months. A › Progress to bolus mealtime insulin or a GLP-1 agonist to cover postprandial glycemic excursions if HbA1c remains above goal despite an adequate trial of basal insulin. A Strength of recommendation (SOR) A Good-quality patient-oriented evidence B Inconsistent or limited-quality patient-oriented evidence C Consensus, usual practice, opinion, disease-oriented evidence, case series The "Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes" guidelines published in 2015 by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) state that metformin is the preferred initial pharmacotherapy for managing type 2 diabetes.1 Metformin, a biguanide, enhances insulin sensitivity in muscle and fat tissue and inhibits hepatic glucose production. Advantages of metformin include the longstanding research supporting its efficacy and safety, an expected decrease in the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level of 1% to 1.5%, low cost, minimal hypoglycemic risk, and potential reductions in cardiovascular (CV) events due to decreased low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol.1,2 To minimize adverse gastrointestinal effects, start metformin at 500 mg once or twice a day and titrate upward every one to 2 weeks to the target dose.3 To help guide dosing decisions, use the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) instead of the serum creatinine (SCr) level, because the SCr can translate into a variable range of eGFRs (TABLE 1).4,5 What if metfo Continue reading >>

8 Natural Alternatives To Actos And Metformin

8 Natural Alternatives To Actos And Metformin

If you suffer from Type 2 diabetes, there is a good chance that you’ve had a discussion with your doctor about the prescription drug Metformin. It is often initiated at the diagnosis of diabetes and helps to reduce blood sugars in an effective way. The problem however with this solution is its inability to work for everyone. Additionally, many users of Metformin may find the side effects of this drug extremely bothersome. The first thing to remember is that the development of Type 1 diabetes is not your fault, no matter what your medical providers might have you believe. Diabetes is caused by your body’s inability to process, driving up your blood sugars. However, Type 2 diabetes (adult onset) can be avoided many times and even reversed with the right diet, exercise program and proper natural herbs and vitamins. Dealing with High Blood Sugar Levels Maintaining your blood sugar levels into acceptable ranges is critically necessary to maintain your quality of life, which means your routines are going to be changing no matter what you do. High blood sugars can cause nerve and kidney damage, so it is important to act now. Whether you want to avoid prescription medication, or suffer with current side effects, many natural alternatives exist for Metformin. These options may be able to effectively treat your diabetes and help you feel back in control again 8 Natural Alternatives to Metformin 1. Lifestyle Changes: For many that suffer with Type 2 diabetes, basic lifestyle changes are often the primary thing that is necessary for treatment of their disease. For many people, this means an increased level of exercise and an improvement in their overall nutrition. The goal of these lifestyle changes is to get on an effective weight loss plan that is combined with higher levels Continue reading >>

Which Diabetes Drug Is Best?

Which Diabetes Drug Is Best?

HealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, July 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- No single drug to treat type 2 diabetes stands out from the pack when it comes to reducing the risks of heart disease, stroke or premature death, a new research review finds. The analysis of hundreds of clinical trials found no evidence that any one diabetes drug, or drug combination, beats out the others. Researchers said the results bolster current recommendations to first try an older, cheaper drug -- metformin (Glumetza, Glucophage) -- for most patients with type 2 diabetes. "There are very few things experts agree on, but this is one of them," said Dr. Kevin Pantalone, a diabetes specialist at the Cleveland Clinic and a member of the Endocrine Society. "Metformin, in the absence of contraindications or intolerability, should be the first-line agent to treat patients with type 2 diabetes," he said. Metformin can cause upset stomach and diarrhea, so some patients are unable to stick with it day to day, explained Pantalone, who wasn't involved in the study. And people with kidney disease generally shouldn't take it, he said. More than 29 million Americans have diabetes -- mostly type 2, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The disease, which is often linked to obesity, causes blood sugar levels to be chronically high. Over time, that can lead to complications, such as heart disease, stroke, kidney failure and nerve damage, the CDC says. There are numerous classes of medications that lower blood sugar levels. What's been unclear is whether any of those drugs work better than others in warding off diabetes complications and extending people's lives. The new analysis found no obvious winners. But the researchers also cautioned against drawing conclusions: The trials in the review w Continue reading >>

Alternatives To Metformin

Alternatives To Metformin

What Are the Alternatives to Metformin? Metformin (Glucophage®) is a prescription medication used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. A long-acting form, metformin ER (Glucophage XR®), is also available. For most people, metformin is effective in treating their diabetes, and most people tolerate it well. However, as with all medicines, side effects can occur. In other cases, the medicine may not completely control a person's diabetes. Fortunately, there are several alternatives to metformin. Some of the metformin alternatives include: Lifestyle Changes for Type 2 Diabetes Many lifestyle changes have been shown to be very effective for controlling type 2 diabetes (especially early type 2 diabetes). These lifestyle changes include weight loss, becoming more physically active (see Diabetes and Exercise), and changes in diet (see Diabetic Diet). In fact, these changes are important for all people with type 2 diabetes, including people taking diabetes medications. For many people, lifestyle changes alone may not be enough to adequately control type 2 diabetes. For these people, medications (including oral and injectable medications) may be necessary. Fortunately, there are many different types of oral medications available to treat type 2 diabetes, including: Sulfonylureas Sulfonylureas are medications that force the pancreas to produce more insulin. Because of this, they are very effective, but are also more likely to cause dangerously low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). These medications include: Meglitinides Meglitinides are similar to sulfonylureas, in that they force the pancreas to produce more insulin. However, they are short-acting and are less likely to cause dangerously low blood sugar. They are usually taken before every meal. Meglitinides include: Thiazolidinedio Continue reading >>

After Metformin, Are Newer Drugs Better For Type 2 Diabetes?

After Metformin, Are Newer Drugs Better For Type 2 Diabetes?

After Metformin, Are Newer Drugs Better for Type 2 Diabetes? Use of a sulfonylurea as second-line therapy after metformin for type 2 diabetes is just as effective as a newer agent but far less costly, a new study based on claims data finds. The results were published online February 26 in Diabetes Care by Yuanhui Zhang, a PhD candidate at North Carolina State University, Raleigh, and colleagues. "In light of an incomplete understanding of the pros and cons of second-line medications and the high cost associated with newer medications, the decision to use newer medications should be weighed against the additional cost burden to patients and/or the health system," study coauthor Brian Denton, PhD, of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, told Medscape Medical News. However, the use of retrospective data means that the study is subject to both ascertainment and physician-choice bias, said Alan J. Garber, MD, PhD, of Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, when asked to comment for Medscape Medical News. Moreover, noted Dr. Garber, the study doesn't adequately account for the adverse effects of sulfonylurea-induced hypoglycemia. "Patients value things differently. If you had a hypoglycemic episode and you don't like that, you're willing to pay a lot more of your discretionary income to avoid having another one." The researchers explain that there are currently 11 classes of approved glucose-lowering medications. Metformin has a long-standing evidence base for efficacy and safety, is inexpensive, and is regarded by most as the primary first-line treatment for type 2 diabetes. When metformin fails to achieve or maintain glycemic goals, another agent needs to be added. However, there is no consensus or sufficient evidence supporting the use of one second-line agent over Continue reading >>

A Complete List Of Diabetes Medications

A Complete List Of Diabetes Medications

Diabetes is a condition that leads to high levels of blood glucose (or sugar) in the body. This happens when your body can’t make or use insulin like it’s supposed to. Insulin is a substance that helps your body use the sugar from the food you eat. There are two different types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. People with both types of diabetes need medications to help keep their blood sugar levels normal. The types of drugs that can treat you depend on the type of diabetes you have. This article gives you information about drugs that treat both types of diabetes to help give you an idea of the treatment options available to you. Insulin Insulin is the most common type of medication used in type 1 diabetes treatment. It’s also used in type 2 diabetes treatment. It’s given by injection and comes in different types. The type of insulin you need depends on how severe your insulin depletion is. Options include: Short-acting insulin regular insulin (Humulin and Novolin) Rapid-acting insulins Intermediate-acting insulin Long-acting insulins Combination insulins NovoLog Mix 70/30 (insulin aspart protamine-insulin aspart) Humalog Mix 75/25 (insulin lispro protamine-insulin lispro) Humalog Mix 50/50 (insulin lispro protamine-insulin lispro) Humulin 70/30 (human insulin NPH-human insulin regular) Novolin 70/30 (human insulin NPH-human insulin regular) Ryzodeg (insulin degludec-insulin aspart) Amylinomimetic drug Pramlintide (SymlinPen 120, SymlinPen 60) is an amylinomimetic drug. It’s an injectable drug used before meals. It works by delaying the time your stomach takes to empty itself. It reduces glucagon secretion after meals. This lowers your blood sugar. It also reduces appetite through a central mechanism. Most medications for type 2 diabetes are o Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drugs You Inject That Aren't Insulin

Diabetes Drugs You Inject That Aren't Insulin

Insulin isn't the only type of injectable diabetes medicine your doctor might prescribe for you. Other drugs include: Albiglutide (Tanzeum) What it is: It's a man-made version of a hormone called GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide-1). Your intestines normally release this substance when you eat. It helps control your blood sugar. Who can take it: Adults who have type 2 diabetes and haven’t had success with other treatment. If you're planning to get pregnant, talk with your doctor, since researchers haven't studied albiglutide in pregnant women. What it does: After you eat, albiglutide helps your pancreas release insulin, which moves blood sugar (glucose) into your cells. It also limits how much of the hormone glucagon your body makes. This substance spurs your liver to release stored sugar. The drug also slows down digestion. Side effects: The most common ones are upper respiratory tract infection, diarrhea, nausea, and skin reactions where you give yourself the shot. All GLP-1 drugs, including albiglutide, have a boxed warning noting that in animal studies, this type of drug has been linked to thyroid cancer in some rats and mice. Experts don't know whether it has the same effect in people, though. Inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis), which may be severe, is another side effect. Exenatide (Bydureon, Byetta) What it is: Exenatide was the first GLP-1 drug approved by the FDA. Byetta came first. You take it as a shot twice daily. Bydureon is the newer, extended-release version, which you inject once a week. You can't take both drugs. Who can take it: Adults with type 2 diabetes for whom other treatment hasn't worked. If you think you might get pregnant, talk to your doctor. Researchers haven't studied this drug in pregnant women. What it does: Like other GLP-1 drugs, Continue reading >>

Can This Herb Completely Replace Drugs For Type-2 Diabetics?

Can This Herb Completely Replace Drugs For Type-2 Diabetics?

A few weeks ago, I received this email from a diabetic patient of mine. He's been working hard to control his blood sugar. He said, "Hi Frank, I have some very good news that I'm excited to tell you. I've been following your program closely and was a little discouraged. Although my A1c levels [average blood sugar levels] have been dropping, my fasting blood sugar has not. It was still at 123. About two to three weeks ago, I began taking berberine (500 mg, three times daily) and my fasting blood sugar dropped into the 90s. I'm stoked! Sincerely, Rich." So the question I had to answer for myself is, "Why did Rich fail to respond well to my usual program, and then do so well on berberine?" Berberine is a phytochemical (plant chemical) found in many different plants. When used in herbal medicine, the usual sources are barberry, goldenseal, or Oregon grape. It's the main alkaloid of Coptis chinensis, which Asian folk medicine uses to treat diabetes. You also may hear people refer to Coptis chinensis as Chinese Goldthread, Huang-Lian, and Huang-LienIt. Berberine has a lot of uses. It can treat heart disease, immune disorders, digestive problems, eye infections, and other infections. I had never heard of it being all that effective in diabetes. So as soon as Rich sent me that message, I looked into it. I found several well-written scientific articles describing an effect of berberine that I could hardly believe. It seems that you can use it as a substitute for insulin. One study, published just last year looked at the effect of berberine on how well muscle cells take in sugar. As you probably already know, except when we are actively exercising, sugar cannot get into muscle cells unless insulin is present to escort it in. That's why the blood sugar goes up when patients either Continue reading >>

Drug Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus In Patients For Whom Metformin Is Contraindicated

Drug Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus In Patients For Whom Metformin Is Contraindicated

Go to: Metformin has long been considered the initial drug therapy choice in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The most widely recognized clinical guidelines and consensus recommendations endorse its use when monotherapy is initially preferred to treat hyperglycemia.1–4 However, treatment with metformin is not suitable for all patients diagnosed with T2DM. Patients may initially receive metformin but not be able to tolerate common side effects, mainly its gastrointestinal adverse effects. Likewise, some practitioners may be cautious in using metformin in patients at risk for but who do not necessarily currently have specific contraindications to its use. While the specific contraindications to use of metformin have changed to an extent over the last decade, significant renal impairment or conditions that could acutely alter renal function remain a consistent theme in delineating who should not receive the medication. Some of the common sources and specific contraindications to the use of metformin based on renal function are provided in Table 1. Inconsistencies between these sources remain. Current guidelines/consensus recommendations for specific therapies to initiate in patients who cannot tolerate or have a contraindication to metformin use provide some insight on the issue but also conflict with each other. The American Diabetes Association/European Association for the Study of Diabetes recommend a sulfonylurea, meglitinide, pioglitazone, or dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitor when metformin cannot be used.3 They also recommend using a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonist if weight loss is warranted. The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists state GLP-1 agonists, DPP-4 inhibitors, and alpha-glucosidase inhibitors are acceptable Continue reading >>

Glycosidase Inhibitors For Pcos Treatment

Glycosidase Inhibitors For Pcos Treatment

Alternatives to glucophage for treating insulin resistance in PCOS Byetta For women with polycystic ovary syndrome – PCOS, insulin resistance is a common finding. In addition, many of these women do not respond to Clomid (Clomiphene Serophene)(Clomid resistance). For these reasons, many women are now treated with a diabetes medication known as glucophage (metformin) which works, in part, to reduce insulin resistance and improves the chances for ovulating spontaneously or with Clomid. However, many women will have side effects from glucophage such as bloating, cramping, diarrhea, flatulence and nausea. The most serious complication of glucophage is lactic acidosis which is a rare but potentially life threatening condition. Byetta: (Exenatide for injection) Byetta belongs to a class of medications known as incretin mimetics. Incretins are naturally occurring hormones secreted from the intestines in response to food intake. In the pancreas, incretin hormones act to increase insulin secretion in response to rising sugar levels in the blood. This helps to ensure an appropriate insulin response following ingestion of a meal. The incretin hormone which scientists have studies the most is called glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Byetta works by mimicking the effects of GLP-1. Studies show it increases insulin sensitivity. Byetta is approved by the FDA for the treatment of diabetes – not PCOS yet. Two advantages of Byetta that have been shown in clinical studies include better control of blood sugar levels in diabetics and weight loss. Since Byetta improves insulin resistance, some scientists feel that PCOS patients may benefit from taking Byetta. In a study of 60 overweight women with PCOS, Byetta improved the likelihood of women having regular menstrual cycles. The combinat Continue reading >>

Metformin Alternative

Metformin Alternative

I very much agree. That is awesome for you! I haven't had a period in over 7 years. Can't say that I miss it though. lol I'm very happy without it. My body couldn't tolerate metformin so my PCOS went untreated for years after diagnosis, but I've found that if I don't drink soda I get a period. Since I've been eating low carb/calorie I've had 3 in a row. After not having one for over a year. I really think if you pay attention to what you put in your body and get active it will reverse itself! Good luck girls! Edited by: MRSBEDWELL at: 4/1/2013 (09:42) It's not a diet, it's a lifestyle change!! It's not necessarily no dairy, it is no pasteurized, homogenized dairy with up to 6 drugs in it. What is sold in the stores is poison, imo. Here is a link to one article: This one will really be disconcerting, but people need to know it: It has probiotics that make it so healthy. It is ridiculous that healthy, raw milk is outlawed in so many states. People should have a choice. If you start learning about the origin of food and lift that veil, you'll notice a lot of secrecy. Watch Food, Inc. for one. Very eye opening. Edited by: INNERJETTIC at: 3/31/2013 (17:00) I am thinking of NOT taking it anymore.I am taking chromiu, and decreasing my carbs. I have this to say. I was on Metformin for YEARS. In the beginning, it did stop my inexplicable weight gain. There came a day last year that I just stopped taking it. I was at a friend's house visiting. Another friend was visiting as well. I was so sensitive to every sound that it was not only distracting but driving me nuts. I could hear the dog doing this whistly breathing that I absolutely could not subtract out of my head. The other friend who was visiting knew I was taking medication. She used to be a pharmacist but hasn't practiced Continue reading >>

Alternate Medications Other Than Metformin For Type 2 Diabetes

Alternate Medications Other Than Metformin For Type 2 Diabetes

As of 2006 diabetes was the seventh cause of death in the United States, according to the American Diabetes Society. By 2007 the medical costs of diagnosed diabetes exceeded $100 billion. Medication is a major factor in treating diabetes. Metformin is often the drug prescribed to newly diagnosed diabetics, notes FamilyDoctor.org. However there are other medications that be used in addition to metformin. Video of the Day Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors are a form of oral diabetes medication that target the digestive system. These drugs decrease the absorption of blood sugar by the stomach and intestines, explains FamilyDoctor.org. Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors may cause abdominal pain, loose bowel movement, or bloatedness. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 Inhibitors Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, or DPP-4 inhibitors, are oral medicines that aid the body in producing insulin after meals. DPP-4 inhibitors accomplish this by preventing the destruction of a biochemical called GLP-1. This biochemical helps reduce blood sugar levels, according to the American Diabetes Association. Exenatide is an incretin mimetic. Incretin mimetics are injectable diabetic medications that typically lower blood sugar by stimulating insulin release. Incretin mimetics can cause nausea and possibly hypoglycemia, explains the American Diabetes Association. Insulin is a biochemical that is normally produced by the pancreas, and utilized to regulate blood sugar levels, according to the American Diabetes Association. However diabetes either prevents the body from producing insulin, or renders the body unable to utilize the insulin produced. As such, it is necessary for some diabetics to use artificial insulin. However because insulin breaks down upon contact with digestive juices insulin must injected directly Continue reading >>

The Surprising Truth About Metformin

The Surprising Truth About Metformin

The “natural” blood-sugar remedy that had been sidelined for far too long What I’m about to tell you may be shocking. And it’s sure to ruffle the feathers of many of the “natural know-it-alls.” But the science is clear, so I’m not afraid to say it: If you have unmanaged Type II diabetes, you should consider the drug metformin as a first line of treatment. And you won’t get the full story anywhere else, since the natural health industry wouldn’t be caught dead recommending a drug. So, please allow me to do the honors here… Think of it as your emergency “get out of jail free card” Diabetes is deadly. High blood sugar coursing through your body destroys your eyes, kidneys, heart, brain, and more. So the sooner you bring it down the better. (Just like high blood pressure, for which I also recommend tried and true medications as a first-line treatment for unmanaged hypertension.) And in this case, the science is clear—the drug metformin has been proven safe and effective for most people. And since it’s now a generic drug, it’s highly cost effective, too. Now don’t get me wrong…I’m not saying diet and exercise isn’t important. In fact, they’re the best means for preventing and even reversing Type II diabetes entirely. Something metformin can’t do. And there are certainly dietary supplements that can help with maintaining healthy blood sugar (like berberine). But Type II diabetes doesn’t develop overnight. And let’s face it, changing the habits and consequences that got us there in the first place isn’t an overnight task either. So if you need additional help, this is one rare instance where you shouldn’t be afraid to look at a mainstream therapy. And when an option this effective comes along to help kick-start your efforts saf Continue reading >>

More in diabetes