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Organs Affected By Diabetes Type 2

The Final Frontier: How Does Diabetes Affect The Brain?

The Final Frontier: How Does Diabetes Affect The Brain?

Our understanding of the impact of diabetes on organ function has been evolving since the discovery of insulin in the 1920s. At that time insulin was a miracle drug that appeared to cure diabetes, but over time it became clear that death and disability from diabetes complications involving the eyes, kidneys, peripheral nerves, heart, and vasculature could occur even with treatment. With the improvement in diabetes care over the past 20 years, fewer patients are developing the traditional diabetes complications. However, as people live long and well with the disease, it has become apparent that diabetes can alter function and structure in tissues not typically associated with complications such as the brain and bone. Alteration in brain structure and function are particularly of concern because of the impact of dementia and cognitive dysfunction on overall quality of life. From large epidemiological studies, it has been demonstrated that both vascular and Alzheimer's dementia are more common in patients with type 2 diabetes (1). Why this might be true has been difficult to define. Certainly these patients can be expected to have more risk factors such as previous cardiovascular disease, history of hypertension, and dyslipidemia than aged matched control subjects, but when these variables are controlled, the risk for patients with diabetes appears to be higher than that of other subject groups. Persistent hyperglycemia appears to play an important role in cerebral dysfunction. Many years ago, Reaven et al. (2) demonstrated that performance on cognitive tasks assessing learning, reasoning, and complex psychomotor performance was inversely related to glycemic control in a small population of subjects with type 2 diabetes. This issue was recently readdressed in the much larg Continue reading >>

Effects Of Alcohol On Diabetes

Effects Of Alcohol On Diabetes

Alcohol, which is made from fermented yeast, sugars, and starches is a very commonly used substance. In fact, 87.6% of adults aged 18 and over have consumed it at some point in their lifetime. It is also known as a depressant due to its capability to depress the central nervous system. About 71% have drank in the past year. When enjoyed in moderation, alcohol does not pose a risk, and actually has some health benefits to it. However, for those with diabetes, it can be a struggle to maintain a safe blood sugar while drinking. It is very easy to become hypoglycemic (low blood sugar) or hyperglycemic (high blood sugar), depending on which type of diabetes you have and the medications that you take. Understanding the effects drinking has on diabetes is very important. This article discusses the risks and benefits of drinking. It also explains what drinks are best for individuals with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Can I drink if I have diabetes? You can most certainly drink alcohol with diabetes. The key, just like many other things, is to do so in moderation. Also, if your blood sugar is not under good control, you should not drink because it can cause it to become too high or too low. Your doctor should be aware of your drinking habits so that they can make sure that you are not experiencing any complications related to it. I recommend reading the following articles: How does alcohol affect diabetes and my blood sugar levels? Normally, the liver is the organ that stores and secretes glucose to the cells in the body to fuel them when you are not eating. The liver is also responsible for cleansing the body of toxins. The liver does not recognize alcohol as food. Instead, it sees it as a drug and a toxin. When alcohol is in the system, the liver changes gears and begins to deto Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs: Symptoms, Causes, & Treatment

Diabetes In Dogs: Symptoms, Causes, & Treatment

Diabetes is a chronic disease that can affect dogs and cats and other animals (including apes, pigs, and horses) as well as humans. Although diabetes can’t be cured, it can be managed very successfully. Diabetes mellitus, or “sugar diabetes,” is the type of diabetes seen most often in dogs. It is a metabolism disorder. Metabolism refers to how the body converts food to energy. To understand what diabetes is, it helps to understand some of this process. The conversion of food nutrients into energy to power the body’s cells involves an ongoing interplay of two things: • Glucose: essential fuel for the body’s cells. When food is digested, the body breaks down some of the nutrients into glucose, a type of sugar that is a vital source of energy for certain body cells and organs. The glucose is absorbed from the intestines into the blood, which then transports the glucose throughout the body. • Insulin: in charge of fuel delivery. Meanwhile, an important organ next to the stomach called the pancreas releases the hormone insulin into the body. Insulin acts as a “gatekeeper” that tells cells to grab glucose and other nutrients out of the bloodstream and use them as fuel. What is diabetes? With diabetes, the glucose-insulin connection isn’t working as it should. Diabetes occurs in dogs in two forms: • Insulin-deficiency diabetes—This is when the dog’s body isn’t producing enough insulin. This happens when the pancreas is damaged or otherwise not functioning properly. Dogs with this type of diabetes need daily shots to replace the missing insulin. This is the most common type of diabetes in dogs. • Insulin-resistance diabetes—This is when the pancreas is producing some insulin, but the dog’s body isn’t utilizing the insulin as it should. The ce Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Complications

Type 2 Diabetes Complications

With type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus), if you don’t work hard to keep your blood glucose level under control, there are short- and long-term complications to contend with. However, by watching the amount and types of food you eat (your meal plan), exercising, and taking any necessary medications, you may be able to prevent these complications. And even if you have some of the long-term, more serious complications discussed below when you’re first diagnosed, getting tight control of your blood glucose will help prevent the complications from becoming worse. (It is possible with type 2 diabetes to already have some of these complications when you’re first diagnosed. That’s because type 2 develops gradually, and you may not realize that you have high blood glucose for quite some time. Over time, high blood glucose can cause serious damage. You can learn more about that in this article on the symptoms of type 2 diabetes.) Short-term Diabetes Complications Hypoglycemia is low blood glucose (blood sugar). It is possible for your blood glucose to drop, especially if you’re taking insulin or a sulfonylurea drug (those make your body produce insulin throughout the day). With these medications, if you eat less than usual or were more active, your blood glucose may dip too much. Other possible causes of hypoglycemia include certain medications (aspirin, for example, lowers the blood glucose level if you take a dose of more than 81mg) and too much alcohol (alcohol keeps the liver from releasing glucose). Rapid heartbeat Sweating Whiteness of skin Anxiety Numbness in fingers, toes, and lips Sleepiness Confusion Headache Slurred speech Mild cases of hypoglycemia can be treated by drinking orange juice or eating a glucose tablet—those will quickly rai Continue reading >>

Type 3 Diabetes

Type 3 Diabetes

The Increased Risk of Alzheimer's Disease Understanding the link between Diabetes & Alzheimer's disease Most of us are familiar with two types of diabetes: type 1 (juvenile onset) and type 2 (adult or acquired) diabetes. Diabetes is a problem with blood sugar regulation in the body that can lead to more serious health concerns. More recently, a third type of diabetes, which has been linked to Alzheimer's disease has come to light. To understand this better, let's first look at the most common form of diabetes, type 2. The link between type 2 diabetes & Alzheimer's disease The exact connection between Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes is still unknown. However, poorly controlled blood sugar may increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's. In fact, this relationship is so strong that some have called Alzheimer's "diabetes of the brain" or "type 3 diabetes." A recent study presented at the Society of Neuroscience suggests that Alzheimer's may actually be the late stage of type 2 diabetes. The study, which was conducted at University of Albany, suggests that the excess insulin produced due to insulin resistance can actually cross into the brain and disrupt brain chemistry, which leads to the production of toxic proteins that "poison" brain cells. The amyloid protein that forms in both Alzheimer's patients and those who have type 2 diabetes is identical. Dr. Ewan McNay, a lead researcher at the University of Albany, said, "People who develop diabetes have to realize this is more than controlling their weight or diet. It's also the first step on the road to cognitive decline. At first they won't be able to keep up with their kids playing games, but in 30 years' time they may not even recognize them." Over the past decade as the connection between type 2 diabetes and Alz Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Type 2

Diabetes - Type 2

Description An in-depth report on the causes, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of type 2 diabetes. Alternative Names Type 2 diabetes; Maturity onset diabetes; Noninsulin-dependent diabetes Highlights Diabetes Statistics According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Diabetes Fact Sheet, nearly 26 million American adults and children have diabetes. About 79 million Americans aged 20 years and older have pre-diabetes, a condition that increases the risk for developing diabetes. Diabetes and Cancer Type 2 diabetes increases the risk for certain types of cancer, according to a consensus report from the American Diabetes Association and the American Cancer Society. Diabetes doubles the risk for developing liver, pancreatic, or endometrial cancer. Certain medications used for treating type 2 diabetes may possibly increase the risk for some types of cancers. Screening for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus The American Diabetes Association recommends that pregnant women without known risk factors for diabetes get screened for gestational diabetes at 24 - 28 weeks of pregnancy. Pregnant women with risk factors for diabetes should be screened for type 2 diabetes at the first prenatal visit. Aspirin for Heart Disease Prevention The American Diabetes Association now recommends daily low-dose (75 - 162 mg) aspirin for men older than age 50 and women older than age 60 who have diabetes and at least one additional heart disease risk factor (such as smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, family history, or albuminuria). Guidelines for Treatment of Diabetic Neuropathy The anticonvulsant drug pregabalin (Lyrica) is a first-line treatment for painful diabetic neuropathy, according to recent guidelines released by the American Academy of Neurol Continue reading >>

How Type 2 Diabetes Can Damage Your Body

How Type 2 Diabetes Can Damage Your Body

Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failure in the U.S.(ISTOKEPHOTO) Type 2 diabetes is the most common type of diabetes by farmaking up more than 90% of the 24 million cases in the U.S. Experts use words like "epidemic" and "worldwide crisis" when they talk about it: Millions of people have it and a staggering number are expected to get it (300 million worldwide by 2025, according to one study). Diabetes doesn't get the attention of, say, cancer or scary viruses. One reason might be because type 2 diabetes is so incredibly commonabout 20% of people over age 60 get it. A large chunk of the population just seems to have the genetic programming to develop the disease with age. Type 2 diabetes is showing up in young people However, diabetes is also on the rise because our modern lifestylelots of food and little exercisespeeds up the process. So people who might have developed this "old-age disease" in their 60s and 70s are now developing the disease much earlier due to obesity and lack of exercise; sometimes in their teens or in childhood. Anyone can get diabetes. But some people are at much higher risk, particularly those who are obese. (Are you overweight? Use this body mass index calculator to find out.) One in three children born in the U.S. in 2000 will develop diabetes at some point in their life (including more than half of Hispanic females), according to a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study published in 2003. But not all is gloom and doom. If you have diabetes, you have a lot more control over the disease now than just about any other point in history. And if you have prediabetes, you have a good chance of preventing or delaying the disease by making lifestyle changes or taking medication. What happens in the body when you have type 2 diabetes Wit Continue reading >>

Body Parts Affected By Diabetes

Body Parts Affected By Diabetes

What you’ll get from the post is the answer to all the below questions: What are the different body parts affected by diabetes? How does diabetes weaken the immune system? How is the endocrine system affected by diabetes? What is the effect of diabetes on the eye? How does diabetes affect kidneys? What is diabetic neuropathy? What are the cardiovascular diseases caused by diabetes? What is the effect of diabetes on the digestive systems? What is the effect of diabetes on the integumentary system? What is a diabetic foot? How is the circulatory system affected? In the following paragraphs, we shall deep dive and try to understand the answers to each of the questions above. Which are the Body Parts Affected by Diabetes? Diabetes is caused when the pancreas of the body is not able to produce insulin or the body is unable to utilize the insulin efficiently. Diabetes is often marked by an increase in the blood sugar level, giving rise to a lot of complications. Following are a few organs affected by diabetes: Kidneys and the urinary system. Circulatory system How does Diabetes Weaken the Immune System? It is said that type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. When a person is affected by it, the immune system of the body begins to react against its own immune system. When our body is attacked by viruses, the T-cells of the body produce antibodies which help to fight against these viruses. Now sometimes, these antibodies act against the beta cells when both these types have the same property. It is the beta cell which is responsible for the production of insulin in the body. In type 2 diabetes, the body becomes resistant to insulin. This results in the release of cytokines. The fat cells thus lead to higher production of fatty acid in the blood, which ultimately results in Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Diabetes On Your Body

The Effects Of Diabetes On Your Body

When you hear the word “diabetes,” your first thought is likely about high blood sugar. Blood sugar is an often-underestimated component of your health. When it’s out of whack over a long period of time, it could develop into diabetes. Diabetes affects your body’s ability to produce or use insulin, a hormone that allows your body to turn glucose (sugar) into energy. Here’s what symptoms may occur to your body when diabetes takes effect. Diabetes can be effectively managed when caught early. However, when left untreated, it can lead to potential complications that include heart disease, stroke, kidney damage, and nerve damage. Normally after you eat or drink, your body will break down sugars from your food and use them for energy in your cells. To accomplish this, your pancreas needs to produce a hormone called insulin. Insulin is what facilitates the process of pulling sugar from the blood and putting it in the cells for use, or energy. If you have diabetes, your pancreas either produces too little insulin or none at all. The insulin can’t be used effectively. This allows blood glucose levels to rise while the rest of your cells are deprived of much-needed energy. This can lead to a wide variety of problems affecting nearly every major body system. The effects of diabetes on your body also depends on the type you have. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 1, also called juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, is an immune system disorder. Your own immune system attacks the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, destroying your body’s ability to make insulin. With type 1 diabetes, you must take insulin to live. Most people are diagnosed as a child or young adult. Type 2 is related to insulin resistance. It used to occur i Continue reading >>

Pathophysiology And Pathogenesis Of Type 2 Diabetes

Pathophysiology And Pathogenesis Of Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes Overview Type 2 Diabetes at the Cellular Level Pathophysiology of Type 2 Diabetes Insulin Resistance The Impact of Cortisol Cellular Inflammation Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEs) The 7 Stages of Type 2 Diabetes Pathogenesis Red Blood Cell Lifecycle Why Understanding Diabetes Is So Important Next Steps to Reverse Your Diabetes Clinical References Author Sidebar: When I was in the hospital (and after I came out of the coma), I remember the doctors and nurses telling me that I had Type 2 diabetes. They said I had a very severe blood sugar problem because my blood sugar was over 1300. And, because my blood sugar was so high, I was given insulin to bring my blood sugar back down. At the time, this all made sense to me. So, I concluded (at that time) that once my blood sugar returned to normal, everything would be okay. But, instead, I was told that once my blood sugar returned to normal, everything would not be okay because I would still be diabetic. Needless to say, this was confusing and disheartening. But, I quickly realized that "high blood sugar" was not the real problem! -- it was a symptom of the problem. And, the real problem of having Type 2 diabetes was more than just a blood sugar problem. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, with more than 90% of diabetics being Type 2; and, 5% to 10% being Type 1. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a heterogeneous disorder with varying prevalence among different ethnic groups. In the United States the populations most affected are Native Americans, particularly in the desert Southwest, Hispanic-Americans, African-Americans, and Asian-Americans. However, Caucasian-Americans are also affected, but not at the same disproportionate percentage levels. Type 2 Diabetes Impacts ALL groups and cultures! The Continue reading >>

Does Type 2 Diabetes Affect Life Expectancy? Live Longer By Spotting These Symptoms

Does Type 2 Diabetes Affect Life Expectancy? Live Longer By Spotting These Symptoms

If type 2 diabetes isn't treated properly and well managed, it can lead to a number of other health problems including heart disease. However, there is no way of knowing how long someone with the condition is expected to live. It depends how soon diabetes was diagnosed, any other health conditions unrelated to diabetes and factors including how often people attend health checks and look after their own health. Knowing the symptoms of diabetes can boost the chances of living longer. Diabetes UK said: “Early diagnosis, treatment and good control are vital for good health and reduce the chances of developing serious complications.” Symptoms include urinating more than usual, feeling thirst, feeling tired, cuts or wounds which heal slowly and blurred vision. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin or the insulin produced does not work properly and can be linked to lifestyle factors such as being overweight. High glucose levels - also known as blood sugar can damage blood vessels, nerves and organs. If diabetes is not properly managed it can lead to serious consequences such as sight loss, limb amputation, kidney failure and stroke. Experts also suggest a mildly raised glucose level that doesn't cause any symptoms can also have long-term damaging effects. The condition can impact life expectancy, how experts have said the length of time people are expected to live with the condition has increased. Seven years ago, Diabetes UK estimated that the life expectancy of someone with type 2 diabetes is likely to be reduced, as a result of the condition, by up to 10 years. Wed, June 21, 2017 Living with diabetes - ten top tips to live normally with the condition. However, a report based on data collected by GP services in the UK between 1991 and 2014, Continue reading >>

The Liver & Blood Sugar

The Liver & Blood Sugar

During a meal, your liver stores sugar for later. When you’re not eating, the liver supplies sugar by turning glycogen into glucose in a process called glycogenolysis. The liver both stores and produces sugar… The liver acts as the body’s glucose (or fuel) reservoir, and helps to keep your circulating blood sugar levels and other body fuels steady and constant. The liver both stores and manufactures glucose depending upon the body’s need. The need to store or release glucose is primarily signaled by the hormones insulin and glucagon. During a meal, your liver will store sugar, or glucose, as glycogen for a later time when your body needs it. The high levels of insulin and suppressed levels of glucagon during a meal promote the storage of glucose as glycogen. The liver makes sugar when you need it…. When you’re not eating – especially overnight or between meals, the body has to make its own sugar. The liver supplies sugar or glucose by turning glycogen into glucose in a process called glycogenolysis. The liver also can manufacture necessary sugar or glucose by harvesting amino acids, waste products and fat byproducts. This process is called gluconeogenesis. When your body’s glycogen storage is running low, the body starts to conserve the sugar supplies for the organs that always require sugar. These include: the brain, red blood cells and parts of the kidney. To supplement the limited sugar supply, the liver makes alternative fuels called ketones from fats. This process is called ketogenesis. The hormone signal for ketogenesis to begin is a low level of insulin. Ketones are burned as fuel by muscle and other body organs. And the sugar is saved for the organs that need it. The terms “gluconeogenesis, glycogenolysis and ketogenesis” may seem like compli Continue reading >>

Complications Of Diabetes Mellitus

Complications Of Diabetes Mellitus

The complications of diabetes mellitus are far less common and less severe in people who have well-controlled blood sugar levels. Acute complications include hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, diabetic coma and nonketotic hyperosmolar coma. Chronic complications occur due to a mix of microangiopathy, macrovascular disease and immune dysfunction in the form of autoimmune disease or poor immune response, most of which are difficult to manage. Microangiopathy can affect all vital organs, kidneys, heart and brain, as well as eyes, nerves, lungs and locally gums and feet. Macrovascular problems can lead to cardiovascular disease including erectile dysfunction. Female infertility may be due to endocrine dysfunction with impaired signalling on a molecular level. Other health problems compound the chronic complications of diabetes such as smoking, obesity, high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol levels, and lack of regular exercise which are accessible to management as they are modifiable. Non-modifiable risk factors of diabetic complications are type of diabetes, age of onset, and genetic factors, both protective and predisposing have been found. Overview[edit] Complications of diabetes mellitus are acute and chronic. Risk factors for them can be modifiable or not modifiable. Overall, complications are far less common and less severe in people with well-controlled blood sugar levels.[1][2][3] However, (non-modifiable) risk factors such as age at diabetes onset, type of diabetes, gender and genetics play a role. Some genes appear to provide protection against diabetic complications, as seen in a subset of long-term diabetes type 1 survivors without complications .[4][5] Statistics[edit] As of 2010, there were about 675,000 diabetes-related emergency department (ED) visits in the Continue reading >>

Nerve Damage (diabetic Neuropathies)

Nerve Damage (diabetic Neuropathies)

What are diabetic neuropathies? Diabetic neuropathies are a family of nerve disorders caused by diabetes. People with diabetes can, over time, develop nerve damage throughout the body. Some people with nerve damage have no symptoms. Others may have symptoms such as pain, tingling, or numbness—loss of feeling—in the hands, arms, feet, and legs. Nerve problems can occur in every organ system, including the digestive tract, heart, and sex organs. About 60 to 70 percent of people with diabetes have some form of neuropathy. People with diabetes can develop nerve problems at any time, but risk rises with age and longer duration of diabetes. The highest rates of neuropathy are among people who have had diabetes for at least 25 years. Diabetic neuropathies also appear to be more common in people who have problems controlling their blood glucose, also called blood sugar, as well as those with high levels of blood fat and blood pressure and those who are overweight. What causes diabetic neuropathies? The causes are probably different for different types of diabetic neuropathy. Researchers are studying how prolonged exposure to high blood glucose causes nerve damage. Nerve damage is likely due to a combination of factors: metabolic factors, such as high blood glucose, long duration of diabetes, abnormal blood fat levels, and possibly low levels of insulin neurovascular factors, leading to damage to the blood vessels that carry oxygen and nutrients to nerves autoimmune factors that cause inflammation in nerves mechanical injury to nerves, such as carpal tunnel syndrome inherited traits that increase susceptibility to nerve disease lifestyle factors, such as smoking or alcohol use What are the symptoms of diabetic neuropathies? Symptoms depend on the type of neuropathy and which Continue reading >>

Effects Of Diabetes

Effects Of Diabetes

In some cases the effects may be short term and can be eliminated through appropriate treatment. In the case of long term complications, any damage sustained tends to be permanent. Whilst there are a lot of ways in which diabetes can affect the body, it’s important to note that the risks of developing health problems can be significantly reduced through good management of diabetes and living a healthy life. Heart Higher than normal blood sugar levels over a period of time can lead to an increase in risk of damage occurring to larger blood vessels in the body. This raises the risk of blood clots forming in blood vessels which can lead to heart attacks – a form of coronary heart disease. Approximately, 600,000 people die of heart disease in the United States every year–that’s 1 in every 4 deaths. Learn more about Heart disease. Brain The brain is another major organ that can pose a threat to life if it is affected by damage or blockages in its blood supply. Elevated blood sugar levels over a long period of time can cause blockages in the blood vessels supplying the brain, resulting in stroke, and can also damage the very small blood vessels in the outer part of the brain, increasing the risk of brain damage and conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease. In the short term, too low blood glucose levels can lead to a reduced ability to make decisions and cause confusion and disorientation. Nerves The nerves play a very important part throughout the body. Not only do they allow us to sense touch, nerves also allow our organs to function properly. For instance, nerves are crucial in helping the digestive system to sense how it should respond. If the nerves become damaged we can lose our ability to sense pain in parts of the body that are affected and if nerve damage (ne Continue reading >>

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