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Organs Affected By Diabetes Type 2

Type 3 Diabetes

Type 3 Diabetes

The Increased Risk of Alzheimer's Disease Understanding the link between Diabetes & Alzheimer's disease Most of us are familiar with two types of diabetes: type 1 (juvenile onset) and type 2 (adult or acquired) diabetes. Diabetes is a problem with blood sugar regulation in the body that can lead to more serious health concerns. More recently, a third type of diabetes, which has been linked to Alzheimer's disease has come to light. To understand this better, let's first look at the most common form of diabetes, type 2. The link between type 2 diabetes & Alzheimer's disease The exact connection between Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes is still unknown. However, poorly controlled blood sugar may increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's. In fact, this relationship is so strong that some have called Alzheimer's "diabetes of the brain" or "type 3 diabetes." A recent study presented at the Society of Neuroscience suggests that Alzheimer's may actually be the late stage of type 2 diabetes. The study, which was conducted at University of Albany, suggests that the excess insulin produced due to insulin resistance can actually cross into the brain and disrupt brain chemistry, which leads to the production of toxic proteins that "poison" brain cells. The amyloid protein that forms in both Alzheimer's patients and those who have type 2 diabetes is identical. Dr. Ewan McNay, a lead researcher at the University of Albany, said, "People who develop diabetes have to realize this is more than controlling their weight or diet. It's also the first step on the road to cognitive decline. At first they won't be able to keep up with their kids playing games, but in 30 years' time they may not even recognize them." Over the past decade as the connection between type 2 diabetes and Alz Continue reading >>

Diabetes Organs

Diabetes Organs

Ads by Google What are diabetes organs? Pancreas and Liver are considering as diabetes organs, which are responsible for the glucose metabolism. Diabetes pancreas, liver & muscle cells Glucose metabolism involves small intestine, pancreas, liver and muscle cell. If there are, any problem with any of this diabetes organ leads to defect in glucose metabolism and can develop diabetes. Diabetes pancreas The pancreas produces various enzymes that aid in the digestive process, additionally to convert glucose into energy. The pancreas secretes various enzyme and hormones, which include insulin requires for the digestion and absorption of food. The glucose utilization in the body is controlling by the insulin. Your body tissues requires insulin for proper glucose absorption, exception is your brain. If your pancreas fails to produce or secretes sufficient amount of insulin, leads to elevated blood glucose level called diabetes mellitus. Functions of Insulin hormone Insulin is a hormone, which controls and comments (signals) the whole glucose metabolism process. When food is digested, glucose (first nutrient released from food, which energies the whole body) is released in the blood stream. On seeing the high level of glucose in blood, pancreas releases certain quantity of insulin with respect to the level of glucose in blood to normalize the blood-glucose level. Insulin as a commenting signal to muscle cells that inform there is enough glucose available for consumption it is the commenting signal to liver to stop converting glycogen to glucose and releasing of glucose in the blood stream. if there is high level of glucose in blood than the normal requirement, then pancreas release’s high level of insulin with respect to the level of glucose. This high level of insulin is the Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Harms The Brain

How Diabetes Harms The Brain

TIME Health For more, visit TIME Health. When blood sugar levels start to climb in diabetes, a number of body systems are harmed—and that list includes the brain, since studies have linked diabetes with a higher risk of stroke and dementia. Now, a new study published in the journal Neurology reports that changes in blood vessel activity in the brains of diabetics may lead to drops in cognitive functions and their ability to perform daily activities. Dr. Vera Novak, associate professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and her colleagues followed a group of 65 older people. About half had type 2 diabetes, and half did not. After two years, the diabetic patients had lower scores on cognitive tests compared to when they began, while people without diabetes showed little change on the tests. MORE: The Strange Way a Diabetes Drug May Help Skin Scars What drove the decline, says Novak, were changes in the brains of the diabetic patients. Diabetes can cause blood vessels to be less responsive to the ebb and flow of demand in different parts of the brain. Normally, flexible vessels will swell slightly to increase blood flow and oxygen to areas that are more intensely active, such as regions involved in memory or higher reasoning during intellectual tasks. But unchecked blood sugar can make these vessels less malleable and therefore less responsive. “When doing any task, from cognition to moving your fingers, you need to increase blood flow to that specific area of the brain,” says Novak. “With diabetes, however, that vasodilation ability is reduced, so you have fewer resources to perform any task.” MORE: Statins May Seriously Increase Diabetes Risk In the study, Novak measured the changes in the flexibility of the blood v Continue reading >>

Leg, Foot, And Organ Damage With Diabetes

Leg, Foot, And Organ Damage With Diabetes

Healthy nerves carry messages to our muscles and organs. Having high blood sugar levels for a long time can damage nerves throughout the body. Also, the older people get and the longer they have diabetes, the more likely they are to have some nerve damage. When nerves become damaged, they can't send messages, the messages they send get interrupted, or the messages get mixed up. This is a condition called diabetic neuropathy. High blood sugar affects: Long nerves from the spinal cord that allow us to move and feel. Smaller nerves that support our body organs including the heart, stomach, and bladder. Leg and Foot Damage Long nerves from the spinal cord send messages to the lower legs and feet. When blood sugar levels stay high, the nerve cells swell and scar. After a while, the nerves can't send messages to the legs and feet the way they should. When this happens, it can cause people to lose feeling in their legs and feet, making it hard to sense pressure or pain. It can also cause uncomfortable feelings in the arms and legs, like tingling, shooting pains, or aching. This condition is known as peripheral neuropathy. Damaged nerves can also affect the muscles in the legs and feet, causing them to lose shape. When muscles in the foot lose their shape, they aren't able to hold the bones and joints of the feet together, or they can pull up on the bones, causing the foot to become deformed. These kinds of changes can put pressure on parts of the foot that aren't meant for walking, making it harder and more painful to walk. Sometimes people lose feeling in their feet without realizing it. When people don't know they've lost feeling, it can lead to very serious foot problems, including wounds that won't heal. Treatment Ask your doctor or other member of your health care team to Continue reading >>

Kidney Disease Of Diabetes

Kidney Disease Of Diabetes

Kidney Disease of Diabetes Facts* *Kidney Disease of Diabetes Facts Medically Edited by: Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis, Treatment, Medication Medical Author: Melissa Conrad Stoppler, MD Medical Editor: Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C) Proper nutrition is essential for anyone living with diabetes. Control of blood glucose levels is only one goal of a healthy eating plan for people with diabetes. A diet for those with diabetes should also help achieve and maintain a normal body weight as well as prevent heart and vascular disease, which are frequent complications of diabetes. There is no prescribed diet plan for those with diabetes. Rather, eating plans are tailored to fit an individual's needs, schedules, and eating habits. A diabetes diet plan must also be balanced with the intake of insulin and oral diabetes medications. In general, the principles of a healthy diabetes diet are the same for everyone. Consumption of a variety of foods including whole grains, fruits, non-fat dairy products, beans, and lean meats or vegetarian substitutes, poultry and fish is recommended to achieve a healthy diet. Each year in the United States, more than 100,000 people are diagnosed with kidney failure, a serious condition in which the kidneys fail to rid the body of wastes. Kidney failure is the final stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Diabetes is the most common cause of kidney failure, accounting for nearly 44 percent of new cases. Even when diabetes is controlled, the disease can lead to chronic kidney disease and kidney failure. Most people with diabetes do not develop chronic kidney disease that is severe enough to progress to kidney failure. Nearly 24 million people in the United States have diabetes, and nearly 200,000 people are living with kidney failure a Continue reading >>

Complications Of Diabetes – A Disease Affecting All Organs

Complications Of Diabetes – A Disease Affecting All Organs

We’re treating people with type 2 diabetes completely wrong – and it’s harming every organ in their bodies. Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) may be the hallmark of diabetes, but does not cause most of the morbidity (the harm of the disease). Blood glucose is fairly easily controlled by medication, but this does not prevent the long-term complications. Despite blood glucose control, damage occurs to virtually every organ system. It would be difficult to find a single organ system NOT affected by diabetes. These complications are generally classified as either microvascular (small blood vessels) or macrovascular (large blood vessels). Certain organs, such as the eyes, kidneys and nerves are predominantly perfused by small blood vessels. Chronic damage to these small blood vessels causes failure of these organs. Damage to larger blood vessels results in narrowing called atherosclerotic plaque. When this plaque ruptures, it triggers an inflammatory reaction and blood clots that cause heart attacks and strokes. When blood flow is impaired to the legs, it may cause gangrene due to reduced circulation. There are other complications do not fall neatly into this simple categorization. A variety of diabetic complications are not obviously caused by injured blood vessels. These would include skin conditions, fatty liver disease, infections, polycystic ovarian syndromes, Alzheimer’s disease and cancer. Microvascular Complications Retinopathy Diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness in the United States, according to the Center for Disease Control in 2011. Eye disease, characteristically retinal damage (retinopathy) is one of the most frequent complications of diabetes. The retina is the light-sensitive nerve layer at the back of the eye that sends its ‘pict Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Affects The Digestive System

How Diabetes Affects The Digestive System

With an increase of glucose in the blood, our digestive systems can experience problems with absorbing necessary nutrients. Diabetes is currently one of the most common health conditions. This illness arises when the body is not capable of producing insulin, something that usually helps regulate the amount of sugar in the blood. Diabetes varies in type and severity, but regardless of these details they all pose health risks. While it continues to be incurable, it is treatable. For this reason, we are about to explain in detail how diabetes affects the digestive system. Legionella Testing Lab - High Quality Lab Results CDC ELITE & NYSDOH ELAP Certified - Fast Results North America Lab Locations legionellatesting.com The functions of the digestive system One of the most important systems in a human being is the digestive system. It is a network of organs including the mouth, the pharynx, and the stomach, which must transform food into something that can be absorbed by parts of the body, mainly cells, so that it can function. The complete digestive cycle is comprised of transportation, secretion, absorption, and excretion in order for the body to function properly. It supplies all of the nutrients our bodies need through this process. It also allows us to clean or dispose of those elements that our bodies no longer need. How diabetes affects the digestive system As we already know, digestion is an automatic process. This means that our body does not require a conscious stimulus to work and digest food. The opposite is actually true, the digestive system operates on its own thanks to the nervous system. Diabetes creates issues with this system that prevent proper functioning of the digestive system. When the blood has an increased amount of glucose, our digestive system can Continue reading >>

Avoiding Complications Of Diabetes

Avoiding Complications Of Diabetes

It can take work to get your diabetes under control, but the results are worth it. If you don't make the effort to get a handle on it, you could set yourself up for a host of complications. Diabetes can take a toll on nearly every organ in your body, including the: Heart and blood vessels Eyes Kidneys Nerves Gastrointestinal tract Gums and teeth Heart and Blood Vessels Heart disease and blood vessel disease are common problems for many people who don’t have their diabetes under control. You're at least twice as likely to have heart problems and strokes as people who don’t have the condition. Blood vessel damage or nerve damage may also cause foot problems that, in rare cases, can lead to amputations. People with diabetes are ten times likelier to have their toes and feet removed than those without the disease. Symptoms: You might not notice warning signs until you have a heart attack or stroke. Problems with large blood vessels in your legs can cause leg cramps, changes in skin color, and less sensation. The good news: Many studies show that controlling your diabetes can help you avoid these problems, or stop them from getting worse if you have them. Diabetes is the leading cause of new vision loss among adults ages 20 to 74 in the U.S. It can lead to eye problems, some of which can cause blindness if not treated: Glaucoma Cataracts Diabetic retinopathy, which involves the small blood vessels in your eyes Symptoms: Vision problems or sudden vision loss. The good news: Studies show that regular eye exams and timely treatment of these kinds of problems could prevent up to 90% of diabetes-related blindness. *CGM-based treatment requires fingersticks for calibration, if patient is taking acetaminophen, or if symptoms/expectations do not match CGM readings, and if not pe Continue reading >>

Metformin, The Liver, And Diabetes

Metformin, The Liver, And Diabetes

Most people think diabetes comes from pancreas damage, due to autoimmune problems or insulin resistance. But for many people diagnosed “Type 2,” the big problems are in the liver. What are these problems, and what can we do about them? First, some basic physiology you may already know. The liver is one of the most complicated organs in the body, and possibly the least understood. It plays a huge role in handling sugars and starches, making sure our bodies have enough fuel to function. When there’s a lot of sugar in the system, it stores some of the excess in a storage form of carbohydrate called glycogen. When blood sugar levels get low, as in times of hunger or at night, it converts some of the glycogen to glucose and makes it available for the body to use. Easy to say, but how does the liver know what to do and when to do it? Scientists have found a “molecular switch” called CRTC2 that controls this process. When the CRTC2 switch is on, the liver pours sugar into the system. When there’s enough sugar circulating, CRTC2 should be turned off. The turnoff signal is thought to be insulin. This may be an oversimplification, though. According to Salk Institute researchers quoted on RxPG news, “In many patients with type II diabetes, CRTC2 no longer responds to rising insulin levels, and as a result, the liver acts like a sugar factory on overtime, churning out glucose [day and night], even when blood sugar levels are high.” Because of this, the “average” person with Type 2 diabetes has three times the normal rate of glucose production by the liver, according to a Diabetes Care article. Diabetes Self-Management reader Jim Snell brought the whole “leaky liver” phenomenon to my attention. He has frequently posted here about his own struggles with soarin Continue reading >>

Diabetes Complications

Diabetes Complications

Diabetes is a systemic disease meaning that it can affect almost every organ in the body. The effects of diabetes include damage from high blood glucose levels to the heart, kidneys, brain and eyes. Find more information on how diabetes affects the organs here. Research indicates that patients who have survived longer with HIV might be more vulnerable to chronic conditions such as diabetes. Not all diabetics develop complications if the condition is monitored adequately. A recent study found that a group of common viral infections, caused by enteroviruses, may have ties to type 1 diabetes. Most people don't realise diabetes can affect almost every part of the body. Here are some of the most common complications associated with type 2 diabetes. When nerve damage from diabetes takes place, the nerves in the brain that control sensation, are often damaged. New research suggests that doctors and their diabetic patients should be aware that the onset of diabetes or rapidly deteriorating diabetes could be the first sign of hidden pancreatic cancer. There are a number of ways that diabetes damages the nerves, but they all seem related to blood sugar being too high for a long period of time. A study has found an association between lower levels of physical activity among diabetics and heightened odds for diabetic retinopathy. Better diabetes treatment has slashed rates of complications such as heart attacks, strokes and amputations in older adults. Kidney problems result from damage to the blood vessels in the kidneys caused by high blood sugar levels in some diabetes patients. load more Continue reading >>

The Dose-dependent Organ-specific Effects Of A Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor On Cardiovascular Complications In A Model Of Type 2 Diabetes

The Dose-dependent Organ-specific Effects Of A Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor On Cardiovascular Complications In A Model Of Type 2 Diabetes

Abstract Although dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors have been suggested to have a non-glucoregulatory protective effect in various tissues, the effects of long-term inhibition of DPP-4 on the micro- and macro-vascular complications of type 2 diabetes remain uncertain. The aim of the present study was to investigate the organ-specific protective effects of DPP-4 inhibitor in rodent model of type 2 diabetes. Eight-week-old diabetic and obese db/db mice and controls (db/m mice) received vehicle or one of two doses of gemigliptin (0.04 and 0.4%) daily for 12 weeks. Urine albumin excretion and echocardiography measured at 20 weeks of age. Heart and kidney tissue were subjected to molecular analysis and immunohistochemical evaluation. Gemigliptin effectively suppressed plasma DPP-4 activation in db/db mice in a dose-dependent manner. The HbA1c level was normalized in the 0.4% gemigliptin, but not in the 0.04% gemigliptin group. Gemigliptin showed a dose-dependent protective effect on podocytes, anti-apoptotic and anti-oxidant effects in the diabetic kidney. However, the dose-dependent effect of gemigliptin on diabetic cardiomyopathy was ambivalent. The lower dose significantly attenuated left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, apoptosis, and cardiac fibrosis, but the higher dose could not protect the LV dysfunction and cardiac fibrosis. Gemigliptin exerted non-glucoregulatory protective effects on both diabetic nephropathy and cardiomyopathy. However, high-level inhibition of DPP-4 was associated with an organ-specific effect on cardiovascular complications in type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Effects Of Alcohol On Diabetes

Effects Of Alcohol On Diabetes

Alcohol, which is made from fermented yeast, sugars, and starches is a very commonly used substance. In fact, 87.6% of adults aged 18 and over have consumed it at some point in their lifetime. It is also known as a depressant due to its capability to depress the central nervous system. About 71% have drank in the past year. When enjoyed in moderation, alcohol does not pose a risk, and actually has some health benefits to it. However, for those with diabetes, it can be a struggle to maintain a safe blood sugar while drinking. It is very easy to become hypoglycemic (low blood sugar) or hyperglycemic (high blood sugar), depending on which type of diabetes you have and the medications that you take. Understanding the effects drinking has on diabetes is very important. This article discusses the risks and benefits of drinking. It also explains what drinks are best for individuals with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Can I drink if I have diabetes? You can most certainly drink alcohol with diabetes. The key, just like many other things, is to do so in moderation. Also, if your blood sugar is not under good control, you should not drink because it can cause it to become too high or too low. Your doctor should be aware of your drinking habits so that they can make sure that you are not experiencing any complications related to it. I recommend reading the following articles: How does alcohol affect diabetes and my blood sugar levels? Normally, the liver is the organ that stores and secretes glucose to the cells in the body to fuel them when you are not eating. The liver is also responsible for cleansing the body of toxins. The liver does not recognize alcohol as food. Instead, it sees it as a drug and a toxin. When alcohol is in the system, the liver changes gears and begins to deto Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

What Is It? Type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease. It is characterized by high levels of sugar in the blood. Type 2 diabetes is also called type 2 diabetes mellitus and adult-onset diabetes. That's because it used to start almost always in middle- and late-adulthood. However, more and more children and teens are developing this condition. Type 2 diabetes is much more common than type 1 diabetes, and is really a different disease. But it shares with type 1 diabetes high blood sugar levels, and the complications of high blood sugar. During digestion, food is broken down into basic components. Carbohydrates are broken down into simple sugars, primarily glucose. Glucose is a critically important source of energy for the body's cells. To provide energy to the cells, glucose needs to leave the blood and get inside the cells. Insulin traveling in the blood signals the cells to take up glucose. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas. The pancreas is an organ in the abdomen. When levels of glucose in the blood rise (for example, after a meal), the pancreas produces more insulin. Type 2 diabetes occurs when your body's cells resist the normal effect of insulin, which is to drive glucose in the blood into the inside of the cells. This condition is called insulin resistance. As a result, glucose starts to build up in the blood. In people with insulin resistance, the pancreas "sees" the blood glucose level rising. The pancreas responds by making extra insulin to maintain a normal blood sugar. Over time, the body's insulin resistance gets worse. In response the pancreas makes more and more insulin. Finally, the pancreas gets "exhausted". It cannot keep up with the demand for more and more insulin. It poops out. As a result, blood glucose levels start to rise. Type 2 diabetes ru Continue reading >>

Body Areas Affected By Diabetes

Body Areas Affected By Diabetes

XIAFLEX® is a prescription medicine used to treat adults with Dupuytren's contracture when a "cord" can be felt. It is not known if XIAFLEX® is safe and effective in children under the age of 18. Do not receive XIAFLEX® if you have had an allergic reaction to collagenase clostridium histolyticum or any of the ingredients in XIAFLEX®, or to any other collagenase product. See the end of the Medication Guide for a complete list of ingredients in XIAFLEX®. XIAFLEX® can cause serious side effects, including: Tendon rupture or ligament damage. Receiving an injection of XIAFLEX® may cause damage to a tendon or ligament in your hand and cause it to break or weaken. This could require surgery to fix the damaged tendon or ligament. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have trouble bending your injected finger (towards the wrist) after the swelling goes down or you have problems using your treated hand after your follow-up visit Nerve injury or other serious injury of the hand. Call your healthcare provider right away if you get numbness, tingling, increased pain, or tears in the skin (laceration) in your treated finger or hand after your injection or after your follow-up visit Hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis. Severe allergic reactions can happen in people who receive XIAFLEX® because it contains foreign proteins. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of these symptoms of an allergic reaction after an injection of XIAFLEX®: hives swollen face breathing trouble chest pain low blood pressure dizziness or fainting Increased chance of bleeding. Bleeding or bruising at the injection site can happen in people who receive XIAFLEX®. Talk to your healthcare provider if you have a problem with your blood clotting. XIAFLEX® may not b Continue reading >>

Fatty Liver Disease: Complex Condition Can Also Damage Other Organs

Fatty Liver Disease: Complex Condition Can Also Damage Other Organs

Fatty liver disease is a major public health concern because it leads to serious and often fatal liver conditions, including cancer. The condition is linked to chronic liver diseases it as cirrhosis - where the liver shrinks and can lead to liver failure. Experts have warned it can also increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. If the liver is damaged - and a person has fatty liver disease, it produced glucose and unfavourable fats and proteins. These including hepatokine fetuin-A which release into the bloodstream which can trigger inflammation. This means the substances from the organ enter other organs. Now scientists have warned fatty liver disease can cause damage to other organs, including the pancreas. According to experts from the German Centre for Diabetes Research and the University of Tübingen, the pancreas is one of the worst affected by this, but scientists haven’t previously discovered why. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the pancreas can't make enough insulin or the insulin produced doesn’t work properly, and blood glucose levels rise. Tue, August 22, 2017 Liver disease: Risk factors for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The pancreas is a large gland that lies behind the stomach, at the back of the tummy area. The organ makes hormones, including insulin, which controls the level of sugar in the blood. It also makes enzymes, which help to digest food. Experts analysed 200 subjects with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes and their pancreatic fat content was measured by MRI scans. Scientists found that in people who already had poorly regulated blood glucose levels, an an increased pancreatic fatty degeneration was associated with a reduced levels of insulin. The investigations were carried out by Professor Hans Ulrich Häring and the Endocrinology R Continue reading >>

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