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Omeprazole Raises Blood Sugar

Drugs That Can Raise Bg

Drugs That Can Raise Bg

By the dLife Editors Some medicines that are used for treating other medical conditions can cause elevated blood sugar in people with diabetes. You may need to monitor your blood glucose more closely if you take one of the medicines listed below. It’s important to note that just because a medicine has the possibility of raising blood sugar, it does not mean the medicine is unsafe for a person with diabetes. For instance, many people with type 2 diabetes need to take a diuretic and a statin to lower blood pressure and cholesterol. In these and many other cases, the pros will almost always outweigh the cons. Don’t ever take matters of medication into your own hands. Discuss any concerns you have with your healthcare provider. Certain Antibiotics Of all the different antibiotics, the ones known as quinolones are the only ones that may affect blood glucose. They are prescribed for certain types of infection. Levofloxacin (Levaquin) Ofloxacin (Floxin) Moxifloxacin (Avelox) Ciprofloxacin (Cipro, Cipro XR, Proquin XR) Gemifloxacin (Factive) Second Generation Antipsychotics These medicines are used for a variety of mental health conditions. There is a strong association between these medicines and elevated blood sugar, and frequent monitoring is recommended. Clozapine (Clozaril) Olanzapine (Zyprexa) Paliperidone (Invega) Quietiapine (Seroquel, Seroquel XR) Risperidone (Risperdal) Aripiprazole (Abilify) Ziprasidone (Geodon) Iloperidone (Fanapt) Lurasidone (Latuda) Pemavanserin (Nuplazid) Asenapine (Saphris) Beta Blockers Beta blockers are used to treat high blood pressure and certain heart conditions. Not all available beta blockers have been shown to cause high blood sugar. Atenolol Metoprolol Propranolol Corticosteroids Corticosteroids are used to treat conditions where th Continue reading >>

Improved Diabetes Control And Pancreatic Function In A Type 2 Diabetic After Omeprazole Administration

Improved Diabetes Control And Pancreatic Function In A Type 2 Diabetic After Omeprazole Administration

Copyright © 2012 I. N. Mefford et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract A 43-year-old man with type 2 diabetes, opposed to insulin use and poorly responsive to oral agents added sequentially over 6 years, was placed on 40 mg omeprazole twice daily. A linear decline in daily fasting blood glucose was observed over the first two-month treatment, and his hemoglobin A1c was reduced from 11.9% to 8.2%, then sustained at 8.1% after four months. Glucose, insulin, and C-peptide response to a 2-hour glucose tolerance test were consistently improved across this time period, and calculated beta-cell mass increased by 67%. We believe these responses are consistent with activation or neogenesis of pancreatic beta cells, possibly through a gastrin-mediated mechanism. 1. Introduction Type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease characterized by both insulin resistance and increasing dysfunction of pancreatic beta cells, either through inactivation or apoptosis [1, 2]. Common treatments of type 2 diabetes may modify insulin sensitivity, increase insulin secretion, or in some cases either reduce beta-cell dysfunction or slow their degradation [3]. However, none of the current available agents are known to increase beta-cell population in humans. Meier et al. have demonstrated increased beta-cell activity in the human pancreas surrounding gastrinomas [4], and further studies have shown gastrin administration to induce pancreatic beta-cell neogenesis in animal models of diabetes [5, 6]. We previously observed in a retrospective analysis of our patient database a significant improvement in type 2 diabetes Continue reading >>

Prilosec (omeprazole) - Side Effects, Dosage, Interactions - Drugs

Prilosec (omeprazole) - Side Effects, Dosage, Interactions - Drugs

Prilosec is the brand name of the drug omeprazole, which is used to treat symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) . GERD happens when acid from the stomach flows backward into the esophagus (the tube between the throat and the stomach). It can cause heartburn and injure the esophagus. Prilosec is also used to treat erosive esophagitis and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (a condition in which the stomach produces too much acid). And Prilosec may be used to prevent upper gastrointestinal bleeding in critically ill patients, and is part of the treatment for an infection of Helicobacter pylori, a type of bacteria that can cause stomach ulcers. Prilosec is in a class of drugs called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) . These medicines block production of stomach acid. The medicine is available in a prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) form. It was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1989. You should take Prilosec exactly as prescribed or as directed on the OTC package label. Do not take the nonprescription form of Prilosec for longer than 14 days or use the drug more often than once every four months without first talking to your doctor. Prilosec is not intended for immediate symptom relief. It may take up to four days for you to feel the full benefit of this medication. You should call your doctor if your symptoms worsen or do not improve after 14 days of taking the drug. Also, contact your physician if your symptoms return sooner than four months after you finish treatment with Prilosec. You should continue to take Prilosec even if you feel well. Do not stop taking this drug without first talking to your doctor. PPIs such as Prilosec may put you at an increased risk for fracturing your wrists, hips, or spine. This risk is greater if you take high dos Continue reading >>

390 Drugs That Can Affect Blood Glucose Levels

390 Drugs That Can Affect Blood Glucose Levels

Knowing the drugs that can affect blood glucose levels is essential in properly caring for your diabetes patients. Some medicines raise blood sugar in patients while others might lower their levels. However, not all drugs affect patients the same way. 390 Drugs that Can Affect Blood Glucose Levels is also available for purchase in ebook format. 390 Drugs that can affect blood glucose Level Table of Contents: Drugs that May Cause Hyper- or Hypoglycemia Drugs That May Cause Hyperglycemia (High Blood Sugar) (GENERIC NAME | BRAND NAME) Abacavir | (Ziagen®) Abacavir + lamivudine,zidovudine | (Trizivir®) Abacavir + dolutegravir + lamivudine | (Triumeq®) Abiraterone | (Zytiga®) Acetazolamide | (Diamox®) Acitretin | (Soriatane®) Aletinib | (Alecensa®) Albuterol | (Ventolin®, Proventil®) Albuterol + ipratropium | (Combivent®) Aliskiren + amlodipine + hydrochlorothiazide | (Amturnide®) Aliskiren + amlodipine | (Tekamlo®) Ammonium chloride Amphotericin B | (Amphocin®, Fungizone®) Amphotericin B lipid formulations IV | (Abelcet®) Amprenavir | (Agenerase®) Anidulafungin | (Eraxis®) Aripiprazole | (Abilify®) Arsenic trioxide | (Trisenox®) Asparaginase | (Elspar®, Erwinaze®) Atazanavir | (Reyataz ®) Atazanavir + cobistat | (Evotaz®) Atenolol + chlorthalidone | (Tenoretic®) Atorvastatin | (Lipitor®) Atovaquone | (Mepron®) Baclofen | (Lioresal®) Belatacept | (Nulojix®) Benazepril + hydrochlorothiazide | (Lotension®) Drugs That May Cause Hyperglycemia (High Blood Sugar) – Continued (GENERIC NAME | BRAND NAME) Betamethasone topical | (Alphatrex®, Betatrex®, Beta-Val®, Diprolene®, Diprolene® AF, Diprolene® Lotion, Luxiq®, Maxivate®) Betamethasone +clotrimazole | (Lotrisone® topical) Betaxolol Betoptic® eyedrops, | (Kerlone® oral) Bexarotene | (Targ Continue reading >>

What Medicines Can Make Your Blood Sugar Spike?

What Medicines Can Make Your Blood Sugar Spike?

If you have diabetes or high blood sugar, you probably know some of the things that cause your glucose (another name for blood sugar) to go up. Like a meal with too many carbohydrates, or not enough exercise. But other medicines you might take to keep yourself healthy can cause a spike, too. Know Your Meds Medicines you get with a prescription and some that you buy over the counter (OTC) can be a problem for people who need to control their blood sugar. Prescription medicines that can raise your glucose include: Steroids (also called corticosteroids). They treat diseases caused by inflammation, like rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and allergies. Common steroids include hydrocortisone and prednisone. But steroid creams (for a rash) or inhalers (for asthma) aren’t a problem. Drugs that treat high blood pressure, such as beta-blockers and thiazide diuretics High doses of asthma medicines, or drugs that you inject for asthma treatment OTC medicines that can raise your blood sugar include: Cough syrup. Ask your doctor if you should take regular or sugar-free. How Do You Decide What to Take? Even though these medicines can raise your blood sugar, it doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t take them if you need them. The most important thing is to work with your doctor on the right way to use them. If you have diabetes or you’re watching your blood sugar, ask your doctor before you take new medicines or change any medicines, even if it’s just something for a cough or cold. (Remember, just being sick can raise your blood sugar.) Make sure your doctor knows all the medicines you take -- for diabetes or any other reason. If one of them may affect your blood sugar, she may prescribe a lower dose or tell you to take the medicine for a shorter time. You may need to check your blood s Continue reading >>

Pantoprazole Improves Glycemic Control In Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Trial

Pantoprazole Improves Glycemic Control In Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Trial

Pantoprazole Improves Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial Departments of Pharmacology (P.K.S., D.H., A.C., A.S., I.S.), Chandigarh 160012, India Search for other works by this author on: Departments of Pharmacology (P.K.S., D.H., A.C., A.S., I.S.), Chandigarh 160012, India Search for other works by this author on: Endocrinology (P.D., N.S., A.B.), Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh 160012, India Search for other works by this author on: Endocrinology (P.D., N.S., A.B.), Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh 160012, India Search for other works by this author on: Departments of Pharmacology (P.K.S., D.H., A.C., A.S., I.S.), Chandigarh 160012, India Search for other works by this author on: Departments of Pharmacology (P.K.S., D.H., A.C., A.S., I.S.), Chandigarh 160012, India Search for other works by this author on: Departments of Pharmacology (P.K.S., D.H., A.C., A.S., I.S.), Chandigarh 160012, India Search for other works by this author on: Endocrinology (P.D., N.S., A.B.), Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh 160012, India Address all correspondence and requests for reprints to: Dr. Anil Bhansali, Professor and Head, Department of Endocrinology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh 160012, India. Search for other works by this author on: The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Volume 97, Issue 11, 1 November 2012, Pages E2105E2108, Pawan Kumar Singh, Debasish Hota, Pinaki Dutta, Naresh Sachdeva, Amitava Chakrabarti, Anand Srinivasan, Inderjeet Singh, Anil Bhansali; Pantoprazole Improves Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial, Continue reading >>

Effect Of Omeprazole On Metformin

Effect Of Omeprazole On Metformin

In this study, investigators hypothesized that the plasma concentration of metformin and its glucose-lowering action would be affected by omeprazole, probably by altering the expression or function of OCTs in the liver, its primary target organ, as well as in the kidney. Metformin is the most widely used drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. This insulin-sensitizing agent has well known beneficial effects not only on glycemic control, but also on the cardiovascular system. The antihyperglycemic effect of metformin is mainly based on suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis by activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which suppresses glucagon-stimulated glucose production and causes an increase in glucose uptake in muscle and in hepatic cells. Metformin is actively transported across membranes. The organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1) is responsible for uptake of metformin in hepatocytes, which is an essential step in reducing hepatic glucose production. , which is closely associated with its pharmacological action/adverse reactions. However, metformin alone is thought to be insufficient for achieving good metabolic control. Thus, treatment in addition to metformin is often required. Sitagliptin attenuates metformin-mediated AMPK phosphorylation through inhibition of organic cation transporters PPIs are frequently used in metformin-treated patients with metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is commonly seen in patients with type 2 diabetes and proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) are the drugs of best choice in treatment of GERD. These data support the hypothesis that proton pump inhibitors can be used to treat type II diabetes. Moreover, PPIs itself appears to has significant glucose-lowering effects in an Continue reading >>

8 Drugs Doctors Wouldn't Take

8 Drugs Doctors Wouldn't Take

Print Font: With 3,480 pages of fine print, the Physicians' Desk Reference (a.k.a. PDR) is not a quick read. That's because it contains every iota of information on more than 4,000 prescription medications. Heck, the PDR is medication — a humongous sleeping pill. More women opting for preventive mastectomy - but should they be? Rates of women who are opting for preventive mastectomies, such as Angeline Jolie, have increased by an estimated 50 percent in recent years, experts say. But many doctors are puzzled because the operation doesn't carry a 100 percent guarantee, it's major surgery -- and women have other options, from a once-a-day pill to careful monitoring. Doctors count on this compendium to help them make smart prescribing decisions — in other words, to choose drugs that will solve their patients' medical problems without creating new ones. Unfortunately, it seems some doctors rarely pull the PDR off the shelf. Or if they do crack it open, they don't stay versed on emerging research that may suddenly make a once-trusted treatment one to avoid. Worst case: You swallow something that has no business being inside your body. Of course, plenty of M.D.'s do know which prescription and over-the-counter drugs are duds, dangers, or both. So we asked them, "Which medications would you skip?" Their list is your second opinion. If you're on any of these meds, talk to your doctor. Maybe he or she will finally open that big red book with all the dust on it. Advair It's asthma medicine ... that could make your asthma deadly. Advair contains the long-acting beta-agonist (LABA) salmeterol. A 2006 analysis of 19 trials, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, found that regular use of LABAs can increase the severity of an asthma attack. Because salmeterol is more widel Continue reading >>

Heartburn (acid Reflux) And Indigestion In Pregnancy

Heartburn (acid Reflux) And Indigestion In Pregnancy

Unfortunately heartburn and indigestion are a common problem during pregnancy but what things are suitable to take during pregnancy which won't effect your blood sugar levels? Gaviscon and Sugar Free Rennies. If these do not work then your GP may prescribe Ranitidine or Omeprazole. All these products are suitable for use during pregnancy with gestational diabetes. Off the shelf products for heartburn and indigestion Gaviscon contains no sugar and will not raise blood sugar levels Rennies can be used, but be careful to select the sugar free version Get Free Email Updates! Signup now and receive an email once I publish new content. I will never give away, trade or sell your email address. You can unsubscribe at any time. Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of Metformin Are More Serious Than You Think

Side Effects Of Metformin Are More Serious Than You Think

The Side Effects of Metformin can range from not so serious, to deadly, are the risks of Metformin and Glucophage side effects worth it? This page will give you information that might be able to help you decide that for yourself. Also known as Glucophage, this is an antidiabetic medicine most often used in those with Type 2 Diabetes who are also overweight. It’s also used extensively in women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, a condition known as PCOS, which is often accompanied by higher blood sugar readings which often benefit from the blood sugar lowering effects of Metformin. While at first glance it seems that Side Effects of Metformin are rare, a closer look and a little math show that there are some serious problems that can occur when taking this drug, and others that can and should be prevented easily, but are usually not due to a medical community that simply does not use nutritional supplements in the prevention of even well-known, easily preventable Glucophage side effects. Vitamin B12 Deficiency Vitamin B12 and Folic Acid Deficiency are well-known and well-studied side effects of Metformin. Despite the fact that there have been many studies confirming this problem over and over again in the medical literature, just like the Side Effects of Nitrous Oxide, few doctors warn their patients of this or recommend that they take simple, cheap over the counter Vitamin B12 Supplements in order to avoid this potentially devastating nutritional deficiency. In addition, the long term use of the ‘antacid’ drugs known as H2 receptor antagonist or proton pump inhibitors like Famotidine or Omeprazole, some of the most widely prescribed drugs, can increase this risk, as is mentioned in the Omeprazole Side Effects page. The Vitamin B12 Deficiency Symptoms range anywhere Continue reading >>

Prilosec/zantac - Other Medications - Diabetes Forums

Prilosec/zantac - Other Medications - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I was told today that I most likely either have IBS or a food allergy. While I wait for the allergy testing I was told to use either Prilosec or Zantac. After reading the packages I went with Zantac because the Prilosec was kind of frightening. Has anybody used either of these products? Do you know how they effect blood sugar? Although I went iwth Zantac I am would like to hear more about Prilosec from somebody who has taken it in case I decide I need to try something different. I took Prilosec quite regularly pre-D without any issues. However its not good to take with metformin so I don't anymore ... but hey, I don't need it anymore since losing a bunch of weight and getting my BGL under control. You have to take those warnings seriously by watching out for bad side effects, but not taking them because you are scared of *potential* side effects (unless you have a risk factor listed in the warning) means you are not going to be able to take almost ANY medications ever because they ALL have potential side effects. I've taken Prilosec (not OTC) w/ no adverse effect on BSs - I only took it for a short while, though. I take Prolisec script not otc. Been for years and never noticed any effect on my bs. I also found apples to apples the OTC Prolisec does not work for me, has to be the scrpt. The back of the box didn't say anything about side effects, but it did say that you could not take it for more than 14 days and you could only repeat the course every 4 months or something like that- that was what scared me off. My allergist's appointment is not until April so I need something that I can take u Continue reading >>

Tasigna

Tasigna

How does this medication work? What will it do for me? Nilotinib belongs to group of the cancer-fighting medications known as antineoplastics, and specifically to the family of medications called protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Nilotinib is used to treat adults who have chronic phase (long-lasting) or accelerated phase (fast-growing) forms of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) that is Philadelphia chromosome positive. It is used when other therapies have been tried, including imatinib, and not produced a response, or other therapies have produced unacceptable levels of side effects. Nilotinib has also been granted a notice of compliance with conditions (NOC/c) by Health Canada for the treatment of newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome positive CML in chronic phase. This means that Health Canada has approved this medication to be marketed based on promising evidence of effectiveness, but additional results of studies are needed to verify its effectiveness. An NOC/c is used to allow access to products that are used to treat or prevent serious, life-threatening, or severely debilitating illness. In CML, the body produces abnormal white blood cells. Nilotinib works by blocking the signal that triggers the production of these abnormal white blood cells. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people t Continue reading >>

Drugs That Can Worsen Diabetes Control

Drugs That Can Worsen Diabetes Control

One of the main goals of any diabetes control regimen is keeping blood glucose levels in the near-normal range. The cornerstones of most plans to achieve that goal include following a healthy diet, getting regular exercise, and taking insulin or other medicines as necessary. However, it’s not uncommon for people with diabetes to have other medical conditions that also require taking medicines, and sometimes these drugs can interfere with efforts to control blood glucose. A few medicines, including some commonly prescribed to treat high blood pressure and heart disease, have even been implicated as the cause of some cases of diabetes. This article lists some of the medicines that can worsen blood glucose control, the reasons they have that effect, the usual magnitude of the blood glucose changes, as well as the pros and cons of using these drugs in people who have diabetes. Where the problems occur To understand how various medicines can worsen blood glucose control, it helps to understand how insulin, the hormone responsible for lowering blood glucose, works in the body. Insulin is released from the beta cells of the pancreas in response to rising levels of glucose in the bloodstream, rising levels of a hormone called GLP-1 (which is released from the intestines in response to glucose), and signals from the nerve connections to the pancreas. The secretion of insulin occurs in two phases: a rapid first phase and a delayed second phase. Both of these phases are dependent on levels of potassium and calcium in the pancreas. Insulin acts on three major organs: the liver, the muscles, and fat tissue. In the liver, insulin enhances the uptake of glucose and prevents the liver from forming new glucose, which it normally does to maintain fasting glucose levels. In muscle and f Continue reading >>

How Do Prescription Drugs Affect Sexuality

How Do Prescription Drugs Affect Sexuality

Are Prescription Drugs affecting your Sexuality? If your libido is low, you've lost interest in sex or if you are experiencing problems such as male erectile dysfunction or female lack of arousal, don't just try to bury the issue, feeling stressed and depressed about it. It may well be that a prescription medicine that you are taking is to blame! In the clinics and via our help desk , we are often asked about the safety of herbal supplements for loss of libido, erectile dysfunction and other problems affecting both male and female sexuality. I haven't analysed this but suspect that in about 90% of cases the underlying issue is that the enquirer is taking a prescription medicine for which sexual dysfunction is a known side effect. And often not just one, but two or three, leading to a compound effect that not even the most potent sexual enhancement pill could negate. Herbs like Damiana (Turnera diffusa), Horny goat weed (Epimedium sagittatum), Tribulus terrestris, Maca, do help to increase libido although they are not instant fixes like sildenafil (commonly known as Viagra). There are however a couple of points to note. Firstly, if you buy it please do make sure you are buying it from a reputable supplier. A lot of 'natural' enhancement supplements come in from Asia and are herbs deliberately mixed with (contaminated by) cialis, sildenafil, caffeine and other stimulants by companies wanting to make a quick buck under the "natural" label. Like nightclub "party drugs" its a gamble as to what has been put in it - sometimes you'll be ok but sometimes you're not so lucky. Secondly, be aware of any other medications, (including prescription medicine, over the counter medicines and supplements) that you are taking as there is the potential for them all to interact and cause un Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Take Supplements If You Have Diabetes?

Is It Safe To Take Supplements If You Have Diabetes?

You will find supplements for anything and everything these days. Even when you do not suffer from an ailment, supplements are suggested to keep you healthy and ailment-free. According to CDC, use of supplements is common among US adult population – over 50% adults used supplements during 2003-2006, with multivitamins/multiminerals being the most commonly used. So when you are a diabetic, especially if you have prediabetes and type-2 diabetes, you may find yourself confronting a large number of options for supplements that claim to support, reduce and even cure your diabetes. Diabetes is quite a frustrating disorder and you may find yourself tempted to try out these supplements one after another. But is it really safe to take supplements when you are a diabetic? Let us find out. But before that you need to understand what exactly supplements are. Defining Supplements As the name suggests, a supplement is anything that adds on to something. A dietary supplement is therefore something that one takes in addition to one’s diet to get proper nutrition. US Congress in the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act defines dietary supplements as having the following characteristics: It is a product that is intended to supplement the diet; It contains one or more dietary ingredients (including vitamins, minerals, herbs and other botanicals, amino acids, and other substances) or their constituents; It is intended to be taken by mouth as a pill, capsule, tablet, or liquid; It is not represented for use as a conventional food or as sole item of a mean or a diet; and, It is labeled on the front panel as being a dietary supplement. Now let us look at some general benefits and risks of taking supplements. We will discuss these in context of diabetes later in the article. Benefit Continue reading >>

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