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Olive Oil And Diabetes Type 2

Olive Oil And Coconut Oil | Super Fats Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Olive Oil And Coconut Oil | Super Fats Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Author's Perspective: The fat phobia is very powerful. Most of us have been taught or told that fat is bad. So, for years, I avoided adding fat to my meals. But, after I did some research and discovered the health benefits of plant oils such as extra virgin olive oil and coconut oil, I became more comfortable with adding fat to my meals. Gradually, I learned to accept that fat was good and that I needed to eat fat on purpose! :-) Extra virgin olive oil is a super fat because it provides anti-inflammatory and glucose stabilization benefits, both of which are beneficial to people with Type 2 diabetes. In addition, extra virgin olive oil is a super fat because it contains phytonutrients called polyphenols, which are well-known to have anti-inflammatory properties. The anti-inflammatory strength of olive oil rests on its polyphenols. These anti-inflammatory compounds contain several well-researched anti-inflammatory nutrients, including the following: Anthocyanidins (cyanidins, peonidins) Flavones (apigenin, luteolin) Flavonols (quercetin; kaempferol) Flavonoid glycosides (rutin) Lignans (pinoresinol) These anti-inflammatory nutrients help to decrease inflammation markers, such as homocysteine, C-reactive protein (CRP), TNF-alpha, interleukin 1-beta, thromboxane B2, and leukotriene B4. This provides health benefits to people with systemic diseases, including diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure and high cholesterol. Heart disease reduction has been identified in numerous studies of the Mediterranean Diet, which uses olive oil. This reduction in heart disease is due to a significant decrease in total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol, and an increase in the HDL:LDL ratio; and a decrease in blood pressure. Olive oil contains heart-healthy fat in the form of oleic acid, Continue reading >>

Olive Oil May Help Reduce Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Olive Oil May Help Reduce Type 2 Diabetes Risk

A study published in Nutrition & Diabetes suggests that for healthy adults olive oil consumption may lower their risk for developing type 2 diabetes. In addition, daily olive oil ingestion may improve glucose metabolism in adults who already have type 2 diabetes. The researchers analyzed data from four cohort studies and 29 randomized controlled trials conducted in Europe, North America, Australia/New Zealand, and Asia. Study duration varied between 5.7 and 22 years for cohort studies and between 2 weeks and 4.1 years for randomized controlled trials; mean ages ranged between 33 and 67. Randomized controlled trials were stratified by three types: olive oil vs. low-fat diet; olive oil vs. polyunsaturated fatty acid-rich oils, and olive oil vs. fish oil. The researchers performed three types of meta-analyses to investigate any association between olive oil consumption and type 2 diabetes risk: high vs. low-intake meta-analysis, dose-response meta-analysis, and restricted cubic spline calculation for each study with more than three categories of exposure to examine for possible nonlinear associations. In random-effects meta-analysis, the researchers found the combined association of the use of olive oil was inversely associated with a lower risk for type 2 diabetes. Compared with the lowest olive oil intake category, those in the highest olive oil intake category saw a 16% reduced risk for developing type 2 diabetes; however, researchers observed evidence of a nonlinear relationship. In the dose-response meta-analysis, researchers found that each 10-g daily increase in olive oil intake was associated with a 9% reduced risk. Risk for developing type 2 diabetes decreased by 13% with increasing olive oil consumption to 1520 g per day; however, there was no observed benefit b Continue reading >>

Studies Explain How Olive Oil May Help Control Type 2 Diabetes

Studies Explain How Olive Oil May Help Control Type 2 Diabetes

High fat foods and oils have been vilified as potential causes of obesity, type 2 diabetes and heart disease for decades. It’s only been within the last few years that nutrition experts began pushing the benefits of healthy fats, particularly olive oil, to Americans. The Health Benefits of Olive Oil Olive oil is a great source of healthy monounsaturated fats and polyphenols (plant-based micronutrients that are high in antioxidants). Studies suggest that adding olive oil to your diet can help slow the development of cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer’s disease and rheumatoid arthritis. But it seems the greatest effect olive oil may have on our health is preventing and controlling type 2 diabetes. What compounds are in olive oil that make it so healthy? Are there other foods comprised of similar compounds? A study recently published in Biochemistry is getting closer to an answer. Olives contain oleuropein, a compound that signals the pancreas to release insulin, helping regulate your blood sugar levels and metabolism, according to Virginia Tech researchers. Oleuropein also detoxifies amylin, a compound that when over-produced becomes harmful, often causing a build-up of protein aggregates in the pancreas. Green olives, black olives and olive oil seem to be the only dietary sources of oleuropein. However, a significant amount of oleuropein is removed from olives during processing. When olives are harvested their natural flavor is so bitter and astringent they’re rendered inedible. This biting taste is from the oleuropein. The traditional method of dulling the taste of olives is heavily seasoning them with spices and salt. Unfortunately, the process takes months. That’s why modern growers opt for soaking olives in lye, followed by bathing them in water. While this so Continue reading >>

Extra Virgin Olive Oil Linked To Lower Cholesterol, Blood Sugar After Meals

Extra Virgin Olive Oil Linked To Lower Cholesterol, Blood Sugar After Meals

Extra Virgin Olive Oil Linked to Lower Cholesterol, Blood Sugar After Meals The Mediterranean diet is known to have many beneficial effects on health, from lowering peripheral arterial disease risk to reducing sleep apnea to increasing life expectancy . Now, according to a small new study from Sapienza University in Rome, extra virgin olive oil as part of a Mediterranean diet appears to have healthier effects on cholesterol and blood sugar after meals than other types of fat. The Mediterranean diet is an eating style typical of countries such as Greece, Italy, Morocco and Spain, that emphasizes whole grains, vegetables, fish, fruits, low-fat dairy, nuts, legumes, and extra virgin olive oil (oil that has been produced by simply pressing the olives ). Previous research has indicated that extra virgin olive oil may help protect against cardiovascular disease, but it has not been clear what accounts for this effect. To determine how the oil benefits heart and blood vessel health, researchers evaluated the effects of adding either no oil, 10 grams (approximately 2 tablespoons) of extra virgin olive oil, or 10 grams of corn oil to a standard Mediterranean lunch in 25 subjects without diabetes. In the first phase of the study, the participants were randomly assigned to eat the meal either with or without the additional extra virgin olive oil. A month later, the participants were randomly assigned to eat the meal either with the addition of extra virgin olive oil or the addition of corn oil. Blood tests taken two hours before and two hours after the meals indicated that blood sugar levels rose much less after the meal with extra virgin olive oil (26.2 mg/dl, on average ) compared to the meal with corn oil (40.7 mg/dl, on average) or the meal with no additional oil (53.6 mg/dl, Continue reading >>

Olive Oil And Diabetes

Olive Oil And Diabetes

During my Masters in Nutrition I had to do one project on my choice of chronic condition and a dietary factor that can help improve that condition. Like most of my projects I chose type 2 diabetes to focus on. Previously I’d learned about oleocanthal, an ingredient in olive oil that is highly anti-inflammatory. And since diabetes is an inflammatory condition I was curious to investigate if using olive oil in a diabetes diet would be beneficial. And I was surprised at what I learned, the benefits were even greater than I expected. Olive oil is very good for diabetes! I did a literature review of the latest research from 2004-2014 and looked at 10 randomized trials, the highest level of study. Seven of those studies far outweighed the benefits of a high carbohydrate diet in their benefits, and the other three showed equivalent results. So what does this all reveal and how can it help you? Olive Oil Helps Diabetes In 3 Ways Reduces Glucose and a1c Helps cholesterol Reduces inflammation Let’s explore how… Components of Olive Oil Olive oil is a monounsaturated fat. The best type of olive oil is extra virgin olive oil and like all fats, olive oil is made up of fatty acids, mostly containing oleic acid at a rate of 55-83%. It also contains 36 known phenolic compounds; these are various compounds that have beneficial effects to our health. As I also mentioned above, it contains one particular compound called oleocanthal that helps reduce inflammation. Researchers have found that oleocanthal has the same anti-inflammatory response in the body as NSAID ibuprofen. It’s not as potent but it doesn’t have any side effects like NSAIDs either, so that’s a great thing. So all in all, it’s got some great components that help improve our health and have great benefits for di Continue reading >>

Olive Oil In The Prevention And Management Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis Of Cohort Studies And Intervention Trials

Olive Oil In The Prevention And Management Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis Of Cohort Studies And Intervention Trials

Olive oil in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies and intervention trials 2Nutrition and Obesity Group, Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Basque Country (UPV/EHU) and Lucio Lascaray Research Center, Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain 3CIBER Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBERobn), Institute of Health Carlos III, Madrid, Spain 3CIBER Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBERobn), Institute of Health Carlos III, Madrid, Spain 4Health Research Institute of Palma (IdISPa), University Hospital Son Espases, Palma de Mallorca, Spain 1Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Nuthetal, Germany 2Nutrition and Obesity Group, Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Basque Country (UPV/EHU) and Lucio Lascaray Research Center, Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain 3CIBER Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBERobn), Institute of Health Carlos III, Madrid, Spain 4Health Research Institute of Palma (IdISPa), University Hospital Son Espases, Palma de Mallorca, Spain 5Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna,, Vienna, Austria *Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Arthur-Scheunert-Allee 114-116, Nuthetal 14558, Germany. E-mail: [email protected] Received 2016 Oct 26; Revised 2017 Jan 25; Accepted 2017 Feb 2. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license ho Continue reading >>

Olive Oil Consumption Associated With Reduced Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Olive Oil Consumption Associated With Reduced Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Olive oil consumption associated with reduced type 2 diabetes risk Schwingshackl L, et al. Nutr Diabetes. 2017;doi:10.1038/nutd.2017.12. In healthy adults, olive oil consumption appeared to lower the risk for developing type 2 diabetes, whereas daily olive oil ingestion improved glucose metabolism in adults who already had the disease, according to findings from a meta-analysis. In many studies, olive oil has been suspected to exert beneficial effects on health, Lukas Schwingshackl, MSc, PhD, of the department of epidemiology at the German Institute of Human Nutrition in Berlin, and colleagues wrote. It is an integral part of the Mediterranean diet, providing approximately two-thirds of vegetable fats in this kind of nutrition ... The major question is still not well answered [as to] which of the components of the Mediterranean diet is worthwhile to be adopted in countries with other dietary traditions, without having a local substitutional food. Schwingshackl and colleagues analyzed data from four cohort studies and 29 randomized controlled trials conducted in Europe (n = 22), North America (n = 8), Australia/New Zealand (n = 2) and Asia (n = 1). Study duration varied between 5.7 and 22 years for cohort studies (n = 183,370) and between 2 weeks and 4.1 years for randomized controlled trials (n = 3,698); mean ages ranged between age 33 years and age 67 years. Randomized controlled trials were stratified by three types: olive oil vs. low-fat diet; olive oil vs. polyunsaturated fatty acid-rich oils, and olive oil vs. fish oil . Researchers performed three types of meta-analyses to investigate any association between olive oil consumption and type 2 diabetes risk: high vs. low-intake meta-analysis, dose-response meta-analysis and restricted cubic spline calculation for ea Continue reading >>

Lower Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes Associated With Olive Oil Consumption

Lower Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes Associated With Olive Oil Consumption

Home / Conditions / Type 2 Diabetes / Lower Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Associated with Olive Oil Consumption Lower Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Associated with Olive Oil Consumption Dietitians have been praising the Mediterranean diet for years, but no studies related to olive oil intake have been focused in the United States until now. Some current evidence suggests saturated fats may increase the risk of diabetes. Contrastingly, dietary intake of unsaturated fats have been shown to have a decreased risk of diabetes in previous studies. More specifically, studies in other countries have evaluated the consumption of extra virgin oil and reduced diabetes risk. Researchers followed two cohorts of over 100,000 women from the Nurses Health Study I and II (NHS I and NHS II) over a span of nearly 22 years. All women were free of diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer at the beginning of the study. Throughout the study, the women were given food frequency questionnaires every four years asking questions pertaining to olive oil used as salad dressing or used with food or bread. Near the end of 22 years, researchers documented 5,738 diabetes cases from the NHS I cohort and 3914 cases from the NHS II cohort. Adjusting for other lifestyle and dietary factors, the researchers concluded that those who consumed greater than one tablespoon (8 grams) of olive oil a day had a 6% reduction in the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Interestingly, the authors noted that substituting eight grams of olive oil per day in the place of a stick margarine, butter or mayonnaise was associated with a 5%, 8% and 15% lower risk of type 2 diabetes. Finding ways to substitute extra virgin olive oil into the diet in place of other saturated fats may be a healthier option for patients in decreasing the ri Continue reading >>

Benefits Of Olive Oil For Diabetes

Benefits Of Olive Oil For Diabetes

Olive oil is a staple of the highly recommended Mediterranean diet. Since the Mediterranean diet is so highly recommended, everyone should go right to their neighborhood grocery store and use olive oil for cooking. Simple, right? Well, in one sense, yes…but is anything ever really that simple? Nutritional Facts about Olive Oil 1 tablespoon of olive oil contains 14 grams of total fat, 2 grams of saturated fats, no fiber, no sugar, no cholesterol and no fiber. It is a good source of Vitamins E and K and no protein—so all the calories come from fats.[1] So far, nothing to get excited overly excited about, is there? What makes olive oil so good to use is the types of fat it contains. It contains 1318 mg of omega-6 fats and 103mg of omega-3 fats. In addition, it contains over 10 grams of either mono- or poly-unsaturated fats—the healthier types of fats. Olive oil also has almost 30 g of phytosterols, a type of plant substance that is chemically similar to cholesterol but helps maintain heart health because it inhibits the absorption of cholesterol from food and lowers the amount of LDL cholesterol, the “bad” cholesterol that is associated with heart disease.[2] Finally, olive oil is rich in antioxidants such as oleocanthal and oleeuropein—those plant substances that can help reduce the oxidative damage caused to our bodies by high levels of blood sugar. What is the Best Form of Olive Oil? It does get upsetting, but the fact is that there are lots of people out there making and selling olive oil with less than 100% olive oil! Olive oil has become so popular, there are many forms of olive oil that are not pure olive oil. So the first thing to do is to buy reputable, well- known brands of olive oil and only buy 100% olive oil—extra virgin olive oil is pressed—it Continue reading >>

The Real Story On Olive Oil

The Real Story On Olive Oil

Canola and olive oil are the two most widely used cooking oils in the world today. It wasn’t always this way and it is important to understand how this change occurred, because it wasn’t always for health reasons that this shift took place. Fred Pescatore, MD, MPH, CCN author of The Hampton’s Diet explains what happened, as he helps us learn about The Science of Fats, Fatty Acids and Edible Oils Canola and olive oil are the two most widely used cooking oils in the world today. It wasn’t always this way and it is important to understand how this change occurred, because it wasn’t always for health reasons that this shift took place. For years, we were stuck in the mire of polyunsaturated fats being healthy for us and these two oils were relegated to the back shelf. However, once the shift to monounsaturated fats and omega-3 fatty acids came to be, these two oils quickly rose to prominence. Since many of you are probably sitting there pretty smugly thinking you are being so healthy because these are the only two oils you use; and, since I have spent so much time saying they aren’t, this is the chapter that explains my reasoning. It is a pretty fascinating story so sit back and read this like a good mystery. Carrie, a 44 year old mother of two teenage children came to see me because she was exhausted all the time. She worked and raised her children so she had plenty to be tired about. She had always been a health nut and during our first visit when we discussed some of the basics, the conversation came around to cooking oils. She held up her hand and said don’t worry there doc, I’ve got that under control – I only use olive oil when I am cooking and canola oil for salad dressings. Several years ago I would have applauded her for her heightened awareness o Continue reading >>

Top 10 Type-2 Superfoods

Top 10 Type-2 Superfoods

Keep these wonder ingredients on your shopping list and in your pantry. These 10 tried-and-true staples are win-win foods for people with type 2 diabetes : nutritious and delicious! Put them on your shopping list. Berries. A smart substitute when you need to limit candy, berries offer sweet flavor, few calories, and lots of fiber. Plus, they have antioxidants , chemicals that help protect against cancer and heart disease . Raspberries, strawberries, and pomegranates (yes, they're considered a berry) also have plenty of ellagic acid, an antioxidant that may counter cancer . Toss fresh or frozen berries in your morning cereal and noontime salads, and keep dried or freeze-dried versions handy for snacking. High-fiber foods like berries help keep blood sugar levels normal. Eggs are an inexpensive source of protein, and they may help you lose weight . Research shows that people who eat eggs at breakfast tend to take in fewer calories the rest of the day. The American Heart Association says healthy adults can eat one egg a day. One reason is that they have little saturated fat . (To be safe, talk to your doctor about your blood cholesterol level.) Hard-boil eggs while you prepare dinner. Then store them in the refrigerator so they're ready for a quick breakfast or snack. Extra virgin olive oil. Called "EVOO" for short, this type of olive oil offers great taste plus type-2- diabetes -friendly monounsaturated fat. "Extra virgin" means the oil is minimally processed, which protects its more than 30 antioxidant and anti-inflammatory plant compounds, says Kathleen Zelman, RD, MPH. Drizzle it on salads, dip bread into it, and use it to saut meat and veggies. Go easy. Like all oils, it packs 120 calories per tablespoon. Kale. This nutrition darling is one of healthiest vegetables. Continue reading >>

Extra Virgin Olive Oil Lowers Blood Glucose And Cholesterol, Study Finds

Extra Virgin Olive Oil Lowers Blood Glucose And Cholesterol, Study Finds

Extra virgin olive oil lowers blood glucose and cholesterol, study finds Extra virgin olive oil lowers blood glucose and cholesterol, study finds Tax sugary drinks to tackle type 2 diabetes, urges Canadian Diabetes Association 08 September 2015 Extra virgin olive oil reduces blood sugar and cholesterol more than other kinds of fats , according to new research. The study, conducted at Sapienza University in Rome, could explain the health benefits associated with a traditional Mediterranean diet for people with diabetes. "Lowering blood glucose and cholesterol may be useful to reduce the negative effects of glucose and cholesterol on the cardiovascular system," said Francesco Violo, lead author of the study. This was a small study involving only 25 participants, all of whom ate a typical Mediterranean lunch - consisting primarily of fruits , vegetables , grains and fish - on two separate occasions. For the first meal, they added 10g of extra virgin olive oil. For the second, they added 10g of corn oil. After each meal, the participants blood glucose levels were tested. The rise in blood sugar levels was much smaller after the meal with extra virgin olive oil than after the meal with corn oil. The findings were consistent with previous studies, which have linked extra virgin olive oil to higher levels of insulin , making it beneficial to people with type 2 diabetes. More surprising, however, were the reduced levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), or "bad" cholesterol, associated with the extra virgin olive oil meal. The study's findings are interesting but preliminary. Further studies are needed to confirm them. The study did not examine whether corn oil was worse or better than having no oil at all, for example. Despite its flaws, the study is one of the first to link Continue reading >>

Can Taking One Spoonful Of Olive Oil Daily In The Morning Cure Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Taking One Spoonful Of Olive Oil Daily In The Morning Cure Type 2 Diabetes?

Can taking one spoonful of olive oil daily in the morning cure type 2 diabetes? I am sorry to disappoint you but I dont believe in quick fix solutions on a serious condition like diabetes. Please understand that diabetes is a functional disorder. Your pancreas does not secret adequate quantities of much needed insulin to deal with the sugar in your blood and to make its optimum use for the benefit of your body. Also understand that insulin is a hormone created by your body to make you feel good, energetic and also keep you fit. It is a hormone that is badly required for our day to day functioning. In other words, insulin is something our bodies need on a daily basis to be generated for our well being and health. Pancreas gets sluggish due to your life style which leads to type II diabetes. This type of diabetes can be easily controlled. Only the experts can opine if it can be cured, i.e. if the lost or retarded capacity of pancreas can be restored to its earlier normal levels. There are medically proven ways by which you can build up the capacity of your pancreas by exercising on a daily basis, controlling intake of fats, bringing down your overall weight and regularly taking your prescribed medicines. Regular check of your sugar level can be a realistic indicator of your sugar control. If the sugar control is good, your physician may adjust your daily dose by bringing it down. But it is dangerous to stop the diabetes medications on your own. Remember, like hypertension, blood sugar is also a silent killer of the modern age. There are several substances, mostly natural by origin, which are touted to be dure for type II diabetes. For instance, many consider methi an Indian herb used in the kitchen, as an effective substance for controlling sugar. There are many who dail Continue reading >>

Olive Oil And Diabetes

Olive Oil And Diabetes

WHAT IS DIABETES? Diabetes mellitus is one of the leading health problems in the developed countries, and the sixth cause of death. It is one of the major metabolic diseases and it is potentially very serious because it can cause many complications that seriously damage health, such as cardiovascular diseases, kidney failure, blindness, peripheral circulation disorders, etc. There are two types of diabetes mellitus: type-I or insulin-dependent diabetes, found in children and teenagers, and type-II or non-insulin-dependent diabetes, which appears in adulthood, generally from the age of 40 onwards. Insulin is required to control the first type while the second, more frequent type is generally associated with obesity and does not call for insulin treatment. Nowadays a person is considered to be a diabetic when, two hours after an oral overdose of glucose, he or she has a fasting blood sugar level of more than 126 mg/dl, or of more than 200 mg/dl in non-fasting conditions. Glucose intolerance is a situation where a person has high blood sugar levels (between 110 and 125 mg/dl) without any clear signs of disease, but with a major risk of suffering from diabetes in the future. OLIVE OIL AND DIABETES An olive-oil-rich diet is not only a good alternative in the treatment of diabetes; it may also help to prevent or delay the onset of the disease. How it does so is by preventing insulin resistance and its possible pernicious implications by raising HDL-cholesterol, lowering triglycerides, and ensuring better blood sugar level control and lower blood pressure. It has been demonstrated that a diet that is rich in olive oil, low in saturated fats, moderately rich in carbohydrates and soluble fibre from fruit, vegetables, pulses and grains is the most effective approach for diabetics Continue reading >>

Can Olive Oil Be Used To Treat Diabetes Type 2?

Can Olive Oil Be Used To Treat Diabetes Type 2?

There were two studies that I had found on PubMed, which I can't seem to locate again. One showed a study done that expressly demonstrated how olive oil stimulates the inceptors of the liver to function effectively, thereby helping to reverse Type II Diabetes. The second study showed the details of how olive oil stimulates the islet cells of the pancreas, and actually causes them to produce insulin, thereby reversing type I Diabetes. I was wondering if you're familiar with these two? If so, you might want to post them on your site, because this is amazing information, and very true. I have experienced the blood glucose lowering effects of olive oil in myself as well. So this is tried and true information, and it would help diabetics enormously, if they knew. Also, I have seen several studies that show the emulsifying power of olive oil, especially when used in conjunction with lecithin, to reverse fatty liver and break down gallstones. We have a reference page with the articles you may be referring to. I wish olive oil could have the miraculous effects you read about. Instead the studies have involved small numbers of subjects, rats or cell cultures. Diet is definitely important in diabetics but there are no large well controlled studies in humans which show olive oil can treat diabetics. The fact that it has helped one or two or even hundreds of people does not make it "tried and true" information; there may be thousands who it hasn't helped. This conclusion has not yet held up to the scrutiny of the scientific method. Diabetes control may be improved by substituting carbohydrate calories with fat or protein calories something which has been knows for decades - see the OmniHeart trial article on the reference page. We know how to cure the vast majority of adult onset Continue reading >>

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