diabetestalk.net

Otc Medications Diabetics Should Avoid

What Diabetics Need To Know About Over-the-counter Meds

What Diabetics Need To Know About Over-the-counter Meds

SATURDAY, Aug. 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- It can be tough for people with diabetes to choose appropriate over-the-counter medicines for a cold, cough or headache, a pharmacist explains. Many of these so-called OTC drugs contain carbohydrates (including sugar) that can affect blood sugar levels, or ingredients that can interact with diabetes medications, according to Miranda Wilhelm. She is a clinical associate professor at Southern Illinois University School of Pharmacy. But labels on OTC medicines don't list carbohydrates, she said. Wilhelm was to present a report on the topic Saturday at the annual meeting of the American Association of Diabetes Educators, in Indianapolis. "It's a dilemma because in some cases the carbs are so high it's equivalent to a snack," Wilhelm said in an association news release. "On the other hand, if you actually read the ingredients, you might be afraid to take something that's safe and could help with symptoms. In other words, you may not be limited to OTC medicines that are formulated for people with diabetes, and that's surprising for most people with the condition," she said. Wilhelm offered the following advice: Good diabetes management is important. "If your A1C levels are well-managed and your blood pressure is at or near your goal, you should be fine taking most OTC medicines -- whether or not they contain carbohydrates -- if you just need them for a few days," she said. Read the label. "If you're concerned about your blood sugar levels, look for medicines labeled 'sugar-free' or 'for people with diabetes,'" Wilhem suggested. Take pills instead of liquids. Liquid forms of medicines typically contain more carbohydrates, and sometimes as much alcohol as a glass of beer or wine, she said. If possible, choose a "topical" medicine. The Continue reading >>

High Blood Pressure And Drug Safety

High Blood Pressure And Drug Safety

One of the goals when you take drugs for high blood pressure is to be sure the medication is working effectively. One step toward achieving this goal is to avoid some medications. What kinds of problems might other drugs cause? Some drugs can make blood pressure rise. If you have high blood pressure to begin with, it can rise to dangerous levels. Some medications may interact with blood pressure medicine. This can prevent either drug from working properly. Here are common types of medication that can make high blood pressure worse. NSAIDs and High Blood Pressure NSAIDs -- nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs -- include both prescription and over-the-counter varieties. They are often used to relieve pain or reduce inflammation from conditions such as arthritis. However, NSAIDs can make the body retain fluid and decrease kidney function. This may cause blood pressure to rise even higher, putting greater stress on your heart and kidneys. Common NSAIDs include: You may also find NSAIDs in over-the-counter medication for other health problems. Cold medicine, for example, often contains NSAIDs. It's a good idea whenever you purchase an over-the-counter drug to check the label for NSAIDs. Ask your doctor if any NSAID is OK for you to use. Your doctor may be able to recommend alternatives, such as using acetaminophen instead of ibuprofen. Blood Pressure and Cough and Cold Medications Many cough and cold medications contain NSAIDs to relieve pain. NSAIDs may increase your blood pressure. Cough and cold medicines also frequently contain decongestants. Decongestants can make blood pressure worse in two ways: Decongestants may prevent high blood pressure drugs from working properly. What can you do? Avoid using cough and cold medicine that contains NSAIDs or decongestants. Ask your Continue reading >>

Cold Medicines That Are Safe For Diabetes

Cold Medicines That Are Safe For Diabetes

Searching for relief for your runny nose, sore throat, or cough? Many over-the-counter cough, cold, and flu remedies list diabetes as an underlying condition that may indicate you should leave the medication on the shelf. The warnings are clear: "Ask a doctor before use if you have: heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes." Unfortunately, your doctor is not along for the trip to the pharmacy. Because illness causes your body to release stress hormones that naturally raise blood glucose, you'll want to be sure that over-the-counter medications won't increase blood glucose levels, too. Simple Is Best for Cold Medicines Keep it simple by choosing an over-the-counter medication based on the types of ingredients proven to relieve your particular symptoms. Often a medication with just one ingredient is all you need to treat your symptoms rather than agents with multiple ingredients. "To choose the correct medication, take time to speak to a pharmacist," says Jerry Meece, R.Ph., CDE, of Gainesville, Texas. "The proper remedies may not only make you feel better, but also cut the length of the illness and possibly save you a trip to the doctor." Oral cold and flu pills are often a better choice than syrups with the same ingredients because the pills may contain no carbohydrate. If you decide to use a syrup, look for one that is sugar-free. If you can't find one, the small amount of sugar in a syrup will likely affect your blood sugar less than the illness itself, Meece says. Safe OTC Cold Medicines Various over-the-counter medications are designed to treat specific symptoms. Many pharmacists recommend these products for people with diabetes. Symptom: Cough Best option: Anti-tussive dextromethorphan (Delsym, Diabetic Tussin NT [includes acetaminophen, diphenhydramine]) Sympt Continue reading >>

Medication Interactions: Food, Supplements And Other Drugs

Medication Interactions: Food, Supplements And Other Drugs

Some foods — even healthy ones — can make your medications less effective. Healthy eating is critical for patients battling cardiovascular disease, also called heart disease. In fact, it can help reverse a condition or reduce the need for medication. But even healthy foods, including fruits and vegetables, can cause unintended and possibly dangerous interactions with certain medications. Perhaps the best-known example is grapefruit, which, along with pomegranate, can alter the way certain cholesterol medications work. Other examples include some leafy green veggies, such as spinach or kale. Their high vitamin K levels pose risks for patients being treated with blood thinners to prevent strokes. Eating high levels of these vegetables can counteract the medication’s effectiveness. Balancing Food and Medication Winston H. Gandy Jr., a cardiologist with Piedmont Heart Institute in Atlanta and an American Heart Association volunteer, said these potential dangers don’t mean patients get a free pass when it comes to eating their veggies. It comes down to maintaining a careful balance when using anti-coagulants such as Coumadin (also known generically as warfarin and marketed under the brand names Marevan, Lawarin, Waran and Warfant). “Coumadin is adjusted to your diet,” Dr. Gandy said. “If you’re eating salad three times a week, then you need to continue that to maintain consistency and balance.” Interactions from Supplements and Other Medications Dr. Gandy said food isn’t the only thing to be cautious of when taking blood thinners, also called anticoagulants. Vitamin supplements can also disrupt a carefully balanced dosage of medication. Antibiotics and common pain relievers also can cause the blood to thicken. On the flip side, some over-the-counter medic Continue reading >>

Nine Drugs

Nine Drugs

I recently received an e-mail alerting me to a webpage discussing “9 Common Drugs That Every Diabetic Should Avoid Mixing With Their Meds.” It was such an intriguing title that I Googled the phrase, and found that several websites had exactly the same list I totally disagree with the author’s premise that people with diabetes (PWD) should avoid the medications on the list; in fact, all of these medications are reasonable for PWD to take, if their physician and/or pharmacist explains the issues involved. Here’s the original information (including some poor grammar and miscapitalizations), plus my comment for each: Beta Blockers: Beta-blockers, such as Lopressor (metoprolol), Tenormin (Atenolol), and Inderal (propanolol), have been known to reduce the release of insulin. The main concern for PWD with the use of beta-blockers, which are very useful drugs for the treatment of hypertension and heart disease, is that they might mask some of the symptoms of hypoglycemia. If you are prone to hypoglycemia, you could expect your usual symptoms relating to pounding heart and shakiness to be blunted while on beta-blockers. Minoxidil: Minoxidil, a direct vasodilator, has a tendency to raise blood glucose levels. See my comment after this list… Thiazide Diuretics: Thiazide diuretics include such drugs as Diuril (Chlorothiazide), Zaroxolyn (Metolazone), and Oretic (Hydrochlorothiazide), and is known to raise glucose levels due to its effect it has on causing the loss of potassium. See my comment after this list… Calcium channel blockers: Calcium channel blockers, which are prescribed for Hypertension, management of Angina include such drugs as Calan (Verapamil), Adalat (Nifedipine),and Norvasc (Amlodipine), and is known to reduce the secretion of insulin. I’m not sure wh Continue reading >>

What Medications Should I Avoid With Bph?

What Medications Should I Avoid With Bph?

For many men, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a normal part of growing older. Prostate enlargement is so common that about half of men have it by age 60, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). By their 80s, the vast majority of men will have prostate growth and its associated symptoms. Men with BPH need to follow the treatment plan their doctor prescribes, and they also need to watch what medicines they take, what beverages they drink, and which foods they eat. Certain drugs, foods, and drinks can worsen BPH symptoms. Here’s a guide to the medications, foods, and drinks to watch out for if you have BPH. BPH is a condition of the prostate gland. The prostate is under the bladder and in front of the rectum. It’s part of the male reproductive system. The main job of the prostate is to contribute fluid to semen. The prostate starts out about the size of a walnut. When a man gets older, for reasons that still aren’t completely understood, the prostate begins to grow. As it enlarges, the prostate squeezes on the urethra. The urethra is the tube through which urine passes from the bladder out of the body. This pressure makes it harder for urine to leave the body and prevents the bladder from fully emptying. As the bladder works harder to release urine, its muscular wall thickens. Eventually, it weakens to the point that it can’t release urine normally. This leads to the symptoms of BPH, which include: urinating often, sometimes eight or more times daily feeling an urgent need to go having a weak stream or dribbling urine feeling pain during urination being unable to urinate (urinary retention) If you take one of these drugs, check with your doctor. All of these medicines can worsen BPH symptoms. You may need to Continue reading >>

Medications To Avoid When Taking Insulin

Medications To Avoid When Taking Insulin

At last count, there are more than 700 medications that potentially interact with insulin with varying degrees of significance. Typically a negative drug interaction either decreases or increases insulin's effects, posing the risk of high or low blood glucose. But rather than insisting that you avoid these medications, it's more likely your doctor will want to adjust your insulin dosage for the period you take them. Commonly prescribed drugs for chronic conditions that may require an adjustment in insulin dosage include: Prednisone Olanzapine thyroid hormones ACE inhibitors selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) sulfonamides disopyramide quinine and quinidine In addition, some drugs that are prescribed for temporary conditions, such as antibiotics for infection, may require an adjustment to your insulin dosage. It's best to check drug interaction information with your pharmacist or physician, and to double-check with your pharmacist each time you refill a prescription of insulin. By Joyce A. Generali, M.S. FASHP, R.Ph., director of the University of Kansas Drug Information Center and the author of The Pharmacy Technician’s Pocket Drug Reference From our sister publication, Diabetes Focus, Summer 2011 Publication Review By: the Editorial Staff at HealthCommunities.com Last Modified: 11 Sep 2015 Continue reading >>

5 Drugs You May Need To Avoid Or Adjust If You Have Kidney Disease

5 Drugs You May Need To Avoid Or Adjust If You Have Kidney Disease

A to Z Health Guide Medications save and improve lives, but it can be easy to overlook their risks and side effects, especially if you don't think they apply to you. Twenty-six million Americans have chronic kidney disease and most don't know it. If you don't know how well your kidneys are working, you may not realize that certain medications could be damaging your kidneys and other parts of your body. Both prescription and over-the-counter medications are filtered by the kidneys. This means that your kidneys degrade and remove medications from the body. When your kidneys aren't working properly, medications can build up and cause you harm. It's important to get your kidneys checked and to work with your doctor to make any adjustments to your medication regimen, such as dosing changes or substitutions. This will help prevent any negative effects from the medication, including further kidney damage. You can determine your level of kidney function with a blood test for serum creatinine to calculate an eGFR measurement. An eGFR estimates how well your kidneys are filtering wastes from the blood. The National Kidney Foundation encourages you to learn more about the health of your kidneys in order to protect these vital organs when taking medications. Always speak with your clinician and pharmacist to determine whether the medications that you're taking should be adjusted based on your kidney function. Only make changes to your prescription medications with the supervision of your trained medical practitioner. Ask questions and evaluate the risks and benefits based on your specific health needs. Here are 5 common types of prescription and over-the-counter medications may need to be adjusted or replaced if you have kidney damage. Cholesterol medications. The dosing of certain Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drugs Without A Prescription?

Diabetes Drugs Without A Prescription?

So you’re standing in line at the checkout of your local pharmacy, your shopping basket filled with soap, shampoo, maybe a snack and some aspirin. But you know you forgot one thing — what was it? Oh yes, your diabetes medicine. No worries; it’s sitting right next to the cash register, strategically placed so that people like you remember to replenish their supply. Far-fetched? Not as much as you might think. According to an article published last week in the Washington Post, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is considering allowing certain drugs for diabetes, asthma, and migraines to be sold without a prescription. No outcome is certain at this point, and the scenario described above might never come to pass even if the FDA’s plans proceed; pharmacists might be required to dispense a drug even if no doctor’s prescription is required. But if all goes as planned, the way people receive drugs used to treat some common health conditions could change dramatically. According to the Post article, the FDA is interested in increasing access to established drugs that have been shown to be easy to administer and relatively low-risk. Since over-the counter drugs require no visit to a doctor and tend to be cheaper than even generic prescription drugs, people with no health insurance or limited coverage could benefit from removing prescription requirements. On several past occasions, the FDA has granted petitions from drugmakers to allow a prescription drug to be sold over-the-counter. Examples from the last decade include omeprazole (brand name Prilosec and others), a drug for gastroesophageal reflux disease; and loratadine (Claritin and others), for allergies. The FDA envisions potential customers filling out questionnaires on electronic kiosks in pharmacies, poss Continue reading >>

Over-the-counter Medications Are They Safe For People With Diabetes?

Over-the-counter Medications Are They Safe For People With Diabetes?

Mrs. Green comes to the pharmacy counter with a package of cold medication in each hand and a confused look on her face. She has been reading labels but cannot find a medication for her husband, who has diabetes and is home in bed with the flu. “…not recommended for use by people with high blood pressure, diabetes, or glaucoma without a doctor’s supervision….” “Consult your doctor before taking if you have diabetes….” These warnings are often found on the packaging of non-prescription or over-the-counter (OTC) medications. Such cautions are often related to the potential for drug interaction. Medications can react with other drugs, food, beverages, or existing medical conditions. Such interactions can elevate or reduce the amount of drug in the body, increase the risk of side effects, and may even be life-threatening. Eating grapefruit with some medications used to treat high cholesterol can make the level of drug in your body higher. Using certain medications to ease a stuffy nose could raise blood glucose. Many people with diabetes also have other chronic problems, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, nerve pain (neuropathy), and depression. Since several chronic conditions are being managed at the same time, a drug interaction is possible. However, educating yourself can reduce your risk of experiencing harmful drug interactions and side effects. Your pharmacist is a medication expert who is also available to answer any of your questions. OTC Medication Guideline for Those with Diabetes Products listed here include only a partial list of those available in each OTC category. If you are considering a product, please ask your pharmacist or doctor about the potential for drug interactions. Analgesics and Antipyretics – used for aches, pain an Continue reading >>

6 Of The Best Dietary Supplements For A Diabetic Diet—and 3 You Should Avoid

6 Of The Best Dietary Supplements For A Diabetic Diet—and 3 You Should Avoid

Should I take supplements? From cinnamon and magnesium to herbal formulas claiming to smack down high blood sugar, “diabetes-friendly” supplements are popping up in health food stores and drugstores and in the medicine cabinets of more and more people with diabetes. More than 50 percent of people with diabetes say they’ve used dietary supplements, according to one 2011 study—and at least one in four has given herbal remedies a try. The big question: Should you? “People with diabetes may be looking for something that seems less potent than a medication or something that will treat other health issues beyond blood sugar control, such as high cholesterol,” notes Laura Shane-McWhorter, PharmD, a University of Utah professor of pharmacotherapy and author of The American Diabetes Association Guide to Herbs & Nutritional Supplements: What You Need to Know from Aloe to Zinc. But experts are reluctant to recommend supplements to people with diabetes for two important health reasons. First, there’s virtually no research on long-term safety. Second, no supplement controls blood sugar as effectively as diabetes drugs (in combination with a healthy lifestyle). “There are no miracle treatments for diabetes,” Shane-McWhorter says. “The most important thing to know if you have diabetes is that no supplement will take care of it for you. Diabetes is a condition that can be well-controlled with a healthy lifestyle plus medication if needed. A supplement can’t replace those.” And new science is changing the supplement landscape. In consulting the latest research as well as supplement experts for this report on the best-studied and most widely used supplements, we found that some popular pills—chromium, we’re talking about you—aren’t living up to their reput Continue reading >>

How Medications Can Impact Type 1 Diabetes Management

How Medications Can Impact Type 1 Diabetes Management

When taking medicine, you must always read labeling carefully and be aware of possible side effects. When you have Type 1, you have the added consideration of how it will affect your blood glucose levels as well as any devices that you depend on for your diabetes management. And as with anything you digest, you must know the carb count, administering insulin as needed. Apart from daily medication such as birth control, having a sick-day protocal is always smart for the unexpected bug. This way, you’ll be stocked ahead of time with essentials to ease your mind and decrease additional stress over your care. Here are some must-knows about over-the-counter medication and what it means for your Type 1. Cold Medicine Being sick stresses the body, and when your body’s stressed it releases blood-glucose raising hormones. These hormones can even prevent insulin from properly lowering your levels. Consider the following when taking cold medicine: Opt for pill forms – if possible, pills over syrups are better for their lack of carbohydrates. Check for added sugars – When taking syrups, double-check the labels of over-the-counter brands to make sure they don’t have added sugar. See if there’s a sugar-free option – Though small doses of sugar don’t pose a huge risk, your safest bet is to ask your pharmacist about sugar-free syrups. Check your BGLs frequently – This should be triple the time you typically check. Being sick makes you more susceptible to BGL extremes. Administer insulin accordingly – Medicine, just like food, must be dosed for. Blood Glucose Levels Even without sugar, short-term cold medicines can send your blood glucose levels spinning. Aspirin has been known to lower glucose levels Pseudoepinephrine, the decongestant found in most over-the-counter Continue reading >>

Over-the-counter Meds That Raise Blood Glucose

Over-the-counter Meds That Raise Blood Glucose

From cough syrup to decongestants, here are the over-the-counter drugs that may affect your blood glucose Continue reading >>

9 Types Of Medication Older Adults Should Use With Caution

9 Types Of Medication Older Adults Should Use With Caution

As a result, it's not uncommon for older adults to be overmedicated and to experience adverse reactions to the ever-lengthening list of medications they take. To lower the chances of overmedication and dangerous drug reactions, the American Geriatrics Society Foundation for Health in Aging recommends that people age 65 and over be cautious about using the following types of drugs: Important: If you are taking any of these medications, talk to your doctor or health care provider before stopping their use. 1. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) Be cautious of: long-lasting NSAIDS such as piroxicam (sold under the brand-name Feldene) and indomethacin (Indocin). The concern: NSAIDs are used to reduce pain and inflammation, but in older adults these medications can increase the risk of indigestion, ulcers and bleeding in the stomach or colon; they can also increase blood pressure, affect your kidneys and make heart failure worse. If NSAIDS are needed, better choices include the shorter-acting ibuprofen (Motrin) and salsalate (Disalcid). Because of the increased risk of bleeding, don't use NSAIDs together with aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), dabigatran (Pradaxa), dipyridamole (Persantine), prasugrel (Effient), ticlopidine (Ticlid) or warfarin (Coumadin). If you take NSAIDs regularly and have a history of ulcers, or are 75 years of age or older, you may need to protect your stomach against bleeding with a prescription medication such as misoprostol (Cytotec) or a proton pump inhibitor such as omeprazole (Prilosec). 2. Muscle relaxants Be cautious of: cyclobenzaprine (Flexeril), methocarbamol (Robaxin), carisoprodol (Soma) and similar medications. The concern: These medications can leave you feeling groggy and confused, increase your risk of falls, and cause constipat Continue reading >>

High Blood Pressure: Over-the-counter Medicines To Avoid - Topic Overview

High Blood Pressure: Over-the-counter Medicines To Avoid - Topic Overview

Some over-the-counter (OTC) medicines can raise your blood pressure or keep your blood pressure medicine from working the way it should. So if you have high blood pressure or other heart or blood vessel problems, you need to be careful with OTC medicines. That includes vitamins and supplements. Your doctor or pharmacist can suggest OTC medicines that are safe for you. Some common types of OTC medicines you may need to avoid include: Some antacids and other stomach medicines. Many of these are high in sodium, which can raise blood pressure. So be sure to read labels carefully to check for sodium content. Some herbal remedies and dietary supplements. Examples are ephedra, ma huang, and bitter orange. Always talk with your pharmacist or doctor before you take any new OTC medicine or supplement. He or she can: Check to make sure that the medicine won't interact with your blood pressure medicine. Suggest OTC medicines that won't affect your blood pressure. It's also important to make a list of all the medicines you take. Bring it to each appointment, and ask your doctor to review it. Be sure to include all your prescription medicines, OTC medicines, vitamins, and herbal and dietary supplements. Continue reading >>

More in diabetes