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Olive Oil Type 1 Diabetes

The Mediterranean Diet Gave My Son His Best A1c

The Mediterranean Diet Gave My Son His Best A1c

The Mediterranean Diet Gave My Son his Best A1C Note:By providing a place for the community to share real life experiences we hope you find inspiration and new ways of thinking about management. We encourage you to approach these offerings as you would a buffet review the options, maybe try a few new things and come back for what works best for you. Bon Appetit! Check out our libraryof resources on Food . Carefully selected fresh market ingredients, rich flavors, aromas and sauces simmering for hours have been staplesof evening and weekend pleasure in our home both prior to and after an unexpected Type 1 diabetes diagnosis that arrived in June 2011. My husband and I took a few detours after the diagnosis, however, assuming that the epicurean delights of home-cooking and dining were very definitely a thing of the past. Following the diagnosis, while assimilating a new lifestyle of carb-counting, measuring and late evening BG checks, our family experimented with several versions of well-known, low-carb diets. Some of these experiments included a meat-centric protein diet, a raw vegetable diet, and a brewers yeast cocktail the result of our desperation, inexperience and wishful thinking to cure Romans diabetes through nutrition during the honeymoon period of his diabetes when no or minimal insulin injections were required, (in our particular case for 12-18 months). We theorized possible explanations for Roman not becoming insulin-dependent Type 2 diabetes, Type 1 diabetes, slow-onset diabetes or MODY? After about 12months of magical thinking that Romans seemingly long-term remission was related to a vegetable-juiced cocktail stimulating his pancreas to insulin production, Romans blood sugars begin to creep up again. Our endocrinologist noted that Romans growth had deceler Continue reading >>

Extra-virgin Olive Oil Improves Postprandial Glucose In Type 1 Diabetes

Extra-virgin Olive Oil Improves Postprandial Glucose In Type 1 Diabetes

Extra-virgin olive oil improves postprandial glucose in type 1 diabetes NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Adding monounsaturated fat in the form of extra-virgin olive oil to high-glycemic index meals significantly reduces early postprandial glycemic response in patients with type 1 diabetes, researchers have found. Dr. Angela A. Rivellese and colleagues from the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery at Federico II University in Naples, Italy, conducted a two-week randomized crossover study in 13 individuals with type 1 diabetes on insulin pumps. The primary outcome was the postprandial blood glucose incremental area under the curve after high- and low-glycemic test meals. Although similar in total carbohydrate content, the meals differed by amount and type of fat -- either low-fat, high in saturated fat (butter), or high in monounsaturated fat (extra-virgin olive oil). In the context of low-glycemic index meals, the quality and amount of fat had no significant influence on postprandial blood glucose, the researchers found. Conversely, postprandial glucose after high-glycemic meals rose significantly more slowly after meals with extra-virgin olive oil than after those low in fat or with butter (p The mean 0- to 3-h glucose incremental area under the curve with extra-virgin olive oil was 198 mmol/L x 180 min, versus 416 mmol/L x 180 min with low-fat and 398 mmol/L x 180 min with butter (p The authors note that the addition of 37 g of extra-virgin olive oil leads to a clinically significant reduction of approximately 50% in the early postprandial glycemic response compared with similar meals with 43 g of butter or very little fat added. "This information has relevant clinical implications for the treatment of people with diabetes," Dr. Rivellese told Reuters Health by ema Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Type 1

Diabetes, Type 1

What is type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder that accounts for five to 10 percent of all cases of diabetes. It initially develops most often in children and young adults. With type 1 diabetes, the pancreas produces little or no insulin, the hormone needed to transport glucose into cells where it can be converted into energy. For this reason, if you have type 1 diabetes you will need to take insulin daily throughout your life. This form of diabetes has also been called juvenile or insulin-dependent diabetes. What are the symptoms? Some of the symptoms of diabetes, such as persistent thirst or irritability, can seem relatively benign, which is one of the reasons why diagnosis may be delayed. With type 1 diabetes, however, symptoms may come on suddenly. Early detection and treatment can decrease the odds of developing the acute complications that can stem from type 1 diabetes. Common symptoms of diabetes include: Frequent urination Excessive thirst Extreme hunger Unusual weight loss Increased fatigue Irritability Blurry vision If high blood sugar levels are not brought quickly under control via treatment, acute complications of type 1 diabetes include severe dehydration and development of diabetic ketoacidosis. This is a metabolic state characterized by high concentrations of ketone bodies, which are byproducts of fatty acid breakdown, and can render the body’s tissues dangerously acidic. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain, which in turn can lead to shock, coma, and even death. Longer term complications of type 1 diabetes – which are also common to those with type 2 diabetes – include: Eye damage: People with diabetes have a 40 percent higher than normal risk of developing glaucoma, increased pressure w Continue reading >>

Extra-virgin Olive Oil Reduces Glycemic Response To A High-glycemic Index Meal In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Extra-virgin Olive Oil Reduces Glycemic Response To A High-glycemic Index Meal In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Extra-Virgin Olive Oil Reduces Glycemic Response to a High-Glycemic Index Meal in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy. Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy [email protected] Diabetes Care. 2016 Apr;39(4):518-24. doi: 10.2337/dc15-2189. Epub 2016 Feb 9. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether fat quality, in the context of meals with high- (HGI) or low-glycemic index (LGI), influences postprandial blood glucose (PPG) response in patients with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: According to a randomized crossover design, 13 patients with type 1 diabetes on insulin pump consumed two series (HGI or LGI) of meals with the same carbohydrate quantity while differing for amount and quality of fat: 1) low in fat ("low fat"), 2) high in saturated fat (butter), or 3) high in monounsaturated fat (extra-virgin olive oil) (EVOO). Premeal insulin doses were based on insulin-to-glycemic load ratios. Continuous glucose monitoring was performed and 6-h PPG evaluated. RESULTS: PPG was significantly different between HGI and LGI meals (P = 0.005 for time glycemic index interaction by repeated-measures analysis [RMA]), being significantly higher during the first 3 h after the HGI meals with a later tendency to an opposite pattern. In the context of HGI meals, PPG was significantly lower after EVOO than after low fat or butter (P < 0.0001 for time meal interaction by RMA), with a marked difference in the 0- to 3-h glucose incremental area under the curve between EVOO (mean SD 198 274 mmol/L 180 min) and either low fat (416 329) or butter (398 355) (P < 0.05). No significant differences were observed in PPG between t Continue reading >>

Coconut Oil And Diabetes

Coconut Oil And Diabetes

Can You Eat Coconut Oil If You Have Diabetes? If you’re living with diabetes, you’ve likely been through the diet overhaul. Out with the rippled chips, white bread, and full-fat cheese. In with the whole-wheat toast, tofu, and celery sticks. Now you may want to replace the fats you use in your cooking. You may have heard coconut oil may be a good substitute, but you may not be sure how it would affect your diabetes. Is it better or worse? Here’s what you need to know about coconut oil and diabetes. Coconut oil, also known as copra oil, is derived from the meat of mature coconuts. The oil is rich in antioxidants and energy-boosting triglycerides, and low in cholesterol. Not only does the oil have a sweet, nutty flavor, but it also leaves behind little grease. It’s commonly used as a replacement for butter and olive or vegetable oils when baking or cooking. Coconut oil also has many cosmetic uses, such as: a natural skin moisturizer a leave-in condition for your hair an ingredient in homemade soap scrub and lotion recipes If you have diabetes, you know that maintaining a healthy weight is a key component of a diabetes meal plan. This is especially true of type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes generally begins with your body’s resistance to insulin. Insulin resistance is linked to excess weight. A 2008 study found that people who consumed medium-chain fats like coconut oil as part of a weight loss plan lost more fat than participants who used olive oil. Coconut oil is high in medium-chain fats. This means coconut oil, a solid fat, is harder to convert to stored fat. This makes it easier for your body to burn it off. Although separate studies, such as this 2009 study in Lipids, have corroborated this, there isn’t enough research to definitively support this claim. Re Continue reading >>

Olive Oil And Diabetes

Olive Oil And Diabetes

WHAT IS DIABETES? Diabetes mellitus is one of the leading health problems in the developed countries, and the sixth cause of death. It is one of the major metabolic diseases and it is potentially very serious because it can cause many complications that seriously damage health, such as cardiovascular diseases, kidney failure, blindness, peripheral circulation disorders, etc. There are two types of diabetes mellitus: type-I or insulin-dependent diabetes, found in children and teenagers, and type-II or non-insulin-dependent diabetes, which appears in adulthood, generally from the age of 40 onwards. Insulin is required to control the first type while the second, more frequent type is generally associated with obesity and does not call for insulin treatment. Nowadays a person is considered to be a diabetic when, two hours after an oral overdose of glucose, he or she has a fasting blood sugar level of more than 126 mg/dl, or of more than 200 mg/dl in non-fasting conditions. Glucose intolerance is a situation where a person has high blood sugar levels (between 110 and 125 mg/dl) without any clear signs of disease, but with a major risk of suffering from diabetes in the future. OLIVE OIL AND DIABETES An olive-oil-rich diet is not only a good alternative in the treatment of diabetes; it may also help to prevent or delay the onset of the disease. How it does so is by preventing insulin resistance and its possible pernicious implications by raising HDL-cholesterol, lowering triglycerides, and ensuring better blood sugar level control and lower blood pressure. It has been demonstrated that a diet that is rich in olive oil, low in saturated fats, moderately rich in carbohydrates and soluble fibre from fruit, vegetables, pulses and grains is the most effective approach for diabetics Continue reading >>

Extra-virgin Olive Oil Lowers After-meal Blood Sugar In Type 1 Diabetes, Study Finds

Extra-virgin Olive Oil Lowers After-meal Blood Sugar In Type 1 Diabetes, Study Finds

Extra-Virgin Olive Oil Lowers After-Meal Blood Sugar in Type 1 Diabetes, Study Finds Extra-virgin olive oil, a key component of the highly praised Mediterranean diet , appears to have a variety of health benefits, including improving the nutritional value of foods when used for frying and reducing cholesterol levels after meals compared to other types of fat. Now, a small new study out of Italy suggests that the oil may have another benefit: reducing after-meal blood sugar levels in people with Type 1 diabetes . To determine whether the quality of fat eaten with either high- or low-glycemic meals affects after-meal blood sugar levels, researchers from Federico II University in Naples looked at 13 people with Type 1 diabetes who were using insulin pumps. The participants were randomly assigned to a week of eating either three meals with a high glycemic index (the glycemic index ranks foods based on their effect on after-meal blood sugar levels, with high-glycemic foods raising levels the most) or three meals with a low glycemic index, followed by the alternate eating plan the next week. The meals in each set contained similar amounts of carbohydrate, but differed in the type and amount of fat, ranging from low fat, to high in saturated fat (43 grams, or roughly 1.5 ounces, of butter), to high in monounsaturated fat (37 grams, or roughly 1.3 ounces, of extra-virgin olive oil). The subjects wore continuous glucose monitors throughout the study period. The researchers found no significant differences in after-meal blood glucose levels based on fat amount and type for the low-glycemic meals. For high-glycemic meals, however, after-meal glucose levels rose significantly more slowly following meals containing extra-virgin olive oil compared to those that were low-fat or conta Continue reading >>

Olive Oil And Coconut Oil | Super Fats Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Olive Oil And Coconut Oil | Super Fats Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Author's Perspective: The fat phobia is very powerful. Most of us have been taught or told that fat is bad. So, for years, I avoided adding fat to my meals. But, after I did some research and discovered the health benefits of plant oils such as extra virgin olive oil and coconut oil, I became more comfortable with adding fat to my meals. Gradually, I learned to accept that fat was good and that I needed to eat fat on purpose! :-) Extra virgin olive oil is a super fat because it provides anti-inflammatory and glucose stabilization benefits, both of which are beneficial to people with Type 2 diabetes. In addition, extra virgin olive oil is a super fat because it contains phytonutrients called polyphenols, which are well-known to have anti-inflammatory properties. The anti-inflammatory strength of olive oil rests on its polyphenols. These anti-inflammatory compounds contain several well-researched anti-inflammatory nutrients, including the following: Anthocyanidins (cyanidins, peonidins) Flavones (apigenin, luteolin) Flavonols (quercetin; kaempferol) Flavonoid glycosides (rutin) Lignans (pinoresinol) These anti-inflammatory nutrients help to decrease inflammation markers, such as homocysteine, C-reactive protein (CRP), TNF-alpha, interleukin 1-beta, thromboxane B2, and leukotriene B4. This provides health benefits to people with systemic diseases, including diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure and high cholesterol. Heart disease reduction has been identified in numerous studies of the Mediterranean Diet, which uses olive oil. This reduction in heart disease is due to a significant decrease in total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol, and an increase in the HDL:LDL ratio; and a decrease in blood pressure. Olive oil contains heart-healthy fat in the form of oleic acid, Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Oils For People With Diabetes

The Best And Worst Oils For People With Diabetes

The Best and Worst Oils for People With Diabetes Oils for cooking and for making salads contain some of the most important fats in our diets. If you have diabetes, you need to know which ones will help you and which can cause harm. Unfortunately, some of our most common oils are also among the unhealthiest.Save Studies indicate that inflammation can be the root cause of diabetes. But the oils that most Americans use the most often are high in pro-inflammatory omega-6 fats and low in anti-inflammatory omega-3 fats. Soybean oil, followed by corn oil, canola oil (manufactured from rapeseed), and cottonseed oil make up 96 percent of the vegetable oil sold in the United States. Macadamia nut oil has the best ratio of omega-3 to omega-6 of any cooking oil 1:1. It has even more healthful oleic acid than olive oil. Its smoke point is 390F so you can use it for cooking almost anything, aside from grilling and frying at the highest heat. It is shelf-stable and has a mild, pleasant, buttery flavor. This oil has only two drawbacks: its expensive and generally available only online. Olive oil has about 12 times as much omega-6 as omega-3. But studies indicate that a 2:1 ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 is what we need for heart health. So while olive oil isnt ideal, it is still anti-inflammatory because of its polyphenols. Avoid Italian olive oil, much of which is fraudulently produced and marketed . Use only extra virgin olive oil from other countries**,** because it hasnt been chemically treated. Its smoke point is 405F. Coconut oil is high in the saturated fat called lauric acid, which has antibacterial, antioxidant, and antiviral properties. While coconut oil doesnt have any omega-3 fats, it doesnt have much omega-6 fats either. Solid at room temperature, its smoke point is 350F. Co Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 diabetes diet definition and facts In Type 1 diabetes the pancreas can do longer release insulin. The high blood sugar that results can lead to complications such as kidney, nerve, and eye damage, and cardiovascular disease. Glycemic index and glycemic load are scientific terms used to measure he impact of a food on blood sugar. Foods with low glycemic load (index) raise blood sugar modestly, and thus are better choices for people with diabetes. Meal timing is very important for people with type 1 diabetes. Meals must match insulin doses. Eating meals with a low glycemic load (index) makes meal timing easier. Low glycemic load meals raise blood sugar slowly and steadily, leaving plenty of time for the body (or the injected insulin dose) to respond. Skipping a meal or eating late puts a person at risk for low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Foods to eat for a type 1 diabetic diet include complex carbohydrates such as brown rice, whole wheat, quinoa, oatmeal, fruits, vegetables, beans, and lentils. Foods to avoid for a type 1 diabetes diet include sodas (both diet and regular), simple carbohydrates - processed/refined sugars (white bread, pastries, chips, cookies, pastas), trans fats (anything with the word hydrogenated on the label), and high-fat animal products. Fats don't have much of a direct effect on blood sugar but they can be useful in slowing the absorption of carbohydrates. Protein provides steady energy with little effect on blood sugar. It keeps blood sugar stable, and can help with sugar cravings and feeling full after eating. Protein-packed foods to include on your menu are beans, legumes, eggs, seafood, dairy, peas, tofu, and lean meats and poultry. The Mediterranean diet plan is often recommended for people with type 1 diabetes because it is full of nut Continue reading >>

Benefits Of Olive Oil For Diabetes

Benefits Of Olive Oil For Diabetes

Olive oil is a staple of the highly recommended Mediterranean diet. Since the Mediterranean diet is so highly recommended, everyone should go right to their neighborhood grocery store and use olive oil for cooking. Simple, right? Well, in one sense, yes…but is anything ever really that simple? Nutritional Facts about Olive Oil 1 tablespoon of olive oil contains 14 grams of total fat, 2 grams of saturated fats, no fiber, no sugar, no cholesterol and no fiber. It is a good source of Vitamins E and K and no protein—so all the calories come from fats.[1] So far, nothing to get excited overly excited about, is there? What makes olive oil so good to use is the types of fat it contains. It contains 1318 mg of omega-6 fats and 103mg of omega-3 fats. In addition, it contains over 10 grams of either mono- or poly-unsaturated fats—the healthier types of fats. Olive oil also has almost 30 g of phytosterols, a type of plant substance that is chemically similar to cholesterol but helps maintain heart health because it inhibits the absorption of cholesterol from food and lowers the amount of LDL cholesterol, the “bad” cholesterol that is associated with heart disease.[2] Finally, olive oil is rich in antioxidants such as oleocanthal and oleeuropein—those plant substances that can help reduce the oxidative damage caused to our bodies by high levels of blood sugar. What is the Best Form of Olive Oil? It does get upsetting, but the fact is that there are lots of people out there making and selling olive oil with less than 100% olive oil! Olive oil has become so popular, there are many forms of olive oil that are not pure olive oil. So the first thing to do is to buy reputable, well- known brands of olive oil and only buy 100% olive oil—extra virgin olive oil is pressed—it Continue reading >>

Extra-virgin Olive Oil Reduces Postprandial Glucose In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

Extra-virgin Olive Oil Reduces Postprandial Glucose In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

Extra-virgin Olive Oil Reduces Postprandial Glucose in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Adjunct Faculty, Bastyr University, Seattle; Owner Naturopathic Doctor Harbor Integrative Medicine, Bellingham, WA Dr. Pantuso reports no financial relationships relevant to this field of study. SYNOPSIS: In this study, the authors demonstrated significantly improved postprandial glucose levels in patients that consumed high glycemic index meals with extra-virgin olive oil compared to meals with butter or low fat meals. SOURCE: Bozzetto L, Alderisio A, Giorgini M, et al. Extra-virgin olive oil reduces glycemic response to a high glycemic index meal in patients with type 1 diabetes: A randomized controlled trial. Diabetes Care 2016;39:518-524. The type of fat contained in meals may be more important than the quantity with respect to the effect on the postprandial glycemic response. Consuming 2.7 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil combined in a high glycemic meal reduces the postprandial blood glucose levels compared to butter or low fat during the 0-3 hours after the meal. Bozzetto et al previously found that considering both the quality (fiber content) and quantity of carbohydrates, compared to only carbohydrate quantity, when calculating pre-meal insulin improves the daily blood glucose profile in type 1 diabetes (DM1) patients.1 The use of continuous glucose monitoring in patients with DM1 has demonstrated that not only carbohydrate quantity but also protein and fat content affect postprandial glucose (PPG) levels.2 There have been conflicting studies on how fat content in meals affects the PPG levels in patients with DM1. The aim of this study was to determine if there is an effect of different dietary fats on the PPG response to either a high glycemic index (HGI) or low glycemic Continue reading >>

Olive Oil Blunts Glucose Response In Type 1 Diabetes

Olive Oil Blunts Glucose Response In Type 1 Diabetes

Olive Oil Blunts Glucose Response in Type 1 Diabetes Encouraging results for fending off type 2 diabetes, too With commentary by lead study author Angela Rivellese, M.D., professor of applied dietetic sciences at Federico II University in Naples. Adding olive oil to a meal improves glucose response in those with type 1 diabetes, researchers in Italy have found. Olive oil may slow blood sugar rise following a high-glycemic meal in those with type 1 diabetes. Our study shows for the first time that the type of fat significantly influences post-prandial glycemic response in patients with type 1 diabetes, said lead author Angela Rivellese, M.D., professor of applied dietetic sciences at Federico II University in Naples. In short, extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) is better than butter. Study subjects who consumed meals with 37 grams of EVOO (2.5 tablespoons) showed an approximate 50% reduction in early, after-meal blood glucose response compared with those who consumed meals with either 43 grams of butter (2.9 tablespoons) or meals deemed low-fat (half-a-tablespoon of EVOO). The EVOO meals were also associated with a significant delay in the time it took for blood glucose to peak compared with the butter and low-fat meals. The EVOO benefit was seen only in meals with a high glycemic index (HGI); it did not apply to meals with a low glycemic index (LGI). HGI foods cause a rapid rise in after-meal blood glucose levels, while LGI foods result in a slower and steadier release of glucose, which leads to healthier blood glucose readings. The study, which suggests that carbohydrate-counting alone may not result in optimal glucose control, has important clinical implications for those with type 1 diabetes, the authors wrote, because it demonstrates that the combination of carbohydrate Continue reading >>

The Real Story On Olive Oil

The Real Story On Olive Oil

Canola and olive oil are the two most widely used cooking oils in the world today. It wasn’t always this way and it is important to understand how this change occurred, because it wasn’t always for health reasons that this shift took place. Fred Pescatore, MD, MPH, CCN author of The Hampton’s Diet explains what happened, as he helps us learn about The Science of Fats, Fatty Acids and Edible Oils Canola and olive oil are the two most widely used cooking oils in the world today. It wasn’t always this way and it is important to understand how this change occurred, because it wasn’t always for health reasons that this shift took place. For years, we were stuck in the mire of polyunsaturated fats being healthy for us and these two oils were relegated to the back shelf. However, once the shift to monounsaturated fats and omega-3 fatty acids came to be, these two oils quickly rose to prominence. Since many of you are probably sitting there pretty smugly thinking you are being so healthy because these are the only two oils you use; and, since I have spent so much time saying they aren’t, this is the chapter that explains my reasoning. It is a pretty fascinating story so sit back and read this like a good mystery. Carrie, a 44 year old mother of two teenage children came to see me because she was exhausted all the time. She worked and raised her children so she had plenty to be tired about. She had always been a health nut and during our first visit when we discussed some of the basics, the conversation came around to cooking oils. She held up her hand and said don’t worry there doc, I’ve got that under control – I only use olive oil when I am cooking and canola oil for salad dressings. Several years ago I would have applauded her for her heightened awareness o Continue reading >>

Extra Virgin Olive Oil Reduces Postprandial Glucose After High Gi Meal In Type 1 Diabetes

Extra Virgin Olive Oil Reduces Postprandial Glucose After High Gi Meal In Type 1 Diabetes

Extra Virgin Olive Oil Reduces Postprandial Glucose After High GI Meal in Type 1 Diabetes New research shows that extra virgin olive oil reduces postprandial glucose in type 1 diabetics after consuming a high glycemic index meal Maintaining blood glucose control is extremely important for both type 1 and type 2 diabetics. To do so it is often recommended that diabetics consume low glycemic index foods as a large proportion of their daily intake. And monitoring the quantity of carbohydrate consumed is common practice. The glycemic index is a measure of carbohydrate quality and shows how quickly different foods cause blood glucose to rise. Low glycemic index foods are those categorized as 55 or below. High glycemic foods are above 55. The higher the index, the more rapidly blood glucose is affected. To measure the response to various foods and meals, postprandial, also known as post meal, blood glucose is commonly recorded by diabetics. A recent study by Bozzetto and Colleagues, from Federico II University in Naples, Italy, published in Diabetes Care, evaluated whether fat quality could influence postprandial glucose response in the context of high or low glycemic index meals in type 1 diabetes patients. The study recruited 13 type 1 diabetic patients on insulin pumps in a randomized crossover trial where they consumed two series of meals, high glycemic and low glycemic, composed of the same carbohydrate amount but with differing fat quality low fat, butter (saturated fat), or extra virgin olive oil (EVOO; monounsaturated fat). As was expected, there was a significant difference in postprandial glucose in response to a high glycemic index meal compared to a low glycemic index meal, especially in the first 3 hours where blood glucose was significantly higher after consumi Continue reading >>

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